Hybrid Cars IQP 
 
 
 
 
A Study on Hybrid Cars:  
Environmental Effects and Consumer Habits 
 
An Interactive Qualifying Project to be submitted to the faculty of Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 
 
Submitted By: 
Michael Beliveau 
James Rehberger 
Jonathan Rowell 
Alyssa Xarras 
 
Submitted to: 
 
Project Advisor: 
 
 
Prof. Chickery Kasouf 
 
Submitted: 28 April 2010
 
 
 
Pdf to ppt - control SDK system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to ppt - control SDK system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Hybrid Cars IQP 
 
Table of Contents 
List of Figures ................................................................................................................................................ 4 
Abstract ......................................................................................................................................................... 5 
Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................................... 6 
Chapter 1. 
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 9 
Chapter 2. 
Literature Review ................................................................................................................ 12 
2.1 Environmental Effects ....................................................................................................................... 12 
2.2 Emissions ........................................................................................................................................... 14 
2.3 Production of Cars ............................................................................................................................. 16 
2.3.1 Production Emissions ................................................................................................................. 16 
2.3.2 Production Energy Consumption ............................................................................................... 20 
2.3.3 
Raw Materials and Recycling .............................................................................................. 23 
2.4 Consumer Behavior and Marketing Strategy .................................................................................... 24 
2.5 Widespread change to hybrid/electric instead of gasoline/diesel ................................................... 34 
2.6 Conclusion ......................................................................................................................................... 34 
Chapter 3. 
Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 36 
3.1 Quantitative Data Analysis ................................................................................................................ 36 
3.1.1 
Energy Consumption Calculations ...................................................................................... 36 
3.1.2 
Breakeven Calculations ....................................................................................................... 37 
3.2 Consumer Attitudes and Selling ........................................................................................................ 38 
3.2.1 Interview with a Car Salesperson ............................................................................................... 39 
3.3 Focus Groups ..................................................................................................................................... 40 
3.3.1 People who bought a hybrid in the past year. ........................................................................... 41 
3.3.2 People who bought a new car (non‐hybrid) in the past year. ................................................... 41 
Chapter 4. 
Findings ............................................................................................................................... 43 
4.1 Emissions and Efficiency ................................................................................................................... 43 
4.1.1 Energy Consumption for Manufacturing Vehicles ..................................................................... 43 
4.1.2 CO
2
 Emissions Resulting Manufacturing Vehicles ...................................................................... 44 
4.4.3 Break Even Points....................................................................................................................... 45 
4.2 Public’s View on Purchasing Vehicles ................................................................................................... 48 
4.3 Sales Approach: ................................................................................................................................. 52 
4.4 Incentives .......................................................................................................................................... 53 
control SDK system:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Creating a PDF from PPTX/PPT has never been so easy! Web Security. Your PDF and PPTX/PPT files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
Hybrid Cars IQP 
 
4.5 Feasibility of Mass Conversion .......................................................................................................... 54 
Chapter 5. 
Conclusions ......................................................................................................................... 56 
Appendix A: Focus Group Transcript .......................................................................................................... 59 
Bibliography: ............................................................................................................................................... 85 
 
 
 
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document. Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint in C# Program.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. How to C#: Convert PPT to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Hybrid Cars IQP 
 
List of Figures 
Figure 1: Transportation Air Quality: Selected Facts and Figures 2002. ..................................................... 15 
Figure 2: CO
2
 Emissions (kgC) Resulting from the Production of Automobile Components from Virgin 
Materials for all vehicles considered in this study, by material.................................................................. 18 
Figure 3: CO2 Emissions (kgC) Resulting from the Production of Automobile Components from 
Secondary Materials for all vehicles considered in this study, by material. ............................................... 19 
Figure 4: Energy Use in Vehicle Production (in MJ per kg of material). ..................................................... 20 
Figure 5: Vehicle Mass (in kg) by Material for all Vehicles Considered in This Study. ................................ 22 
Figure 6: Top Fourteen Reasons People Buy Hybrids. Source: Road and Travel Magazine, June 24, 2009.
 .................................................................................................................................................................... 25 
Figure 7: Federal Tax Credits for Hybrids .................................................................................................... 32 
Figure 8: Calculation Spreadsheet for Energy Consumption ...................................................................... 37 
Figure 9: Breakeven Point Equation ............................................................................................................ 38 
Figure 10: Energy Consumption for Manufacturing Vehicles ..................................................................... 44 
Figure 11: CO
2
 Emissions Resulting Manufacturing Vehicles ...................................................................... 45 
Figure 12: Break even Point for the 2010 Ford Fusion ............................................................................... 46 
Figure 13: Break even Point for the 2010 Ford Escape ............................................................................... 47 
Figure 14: Break even Point for the Toyota Highlander ............................................................................. 48 
 
 
 
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. Learn How to Change Load your PPT (.pptx) document. PPTXDocument doc = new PPTXDocument
www.rasteredge.com
Hybrid Cars IQP 
 
Abstract 
 
This paper focused on hybrid vehicle technology and its integration into society.  The 
encompassing issue answered in this project was whether hybrids meet the expectations for 
environmental benefits suggested by many people.  Research was done is the areas of types of 
hybrids, consumer trends, and the future of hybrid technology.  Hybrid production and 
efficiency data were analyzed to examine the technical aspects of the technology.  A focus 
group of people who recently bought cars, both hybrids and non‐hybrids, revealed what 
consumers look for in their cars.  Analysis of the needs of hybrid technology helped determine 
how feasible widespread change to hybrids would be in future.  With all information taken into 
account, we concluded that hybrids have several drawbacks that offset their fuel efficiency.   
Their higher price both turns consumers away and makes the vehicles a less attractive 
economic investment.  Energy efficient processing techniques need to be developed before the 
advanced materials in hybrids can help add to their clean image.  Widespread change to 
advanced hybrid technologies is not a feasible option in the near future because of both cost 
and the limited amount of hybrids on the road today.  Overall, hybrid technology has a lot of 
potential in the distant future, but as for right now they are not a significant improvement over 
today’s internal combustion engine. 
 
 
 
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET PowerPoint - Render PPT to PDF in VB.NET. What VB.NET demo code can I use for fast PPT (.pptx) to PDF conversion in .NET class application?
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
www.rasteredge.com
Hybrid Cars IQP 
 
Executive Summary 
 
This Interactive Qualifying Project focused on the ever advancing hybrid vehicle 
technology and its integration into society.  Society has been making a large effort to make 
everything green and cleaner in today’s world, including transportation.  Advertisements have 
led people to believe that hybrid cars pollute less, will save money and reduce dependence on 
natural fuel sources.  The encompassing question answered in this paper was; do hybrids live 
up to expectations that society has suggested of them in the past decade?   
The push to develop green technologies stems from the fact that the earth’s 
atmosphere is rapidly changing.  This change is largely due to human activity; industry, 
transportation, waste, and everyday living.  Everyday large amounts of pollutants are released 
into the atmosphere leading the greenhouse effect and global warming.  This global warming 
can cause major issues such as the melting of polar ice caps and a rise in sea level, which in turn 
would cause intense flooding in most if not all coastline areas, giving cause to other disasters 
such as mass erosions, mud slides, outbreaks of disease to more humid climates, coastal 
reformation, and other disasters. Given enough time, a steady increase of these gasses would 
also change the length and intensity of the seasons, create droughts, and increase the 
frequency and impact of large storms.  Conjoined efforts are being made by countries to 
understand this growing dilemma, and scientists are trying to theorize ways to slow its effects. 
Industry plays a large role in the amount of emissions that are released into the 
atmosphere.  Every vehicle manufactured produces emissions, both while being made and 
while driving on the road.  These emissions include nitrogen gas (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), 
water vapor (H2O), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons or volatile organic compounds 
(VOCs), and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, together called NOx).
1
  Regulations have been placed 
on industries to try and reduce the amount of pollutants released into the atmosphere, but 
further steps need to be taken.  Energy consumption by industries, in the manufacturing of 
products, also leads to pollutants.  Whether oil, coal, nuclear, or even water or wind power is 
used to create energy, harmful by‐products are still produced.   
                                                           
 
1
 Randy 2009 
Hybrid Cars IQP 
 
People buy new cars for a variety of reasons, sometimes out of necessity, sometimes for 
vanity, and sometimes for fun.  Buying a car is a big investment and requires the consideration 
of many different variables.  People look into price, performance, safety, and reliability when 
searching for a new car.  With the growing interest in saving our planet, many companies have 
created hybrid cars and the government is developing incentive programs.  These factors have 
enticed many people to consider buying these vehicles. 
With many types of hybrid technology available there is much interest in widespread 
conversion to hybrid transportation.  With such a massive world population and high 
dependency on transportation, a significant switch to hybrids from gasoline and diesel vehicles 
must be met before any changes can be seen.  This could mean converting all of our gas 
stations; possibly to electric plug in stations or hydrogen fill up stations.  A widespread change 
to hybrids requires an extended period of time and also may not be cost effective.  Many of the 
outcomes are not worth all that goes into getting the advanced technology on the road.
  
 
After extensive research we decided to focus on car production, efficiency, what things 
people take into consideration when buying a car, and what current purchasing trends are.  To 
do this we analyzed emissions, energy and material data allowing us to compare energy 
consumption values, emission levels, and vehicle efficiency.  This data was then graphed to 
draw conclusions.  Focus groups were organized, for both people that bought hybrids and non‐
hybrids, to gather consumer purchasing information.  An interview was conducted with a local 
car dealership owner to discuss hybrid marketing strategies. 
The data suggested that the production of hybrids consumes more energy and releases 
more emissions than the production of conventional cars.  This is mostly because of the 
advanced materials that are required in hybrids.  It was also determined that hybrids are not a 
great investment for the consumer.  For a hybrid to break even with the higher price a 
consumer will have to drive primarily in the city and for more miles than the average person 
keeps a car for. 
Focus group participants indicated that there are a variety of different reasons for 
individuals to purchase new vehicles.  The most prominent deciding factors were related to 
lifestyle; having to do with family necessities, daily commute, different personal activities, or 
Hybrid Cars IQP 
 
weather conditions.  Another major deciding factor for purchasing a new vehicle was 
affordability.  The interview with the local car dealer verified that their currently is not much of 
a market for hybrid vehicles 
We made several conclusions about hybrid vehicles.  We found that hybrid vehicles 
create much more emission in their production, before even being driven, in some cases 
consuming up to four times the energy.  Although hybrid cars typically achieve better gas 
mileage, they are initially much more expensive than conventional vehicles.  If the increased 
initial cost of a hybrid is too much, the investment will be very hard to break even with.  Hybrids 
must be driven to high mileages in certain conditions to really be worth paying for; these 
mileages are often many times higher than the average mileage that a consumer keeps their car 
for.  In our focus group of non hybrid vehicles, the additional investment of a hybrid car was 
often a deciding factor against purchasing a hybrid vehicle.  Others in the non‐hybrid focus 
group were unable to find hybrid vehicles that fit the requirements that were necessary to 
accommodate their lifestyles.  Those that purchased hybrid vehicles were often doing so as a 
statement about their concern and efforts to saving the environment.  Industry needs to find 
cleaner and more efficient way of producing lightweight materials such as aluminum and 
carbon fiber, which is used in the car bodies.  More effective and increased levels of recycling 
would lead to much lower energy consumption and would add to the clean image of hybrids.  
Hybrid vehicles need to be utilized in situations that will benefit the most from them, such as 
public transportation.  It can also be concluded that widespread implementation of hybrid 
technology is not feasible at this time.  The production of equally efficient hybrid vehicles is not 
great enough to compete with non‐hybrids, both economically and numerically.   
 
 
 
Hybrid Cars IQP 
 
Chapter 1.
Introduction 
As modern culture and technology continue to develop, the growing presence of global 
warming and irreversible climate change draws increasing amounts of concern from the world’s 
population. Earth’s climate is beginning to transform, proven by the frequent severe storms, 
the drastic shrinking of polar ice caps and mountain glaciers, the increased amount of flooding 
in coastal areas, and longer droughts in arid sections of the world.  There are large holes in the 
ozone layer of the earth’s atmosphere and smog levels are ever increasing, leading to 
decreased air quality
2
. It is true that natural causes such as geothermal vents and volcanic 
hotspots are part of the global warming problem but many of the issues are still a result of the 
massive quantities of greenhouse gasses that the world’s population has produced in the past 
few centuries.  It has only been within the past few decades that modern society has actually 
taken notice of these changes and decided that something needs to change if the global 
warming process is to be stopped, or even slowed at this point in time. Countries around the 
world are working to drastically reduce CO
2
 emissions as well as other harmful environmental 
pollutants. Everything from cars and industries to livestock and crops are being studied and 
regulated with plans of minimizing pollution levels. 
Amongst the most notable producers of these pollutants are automobiles, which are 
almost exclusively powered by internal combustion engines and spew out unhealthy emissions.  
Cars and trucks are responsible for almost 25% of CO
2
 emission, and other major transportation 
methods account for another 12%.
3
  With a global population in excess of six billion, and over 
50% of whom live in urban areas and rely on transportation to contribute to society. In the 
opinion of many, cars are a large contributor to urban pollutions levels and, in the bigger 
picture, global warming.  With immense quantities of cars on the road today, pure combustion 
engines are quickly becoming a target of global warming blame.   Internal combustion engines 
account for a lot of the pollution problems, but the issue still stands as to what system will drive 
the next wave of automotive vehicles. 
One potential alternative to the world’s dependence on standard combustion engine 
vehicles are hybrid cars. Hybrids, like their name suggests, are vehicles that utilize multiple 
                                                           
 
2
Shanklin 2009 
3
 Hopwood et al. 2009 
Hybrid Cars IQP 
10 
 
forms of fuel to power their engines. In the majority of modern hybrids, cars are powered by a 
combination of traditional gasoline power and the addition of an electric motor.  In this sort of 
hybrid engine, the combustion engine is used at high speeds for long distances, such as the 
highway, and the electric engine at low speeds and short distances, such as in urban areas. By 
incorporating alternative energy drive‐trains into vehicles that also use combustion engines, 
they allow for a slightly cleaner mode of transportation. Hybrids however, do still use the 
petroleum based engine while driving so they are not completely clean, just cleaner than 
petroleum only cars. This enables hybrid cars to have the potential to segue into new 
technologies that rely strictly on alternate fuel sources. 
Just as combustion engines are still being improved, alternate fuel based technologies 
are making advancements as well. Automotive companies are currently in production of strictly 
electric cars along with many more designs that are still in the prototype stages. Alternative 
fuels, such as hydrogen, natural gas, and bio diesel are extensively studied and explored in 
hopes of widespread future implementation into society. However, many of these alternative 
fuels will require far too many resources for the world’s population to fully convert to within 
the near future, if at all.  Fuel cells would require a complete reinvention of the automobile, not 
to mention the nation's gas stations, and the technology to put them on the road is still a long 
way from fruition.
4
  As is the case with many alternative fuel sources, a great amount of time 
and money would have to be spent to change the current gas stations so that they are 
alternative fuel compatible. 
The introduction of hybrid technology in the past decade was the first step towards 
turning the world’s population into a more fuel efficient and emissions conscious society. There 
are different claims, however, as to how helpful hybrids actually are in the race to save the 
environment, with projections ranging from significantly to marginally.  Some sources say 
hybrid cars cause significantly less damage to the environment than the current standard 
combustion engine drive‐train, while others argue that if one looks at growth projections for oil 
consumption, hybrids will slow the growth rate of oil imports only marginally, at best, with the 
                                                           
 
4
 Hakim 2005 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested