“Well, then, come along; no use to take truck and leave money.”
“Say, won’t he suspicion what we’re up to?”
“Maybe he won’t. But we got to have it anyway. Come along.”
So they got out and went in.
The door slammed to because it was on the careened side; and in a
half second I was in the boat, and Jim come tumbling after me. I out
with my knife and cut the rope, and away we went!
We didn’t touch an oar, and we didn’t speak nor whisper, nor hard-
ly even breathe. We went gliding swift along, dead silent, past the tip
of the paddle-box, and past the stern; then in a second or two more
we was a hundred yards below the wreck, and the darkness soaked
her up, every last sign of her, and we was safe, and knowed it.
When we was three or four hundred yards down-stream we see the
lantern show like a little spark at the texas door for a second, and we
knowed by that that the rascals had missed their boat, and was begin-
ning to understand that they was in just as much trouble now as Jim
Turner was.
Then Jim manned the oars, and we took out after our raft. Now
was the first time that I begun to worry about the men—I reckon I
hadn’t had time to before.  I begun to think how dreadful it was, even
for murderers, to be in such a fix. I says to myself, there ain’t no
telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet, and then how
would I like it? So says I to Jim:
“The first light we see we’ll land a hundred yards below it or above
it, in a place where it’s a good hiding-place for you and the skiff, and
then I’ll go and fix up some kind of a yarn, and get somebody to go
for that gang and get them out of their scrape, so they can be hung
when their time comes.”
But that idea was a failure; for pretty soon it begun to storm
again, and this time worse than ever. The rain poured down, and
never a light showed; everybody in bed, I reckon. We boomed
along down the river, watching for lights and watching for our
raft.  After a long time the rain let up, but the clouds stayed, and
the lightning kept whimpering, and by and by a flash showed us
a black thing ahead, floating, and we made for it.
It was the raft, and mighty glad was we to get aboard of it again.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
74
How to change pdf to powerpoint on - application SDK tool:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to change pdf to powerpoint on - application SDK tool:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
We seen a light now away down to the right, on shore. So I said I
would go for it.  The skiff was half full of plunder which that gang
had stole there on the wreck. We hustled it on to the raft in a pile,
and I told Jim to float along down, and show a light when he
judged he had gone about two mile, and keep it burning till I
come; then I manned my oars and shoved for the light. As I got
down towards it three or four more showed—up on a hillside. It
was a village. I closed in above the shore light, and laid on my oars
and floated. As I went by I see it was a lantern hanging on the jack-
staff of a double-hull ferryboat. I skimmed around for the watch-
man, a-wondering whereabouts he slept; and by and by I found
him roosting on the bitts forward, with his head down between his
knees. I gave his shoulder two or three little shoves, and begun to
cry.
He stirred up in a kind of a startlish way; but when he see it was
only me he took a good gap and stretch, and then he says:
“Hello, what’s up? Don’t cry, bub. What’s the trouble?”
I says:
“Pap, and mam, and sis, and—”
Then I broke down. He says:
“Oh, dang it now, don’t take on so; we all has to have our troubles,
and this ‘n ‘ll come out all right.  What’s the matter with ‘em?”
“They’re—they’re—are you the watchman of the boat?”
“Yes,” he says, kind of pretty-well-satisfied like. “I’m the captain
and the owner and the mate and the pilot and watchman and head
deck-hand; and sometimes I’m the freight and passengers. I ain’t as
rich as old Jim Hornback, and I can’t be so blame’ generous and good
to Tom, Dick, and Harry as what he is, and slam around money the
way he does; but I’ve told him a many a time ‘t I wouldn’t trade
places with him; for, says I, a sailor’s life’s the life for me, and I’m
derned if I’D live two mile out o’ town, where there ain’t nothing
ever goin’ on, not for all his spondulicks and as much more on top of
it. Says I—”
I broke in and says:
“They’re in an awful peck of trouble, and—”
“Who is?”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
75
application SDK tool:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Able to view and edit PowerPoint rapidly. Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PowerPoint to Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
“Why, pap and mam and sis and Miss Hooker;and if you’d take
your ferryboat and go up there—”
“Up where? Where are they?”
“On the wreck.”
“What wreck?”
“Why, there ain’t but one.”
“What, you don’t mean the Walter Scott?”
“Yes.”
“Good land! what are they doin’ there, for gracious sakes?”
“Well, they didn’t go there a-purpose.”
“I bet they didn’t! Why, great goodness, there ain’t no chance for
‘em if they don’t git off mighty quick! Why, how in the nation did
they ever git into such a scrape?”
“Easy enough. Miss Hooker was a-visiting up there to the town—”
“Yes, Booth’s Landing—go on.”
“She was a-visiting there at Booth’s Landing, and just in the edge of
the evening she started over with her nigger woman in the horse-ferry
to stay all night at her friend’s house, Miss What-you-may-call-her, I
disremember her name—and they lost their steering-oar, and swung
around and went a-floating down, stern first, about two mile, and
saddle-baggsed on the  wreck, and  the ferryman  and the  nigger
woman and the horses was all lost, but Miss Hooker she made a grab
and got aboard the wreck. Well, about an hour after dark we come
along down in our trading-scow, and it was so dark we didn’t notice
the wreck till we was right on it; and so we saddle-baggsed; but all of
us was saved but Bill Whipple—and oh, he was the best cretur !—I
most wish ‘t it had been me, I do.”
“My George! It’s the beatenest thing I ever struck. And then what
did you all do?”
“Well, we hollered and took on, but it’s so wide there we couldn’t
make nobody hear. So pap said somebody got to get ashore and get
help somehow. I was the only one that could swim, so I made a dash
for it, and Miss Hooker she said if I didn’t strike help sooner, come
here and hunt up her uncle, and he’d fix the thing. I made the land
about a mile below, and been fooling along ever since, trying to get
people to do something, but they said, ‘What, in such a night and
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
76
application SDK tool:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint in C# .NET Programming Project. PowerPoint Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
such a current? There ain’t no sense in it; go for the steam ferry.’ Now
if you’ll go and—”
“By Jackson, I’d like to, and, blame it, I don’t know but I will; but
who in the dingnation’s a-going’ to pay for it? Do you reckon your
pap—”
“Why that’s all right. Miss Hooker she tole me, particular, that her
uncle Hornback—”
“Great guns! is he her uncle? Looky here, you break for that light
over yonder-way, and turn out west when you git there, and about a
quarter of a mile out you’ll come to the tavern; tell ‘em to dart you
out to Jim Hornback’s, and he’ll foot the bill. And don’t you fool
around any, because he’ll want to know the news. Tell him I’ll have
his niece all safe before he can get to town. Hump yourself, now; I’m
a-going up around the corner here to roust out my engineer.”
I struck for the light, but as soon as he turned the corner I went
back and got into my skiff and bailed her out, and then pulled up
shore in the easy water about six hundred yards, and tucked myself in
among some woodboats; for I couldn’t rest easy till I could see the
ferryboat start. But take it all around, I was feeling ruther comfort-
able on accounts of taking all this trouble for that gang, for not many
would a done it.  I wished the widow knowed about it. I judged she
would be proud of me for helping these rapscallions, because rapscal-
lions and dead beats is the kind the widow and good people takes the
most interest in.
Well, before long here comes the wreck, dim and dusky, sliding
along down! A kind of cold shiver went through me, and then I
struck out for her. She was very deep, and I see in a minute there
warn’t much chance for anybody being alive in her. I pulled all
around her and hollered a little, but there wasn’t any answer; all dead
still. I felt a little bit heavy-hearted about the gang, but not much, for
I reckoned if they could stand it I could.
Then here comes the ferryboat; so I shoved for the middle of the
river on a long down-stream slant; and when I judged I was out of
eye-reach I laid on my oars, and looked back and see her go and
smell around the wreck for Miss Hooker’s remainders, because the
captain would know her uncle Hornback would want them; and
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
77
application SDK tool:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
Such as load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, convert PowerPoint to PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file, as well as add
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
create image on desired PowerPoint slide, merge/split PowerPoint file, change the order of How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to SVG
www.rasteredge.com
then pretty soon the ferryboat give it up and went for the shore, and
I laid into my work and went a-booming down the river.
It did seem a powerful long time before Jim’s light showed up; and
when it did show it looked like it was a thousand mile off. By the
time I got there the sky was beginning to get a little gray in the east;
so we struck for an island, and hid the raft, and sunk the skiff, and
turned in and slept like dead people.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
78
application SDK tool:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) Document. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
B
y and by, when we got up, we turned over the truck the gang
had stole off of the wreck, and found boots, and blankets, and
clothes, and all sorts of other things, and a lot of books, and a spy-
glass, and three boxes of seegars. We hadn’t ever been this rich before
in neither of our lives. The seegars was prime.  We laid off all the
afternoon in the woods talking, and me reading the books, and hav-
ing a general good time.  I told Jim all about what happened inside
the wreck and at the ferryboat, and I said these kinds of things was
adventures; but he said he didn’t want no more adventures. He said
that when I went in the texas and he crawled back to get on the raft
and found her gone he nearly died, because he judged it was all up
with him anyway it could be fixed; for if he didn’t get saved he would
get drownded; and if he did get saved, whoever saved him would
send him back home so as to get the reward, and then Miss Watson
would sell him South, sure. Well, he was right; he was most always
right; he had an uncommon level head for a nigger.
I read considerable to Jim about kings and dukes and earls and
such, and how gaudy they dressed, and how much style they put on,
and called each other your majesty, and your grace, and your lord-
ship, and so on, ‘stead of mister; and Jim’s eyes bugged out, and he
was interested. He says:
“I didn’ know dey was so many un um. I hain’t hearn ‘bout none
un um, skasely, but ole King Sollermun, onless you counts dem kings
dat’s in a pack er k’yards. How much do a king git?”
“Get?” I says; “why, they get a thousand dollars a month if they
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
79
want it; they can have just as much as they want; everything belongs
to them.”
“Ain’ dat gay? En what dey got to do, Huck?”
“They don’t do nothing! Why, how you talk! They just set around.”
“No; is dat so?”
“Of course it is. They just set around—except, maybe, when there’s
a war; then they go to the war.  But other times they just lazy around;
or go hawking—just hawking and sp—Sh!—d’ you hear a noise?”
We skipped out and looked; but it warn’t nothing but the flutter of
a steamboat’s wheel away down, coming around the point; so we
come back.
“Yes,” says I, “and other times, when things is dull, they fuss with
the parlyment; and if everybody don’t go just so he whacks their
heads off. But mostly they hang round the harem.”
“Roun’ de which?”
“Harem.”
“What’s de harem?”
“The place where he keeps his wives. Don’t you know about the
harem? Solomon had one; he had about a million wives.”
“Why, yes, dat’s so; I—I’d done forgot it. A harem’s a bo’d’n-house,
I reck’n. Mos’ likely dey has rackety times in de nussery. En I reck’n
de wives quarrels considable; en dat ‘crease de racket. Yit dey say
Sollermun de wises’ man dat ever live’. I doan’ take no stock in dat.
Bekase why: would a wise man want to live in de mids’ er sich a
blim-blammin’ all de time? No—‘deed he wouldn’t. A wise man ‘ud
take en buil’ a biler-factry; en den he could shet down de biler-factry
when he want to res’.”
“Well, but he WAS the wisest man, anyway; because the widow she
told me so, her own self.”
“I doan k’yer what de widder say, he warn’t no wise man nuther.
He had some er de dad-fetchedes’ ways I ever see. Does you know
‘bout dat chile dat he ‘uz gwyne to chop in two?”
“Yes, the widow told me all about it.”
“Well, den! Warn’ dat de beatenes’ notion in de worl’? You jes’ take
en look at it a minute. Dah’s de stump, dah—dat’s one er de women;
heah’s you—dat’s de yuther one; I’s Sollermun; en dish yer dollar
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
80
bill’s de chile. Bofe un you claims it. What does I do? Does I shin
aroun’ mongs’ de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill do
b’long to, en han’ it over to de right one, all safe en soun’, de way dat
anybody dat had any gumption would? No; I take en whack de bill
in two, en give half un it to you, en de yuther half to de yuther
woman. Dat’s de way Sollermun was gwyne to do wid de chile. Now
I want to ast you: what’s de use er dat half a bill?—can’t buy noth’n
wid it. En what use is a half a chile? I wouldn’ give a dern for a mil-
lion un um.”
“But hang it, Jim, you’ve clean missed the point—blame it, you’ve
missed it a thousand mile.”
“Who? Me? Go ‘long. Doan’ talk to me ‘bout yo’ pints. I reck’n I
knows sense when I sees it; en dey ain’ no sense in sich doin’s as dat.
De ‘spute warn’t ‘bout a half a chile, de ‘spute was ‘bout a whole
chile; en de man dat think he kin settle a ‘spute ‘bout a whole chile
wid a half a chile doan’ know enough to come in out’n de rain. Doan’
talk to me ‘bout Sollermun, Huck, I knows him by de back.”
“But I tell you you don’t get the point.”
“Blame de point! I reck’n I knows what I knows.  En mine you,
de real pint is down furder—it’s down deeper. It lays in de way
Sollermun was raised.  You take a man dat’s got on’y one or two
chillen; is dat man gwyne to be waseful o’ chillen? No, he ain’t; he
can’t ‘ford it. He know how to value ‘em.  But you take a man dat’s
got ‘bout five million chillen runnin’ roun’ de house, en it’s dif-
funt. He as soon chop a chile in two as a cat. Dey’s plenty mo’. A
chile er two, mo’ er less, warn’t no consekens to Sollermun, dad
fatch him!”
I never see such a nigger. If he got a notion in his head once, there
warn’t no getting it out again. He was the most down on Solomon of
any nigger I ever see. So I went to talking about other kings, and let
Solomon slide. I told about Louis Sixteenth that got his head cut off
in France long time ago; and about his little boy the dolphin, that
would a been a king, but they took and shut him up in jail, and some
say he died there.
“Po’ little chap.”
“But some says he got out and got away, and come to America.”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
81
“Dat’s good! But he’ll be pooty lonesome—dey ain’ no kings here,
is dey, Huck?”
“No.”
“Den he cain’t git no situation. What he gwyne to do?”
“Well, I don’t know. Some of them gets on the police, and some of
them learns people how to talk French.”
“Why, Huck, doan’ de French people talk de same way we does?”
“No, Jim; you couldn’t understand a word they said—not a single
word.”
“Well, now, I be ding-busted! How do dat come?”
“I don’t know; but it’s so. I got some of their jabber out of a book.
S’pose a man was to come to you and say Polly-voo-franzy—what
would you think?”
“I wouldn’ think nuff’n; I’d take en bust him over de head—dat is,
if he warn’t white. I wouldn’t ‘low no nigger to call me dat.”
“Shucks, it ain’t calling you anything. It’s only saying, do you know
how to talk French?”
“Well, den, why couldn’t he say it?”
“Why, he is a-saying it. That’s a Frenchman’s way of saying it.”
“Well, it’s a blame ridicklous way, en I doan’ want to hear no mo’
‘bout it. Dey ain’ no sense in it.”
“Looky here, Jim; does a cat talk like we do?”
“No, a cat don’t.”
“Well, does a cow?”
“No, a cow don’t, nuther.”
“Does a cat talk like a cow, or a cow talk like a cat?”
“No, dey don’t.”
“It’s natural and right for ‘em to talk different from each other, ain’t it?”
“Course.”
“And ain’t it natural and right for a cat and a cow to talk different
from us?”
“Why, mos’ sholy it is.”
“Well, then, why ain’t it natural and right for a Frenchman to talk
different from us? You answer me that.”
“Is a cat a man, Huck?”
“No.”
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
82
“Well, den, dey ain’t no sense in a cat talkin’ like a man. Is a cow a
man?—er is a cow a cat?”
“No, she ain’t either of them.”
“Well, den, she ain’t got no business to talk like either one er the
yuther of ‘em. Is a Frenchman a man?”
“Yes.”
“Well, den! Dad blame it, why doan’ he talk like a man? You answer
me dat!”
I see it warn’t no use wasting words—you can’t learn a nigger to
argue. So I quit.
H
U
C
K
L
E
B
E
R
R
Y
F
I
N
N
83
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested