stealthy, and got up to the main floor all right, but here comes Aunt
Sally with a candle, and I clapped the truck in my hat, and clapped
my hat on my head, and the next second she see me; and she says:
“You been down cellar?”
“Yes’m.”
“What you been doing down there?”
“Noth’n.”
“Noth’n!”
“No’m.”
“Well, then, what possessed you to go down there this time of
night?”
“I don’t know ‘m.”
“You don’t know? Don’t answer me that way.  Tom, I want to know
what you been doing down there.”
“I hain’t been doing a single thing, Aunt Sally, I hope to gracious if
I have.”
I reckoned she’d let me go now, and as a generl thing she would;
but I s’pose there was so many strange things going on she was just
in a sweat about every little thing that warn’t yard-stick straight; so
she says, very decided:
“You just march into that setting-room and stay there till I come.
You been up to something you no business to, and I lay I’ll find out
what it is before I’m done with you.”
So she went away as I opened the door and walked into the setting-
room. My, but there was a crowd there! Fifteen farmers, and every
one of them had a gun. I was most powerful sick, and slunk to a
chair and set down. They was setting around, some of them talking a
little, in a low voice, and all of them fidgety and uneasy, but trying to
look like they warn’t; but I knowed they was, because they was always
taking off their hats, and putting them on, and scratching their
heads, and changing their seats, and fumbling with their buttons. I
warn’t easy myself, but I didn’t take my hat off, all the same.
I did wish Aunt Sally would come, and get done with me, and lick
me, if she wanted to, and let me get away and tell Tom how we’d
overdone this thing, and what a thundering hornet’s-nest we’d got
ourselves into, so we could stop fooling around straight off, and clear
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
274
Change pdf to powerpoint online - control Library system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Change pdf to powerpoint online - control Library system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
out with Jim before these rips got out of patience and come for us.
At last she come and begun to ask me questions, but I couldn’t
answer them straight, I didn’t know which end of me was up; because
these men was in such a fidget now that some was wanting to start
right now and lay for them desperadoes, and saying it warn’t but a
few minutes to midnight; and others was trying to get them to hold
on and wait for the sheep-signal; and here was Aunty pegging away
at the questions, and me a-shaking all over and ready to sink down in
my tracks I was that scared; and the place getting hotter and hotter,
and the butter beginning to melt and run down my neck and behind
my ears; and pretty soon, when one of them says, “I’m for going and
getting in the cabin first and right now, and catching them when they
come,” I most dropped; and a streak of butter come a-trickling down
my forehead, and Aunt Sally she see it, and turns white as a sheet,
and says:
“For the land’s sake, what is the matter with the child? He’s got the
brain-fever as shore as you’re born, and they’re oozing out!”
And everybody runs to see, and she snatches off my hat, and out
comes the bread and what was left of the butter, and she grabbed me,
and hugged me, and says:
“Oh, what a turn you did give me! and how glad and grateful I am
it ain’t no worse; for luck’s against us, and it never rains but it pours,
and when I see that truck I thought we’d lost you, for I knowed by
the color and all it was just like your brains would be if—
Dear, dear, whyd’nt you tell me that was what you’d been down
there for, I wouldn’t a cared. Now cler out to bed, and don’t lemme
see no more of you till morning!”
I was up stairs in a second, and down the lightning-rod in another
one, and shinning through the dark for the lean-to. I couldn’t hardly
get my words out, I was so anxious; but I told Tom as quick as I
could we must jump for it now, and not a minute to lose—the house
full of men, yonder, with guns!
His eyes just blazed; and he says:
“No!—is that so? Ain’t it bully! Why, Huck,if it was to do over
again, I bet I could fetch two hundred! If we could put it off till—”
“Hurry! Hurry!” I says. “Where’s Jim?”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
275
control Library system:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:RasterEdge for .NET Online Demo
Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings.
www.rasteredge.com
“Right at your elbow; if you reach out your arm you can touch
him. He’s dressed, and everything’s ready. Now we’ll slide out and
give the sheep-signal.”
But then we heard the tramp of men coming to the door, and
heard them begin to fumble with the pad-lock, and heard a man say:
“I told you we’d be too soon; they haven’t come—the door is
locked. Here, I’ll lock some of you into the cabin, and you lay for
‘em in the dark and kill ‘em when they come; and the rest scatter
around a piece, and listen if you can hear ‘em coming.”
So in they come, but couldn’t see us in the dark, and most trod on
us whilst we was hustling to get under the bed. But we got under all
right, and out through the hole, swift but soft—Jim first, me next,
and Tom last, which was according to Tom’s orders. Now we was in
the lean-to, and heard trampings close by outside. So we crept to the
door, and Tom stopped us there and put his eye to the crack, but
couldn’t make out nothing, it was so dark; and whispered and said he
would listen for the steps to get further, and when he nudged us Jim
must glide out first, and him last.  So he set his ear to the crack and
listened, and listened, and listened, and the steps a-scraping around
out there all the time; and at last he nudged us, and we slid out, and
stooped down, not breathing, and not making the least noise, and
slipped stealthy towards the fence in Injun file, and got to it all right,
and me and Jim over it; but Tom’s britches catched fast on a splinter
on the top rail, and then he hear the steps coming, so he had to pull
loose, which snapped the splinter and made a noise; and as he
dropped in our tracks and started somebody sings out:
“Who’s that? Answer, or I’ll shoot!”
But we didn’t answer; we just unfurled our heels and shoved. Then
there was a rush, and a bang, bang, bang! and the bullets fairly
whizzed around us! We heard them sing out:
“Here they are! They’ve broke for the river!
After ‘em, boys, and turn loose the dogs!”
So here they come, full tilt. We could hear them because they
wore boots and yelled, but we didn’t wear no boots and didn’t yell.
We was in the path to the mill; and when they got pretty close on
to us we dodged into the bush and let them go by, and then
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
276
control Library system:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings.
www.rasteredge.com
dropped in behind them. They’d had all the dogs shut up, so they
wouldn’t scare off the robbers; but by this time somebody had let
them loose, and here they come, making powwow enough for a
million; but they was our dogs; so we stopped in our tracks till they
catched up; and when they see it warn’t nobody but us, and no
excitement to offer them, they only just said howdy, and tore right
ahead towards the shouting and clattering; and then we up-steam
again, and whizzed along after them till we was nearly to the mill,
and then struck up through the bush to where my canoe was tied,
and hopped in and pulled for dear life towards the middle of the
river, but didn’t make no more noise than we was obleeged to. Then
we struck out, easy and comfortable, for the island where my raft
was; and we could hear them yelling and barking at each other all
up and down the bank, till we was so far away the sounds got dim
and died out.
And when we stepped on to the raft I says:
“Now, old Jim, you’re a free man again, and I bet you won’t ever
be a slave no more.”
“En a mighty good job it wuz, too, Huck. It ‘uz planned beautiful, en
it ‘uz done beautiful; en dey ain’t nobody kin git up a plan dat’s mo’
mixed-up en splendid den what dat one wuz.”
We was all glad as we could be, but Tom was the gladdest of all
because he had a bullet in the calf of his leg.
When me and Jim heard that we didn’t feel so brash as what we
did before. It was hurting him considerable, and bleeding; so we
laid him in the wigwam and tore up one of the duke’s shirts for to
bandage him, but he says:
“Gimme the rags; I can do it myself. Don’t stop now; don’t
fool around here, and the evasion booming along so handsome;
man the sweeps, and set her loose! Boys, we done it elegant!—
‘deed we did. I wish we’d a had the handling of Louis XVI.,
there wouldn’t a been no ‘Son of Saint Louis, ascend to heaven!’
wrote down in his biography; no, sir, we’d a whooped him over
the border—that’s what we’d a done with him—and done it just
as  slick  as  nothing  at  all,  too.  Man  the  sweeps—man  the
sweeps!”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
277
control Library system:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Add image to specified position on PowerPoint page. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try PDF for .NET with online support. See Pricing
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Try Online Demo Now. Please click Browse to upload a file to display in web viewer. Suppported files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom and main
www.rasteredge.com
But me and Jim was consulting—and thinking.
And after we’d thought a minute, I says:
“Say it, Jim.”
So he says:
“Well, den, dis is de way it look to me, Huck. Ef it wuz him dat ‘uz
bein’ sot free, en one er de boys wuz to git shot, would he say, ‘Go on
en save me, nemmine ‘bout a doctor f’r to save dis one?’ Is dat like
Mars Tom Sawyer? Would he say dat? You bet he wouldn’t! Well, den,
is Jim gywne to say it?  No, sah—I doan’ budge a step out’n dis place
‘dout a doctor, not if it’s forty year!”
I knowed he was white inside, and I reckoned he’d say what he did
say—so it was all right now, and I told Tom I was a-going for a doc-
tor. He raised considerable row about it, but me and Jim stuck to it
and wouldn’t budge; so he was for crawling out and setting the raft
loose himself; but we wouldn’t let him.  Then he give us a piece of his
mind, but it didn’t do no good.
So when he sees me getting the canoe ready, he says:
“Well, then, if you re bound to go, I’ll tell you the way to do when
you get to the village. Shut the door and blindfold the doctor tight
and fast, and make him swear to be silent as the grave, and put a
purse full of gold in his hand, and then take and lead him all around
the back alleys and everywheres in the dark, and then fetch him here
in the canoe, in a roundabout way amongst the islands, and search
him and take his chalk away from him, and don’t give it back to him
till you get him back to the village, or else he will chalk this raft so
he can find it again. It’s the way they all do.”
So I said I would, and left, and Jim was to hide in the woods when
he see the doctor coming till he was gone again.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
278
control Library system:VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. Click to strikethrough text on PDF page. Users can change outline color and set transparency value in properties.
www.rasteredge.com
T
he doctor was an old man; a very nice, kind-looking old man
when I got him up. I told him me and my brother was over on
Spanish Island hunting yesterday afternoon, and camped on a piece
of a raft we found, and about midnight he must a kicked his gun in
his dreams, for it went off and shot him in the leg, and we wanted
him to go over there and fix it and not say nothing about it, nor let
anybody know, because we wanted to come home this evening and
surprise the folks.
“Who is your folks?” he says.
“The Phelpses, down yonder.”
“Oh,” he says. And after a minute, he says:
“How’d you say he got shot?”
“He had a dream,” I says, “and it shot him.”
“Singular dream,” he says.
So he lit up his lantern, and got his saddle-bags, and we started.
But when he sees the canoe he didn’t like the look of her—said she
was big enough for one, but didn’t look pretty safe for two. I says:
“Oh, you needn’t be afeard, sir, she carried the three of us easy
enough.”
“What three?”
“Why, me and Sid, and—and—and the guns; that’s what I mean.”
“Oh,” he says.
But he put his foot on the gunnel and rocked her, and shook his
head, and said he reckoned he’d look around for a bigger one. But
they was all locked and chained; so he took my canoe, and said for
CHAPTER FORTY-ONE
279
me to wait till he come back, or I could hunt around further, or
maybe I better go down home and get them ready for the surprise if
I wanted to. But I said I didn’t; so I told him just how to find the
raft, and then he started.
I struck an idea pretty soon. I says to myself, spos’n he can’t fix that
leg just in three shakes of a sheep’s tail, as the saying is? spos’n it takes
him three or four days? What are we going to do?—lay around there
till he lets the cat out of the bag? No, sir; I know what I’ll do. I’ll
wait, and when he comes back if he says he’s got to go any more I’ll
get down there, too, if I swim; and we’ll take and tie him, and keep
him, and shove out down the river; and when Tom’s done with him
we’ll give him what it’s worth, or all we got, and then let him get
ashore.
So then I crept into a lumber-pile to get some sleep; and next time
I waked up the sun was away up over my head! I shot out and went
for the doctor’s house, but they told me he’d gone away in the night
some time or other, and warn’t back yet. Well, thinks I, that looks
powerful bad for Tom, and I’ll dig out for the island right off. So
away I shoved, and turned the corner, and nearly rammed my head
into Uncle Silas’s stomach! He says:
“Why, Tom! Where you been all this time, you rascal?”
“I hain’t been nowheres,” I says, “only just hunting for the runaway
nigger—me and Sid.”
“Why, where ever did you go?” he says. “Your aunt’s been mighty
uneasy.”
“She needn’t,” I says, “because we was all right.  We followed the
men and the dogs, but they outrun us, and we lost them; but we
thought we heard them on the water, so we got a canoe and took out
after them and crossed over, but couldn’t find nothing of them; so we
cruised along up-shore till we got kind of tired and beat out; and tied
up the canoe and went to sleep, and never waked up till about an
hour ago; then we paddled over here to hear the news, and Sid’s at
the post-office to see what he can hear, and I’m a-branching out to
get something to eat for us, and then we’re going home.”
So then we went to the post-office to get “Sid”; but just as I suspi-
cioned, he warn’t there; so the old man he got a letter out of the
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
280
office, and we waited awhile longer, but Sid didn’t come; so the old
man said, come along, let Sid foot it home, or canoe it, when he got
done fooling around—but we would ride. I couldn’t get him to let
me stay and wait for Sid; and he said there warn’t no use in it, and I
must come along, and let Aunt Sally see we was all right.
When we got home Aunt Sally was that glad to see me she laughed
and cried both, and hugged me, and give me one of them lickings of
hern that don’t amount to shucks, and said she’d serve Sid the same
when he come.
And the place was plum full of farmers and farmers’ wives, to din-
ner; and such another clack a body never heard. Old Mrs. Hotchkiss
was the worst; her tongue was a-going all the time. She says:
“Well, Sister Phelps, I’ve ransacked that-air cabin over, an’ I b’lieve
the  nigger  was  crazy. I  says  to  Sister Damrell—didn’t  I,  Sister
Damrell?—s’I, he’s crazy, s’I—them’s the very words I said. You all
hearn me: he’s crazy, s’I; everything shows it, s’I.  Look at that-air
grindstone, s’I; want to tell me’t any cretur ‘t’s in his right mind ‘s a
goin’ to scrabble all them crazy things onto a grindstone, s’I? Here
sich ‘n’ sich a person busted his heart; ‘n’ here so ‘n’ so pegged along
for thirty-seven year, ‘n’ all that—natcherl son o’ Louis somebody, ‘n’
sich everlast’n rubbage. He’s plumb crazy, s’I; it’s what I says in the
fust place, it’s what I says in the middle, ‘n’ it’s what I says last ‘n’ all
the time—the nigger’s crazy—crazy ‘s Nebokoodneezer, s’I.”
“An’ look at that-air ladder made out’n rags, Sister Hotchkiss,” says
old Mrs. Damrell; “what in the name o’ goodness could he ever want
of—”
“The very words I was a-sayin’ no longer ago th’n this minute to
Sister Utterback, ‘n’ she’ll tell you so herself. Sh-she, look at that-air
rag ladder, sh-she; ‘n’ s’I, yes, look at it, s’I—what could he a-wanted
of it, s’I. Sh-she, Sister Hotchkiss, sh-she—”
“But how in the nation’d they ever git that grindstone in there, any-
way? ‘n’ who dug that-air hole? ‘n’ who—”
“My very words, Brer Penrod! I was a-sayin’—pass that-air sasser o’
m’lasses, won’t ye?—I was a-sayin’ to Sister Dunlap, jist this minute,
how did they git that grindstone in there, s’I. Without help, mind
you—‘thout help! That’s wher ‘tis. Don’t tell me,s’I; there wuz help,
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
281
s’I; ‘n’ ther’ wuz a plenty help, too, s’I; ther’s ben a dozen a-helpin’ that
nigger, ‘n’ I lay I’d skin every last nigger on this place but I’d find out
who done it, s’I; ‘n’ moreover, s’I—”
“A dozen says you!—forty couldn’t a done every thing that’s been
done. Look at them case-knife saws and things, how tedious they’ve
been made; look at that bed-leg sawed off with ‘m, a week’s work for
six men; look at that nigger made out’n straw on the bed; and look
at—” 
“You may well say it, Brer Hightower! It’s jist as I was a-sayin’ to
Brer  Phelps,  his  own  self.  S’e,  what  do  you think  of  it,  Sister
Hotchkiss, s’e? Think o’ what, Brer Phelps, s’I? Think o’ that bed-leg
sawed off that a way, s’e? Think of it, s’I? I lay it never sawed itself off,
s’I—somebody sawed it, s’I; that’s my opinion, take it or leave it, it
mayn’t be no ‘count, s’I, but sich as ‘t is, it’s my opinion, s’I, ‘n’ if any
body k’n start a better one, s’I, let him do it, s’I, that’s all. I says to
Sister Dunlap, s’I—” “Why, dog my cats, they must a ben a house-
full o’ niggers in there every night for four weeks to a done all that
work, Sister Phelps. Look at that shirt—every last inch of it kivered
over with secret African writ’n done with blood! Must a ben a raft uv
‘m at it right along, all the time, amost. Why, I’d give two dollars to
have it read to me; ‘n’ as for the niggers that wrote it, I ‘low I’d take
‘n’ lash ‘m t’ll—”
“People to help him, Brother Marples! Well, I reckon you’d think so
if you’d a been in this house for a while back. Why, they’ve stole
everything they could lay their hands on—and we a-watching all the
time, mind you. They stole that shirt right off o’ the line! and as for
that sheet they made the rag ladder out of, ther’ ain’t no telling how
many times they didn’t steal that; and flour, and candles, and candle-
sticks, and spoons, and the old warming-pan, and most a thousand
things that I disremember now, and my new calico dress; and me and
Silas and my Sid and Tom on the constant watch day and night, as I
was a-telling you, and not a one of us could catch hide nor hair nor
sight nor sound of them; and here at the last minute, lo and behold
you, they slides right in under our noses and fools us, and not only
fools US but the Injun Territory robbers too, and actuly gets away
with that nigger safe and sound, and that with sixteen men and twen-
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
282
ty-two dogs right on their very heels at that very time!  I tell you, it
just bangs anything I ever heard of.  Why, sperits couldn’t a done bet-
ter and been no smarter. And I reckon they must a been sperits—
because, you know our dogs, and ther’ ain’t no better; well, them dogs
never even got on the track of ‘m once! You explain that to me if you
can!—any of you!”
“Well, it does beat—”
“Laws alive, I never—”
“So help me, I wouldn’t a be—”
“House-thieves as well as—”
“Goodnessgracioussakes, I’d a ben afeard to live in sich a—”
“’Fraid to live!—why, I was that scared I dasn’t hardly go to bed, or
get up, or lay down, or set down, Sister Ridgeway. Why, they’d steal
the very—why, goodness sakes, you can guess what kind of a fluster
I was in by the time midnight come last night. I hope to gracious if
I warn’t afraid they’d steal some o’ the family! I was just to that pass I
didn’t have no reasoning faculties no more. It looks foolish enough
now, in the daytime; but I says to myself, there’s my two poor boys
asleep, ‘way up stairs in that lonesome room, and I declare to good-
ness I was that uneasy ‘t I crep’ up there and locked ‘em in! I did. And
anybody would.  Because, you know, when you get scared that way,
and it keeps running on, and getting worse and worse all the time,
and your wits gets to addling, and you get to doing all sorts o’ wild
things, and by and by you think to yourself, spos’n I was a boy, and
was  away  up there, and the door ain’t locked,  and you—” She
stopped, looking kind of wondering, and then she turned her head
around slow, and when her eye lit on me—I got up and took a walk.
Says I to myself, I can explain better how we come to not be in that
room this morning if I go out to one side and study over it a little.
So I done it. But I dasn’t go fur, or she’d a sent for me. And when it
was late in the day the people all went, and then I come in and told
her the noise and shooting waked up me and “Sid,” and the door was
locked, and we wanted to see the fun, so we went down the light-
ning-rod, and both of us got hurt a little, and we didn’t never want
to try that no more. And then I went on and told her all what I told
Uncle Silas before; and then she said she’d forgive us, and maybe it
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
283
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested