ISSN 0081-4539
THE STATE 
OF FOOD 
AND 
AGRICULTURE
2
0
1
3
FOOD SYSTEMS
FOR BETTER NUTRITION
Pdf into powerpoint - Library control component:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf into powerpoint - Library control component:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Photos on front cover and page 3:  FAO Mediabase.
FAO information products are available on the FAO website (www.fao.org/publications) 
and can be purchased through publications-sales@fao.org.
Library control component:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. PowerPoint Page Edit. Insert Pages into PowerPoint File. Delete PowerPoint Pages.
www.rasteredge.com
THE STATE 
OF FOOD 
AND 
AGRICULTURE
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2013
ISSN 0081-4539
2
0
1
3
Library control component:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
By integrating XDoc.PDF SDK into your C#.NET project, Microsoft Office like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint can be converted to PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
The designations employed and the presentation of material in this 
information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever 
on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 
(FAO) concerning the legal or development status of any country, territory, city 
or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or 
boundaries. The mention of specic companies or products of manufacturers, 
whether or not these have been patented, does not imply that these have 
been endorsed or recommended by FAO in preference to others of a similar 
nature that are not mentioned.
ISBN 978-92-5-107671-2 (print)
E-ISBN 978-92-5-107672-9 (PDF)
© FAO 2013
FAO encourages the use, reproduction and dissemination of material in this 
information product. Except where otherwise indicated, material may be 
copied, downloaded and printed for private study, research and teaching 
purposes, or for use in non-commercial products or services, provided that 
appropriate acknowledgement of FAO as the source and copyright holder is 
given and that FAO’s endorsement of users’ views, products or services is not 
implied in any way.
All requests for translation and adaptation rights, and for resale and other 
commercial use rights should be made via www.fao.org/contact-us/licence-
request or addressed to copyright@fao.org.
FAO information products are available on the FAO website (www.fao.org/
publications) and can be purchased through publications-sales@fao.org.
Library control component:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add file. Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. An
www.rasteredge.com
i
i
i
Contents
Foreword 
v
Acknowledgements 
vi
Abbreviations and acronyms 
viii
Executive summary 
ix
Food systems for better nutrition 
1
1.    The role of food systems in nutrition 
3
Why is nutrition important? 
4
Why focus on food systems to address malnutrition? 
6
Food systems and nutrition opportunities 
7
Cross-cutting issues in nutrition-sensitive food systems 
9
Knowledge and information gaps 
11
Structure of the report  
12
2.    Malnutrition and changing food systems 
13
Malnutrition concepts, trends and costs   
13
Food system transformation and malnutrition  
20
Conclusions and key messages 
24
3.    Agricultural production for better nutrition 
26
Making food more available and accessible  
26
Making food more diverse 
30
Making food more nutritious 
33
Conclusions and key messages  
36
4.    Food supply chains for better nutrition 
37
Transformation of food supply chains 
37
Enhancing nutrition through food supply chains 
42
Conclusions and key messages  
47
5.    Helping consumers achieve better nutrition 
49
Food assistance programmes for better nutrition 
49
Nutrition-specific food price subsidies and taxes 
52
Nutrition education 
54
Conclusions and key messages 
59
6.    Institutional and policy environment for nutrition 
61
Building a common vision 
61
Better data for better policy-making 
65
Effective coordination is essential 
65
Key messages of the report 
67
Statistical annex 
69
Notes for the annex table  
71
ANNEx TABlE 
73
References  
83
Special chapters of The State of Food and Agriculture 
98
Library control component:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Bmp, Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
www.rasteredge.com
i
v
TABLES
1.  Disability-adjusted life years in 1990 and 2010, by malnutrition-related risk factor, 
population group and region 
18
2.  Biofortified staple food crops implemented by the HarvestPlus programme  
and actual or expected release year 
35
BOXES
1.  Sustainable production and consumption  
4
2.  The importance of animal-source foods in diets 
11
3.  The urban–rural malnutrition divide  
14
4.  limitations of using the body mass index in measuring excessive body fat 
17
5.  The first thousand days 
29
6.  Increasing dietary diversity through home gardens 
31
7.  Improving child nutrition in small-scale pastoral food systems  
32
8.  Improving livelihoods and nutrition throughout the bean value chain  
43
9.  Food processing, preservation and preparation in the home and micronutrient  
intakes  
45
10.  The Grameen Danone Partnership 
46
11.  Guiding principles for improving nutrition through agriculture 
62
12.  Nutrition governance at the international level  
63
FIGURES
1.  Food system interventions for better nutrition 
8
2.  Prevalence of stunting, anaemia and micronutrient deficiencies among children,  
by developing region  
16
3.  Prevalence of overweight and obesity among adults, by region 
17
4.  The multiple burdens of malnutrition 
21
5.  The food system transformation 
22
6.  Share of countries in each malnutrition category, by level of agricultural  
productivity 
22
7.  Share of countries in each malnutrition category, by degree of urbanization 
23
8.  Modern and traditional retail outlet shares of fresh fruit and vegetable market
in selected countries 
39
9.  Retail sales of packaged food, by region 
39
10.  Modern and traditional retail outlet shares of fresh fruit and vegetable market
and packaged food market in selected countries 
40
v
Foreword
As the world debates the Post-2015 
Development Agenda, we must strive for 
nothing less than the eradication of hunger, 
food insecurity and malnutrition. The social 
and economic costs of malnutrition are 
unconscionably high, amounting to perhaps 
$US3.5 trillion per year or $US500 per person 
globally. Maternal and child malnutrition still 
impose a larger burden than overweight and 
obesity, although the latter is increasing even 
in developing regions. The challenge for the 
global community, therefore, is to continue 
fighting hunger and undernutrition while 
preventing or reversing the emergence of 
obesity.
This edition of The State of Food and 
Agriculture: Food systems for better 
nutrition makes the case that good nutrition 
begins with food and agriculture. Food 
systems around the world are diverse 
and changing rapidly. Food systems have 
become more industrial, commercial and 
global, unleashing processes of productivity 
growth, economic development and social 
transformation being felt around the world. 
These processes have profound implications 
for diets and nutritional outcomes.
Commercialization and specialization 
in agricultural production, processing 
and retailing have enhanced efficiency 
throughout the food system and increased 
the year-round availability and affordability 
of a diverse range of foods for most 
consumers in the world. At the same 
time, concerns are mounting about the 
sustainability of current consumption and 
production patterns, and their implications 
for nutritional outcomes.
Food systems must ensure that all people 
have access to a diverse range of nutritious 
foods and to the knowledge and information 
they need to make healthy choices. The 
contributions of food and agriculture to 
nutritional outcomes through production, 
prices and incomes are fundamental and 
must not be neglected, but food systems as a 
whole can contribute much more. This report 
identifies a number of specific actions that 
can be taken to improve the contribution of 
food systems to better nutrition. At the same 
time, reductions in food and nutrient losses 
throughout the food system can enhance both 
environmental sustainability and nutrition.
Food system strategies for nutrition are 
often contrasted with those that rely on 
medically based interventions such as vitamin 
and mineral supplements. Although food 
supplements can address specific dietary 
deficiencies, a nutritious diet ensures that 
people get the whole complex of nutrients 
they need and thus is the only approach 
that addresses all forms of malnutrition. 
What is more, food system strategies further 
recognize the social, psychological and 
cultural benefits that come from enjoying a 
variety of foods. Malnutrition is a complex 
problem that requires integrated action 
across sectors, but good nutrition must begin 
with food and agriculture. This report helps 
point the way.
José Graziano da Silva
FAO DIRECTOR-GENERAL
v
i
The State of Food and Agriculture 2013 was 
prepared by members of the Agricultural 
Development Economics Division (ESA) of 
FAO under the overall leadership of Kostas 
Stamoulis, Director; Keith Wiebe, Principal 
Officer; and Terri Raney, Senior Economist 
and Chief Editor. Additional guidance was 
provided by Barbara Burlingame, Principal 
Officer; James Garrett, Special Advisor; 
and Brian Thompson, Senior Officer of the 
Nutrition Division (ESN); David Hallam, 
Trade and Markets Division (EST); Jomo 
Kwame Sundaram, Assistant Director-
General, Economic and Social Development 
Department (ADG-ES) and Daniel Gustafson, 
Deputy Director-General (Operations). 
The research and writing team was led 
by André Croppenstedt and included Brian 
Carisma, Sarah lowder, Terri Raney and 
Ellen Wielezynski (ESA); and James Garrett, 
Janice Meerman and Brian Thompson 
(ESN). The statistical annex was prepared 
by Brian Carisma under the supervision of 
Sarah lowder, ESA. Additional inputs were 
provided by Aparajita Bijapurkar and Andrea 
Woolverton (ESA); Robert van Otterdijk, 
Rural Infrastructure and Agro-Industries 
Division (AGS); and Alexandre Meybeck, 
Agriculture and Consumer Protection 
Department (AGD).
The report was prepared in close 
collaboration with Janice Albert, leslie 
Amoroso, Juliet Aphane, Ruth Charrondiere, 
Charlotte Dufour, Florence Egal, Anna 
Herforth, Gina Kennedy, Warren lee, Ellen 
Muehlhoff, Valeria Menza, Martina Park 
and Holly Sedutto, all from (ESN); and The 
State of Food and Agriculture Focal Points: 
Daniela Battaglia, Animal Production and 
Health Division (AGA); Alison Hodder 
and Remi Kahane, Plant Production and 
Protection Division (AGP); David Kahan, 
Office of Knowledge Exchange, Research 
and Extension (OEK); Florence Tartanac 
and Anthony Bennett (AGS); Julien Custot 
and Jonathan Reeves, Climate, Energy 
and Tenure Division (NRC); Karel Callens, 
South-South and Resource Mobilization 
Division (TCS); Neil Marsland and Angela 
Hinrichs, Emergency and Rehabilitation 
Division (TCE); Maxim lobovikov and Fred 
Kafeero, Forestry Economics, Policy and 
Products Division (FOE); Benoist Veillerette, 
Investment Centre Division (TCI); John 
Ryder, Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy 
and Economics Division (FIP); Eleonora 
Dupouy and David Sedik, Regional Office 
for Europe and Central Asia (REUT); 
Fatima Hachem, Regional Office for the 
Near East (FAORNE); David Dawe and 
Nomindelger Bayasgalanbat, Regional 
Office for Asia and the Pacific (FAORAP); 
Solomon Salcedo, Regional Office for latin 
America and the Caribbean (FAORlC); and 
James Tefft, Regional Office for Africa 
(FAORAF). Additional inputs and reviews 
were provided by Jesús Barreiro-Hurlé, Juan 
Carlos García Cebolla, Maarten Immink, 
Joanna Jelensperger, Panagiotis Karfakis, 
Frank Mischler, Mark Smulders and Keith 
Wiebe (ESA); Terri Ballard, Ana Moltedo 
and Carlo Cafiero, Statistics Division (ESS); 
and Christina Rapone, Elisenda Estruch 
and Peter Wobst, Gender, Equity and Rural 
Employment Division (ESW).
External background papers and inputs 
were prepared by Christopher Barrett, 
Miguel Gómez, Erin lentz, Dennis Miller, 
Per Pinstrup-Andersen, Katie Ricketts and 
Ross Welch (Cornell University); Bruce Traill 
(Reading University); Mario Mazzocchi 
(University of Bologna); Robert Mazur (Iowa 
State University); Action Contre la Faim/ACF-
International; Save the Children (UK); Manan 
Chawla (Euromonitor); and Stephen lim, 
Michael MacIntyre, Brittany Wurtz, Emily 
Carnahan and Greg Freedman (University of 
Washington).
The report benefited from external 
reviews and advice from many international 
experts: Francesco Branca, Mercedes de 
Onis, Marcella Wüstefeld and Gretchen 
Stevens, World Health Organization (WHO); 
Corinna Hawkes (World Cancer Research 
Fund International); Howarth Bouis and 
Yassir Islam (HarvestPlus); John McDermott, 
Agnes Quisumbing and laurian Unnevehr, 
International Food Policy Research Institute 
Acknowledgements
v
i
i
(IFPRI); lynn Brown and Saskia de Pee, World 
Food Programme (WFP); Jennie Dey de 
Pryck, Mark Holderness and Harry Palmier, 
Global Forum on Agricultural Research 
(GFAR); Delia Grace, International livestock 
Research Institute (IlRI); and Marie Arimond 
(University of California at Davis). 
Michelle Kendrick, Economic and Social 
Development Department (ES), was 
responsible for publishing and project 
management. Paola Di Santo and liliana 
Maldonado provided administrative support 
and Marco Mariani provided IT support 
throughout the process. We also gratefully 
acknowledge the support in organizing 
the technical workshop offered by David 
Hallam and organized by Jill Buscemi-Hicks, 
EST. Translations and printing services were 
provided by the FAO Meeting Programming 
and Documentation Service (CPAM). Graphic 
design and layout services were provided by 
Omar Bolbol and Flora Dicarlo.
v
i
i
i
Abbreviations and acronyms
BMI 
body mass index
CONSEA 
National Council for Food Security (Conselho Nacional de Segurança Alimentar  
e Nutricional)
DAlY 
disability-adjusted life year
EU 
European Union
GDP 
gross domestic product
HFP 
Homestead Food Production (project)
IFPRI 
International Food Policy Research Institute
MClCP 
Roundtable for Poverty Reduction (Mesa de Concertación para la lucha Contra  
la Pobreza)
MDG 
Millennium Development Goal
NGO 
non-governmental organization
OECD 
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
OFSP 
orange-fleshed sweet potato
R&D 
research and development
REACH 
Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and undernutrition
SUN 
Scaling Up Nutrition
UN 
United Nations
UNICEF 
United Nations Children’s Fund
UNSCN 
United Nations Standing Committee on Nutrition
VAC 
Vuon, Ao, Chuong (Crop farming, Aquaculture, Animal husbandry)
WFP 
World Food Programme
WHO 
World Health Organization
WIC 
Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children  
(United States of America)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested