“There—you’ve heard what he said! Was there any such mark on
Peter Wilks’ breast?”
Both of them spoke up and says:
“We didn’t see no such mark.”
“Good!” says the old gentleman. “Now, what you did see on his
breast was a small dim P, and a B (which is an initial he dropped
when he was young), and a W, with dashes between them, so: P—
B—
W”—and he marked them that way on a piece of paper. “Come,
ain’t that what you saw?”
Both of them spoke up again, and says:
“No, we didn’t. We never seen any marks at all.”
Well, everybody WAS in a state of mind now, and they sings out:
“The whole bilin’ of ‘m ‘s frauds! Le’s duck ‘em! le’s drown ‘em! le’s
ride ‘em on a rail!” and everybody was whooping at once, and there
was a rattling powwow. But the lawyer he jumps on the table and
yells, and says:
“Gentlemen—gentlemen! Hear  me  just  a  word—just  a  single
word—if you please! There’s one way yet—let’s go and dig up the
corpse and look.”
That took them.
“Hooray!” they all shouted, and was starting right off; but the
lawyer and the doctor sung out:
“Hold on, hold on! Collar all these four men and the boy, and fetch
them along, too!”
“We’ll do it!” they all shouted; “and if we don’t find them marks
we’ll lynch the whole gang!”
I WAS scared, now, I tell you. But there warn’t no getting away, you
know. They gripped us all, and marched us right along, straight for
the graveyard, which was a mile and a half down the river, and the
whole town at our heels, for we made noise enough, and it was only
nine in the evening.
As we went by our house I wished I hadn’t sent Mary Jane out of
town; because now if I could tip her the wink she’d light out and save
me, and blow on our dead-beats.
Well, we swarmed along down the river road, just carrying on like
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
204
Convert pdf to powerpoint using - control Library system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint using - control Library system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
wild-cats; and to make it more scary the sky was darking up, and the
lightning beginning to wink and flitter, and the wind to shiver
amongst the leaves. This was the most awful trouble and most dan-
gersome I ever was in; and I was kinder stunned; everything was
going so different from what I had allowed for; stead of being fixed
so I could take my own time if I wanted to, and see all the fun, and
have Mary Jane at my back to save me and set me free when the
close-fit come, here was nothing in the world betwixt me and sudden
death but just them tattoo-marks. If they didn’t find them—
I couldn’t bear to think about it; and yet, somehow, I couldn’t think
about nothing else. It got darker and darker, and it was a beautiful
time to give the crowd the slip; but that big husky had me by the
wrist—Hines—and a body might as well try to give Goliar the slip.
He dragged me right along, he was so excited, and I had to run to
keep up.
When they got there they swarmed into the graveyard and washed
over it like an overflow. And when they got to the grave they found
they had about a hundred times as many shovels as they wanted, but
nobody hadn’t thought to fetch a lantern. But they sailed into dig-
ging anyway by the flicker of the lightning, and sent a man to the
nearest house, a half a mile off, to borrow one.
So they dug and dug like everything; and it got awful dark, and the
rain started, and the wind swished and swushed along, and the light-
ning come brisker and brisker, and the thunder boomed; but them
people never took no notice of it, they was so full of this business; and
one minute you could see everything and every face in that big crowd,
and the shovelfuls of dirt sailing up out of the grave, and the next sec-
ond the dark wiped it all out, and you couldn’t see nothing at all.
At last they got out the coffin and begun to unscrew the lid, and
then such another crowding and shouldering and shoving as there
was, to scrouge in and get a sight, you never see; and in the dark, that
way, it was awful. Hines he hurt my wrist dreadful pulling and tug-
ging so, and I reckon he clean forgot I was in the world, he was so
excited and panting.
All of a sudden the lightning let go a perfect sluice of white glare,
and somebody sings out:
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
205
control Library system:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint. your application with advanced PowerPoint document manipulating SDK to load, create, edit, convert, extract, and
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
“By the living jingo, here’s the bag of gold on his breast!”
Hines let out a whoop, like everybody else, and dropped my wrist
and give a big surge to bust his way in and get a look, and the way I
lit out and shinned for the road in the dark there ain’t nobody can
tell.
I had the road all to myself, and I fairly flew—leastways, I had it all
to myself except the solid dark, and the now-and-then glares, and the
buzzing of the rain, and the thrashing of the wind, and the splitting
of the thunder; and sure as you are born I did clip it along!
When I struck the town I see there warn’t nobody out in the storm,
so I never hunted for no back streets, but humped it straight through
the main one; and when I begun to get towards our house I aimed
my eye and set it. No light there; the house all dark—which made
me feel sorry and disappointed, I didn’t know why. But at last, just as
I was sailing by, flash comes the light in Mary Jane’s window! and my
heart swelled up sudden, like to bust; and the same second the house
and all was behind me in the dark, and wasn’t ever going to be before
me no more in this world. She WAS the best girl I ever see, and had
the most sand.
The minute I was far enough above the town to see I could make
the towhead, I begun to look sharp for a boat to borrow, and the first
time the lightning showed me one that wasn’t chained I snatched it
and shoved. It was a canoe, and warn’t fastened with nothing but a
rope. The towhead was a rattling big distance off, away out there in
the middle of the river, but I didn’t lose no time; and when I struck
the raft at last I was so fagged I would a just laid down to blow and
gasp if I could afforded it. But I didn’t.
As I sprung aboard I sung out:
“Out with you, Jim, and set her loose! Glory be to goodness, we’re
shut of them!”
Jim lit out, and was a-coming for me with both arms spread, he
was so full of joy; but when I glimpsed him in the lightning my
heart shot up in my mouth and I went overboard backwards; for I
forgot he was old King Lear and a drownded A-rab all in one, and
it most scared the livers and lights out of me. But Jim fished me
out, and was going to hug me and bless me, and so on, he was so
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
206
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple VB
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Demo Code to Convert PDF to Tiff Using VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
glad I was back and we was shut of the king and the duke, but I
says:
“Not now; have it for breakfast, have it for breakfast! Cut loose and
let her slide!”
So in two seconds away we went a-sliding down the river, and it did
seem so good to be free again and all by ourselves on the big river,
and nobody to bother us. I had to skip around a bit, and jump up
and crack my heels a few times—I couldn’t help it; but about the
third crack I noticed a sound that I knowed mighty well, and held
my breath and listened and waited; and sure enough, when the next
flash busted out over the water, here they come!—and just a-laying to
their oars and making their skiff hum! It was the king and the duke.
So I wilted right down on to the planks then, and give up; and it
was all I could do to keep from crying.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
207
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple C#
www.rasteredge.com
W
hen they got aboard the king went for me, and shook me by
the collar, and says:
“Tryin’ to give us the slip, was ye, you pup!
Tired of our company, hey?”
I says:
“No, your majesty, we warn’t—please don’t, your majesty!”
“Quick, then, and tell us what was your idea, or I’ll shake the
insides out o’ you!”
“Honest, I’ll tell you everything just as it happened, your majesty.
The man that had a-holt of me was very good to me, and kept say-
ing he had a boy about as big as me that died last year, and he was
sorry to see a boy in such a dangerous fix; and when they was all took
by surprise by finding the gold, and made a rush for the coffin, he
lets go of me and whispers, ‘Heel it now, or they’ll hang ye, sure!’ and
I lit out. It didn’t seem no good for me to stay—I couldn’t do noth-
ing, and I didn’t want to be hung if I could get away. So I never
stopped running till I found the canoe; and when I got here I told
Jim to hurry, or they’d catch me and hang me yet, and said I was
afeard you and the duke wasn’t alive now, and I was awful sorry, and
so was Jim, and was awful glad when we see you coming; you may
ask Jim if I didn’t.”
Jim said it was so; and the king told him to shut up, and said, “Oh,
yes, it’s mighty likely!” and shook me up again, and said he reckoned
he’d drownd me. But the duke says:
“Leggo the boy, you old idiot! Would you a done any different? Did
CHAPTER THIRTY
208
control Library system:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Using this PDF to Word converting library control, .NET developers can quickly convert PDF document to Word file using Visual C# code.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to SVG in C#.NET. C# Programming Language to Render & Convert PDF to SVG Using C#.NET XDoc.PDF Converter Control.
www.rasteredge.com
you inquire around for him when you got loose? I don’t remember
it.”
So the king let go of me, and begun to cuss that town and every-
body in it. But the duke says:
“You better a blame’ sight give yourself a good cussing, for you’re
the one that’s entitled to it most.  You hain’t done a thing from the
start that had any sense in it, except coming out so cool and cheeky
with that imaginary blue-arrow mark. That was bright—it was right
down bully; and it was the thing that saved us. For if it hadn’t been
for that they’d a jailed us till them Englishmen’s baggage come—and
then—the penitentiary, you bet! But that trick took ‘em to the grave-
yard, and the gold done us a still bigger kindness; for if the excited
fools hadn’t let go all holts and made that rush to get a look we’d a
slept in our cravats tonight—cravats warranted to wear, too—longer
than we’d need ‘em.”
They was still a minute—thinking; then the king says, kind of
absent-minded like:
“Mf! And we reckoned the niggers stole it!”
That made me squirm!
“Yes,” says the duke, kinder slow and deliberate and sarcastic, “We
did.”
After about a half a minute the king drawls out:
“Leastways, I did.”
The duke says, the same way:
“On the contrary, I did.”
The king kind of ruffles up, and says:
“Looky here, Bilgewater, what’r you referrin’ to?”
The duke says, pretty brisk:
“When it comes to that, maybe you’ll let me ask, what was you
referring to?”
“Shucks!” says the king, very sarcastic; “but I don’t know—maybe
you was asleep, and didn’t know what you was about.”
The duke bristles up now, and says:
“Oh, let up on this cussed nonsense; do you take me for a blame’
fool? Don’t you reckon I know who hid that money in that coffin?”
“Yes, sir! I know you do know, because you done it yourself!”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
209
“It’s a lie!”—and the duke went for him. The king sings out:
“Take y’r hands off!—leggo my throat!—I take it all back!”
The duke says:
“Well, you just own up, first, that you did hide that money there,
intending to give me the slip one of these days, and come back and
dig it up, and have it all to yourself.”
“Wait jest a minute, duke—answer me this one question, honest
and fair; if you didn’t put the money there, say it, and I’ll b’lieve you,
and take back everything I said.”
“You old scoundrel, I didn’t, and you know I didn’t. There, now!”
“Well, then, I b’lieve you. But answer me only jest this one more—
now don’t git mad; didn’t you have it in your mind to hook the
money and hide it?”
The duke never said nothing for a little bit; then he says:
“Well, I don’t care if I did, I didn’t do it, anyway.  But you not only
had it in mind to do it, but you done it.”
“I wisht I never die if I done it, duke, and that’s honest. I won’t say
I warn’t goin’ to do it, because I was; but you—I mean somebody—
got in ahead o’ me.”
“It’s a lie! You done it, and you got to say you done it, or—”
The king began to gurgle, and then he gasps out:
“’Nough!—I own up!”
I was very glad to hear him say that; it made me feel much more
easier than what I was feeling before.
So the duke took his hands off and says:
“If you ever deny it again I’ll drown you. It’s well for you to set
there and blubber like a baby—it’s fitten for you, after the way you’ve
acted. I never see such an old ostrich for wanting to gobble every-
thing—and I a-trusting you all the time, like you was my own father.
You ought to been ashamed of yourself to stand by and hear it sad-
dled on to a lot of poor niggers, and you never say a word for ‘em. It
makes me feel ridiculous to think I was soft enough to believe that
rubbage. Cuss you, I can see now why you was so anxious to make
up the deffisit—you wanted to get what money I’d got out of the
Nonesuch and one thing or another, and scoop it all!”
The king says, timid, and still a-snuffling:
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
210
“Why, duke, it was you that said make up the deffisit; it warn’t
me.”
“Dry up! I don’t want to hear no more out of you!” says the duke.
“And now you see what you got by it. They’ve got all their own
money back, and all of ourn but a shekel or two besides. G’long to
bed, and don’t you deffersit me no more deffersits, long ‘s you live!”
So the king sneaked into the wigwam and took to his bottle for
comfort, and before long the duke tackled his bottle; and so in about
a half an hour they was as thick as thieves again, and the tighter they
got the lovinger they got, and went off a-snoring in each other’s arms.
They both got powerful mellow, but I noticed the king didn’t get
mellow enough to forget to remember to not deny about hiding the
money-bag again. That made me feel easy and satisfied. Of course
when they got to snoring we had a long gabble, and I told Jim every-
thing.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
211
W
e dasn’t stop again at any town for days and days; kept right
along down the river. We was down south in the warm weather now,
and a mighty long ways from home. We begun to come to trees with
Spanish moss on them, hanging down from the limbs like long, gray
beards. It was the first I ever see it growing, and it made the woods
look solemn and dismal. So now the frauds reckoned they was out of
danger, and they begun to work the villages again.
First they done a lecture on temperance; but they didn’t make
enough for them both to get drunk on.  Then in another village they
started a dancing-school; but they didn’t know no more how to dance
than a kangaroo does; so the first prance they made the general pub-
lic jumped in and pranced them out of town. Another time they
tried to go at yellocution; but they didn’t yellocute long till the audi-
ence got up and give them a solid good cussing, and made them skip
out. They tackled missionarying, and mesmeriz-ing, and doctoring,
and telling fortunes, and a little of everything; but they couldn’t seem
to have no luck.  So at last they got just about dead broke, and laid
around the raft as she floated along, thinking and thinking, and never
saying nothing, by the half a day at a time, and dreadful blue and
desperate.
And at last they took a change and begun to lay their heads togeth-
er in the wigwam and talk low and confidential two or three hours at
a time. Jim and me got uneasy. We didn’t like the look of it. We
judged they was studying up some kind of worse deviltry than ever.
We turned it over and over, and at last we made up our minds they
CHAPTER THIRTY-ONE
212
was going to break into somebody’s house or store, or was going into
the counterfeit-money business, or something. So then we was pretty
scared, and made up an agreement that we wouldn’t have nothing in
the world to do with such actions, and if we ever got the least show
we would give them the cold shake and clear out and leave them
behind.  Well, early one morning we hid the raft in a good, safe place
about two mile below a little bit of a shabby village named Pikesville,
and the king he went ashore and told us all to stay hid whilst he went
up to town and smelt around to see if anybody had got any wind of
the Royal Nonesuch there yet. (“House to rob, you mean,” says I to
myself; “and when you get through robbing it you’ll come back here
and wonder what has become of me and Jim and the raft—and you’ll
have to take it out in wondering.”) And he said if he warn’t back by
midday the duke and me would know it was all right, and we was to
come along.
So we stayed where we was. The duke he fretted and sweated
around, and was in a mighty sour way.  He scolded us for everything,
and we couldn’t seem to do nothing right; he found fault with every
little thing. Something was a-brewing, sure. I was good and glad
when midday come and no king; we could have a change, anyway—
and maybe a chance for THE chance on top of it. So me and the
duke went up to the village, and hunted around there for the king,
and by and by we found him in the back room of a little low dog-
gery, very tight, and a lot of loafers bullyragging him for sport, and
he a-cussing and a-threatening with all his might, and so tight he
couldn’t walk, and couldn’t do nothing to them. The duke he begun
to abuse him for an old fool, and the king begun to sass back, and
the minute they was fairly at it I lit out and shook the reefs out of my
hind legs, and spun down the river road like a deer, for I see our
chance; and I made up my mind that it would be a long day before
they ever see me and Jim again. I got down there all out of breath but
loaded up with joy, and sung out:
“Set her loose, Jim! we’re all right now!”
But there warn’t no answer, and nobody come out of the wigwam.
Jim was gone! I set up a shout—and then another—and then anoth-
er one; and run this way and that in the woods, whooping and
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
213
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested