11
services provided by 
I
2
Cnet 
in a host 
I
2
C
server and submit server-specific or network-
transparent queries.
For  advanced  user  interaction  with I
2
Cnet, several optional add-ons can be
considered as part of the I
2
C client architecture: the description editor, a service
broker, and a client side persistent store. The user may use the description editor to
enhance  the  appearance  of  the  query  image,  analyze  its  features,  and  create  its
description based on guidelines provided by the home pages of description types (on-
line manual). An additional functionality which could be considered, is that of creating
synthetic images, using shape and texture catalogs, as well  as other tools  of the
description  editor,  and  submitting  them  as  an  enhanced  query  by  sketch.  A
personalized service broker helps the user to maintain query pages which are tailored
to his (her) preferences. The client side persistent store is used by the description
editor to store information on algorithms, and texture and shape collections, and by the
service broker to maintain profile information.
3.2.3  I
2
C Service Broker
The administration of I
2
Cnet requires the maintenance of a service profile for each
I
2
C server. This profile includes loosely consistent information on  I
2
C service
availability: e.g. image classes, processing algorithms, and description types. The image
class hierarchy provides a common frame of reference for 
I
2
C
services provided by
different servers. The main component of the image class hierarchy is present on all
servers hosting default image classes, processing algorithms, and description types.
Additional  image  classes,  description  types,  and  processing  algorithms  may  be
developed locally and be  exported as I
2
C services. This results in a dynamically
evolving and to some degree heterogeneous environment.
In this environment, I
2
C service brokers maintain loose consistency and provide
network-transparency. The I
2
C service broker activates agents to actively explore the
network, collecting information on the available servers and services. These agents
query I
2
C servers for updates in the set of available services, statistics of use, and user
feedback on provided services. Specifically, the service broker maintains a directory of
available  services  throughout I
2
Cnet server  profiles which reflect overall server
performance, user profiles which reflect user preferences and information on the client
platform, and service profiles which reflect availability and quality of particular I
2
C
services.
In  the  case  of  network-transparent  services,  the  user  specifies  the  requested
service (what), and the broker employs profile information to resolve the query (how).
Stored profiles on servers, users, and services are used to select the most appropriate
set of servers and description types, and translate the network-transparent query into a
server-specific one. To improve the overall quality of the provided services, the user is
prompted to provide feedback on the quality of the services provided. This information
is taken into account in the profiles maintained by the service broker and affects its
future behavior with respect to the way network-transparent queries are resolved.
To update profile information, I
2
C brokers activate software agents. Software
agents are programs capable of autonomous goal-oriented behavior in a heterogeneous
computing environment [12]. They are currently used to actively gather and supply
various types of information available on the Internet [13,14].
How to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation - Library SDK class:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation - Library SDK class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
12
3.3  User Interface Issues
The user interface of an 
I
2
C
client is a typical Web browser like Mosaic, Netscape,
etc. The user submits content-based queries by interacting with web pages (effectively
filling HTML forms), and then browses the retrieved images.
Each description type supports a set of query types which correspond to web
pages. We expect that the same web page will be compatible with multiple description
types. These pages may be of arbitrary complexity, containing HTML forms with
embedded script language and/or applets. For example, an advanced description type
may allow the specification of a query in natural language. Currently, such advanced
query forms require the communication of appropriate tools (e.g. voice recorder) with
the browser. Since the whole purpose of WWW is to provide uniform access to
heterogeneous sources of information, the only viable solution is to extend editing
tools in a way that allows the transfer of data to and from the Web browser.
Currently, the description editor of I
2
C is being modified to enable its cooperation
with public domain Web browsers. Thus, a user formulating a service request to I
2
Cnet
will be able to drag and drop an image, a sketch, or even a voice recording into an
HTML form. Furthermore, the same interface will enable those I
2
C clients which are
connected  to  the  health  care  network  to  interoperate  with  dedicated  medical
information systems. For example, a doctor confronting a difficult case may look up
images similar to the images in an electronic patient record by dragging them into his
(her) favorite query page.
3.4  Communication among I
2
C servers
When the user wishes to interact with I
2
Cnet for the purpose of requesting an I
2
C
service, a connection is opened to a web server, local to the host I
2
C server of the
query.  Then,  the  web  server forwards  the  service  request  to  the  communication
module of the host server. The communication module is responsible for decomposing
the request, sending the subqueries to the communication modules of the I
2
C servers
involved, maintaining the state of the query, receiving for the results, and composing
the response to the user.
Communication among I
2
C servers is implemented through a message passing
library based on ONC  RPC [15]. Distributed  object  management approaches like
CORBA [16], which provide a much higher level of abstraction, encapsulation, and
flexibility through an interface language are investigated as the means of integrating
I
2
Cnet with the health care network. However, CORBA  introduces additional
overhead in the communication among I
2
C servers which share the same interface
without necessarily supporting the same services, which may be difficult to justify.
3.5  Query Language
The query types supported by 
I
2
C
will also be available in 
I
2
Cnet
, in the HTML
framework. As far as specialized query types are concerned, it is the responsibility of
the I
2
C server that offers the corresponding query services, to make the appropriate
web pages available. However, beyond these primitive query types, service requests
that identify servers and services require the specification and development  of an
embedded query  language. Thus,  complex requests entailing  multiple  servers  and
description types can be expressed through logic operators and map functions.
Library SDK class:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide large amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
Please refer to following API to create and define a new blank PowerPoint document with a user-defined presentation slides count.
www.rasteredge.com
13
A query response set consists of the images retrieved by description types at
particular I
2
C servers. The user may follow an image link to view image related data in
the health care network. In addition, each query response is labeled as to the I
2
C server
and description type that produced it. The user is prompted to rate the relevance and
overall quality of the specific response. User feedback is recorded in the service record
and affects the  translation  of network-transparent  queries.  This permits I
2
Cnet to
evolve intelligently,  since  fast  servers  with  rich  data  description  repositories  and
accurate description types are likely to be used more frequently in network-transparent
queries, while slow servers with unreliable description types become obsolete.
3.6  Discussion
In a regional health care network with multiple heterogeneous medical information
systems, important issues are those of portability, security [17,18], and interoperability.
The separation of the I
2
C client (user interface) from the I
2
C server has reduced
portability problems to a great extent. I
2
C was bound to XWindows and the SunOs
operating system. The WWW interface of the I
2
C client has made the portability of a
client a much easier task, by disengaging the implementation platform of the user
interface from that of the database engine.
Within a hospital PACS environment authorized users may access a patient record
without violating security aspects. Thus, the use of 
I
2
Cnet 
as a clinical support tool,
provides authorized  users with  the  capability to  access  patient  records  linked  to
retrieved images. In remote accesses, without proper user authorization, the approach
taken in I
2
Cnet is that of anonymity [19]. A user lacking authorization to access certain
databases of patient records may still retrieve certain segments of a patient's record
without knowing who that patient is.
The interoperability of I
2
Cnet and the health care network, effectively introducing
content-based similarity retrieval as an added value service, will be achieved through
the  use  of  the  Patient  Meta-Record  (PMR)  which  integrates  all  patient  related
information  in  the  regional  network  [20].  The  PMR  provides  an  authorized
professional with the means to locate all health centers a patient has visited and access
segments of the local patient records. Linking I
2
Cnet to the archives of the regional
network will allow an I
2
C user to navigate the associated PMRs, starting from images
retrieved as a response to a content-based query. At the technical level, the I
2
C server
database  stores  image  identifiers  which  point  to  the  source  image  archive.  The
combination of these identifiers and appropriate standards of information exchange,
that facilitate information gateways among heterogeneous systems and state of the art
caching techniques, form the basis for a regional network offering integrated services.
Library SDK class:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
of the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without methods to reorder current PPT slides in both powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
14
4. AttributeMatch: Content-based Retrieval of Medical Images
4.1  Image Content Description
The processes involved in the content-based management of images in I
2
C are
encapsulated in description types. In this section, we present AttributeMatch, one of
the description types currently supported by 
I
2
C
. The representation of image content
in AttributeMatch consists of geometric properties and texture descriptors of selected
ROIs. Such features, differentiated with respect to their relative clinical significance,
play an important role in comparisons of medical images routinely carried out by
human experts. Furthermore, the similarity criteria applied by human experts are often
quite subjective. The similarity criterion of AttributeMatch enables users to bias the
search  for  similar  images  towards  their  own  subjective  notion  of  similarity  by
specifying the relative significance of ROIs and their computed features.
To extract descriptions of image content, the description editor of I
2
C [5], used in
interactive  mode,  permits  editing  and  combining  the  results  of  different  image
processing modules. These include image enhancement, segmentation, and editing of
segmentation results to obtain ROIs (see Fig. 8). The size of an image description and
the speed of execution of a retrieval process clearly depend on the number of ROIs
retained as being clinically important. For each ROI retained, the following set of
features is computed: location, shape, size, and, only for a selected subset of these
ROIs,  a set  of  texture  descriptors.  Shape and  size properties  include  roundness,
compactness, area, and orientation. A  number  of different  texture descriptors are
computed  based on  gray-tone  cooccurence  matrices  associated  with  a  ROI  (e.g.
maximum probability, angular second moment, contrast, inverse difference moment,
entropy, correlation, variance, cluster shade, diagonal moment, k statistics, and fractal
Image
Image
Enhancement
Image
Enhancement
Computation of
Geometric
Properties
Computation of
Geometric
Properties
Computation of
Texture
Descriptors
Computation of
Texture
Descriptors
all ROIs
Image Description
Image
Segmentation
Image
Segmentation
Selection of
ROIs
Selection of
ROIs
Selected Subset
of ROIs
Figure 8: Image description generation process in AttributeMatch.
Library SDK class:VB.NET PowerPoint: How to Convert PowerPoint Document to TIFF in
by Microsoft and it is composed of individual slides. formats, such as JPEG, GIF and PDF, by using below is designed by our programmers to convert PPT document
www.rasteredge.com
15
signature) [21,22].  In  the  future,  extensive experimentation and  a  more  rigorous
feature selection process will permit us to identify a reduced set of texture descriptors
which constitute an adequate representation of image content.
4.2  Content-based Retrieval
In AttributeMatch,  a  content-based  query  consists  of  a  description  of  image
content I
Q
, the relative significance factors w
r
of ROIs, the relative significance factors
w
f
of ROI features, and the degree of dissimilarity or distance D
d
of any region from a
dummy region. Dummy regions are introduced when the images to be compared do
not have the same number of ROIs. The default similarity criterion assigns equal
significance to all ROIs and ROI features. The matching algorithm retrieves from the
database images whose descriptions match the query description under the specific
similarity criterion.
Two types of query are supported by AttributeMatch. Their difference lies in the
type of user input and the level of user interaction in the generation of a description of
image content:
• Query by Example: Query by example is interactive. Specifically, users are able to
interact with the generation of the image description, following the process outlined
in section 4.1: first, the query image is segmented, a number of key ROIs are
selected,  and  their  features  are  computed.  In  this  query  type,  the  input  is  a
description of the query image content, and the significance factors of ROIs and
their features.
• Query by Sketch: In this case, the input is a sketch of relevant anatomical ROIs and
the significance factors of these ROIs and their features. The user draws this sketch
in the contour editor environment. To derive the image description, the geometric
properties of all sketched ROIs are computed.
4.2.1  Matching Descriptions
The input to the matching algorithm consists of an image description I
Q
, the
significance factors 
w
r
of ROIs, the significance factors 
w
f
of ROI features, and
D
d
.
Based on w
f
w
r
, and D
d
, the similarity of I
Q
to each description in the database is
computed and the images whose descriptions achieve the highest degree of similarity
to the input image description are reported back to the user.
Let R
i
i=1,…,l , be the set of ROIs that belong to the query image description I
Q
and R
j
’, j=1,…,k , the set of ROIs that belong to an image description I
DB
stored in the
database. If k < l, the matching algorithm adds |l-k| dummy regions to the description
with the fewer ROIs. First, the distance D
R
(R
i
, R'
j
) of every pair of regions R
i
, R'
j
in the
two descriptions is computed:
D R R
w
w D R R
R
i
j
f
f A
f
f A
f
i
j
( , ' )
( , ' )
=
˛
˛
å
å
1
where A is the set of features in the description, w
f
is the user-defined significance
factor for feature f, and D
f
is a distance function which computes the normalized
distance of regions R
i
and R'
j
with respect to feature f. Normalization is achieved
through division by D
max
(f), the maximum computed distance in f for all regions stored
in the database. In the current implementation of 
AttributeMatch
D
f
(R
i
,  R'
j
)
is  a
16
normalized Euclidean distance metric. If the value of a feature is not available, 
D
f
(R
i
,
R'
j
) is set equal to D
max
(f). This may occur, if feature f is a texture descriptor. Note that
the denominator is a normalization factor that maps the distance of two regions to the
interval [0,1].
Having computed the distance between each pair of regions (R
i
, R'
j
), the distance
of the two descriptions I
Q
I
DB
is computed as:
D I I
w
wD R R
I
Q
DB
r
r
l
r
r
l
R
r
r
( ,
)
( , ' )
=
=
=
å
å
1
1
1
where R
r
and R'
r
=  map(R
r
),  r=1,…,l , are corresponding regions in the two
descriptions and w
r
is the significance factor of region R
r
. The objective is to find the
mapping function map() that minimizes D
I
(I
DB
,I
Q
). This step can be modeled as an
assignment problem  which is solved using a variant of the Hungarian Method [23] in
O(l
4
) time, ie. polynomial time of order 4 with respect to l, for l>k.
17
4.3  Performance
4.3.1  Adapting the Similarity Criterion
In the evaluation of AttributeMatch, experiments involving different similarity
criteria were carried out, as follows: The descriptions of all images in an image class of
MR Head images were generated using AttributeMatch. A query image was randomly
selected from the class and its description was compared against all descriptions in the
class. Since the query image description already exists in the database of descriptions,
irrespective of the similarity criterion it always scored higher than any other image.
(c) Similarity based on Different Types of Features
0
20
40
60
80
100
847
848
849
850
851
852
853
854
856
857
858
859
860
861
862
texture
geometric
all features
(a) Similarity based on Texture Descriptors
0
20
40
60
80
100
847
848
849
850
851
852
853
854
856
857
858
859
860
861
862
Degree of Similarity (%)
variance
inv. diff. moment
max  prob
cl. shade
contrast
correlation
uniformity
entropy
(b) Similarity based on Geometric Properties
0
20
40
60
80
100
847
848
849
850
851
852
853
854
856
857
858
859
860
861
862
location
shape
size
19
this technique is to reduce the number of database descriptions considered in the
search, without compromising retrieval accuracy.
5.  Related Work
In conventional media databases, image retrieval is accomplished using associated
textual information. Most commercial medical image databases allow diagnostic image
retrieval based on individual fields in the medical record of a patient or information
contained in the image record. Such conventional retrieval methods are no longer
adequate due to the extensive use of multimedia in health care, the need to utilize as
much of the information present in each medium as possible, and the requirement to
fuse information from different sources. Therefore, the use of sophisticated image and
video retrieval mechanisms in modern media databases is advocated [3,24-26].
A number of approaches to the content-based management of
images have been
proposed  and  implemented  in  research  prototypes and commercial  systems. Most
systems support the combination of textual annotations and visual information for
efficient browsing and navigation in image databases. In [25], the conceptual content
of  images  is captured  in  annotations which are then indexed using the  Semantic
Indexing  System  [27]  for  the  purpose  of  browsing  and  retrieval.  The  fusion  of
information from newspaper photographs and their captions is exploited in Piction
[28], a system used to retrieve photographs based on their pictorial content. Tanimoto
[29] introduced the iconic index, that is the use of picture icons as picture indices.
Chang et.al. [24] propose protocols of use for goal oriented image prefetching. In I
2
C,
we deal mostly with visual content. Queries regarding patient data and visual content
involve information stored by I
2
C servers and Image Management and Communication
Systems (IMACS).  Such queries  are  decomposed  and  processed  separately,  thus
leading to possibly more than one set of query results.
The problem of compressing images while retaining content information has been
addressed in Photobook, a browsing and database search tool developed at the MIT
Media Lab [30,31]. Photobook supports query by textual analogies as well as query by
example. Images are  represented  in  a  compact way  through semantics-preserving
compression. The system measures image  features such as  brightness,  edges, and
texture, and selectively applies the Karhunen-Loeve or Wold transform to obtain a
compact description of image features. When detailed relations between objects are
important, the Karhunen-Loeve transform is used. Alternatively, the Wold transform
[32] is used when describing textural properties such as orientation, randomness, and
periodicity.
The QBIC (Query by Image Content) project at IBM, Almaden, also explores
content-based retrieval  methods [11]. It  deals with the  problem of  content-based
management for still images and video and it provides tools for the interactive and
semi-automatic description of image content. QBIC offers the option of query by
example, by sketch, by color, and by texture pattern. The representation of image
content is based on attributes such as texture, shape, and color, as well as on user-
defined attributes. QBIC addresses content-based similarity retrieval in video databases
by regarding a video clip as a sequence of related image frames, from which one may
select representative ones. Motion fields are then used to relate neighboring frames in
the retrieval process. QBIC technology has been combined with traditional database
search in a commercial product, the Ultimedia Manager [33].
20
In  the  Virage  Engine  based  on  the  VIMSYS  model  [34],  image  properties
computed over the entire image (global) or smaller regions of the image (local), are
extracted by different computational processes, each having a different distance metric.
Individual distance metrics are combined into a composite metric by the user, who
adjusts a set of weighting factors and changes the current interpretation of similarity
according to the task at hand. Image features considered include texture, color, and
color  composition.  Virage  technology  has  been  integrated  in  the  Illustra  object-
relational database [35].
The  QBIC and Virage  approaches  are similar  to 
I
2
C
. All  three  facilitate the
addition of custom-made components. In I
2
C, custom components are description
types, segmentation algorithms, image processing algorithms, and properties. In QBIC,
image content may be represented by user-defined attributes. To define a new primitive
in the Virage Engine [36], extraction, distance, print, and marshaling functions need to
supplied  by  the  developer.  In I
2
C, the relation between content description and
matching is loose, i.e. the same primitive may be used with a different distance function
in different description types, while in Virage “description types” ”  may be implemented
as a schema of native primitives in the form of different applications.
CANDID, a system developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, supports
query by image example [37]. A global signature is computed for every image in the
database. The signature is derived from various image features such as texture, shape,
color. A distance between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to
compare image signatures.
Tagare et. all [38], have developed a query-by-pictorial-example system which
can  retrieve  similar  MRI  images  of  the  heart.  For  efficient  retrieval  of  similar
tomographic images, Voronoi diagrams are used to represent the spatial arrangement
of anatomical parts. The modal matching approach has been proposed as a way to
describe anatomical objects in terms of their generalized symmetries, as defined by
their vibration or deformation modes [39,40].
Providing access to image databases through a WWW front end has received
considerable attention [41]. Several research projects maintain on-line demonstrations
of content-based retrieval through a standard WWW interface [42,43]. DOIA is a
medical image database system that provides a WWW front-end. DOIA provides a
unified global access structure to distributed dermatology images. For image retrieval
in DOIA a predefined set of keys (common terminology) is used. It provides database
search according to diagnosis, localization, and appearance of skin lesions [43].
Sclaroff [4] has proposed the development of a WWW image search engine that
crawls  the  web  collecting  information  about  the  images  it  finds,  computes  the
appropriate image decompositions and indices, and stores the extracted information.
Since such a system should employ automatic image content representation, an arsenal
of image decompositions and discriminants is precomputed. At search time, the users
may select a weighted subset of these decompositions to be used for computing image
similarity measurements. Our work in I
2
Cnet has the same flavor, in that it addresses a
new service to the regional health care network through a WWW interface, providing
transparent access to multiple autonomous, geographically distributed repositories of
medical images.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested