Better Together
Combine AdWords with Google Analytics for  
Better Insights, Bidding and Results
Convert pdf to powerpoint with - software SDK dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint with - software SDK dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Introduction
Like sunshine and the beach, or dogs and tennis balls, Google AdWords and Google 
Analytics are great by themselves but even better together. 
You’ll get high-performance insights into your ads and your website when you link 
your AdWords and Analytics accounts. Google Analytics does a vital job in this pairing: 
it shows you the AdWords traffic that didn’t lead to a conversion. If you assume that 
the average site conversion rate is around 3%, that leaves 97% of traffic that can be 
understood better. A lot better.
You can start gathering those detailed insights now by linking your accounts. We’ll begin 
with working with Google Analytics metrics in AdWords, then we’ll move on to working 
with AdWords metrics in GA. Across both platforms, remember that these strategies 
should be used in tandem for maximum success.
Pull Google Analytics Metrics Into AdWords for Deeper Insights 
Page 4 
Analyze AdWords Performance in Google Analytics   
Page 8
Better Together | Combine AdWords with Google Analytics
2
software SDK dll:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
Better Together | Combine AdWords with Google Analytics
3
First, pull Google Analytics metrics into AdWords for deeper insights.
1.
Import goal completions and ecommerce transactions. 
Why:
You can perform richer analysis on customized analytics goals (including micro-
conversions), and then optimize to those GA goals right in AdWords. 
2
 Create custom remarketing lists. 
Why:
Create highly-specific remarketing lists based on pages viewed, goal completions  
or other GA segmentations.
3.
Use Smart Lists to automatically group your site users that are most likely to convert. 
Why:
Reach engaged (but not yet converted) users of your site without needing to segment 
those audiences yourself. 
4
 Understand which Adwords campaigns, ads or keywords drive on-site engagement.
Why:
Conversions only tell part of the story. GA tells you more about how users engage with 
your site, and the keywords that do (or don’t) bring them in.
5
 Monitor ‘% new sessions’ to learn which keywords attract new users.
Why:
Spotting new users from AdWords tells you how to focus your efforts, especially when 
they’re coming into contact with you for the first time.
Second, analyze your AdWords performance right in Google Analytics.
6
 Auto-tag your ads.
Why:
Auto-tagged ads generate more richly-detailed GA reports.
7
 Segment behavior to understand your AdWords target audience.
Why:
Discover the right messages and landing pages for each kind of user.
8
 Layer GA’s secondary dimensions onto your AdWords-specific reports.
Why:
Secondary dimensions help you see which devices, keywords, placements and more 
drive high-quality users.
9
 Use AdWords Secondary Dimensions in GA Reports.
Why:
Find AdWords-specific insights using any of your favorite reports in Analytics— 
insights that can improve your account’s performance.
10.
Use Benchmarking to see how your site stacks up to the competition.
Why:
See what’s possible in your industry and how your own desktop and mobile sites compare.
10 ways to drive results from linked AdWords 
and Google Analytics (GA) accounts
software SDK dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to Image; Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF;
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
Pull Google Analytics Metrics into AdWords for 
Deeper Insights
You can get a deeper understanding of the interactions your customers have  
with your site by working with Google Analytics metrics within the AdWords interface. 
That means insight into detailed conversion behaviors, clearer audience profiles, and 
a better sense of the customer’s journey from their first ad click right through to the 
conversion you want. Let’s look at some places to start.
1. Import Goal Completions and Ecommerce Transactions
A conversion is usually a purchase completed or a lead captured, but a goal can be 
many things: a visit to a given page, a certain amount of time spent on a site, or a host 
of other things you find valuable. 
Google Analytics provides you with flexible goal tracking, and those goals can be 
imported into AdWords as conversions. This helps you perform richer analyses, and 
also create goals that double as profiles for specific audiences. 
Those goals can be certain actions you consider important. For instance:
• Destination: A visit to a specific page on your site, like a visit to a new /blog page on
your site if you’re trying to build a community with your customers.
• Duration: The time someone spends
on your site. You might use this if you 
want users to engage deeply; or, on 
the other hand, if you want them to 
find information as fast as possible.
• Pages or screens per session: How
many pages each user visits—useful if 
you’d rather measure engagement by 
page visits instead of by time on site.
• Event: The moment when someone
watches a video, adds a product to a 
cart, shares a page through a social 
button, or takes any other action. 
Helpful if you want users to complete a specific action beyond a destination page view.
All these goals can be imported into AdWords as conversions, so you can see and 
measure the actions your ads created. 
Additionally, you can track the value of your conversions in AdWords.  
But did you know that you can go even deeper with that tracking in Google Analytics? 
Ecommerce tracking in GA includes detailed information about products (including 
revenue generated by each), transactions (revenue, tax, shipping and more), and time 
to purchase (number of days and sessions it takes to finish a sale). In AdWords,  
TIP: 
You may find minor 
discrepancies in data because 
AdWords tracks clicks and 
Analytics tracks sessions.  
(A click is a user’s interaction 
with your ad; a session is a 
group of interactions that take 
place on your website in one 
time frame by one user.)  
Keep that in mind as you  
dive into your data.
Better Together | Combine AdWords with Google Analytics
4
software SDK dll:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. C# Demo: Convert PowerPoint to PDF Document. Add references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
www.rasteredge.com
Better Together | Combine AdWords with Google Analytics
5
you’ll be able to see the number of transactions and their associated revenue by 
importing your GA ecommerce transactions, and from that you can connect your 
account’s performance directly to your sales data.
Define Micro-Conversions 
Micro-conversions are small (but valuable!) actions that users take on your site. They may 
add something to their cart, for instance, or download a newsletter. 
These things may not have the value of a $2,000 purchase, but they capture user 
actions from different parts of the research and buying process—and show you how 
best to speak to that audience.
Once you import these Google Analytics goals into AdWords, you’re free to customize 
them further. You can decide how to count them, or what the lookback window should be: 
You can monitor these different conversions and micro-conversions using the 
‘Segment’ feature to see reports by conversion name.
TIP: 
It’s a good idea not to track 
session duration alone. Session 
duration is measured by adding 
the time it takes between 
the different interactions 
a user may send to Google 
Analytics; those interactions 
can be pageviews, events or 
ecommerce transactions. If all 
interactions aren’t measured 
on the website, or if users 
spend long periods of time in 
one page before leaving your 
site, you may not get the full 
scope of that session duration.
software SDK dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
2. Create Custom Remarketing Lists 
Remarketing lists help you stay in front of users who have expressed interest in what 
you offer. Combine AdWords and Google Analytics and you’ll be able to build smarter 
remarketing lists to use in your campaigns.
3. Use Smart Lists to Automatically 
Group Your Site Users that are Most 
Likely to Convert
Smart Lists are a good option if you 
don’t have time to segment your 
audience yourself. Google Analytics 
will automatically build a list of users 
on your site who are most likely 
to convert, and you can then use 
remarketing to bring them back to 
your site.
If you prefer to create your own 
custom remarketing lists, try to 
find your ideal audience using 
Google Analytics segmentation 
capabilities like pages viewed, 
location, on-site activity and 
goal completions. (Build your 
audiences under Remarketing 
in your Admin tab in GA.) You 
can pick from predefined 
lists, or create your own, and 
instantly see the estimated size 
of the list that results.
Your goal is to create groups 
that you can reach effectively in the future: groups like homepage visitors, product 
page viewers, conversion abandoners or past converters. All of these, and others like 
them, are groups you can speak to with specific remarketing messages that will bring 
them back to your site.
For example: people who first came to your site through a non-paid link on another site 
haven’t clicked your ads, so they may have different expectations when they see your 
remarketing ad. Or, if users have watched a video on your site once before, you may 
send them to a landing page with a video on it.
You can use any of Google Analytics’ 250+ dimensions and metrics to build these  
kinds of highly-specific remarketing lists. The sky’s the limit, and the power is yours:  
you decide what’s most valuable for your site and your business, and build your 
audiences to match.
NOTE: 
Remarketing may necessitate 
an update to your Analytics 
tracking code, along with some 
other requirements.
TIP: 
Get ideas for your own 
remarketing lists by heading 
over to the Google Analytics 
Solution Gallery. Import a 
remarketing-related solution or 
use one as inspiration for your 
own account.
Using pre-defined audiences
Creating a custom remarketing list
Better Together | Combine AdWords with Google Analytics
6
4. Understand Which AdWords 
Campaigns, Ads or Keywords Drive 
On-site Engagement 
With your accounts linked, you can 
add Google Analytics metrics directly 
to your AdWords reports. Adding 
Analytics’ site interaction metrics to 
standard AdWords metrics like CTR 
and conversion rate will take things 
to a higher level.
Most clicks don’t turn into 
conversions. (This is that 97% we 
spoke of earlier.) Google Analytics metrics can help you see what happened when 
things didn’t turn out quite the way you hoped—and test ways to change that outcome.
For instance, you might try out:
• A new call to action in your ads. How does your message prepare users to interact 
with your site? Does their pages viewed or session length change when you change 
your call to action? 
• A new set of keywords. Do your keywords deliver on users’ expectations?  
Are bounce rates in line with your core keyword base…or better? 
• A new campaign landing page. Does a different landing page draw users deeper 
into your site? Is their average session getting longer? 
More data is better when you’re analyzing performance, as long as that data is really 
relevant. Keep the focus on the metrics that matter most to your account. Then use 
Google Analytics when the primary metrics in your account don’t give you enough 
insight to make effective decisions. 
5. Monitor ‘% New Sessions’ to Learn Which Keywords Attract New Users 
To see and understand where your campaigns reach customers in their journey,  
the % new sessions metric can be a big help.
This metric can be a proxy for new customers to your business. You may have a general 
idea of which keywords are driving new customers to your site, but % new sessions will 
help you prove or disprove your hypothesis. Try it when you’re setting goals for your 
account and also when you’re gauging the success of a keyword or a campaign.
Certain keywords will bring new users your way. Those users have a different value 
than someone who is returning to re-engage with your site. So plan your messaging 
and bids appropriately.
As you learn more about how familiar each user is with your site or brand, you can 
improve the overall strategy for your account.
TIP: 
Want to know even more about 
how customers find you? Take a 
look at Multi-Channel Funnels 
and Attribution Modeling in 
Google Analytics. You’ll see how 
different channels interact with 
one another as they bring new 
users to your site.
Better Together | Combine AdWords with Google Analytics
7
Analyze AdWords Performance in  
Google Analytics
You can take action by viewing your Google Analytics stats within AdWords, and  
you can perform deep analysis by reviewing AdWords performance directly in 
Google Analytics. 
6. Auto-tag Your Ads
Before we get into the reporting details, let’s start with one piece of technical advice: 
plan to use auto-tagging on your ads. Save manual tagging for special cases. This will 
simplify your life and create more reporting flexibility. There are more benefits to 
auto-tagging than we can get into here, but you should plan on using it.
Analyzing your data directly in Google Analytics will add more dimensions to your 
AdWords visits. Something as simple as finding non-converting keywords that still 
bring in above-average quality traffic (low bounce rate, high time-on-site, etc.) can lead 
to big optimizations for your account. The analyses and reports we’ll look at here are 
just scratching the surface of what’s possible. We hope they’ll inspire your own unique 
custom insights as you work with your linked accounts.
7. Segment Behavior to Understand Your AdWords Target Audience
Google Analytics has a powerful segmentation engine. Instead of looking at your 
audience in large bunches, you can break it down into its component parts and 
understand how each part interacts with your site—then bid, message and direct 
traffic accordingly. (You can even build them for yourself with the Segment builder.)
TIP: 
Create your own custom 
segments for even deeper 
analysis. Or, import additional 
segments (here are some for 
Paid Search) to your account 
from the Google Analytics 
Solutions Gallery.
Better Together | Combine AdWords with Google Analytics
8
Here’s an example: How do 
users coming from AdWords 
react to your site on their 
first visit? To find out, run a 
Destination URL report in 
Google Analytics, then segment 
it by New and Returning Users. 
In this case you may also learn 
which pages on your site could 
double as good landing pages 
for AdWords traffic.
You can also learn helpful 
AdWords lessons from the 
rest of your traffic. Check out 
some suggested segments and 
analyses on page 11 that you 
could run in your account.
8. Layer GA’s Secondary 
Dimensions onto Your 
AdWords-specific Reports
Want to know where your 
most profitable customers 
come from? Try layering GA’s 
flexible secondary dimensions 
onto your AdWords-specific 
GA reports.
Secondary dimensions in GA 
work like AdWords segments, 
except that there are more of 
them and they’re more flexible.
Better Together | Combine AdWords with Google Analytics
9
TIP: 
Try creating your own 
custom dimensions if you 
have information about your 
logged-in users from outside of 
Google Analytics, such as from 
your internal systems. You’ll 
see how distinct sets of those 
existing customers perform.
First, pick a question—any question. Then investigate the right dimensions to find the 
answer. For instance:
Question: Do users behave differently on my site if they came there by clicking an ad 
from the top of a page? 
To find the answer: Add an Ad Slot dimension on your campaign/ad group reports.
Question: Should I add more exact match keywords to my campaigns? 
To find the answer: Try Query Match Type layered onto your campaign reports.
Question: Are there certain keywords that perform better on mobile?
To find the answer: Try Device Category layered onto your keyword reports.
9. Use AdWords Secondary Dimensions in GA Reports
Now let’s put your AdWords account performance into perspective by layering 
AdWords secondary dimensions on a Google Analytics report.
No matter which report you run in Analytics, you can add AdWords dimensions onto 
that report for a deeper level of understanding of your AdWords traffic. These reports 
will not only be insightful—they’ll help show you what to do directly in AdWords. 
Determining bid adjustments through a Geographic report is just one example.  
Think about the reports that you value most in GA and then see what that report  
can teach you about your AdWords account.
What you learn from those secondary dimensions will show how you how to message 
to AdWords users and where to send them to on your site.
Here’s one example: Run a report for Audience > Demographics > Age. Then add the  
Ad Slot secondary dimension onto your report. Now look to see: Are more younger than 
older people clicking your AdWords ads on the top? Is there a clear reason why?  
How can you use that reason to improve your AdWords bidding and messaging?
10. Use Benchmarking to See How 
Your Site Stacks up to the Competition
“How’m I doing?” Benchmarking reports 
show how your site stacks up against 
aggregated industry data from other 
companies who anonymously share 
their data. Benchmarks put your 
performance into context. They help 
you set meaningful targets, learn 
about trends in your industry, and see 
how you compare to the competition.
For example, try benchmarking your 
Channels to see if you’re driving less paid search traffic than your peers. There may be 
interested users out there that others are drawing in, but that you haven’t discovered yet.
TIP: 
GA reports can also help you 
determine the right AdWords 
bid adjustments for location, 
device and time of day. GA 
will show you details about 
acquisition, behavior and 
conversions to layer on to 
what you’ll see in AdWords.
TIP: 
Enhanced Ecommerce can 
help you dig even deeper into 
your on-site transactions.  
You’ll learn more about what 
users view and add to their 
carts, and what happens when 
they abandon a purchase.
NOTE: 
This report may require  
you to update your Analytics 
tracking code.
Better Together | Combine AdWords with Google Analytics
10
Define your performance against the competition
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested