Memory for serial order 101
Silver, M. R., Grossberg, S., Bullock, D., Histed, M. H., & Miller (2012). A neural model
of sequential movement planning and control of eye movements: Item-order-rank
working memory and saccade selection by the supplementary eye elds. Neural
Networks, 26, 29-58. doi:10.1016/j.neunet.2011.10.004
Smith, E. E., & Jonides, J. (1997). Working memory: A view from neuroimaging.
Cognitive Psychology, 33, 5-42. doi:10.1006/cogp.1997.0658
Smith, E. E., Jonides, J., & Koeppe, R. A. (1996). Dissociating verbal and spatial
working memory using PET. Cerebral Cortex, 6, 11-20. doi:10.1093/cercor/6.1.11
Smyth, M. M. (1996). Interference with rehearsal in spatial working memory in the
absence of eye movements. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 40A,
940-949. doi:10.1080/027249896392379
Smyth, M. M., Hay, D. C., Hitch, G. J., & Horton, N. J. (2005). Serial position memory
in the visual-spatial domain: Reconstructing sequences of unfamiliar faces. Quarterly
Journal of Experimental Psychology, 58, 909-930. doi:10.1080/02724980443000412
Smyth, M. M., Pearson N. A., & Pendleton, L. R. (1988). Movement and working
memory: Patterns and positions in space. Quarterly Journal of Experimental
Psychology, 40A, 497-514. doi:10.1080/02724988843000041
Smyth, M. M., & Scholey, K. A. (1994). Interference in spatial immediate memory.
Memory & Cognition, 22, 1-13. doi:10.3758/BF03202756
Smyth, M. M., & Scholey, K. A. (1996). Serial order in spatial immediate memory.
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 49, 159-177.
doi:10.1080/027249896392847
Solway, A., Murdock, B. B., & Kahana, M. J. (2012). Positional and temporal clustering
in serial order memory. Memory & Cognition, 40, 177-190.
doi:10.3758/s13421-011-0142-8
Sternberg, S., Monsell, S, Knoll, R. L., & Wright, C. E. (1978). The latency and duration
Table from pdf to powerpoint - software SDK project:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Table from pdf to powerpoint - software SDK project:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Memory for serial order 102
of rapid movement sequences: Comparisons of speech and typing. In G. E. Stelmach
(Ed.), Information Processing in Motor Control and Learning (pp. 117-152). New
York: Academic Press.
Surprenant, A. M., Kelley, M. R., Farley, L. A., & Neath, I. (2005). Fill-in and inll
errors in order memory. Memory, 13, 267-273. doi:10.1080/09658210344000396
Tan, L., & Ward, G. (2000). A recency-based account of primacy eects in free recall.
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 26,
1589-1625. doi:10.1037//0278-7393.26.6.1589
Thomas, J. G., Milner, H. R., & Haberlandt, K. F. (2003). Forward and backward recall:
Dierent response time patterns, same retrieval order. Psychological Science, 14,
169-174. doi:10.1111/1467-9280.01437
Towse, J. N., Hitch, G. J., Horton, N., & Harvey, K. (2010). Synergies between
processing and memory in children’s reading span. Developmental Science, 13,
779-789. doi:10.1111/j.1467-7687.2009.00929.x
Treiman, R., & Danis, C. (1988). Short-term memory errors for spoken syllables are
aected by the linguistic structure of the syllables. Journal of Experimental
Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 14, 145-152.
doi:10.1037//0278-7393.14.1.145
Tremblay, S., Guerard, K., Parmentier, F. B. R., Nicholls, A. P., & Jones, D. M. (2006).
Aspatial modality eect in serial memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology:
Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 32, 1208-1215. doi:10.1037/0278-7393.32.5.1208
Tresch, M. C., Sinnamon, H. M., & Seamon, J. G. (1993). Double dissociation of spatial
and object visual memory: Evidence from selective interference in intact human
subjects. Neuropsychologia, 31, 211-219. doi:10.1016/0028-3932(93)90085-E
Tulving, E. (1962). Subjective organization in free recall of "unrelated" words.
Psychological Review, 69, 344-354. doi:10.1037/h0043150
software SDK project:C# Word - Table Processing in C#.NET
C# Word - Table Processing in C#.NET. Provide C# Users with Variety of Methods to Setup and Modify Table in Word Document. Overview. Create Table in Word.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# Word - Table Row Processing in C#.NET
C# Word - Table Row Processing in C#.NET. How to Set and Modify Table Rows in Word Document with C#.NET Solutions. Overview. Create and Add Rows in Table.
www.rasteredge.com
Memory for serial order 103
Turner, M. L., & Engle, R. W. (1989). Is working memory capacity task dependent?
Journal of Memory and Language, 28, 127-154. doi:10.1016/0749-596X(89)90040-5
Vallar, G., & Baddeley, A. D. (1984). Fractionation of working memory:
Neuropsychological evidence for a phonological short-term store. Journal of Verbal
Learning and Verbal Behavior, 23, 151-161. doi:10.1016/S0022-5371(84)90104-X
Vergauwe, E., Barrouillet, P., & Camos, V. (2009). Visual and spatial working memory
are not dissociated after all: A Time-Based Resource-Sharing account. Journal of
Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 35, 1012-1028.
doi:10.1037/a0015859
Vousden, J. I., & Brown, G. D. A. (1998). To repeat or not to repeat: The time course of
response suppression in sequential behaviour. In J. A. Bullinaria, D. W. Glasspool, &
G. Houghton (Eds.), Proceedings of the fourth neural computation and psychology
workshop: Connectionist representations (pp. 301-315). London: Springer Verlag.
Ward, N. (1994). A connectionist language generator. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing.
Ward, G., Avons, S. E., & Melling, L. (2005). Serial position curves in short-term
memory: Functional equivalence across modalities. Memory, 13, 308-317.
doi:10.1080/09658210344000279
Ward, G., Tan, L., & Grenfell-Essam, R. (2010). Examining the relationship between free
recall and immediate serial recall: The eect of list length and output order. Journal
of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 36, 1207-1241.
doi:10.1037/a0020122
Wickelgren, W. A. (1965a). Acoustic similarity and retroactive interference in short-term
memory. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 4, 53-61.
doi:10.1016/S0022-5371(65)80067-6
Wickelgren, W. A. (1965b). Short-term memory for phonemically similar lists. American
Journal of Psychology, 78, 567-574. doi:10.2307/1420917
software SDK project:C# Word - Table Cell Processing in C#.NET
C# Word - Table Cell Processing in C#.NET. Online Tutorial for Users to Set and Modify Table Cells in Word Document. Overview. Create and Add Cells in Table.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff
www.rasteredge.com
Memory for serial order 104
Author Note
This paper is based on part of the rst author’s doctoral dissertation completed at
the University of York, England, which was supported by a research studentship from the
Economic and Social Research Council of the United Kingdom. The rst author is now
based at the University of Western Australia.
The authors wish to acknowledge informative discussions with colleagues including
Neil Burgess, Gordon Brown, Simon Farrell, Tom Hartley, and Stephan Lewandowsky.
The authors thank Geo Ward and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments
during review. Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Mark
Hurlstone, School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. 6009,
Australia. Email: mark.hurlstone@uwa.edu.au. URL: http://www.cogsciwa.com
software SDK project:C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
Create and Add Table to Footer & Header. The following demo code shows how to create table in footer and header. String docFilePath
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
Rapidly load, create, and edit Word document (pages) in C# class library. Able to render and convert Word document to/from supported document (PDF and ODT).
www.rasteredge.com
Memory for serial order 105
Footnotes
1
It is well-known that the magnitude of the recency eect associated with the
forward recall of verbal sequences is stronger when the presentation modality of items is
auditory than when it is visual (Conrad & Hull, 1968; Crowder & Morton, 1969; Penney,
1989)|a result dubbed the modality eect. The modality eect is not conned to the use
of verbal memoranda: Tremblay et al. (2006) have shown that the recency eect
associated with the forward recall of sequences of auditory-spatial locations is stronger
than for sequences of visual-spatial locations.
We do not consider the modality eect here as it arguably falls outside the scope of
the current article, our view being that it seems most likely to re ect the action of a
modality-specic input store (e.g., Crowder & Morton, 1969) a line of reasoning that has
proved popular in modeling the modality eect in some contemporary computational
theories of short-term memory for serial order (e.g., Grossberg & Pearson, 2008; Page &
Norris, 1998; although see Henson, 1998a for an account of the modality eect based on
the superior coding of positional information in the auditory modality). Note, however,
that the features of memory for serial order described in this article are generally common
to both the auditory and visual modalities.
2
When the forward and backward serial recall of verbal stimuli are compared using a
memory span procedure, backward recall is typically harder than forward recall (e.g.,
Gardner, 1981). However, when the sequence length is xed|as in the studies of
backward recall cited here|the typical nding is that overall levels of recall accuracy for
forward and backward recall do not dier reliably from one another (although see Farrand
&Jones, 1996, Experiments 2 and 3, for exceptions).
3
Recently, Solway, Kahana, and Murdock (2012) have reported an analysis of four
serial recall data sets in which the converse pattern was found, whereby inll errors
actually outweighed ll-in errors. However, the experiments upon which these new
software SDK project:C# Word - Document Processing in C#.NET
0); //Save the document doc0.Save(@""). Create, Add, Delete or Modify Paragraph and Table in Word Document. If you want to create
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
Create Word Document from Existing Files Using C#. Create Word From PDF. Create Word From PowerPoint. Create Word From Open Office Files. Table Processing.
www.rasteredge.com
Memory for serial order 106
analyses are based are not representative of the serial recall task as it is typically
conducted. Specically, the experiments examined by Solway and colleagues employed a
long sequence length of 19-items and the recall protocols emphasized that participants
need only report items in their correct relative order of presentation. This contrasts with
typical studies of serial recall which employ a much shorter sequence length of around
6-items (with 9-items considered as the upper-bound) where the recall protocols
emphasize that participants must recall items in their correct absolute serial position of
presentation. In response to the analyses of Solway et al. (2012), Farrell et al. (2013) have
recently performed an analysis of sequential error dependencies in 21 representative
published serial recall experiments. The results of this new analysis are unambiguous:
Fill-in errors consistently outweigh inll errors, consistent with the original analyses of
these errors (Henson, 1996; Page & Norris, 1998; Surprenant et al., 2005) and at odds
with the new analyses presented by Solway et al. (2012).
4
This context cue is similar to that employed in models that use position marking to
represent serial order (e.g., Burgess and Hitch, 1999). The key dierence is that in
positional models, each item in the sequence is associated with its own context cue and
during recall these context cues must each be reinstated, in turn, to produce a dynamically
changing activation gradient over items. By contrast, in the primacy model, the single
context cue is sucient to retrieve the primacy gradient of activations after which ordered
recall can proceed without the need to reinstate any additional context cues.
5
Note that the predictions displayed in Figure 8 are not taken directly from Farrell
and Lewandowsky (Farrell & Lewandowsky, 2004; Lewandowsky & Farrell, 2008a) but
were instead generated by implementing the dynamic recall architecture and models
employed by these authors. The predictions shown in this gure are comparable to those
illustrated in Figures 2 and 3 of Farrell and Lewandowsky (2004) and Figure 1 of
Lewandowsky and Farrell (2008a) but note that the dierent predictions were not
software SDK project:C# Word - Footnote & Endnote Processing in C#.NET
Create or Add Table in Footnote & Endnote. The following demo code shows how to create table in the footnote. String docFilePath
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# Word - Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET
Word: Convert Word to PDF. C# Word - Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for Converting Word to PDF (.pdf) Document. Word to PDF Conversion Overview
www.rasteredge.com
Memory for serial order 107
necessarily generated using all the same model parameter values.
6
One exception to this rule is the LIST PARSE model of Grossberg and Pearson
(2008), mentioned above, which provides a neurocomputational instantiation of the brain
substrates of verbal and spatial short-term memory. However, it is important to
acknowledge that Grossberg and Pearson did not apply their model to any human data on
spatial short-term memory, but instead restricted application of their model to data
obtained from verbal short-term memory studies. Moreover, there is currently insucient
empirical evidence available to determine whether the model’s core principles of a primacy
gradient complemented by response suppression are sucient to account for memory for
serial order in the visuospatial domain or whether further theoretical constructs will be
necessary.
Memory for serial order 108
Table 1
Phenomena of serial order and the short-term memory (STM) domains in which they have
been demonstrated. See main text for further details. Note: SPC = Serial Position Curve.
STM domain
Phenomenon
Verbal Spatial Visual
1. Forward SPC
Accuracy
Primacy
3
3
3
Recency
3
3
3
Latency
Long initial latency
3
3
?
Inverted U shape
3
3
?
2. Backward SPC
Accuracy
Reduced primacy
3
3
?
Enhanced recency
3
3
?
Latency
Long initial latency
3
?
?
Inverted U shape
3
?
?
Slower than forward recall
3
?
?
3. Sequence length eect
3
3
3
4. Error patterns
Transposition gradients
3
3
3
Transposition latencies
3
?
?
Memory for serial order 109
Table 1
(Continued)
STM domain
Phenomenon
Verbal Spatial Visual
Fill-in: inll ratio
3
3
?
Intrusions
3
3
3
Protrusions
3
?
?
Omissions
3
3
?
Repetitions
3
?
?
More order than item errors
3
3
3
5. Temporal grouping eects
Grouping advantage
3
3
?
Accuracy SPC
3
3
?
Interpositions
3
7
?
Latency SPC
3
3
?
6. Item similarity eects
Pure sequences
3
3
3
Mixed sequences
3
?
?
7. Ranschburg eect
3
?
?
8. Hebb repetition eect
Basic eect
3
3
3
Sensitive to sequence start
3
?
?
Sensitive to grouping pattern
3
?
?
Insensitive to item similarity
3
?
?
Memory for serial order 110
Table2
Contemporarymodelsofverbalshort-termmemoryandtheprinciplesofserialorderandancillaryassumptionstheyinstantiate.
SerialOrderPrinciples
Model
Competitive
Position
Primacy
Response
Cumulative
Queuing
Marking
Gradient
Suppression
Matching
SRN(Botvinick&Plaut,2006)
3
7
7
7
7
SIMPLE(Brownetal.,2007)
7
3
7
7
7
OSCAR(Brownetal.,2000)
3
3
3
3
7
Burgess&Hitch(1992)
3
3
7
3
7
Burgess&Hitch(1999)
3
3
3
3
7
Burgess&Hitch(2006)
3
3
3
3
3
Farrell(2012)
3
3
3
3
7
SEM(Henson,1998a)
3
3
3
3
7
SOB(Farrell&Lewandowsky,2002)
7
7
3
3
7
C-SOB(Lewandowsky&Farrell,2008a)
7
3
3
3
7
LISTPARSE(Grossberg&Pearson,2008)
3
7
3
3
7
Featuremodel(Nairne,1990;Neath,2000)
7
3
7
3
7
Primacymodel(Page&Norris,1998)
3
7
3
3
7
Primacymodel(Page&Norris,2009)
3
7
3
3
3
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested