FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
7
for meat products. Wholesalers, often with 
strong links to modern retail chains, may 
buy staple products directly from producers, 
bypassing traditional local brokers (reardon 
and minten, 2011). meanwhile, supply chains 
for some products may be becoming more 
complex, with additional transformation of 
products by processors and distributors. 
the kinds of food being demanded are 
also changing. new technologies are altering 
modes of transportation, leisure, employment 
and work within the home (Popkin, Adair and 
ng, 2012). increasingly, urban lifestyles lead 
consumers to demand more convenience, 
because they have less time available or 
simply wish to devote less time to food 
production, acquisition and preparation.
urbanization also provides economies of 
scale for markets, resulting in lower transport 
costs and markets that are generally closer 
to home. Combined with generally higher 
incomes for urban dwellers, these changes 
widen the selection of products available. 
Although the diversity of choice leads to 
higher consumption of animal-source foods 
and fruits and vegetables, increases in 
consumption of processed foods also lead to 
higher intakes of fats, sugars and salt. With 
higher energy intakes and lower energy 
expenditure, urban dwellers incur a higher 
risk of overweight and obesity than rural 
dwellers. these changes in purchasing and 
consumption patterns are occurring in smaller 
cities and towns as well as the largest cities. 
through their research and marketing efforts, 
food companies, of course, are shaping as well 
as responding to these demands. 
these changes in activity and dietary 
patterns in developing countries are part of 
a “nutrition transition” in which countries 
simultaneously face not only the emerging 
challenge of rising levels of overweight 
and obesity and related non-communicable 
diseases but continue to deal with problems 
of undernutrition and micronutrient 
deficiencies (bray and Popkin, 1998). this 
transition corresponds closely to rises in 
income and the structural transformation 
of the food system, as seen primarily in 
industrialized and middle-income countries. 
Popkin, Adair and ng (2012, p. 3) describe 
this phenomenon as “the primary mismatch 
between human biology and modern 
society”. All this suggests that the nature 
of the nutrition problem and its solutions 
may differ according to location and type of 
engagement with the food system.
Food systems and nutrition 
opportunities
the structure of food systems is central to 
determining how those systems interact with 
other causal factors and influence nutritional 
outcomes. Awareness of these characteristics 
and the key actors who shape food systems 
will help identify where to intervene and 
what to do to create systems that help achieve 
good nutrition. 
the multiple links between food systems 
and nutrition offer many opportunities 
to shape food systems in such a way that 
they can promote better nutrition. Figure 1 
provides a schematic overview of the elements 
of food systems and the broader economic, 
social, cultural and physical environment 
within which they operate. it highlights 
opportunities for improving nutritional 
outcomes and identifies appropriate policy 
tools. 
the first column outlines the elements of a 
food system, in three broad categories: 
•  production “up to the farm gate”;
•  post-harvest supply chain “from the farm 
gate to retailer”;
•  consumers.
the middle column lists examples of 
potential interventions that are targeted 
specifically at improving nutrition – 
“opportunities”, that is, to shape the system. 
the third column notes some policy tools 
related primarily to food, agriculture and 
rural development that can influence the 
system. the outer ring illustrates the broader 
context, which can also be made more 
“nutrition-sensitive”, for example by giving 
higher priority to nutrition within national 
development strategies and considering 
the nutrition implications of broader 
macroeconomic policies, the status of women 
and environmental sustainability. 
the phases from production to consumption 
are depicted in a linear representation, but 
the interactions among the various actors and 
the flows of their influence are not. demand 
by consumers or processors, for example, 
can affect what is produced, and multiple 
stakeholders can exert influences on the 
system and the policy context at different 
Convert pdf to powerpoint with - application software cloud:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint with - application software cloud:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
8
points and in different ways. Considering the 
entire food system is thus more complex and 
integrated than a simple commodity value-
chain approach, which is likely to focus on the 
technical aspects of various stages of the chain 
and usually considers only one crop or product 
at a time. 
Addressing the entire food system implies 
appreciating and working with all the 
different stakeholders who affect the system. 
these include all people – primarily private 
individuals and companies – who produce, 
store, process, market and consume food, 
as well as the public officials, civil society 
organizations, researchers and development 
practitioners who design the policies, 
regulations, programmes and projects that 
shape the system. 
Figure 1 should be understood as a 
stylized representation of the many diverse 
and dynamic food systems that exist in the 
world. the nature of the food system in 
a given location can guide the choice of 
interventions to take advantage of nutrition 
FiGure 1  
Food system interventions for better nutrition
Economic, social, cultural and physical environment
Policy environment and development priorities
Gender roles and environmental sustainability 
FOOD SYSTEM ELEMENTS
NUTRITION OppORTUNITIES
pOLICY TOOLS
Production “up to 
the farm gate” (r&d, 
inputs, production, farm 
management)
•  sustainable intensification of production 
•  nutrition-promoting farming systems, 
agronomic practices and crops
- micronutrient fertilizers
- biofortified crops
- integrated farming systems, including 
fisheries and forestry
- Crop and livestock diversification
•  stability for food security and nutrition
- Grain reserves and storage
- Crop and livestock insurance
•  nutrition education
- school and home gardens
•  nutrient preserving on-farm storage
•  Food and agricultural 
policies to promote 
availability, 
affordability, diversity 
and quality
•  nutrition-oriented 
agricultural research 
on crops, livestock and 
production systems
•  Promotion of school and 
home gardens
Post-harvest supply chain 
“from the farm gate to 
retailer” (marketing, 
storage, trade, processing, 
retailing)
•  nutrient-preserving processing, packaging, 
transport and storage
•  reduced waste and increased technical 
and economic efficiency
•  Food fortification
•  reformulation for better nutrition (e.g. 
elimination of  trans fats)
•  Food safety
•  regulation and taxation 
to promote efficiency, 
safety, quality, diversity
•  research and promotion 
of innovation in product 
formulation, processing 
and transport
Consumers (advertising, 
labelling, education, safety 
nets)
•  nutrition information and health claims 
•  Product labelling
•  Consumer education 
•  social protection for food security and 
nutrition 
- General food assistance programmes 
and subsidies
- targeted food assistance (prenatal, 
children, elderly, etc.)
•  Food assistance 
programmes
•  Food price incentives
•  nutrition regulations
•  nutrition education and 
information campaigns
AvAILABLE, ACCESSIBLE, DIvERSE, NUTRITIOUS FOODS
Health, food safety, education, sanitation and infrastructure
Source: FAo. 
application software cloud:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
application software cloud:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
9
opportunities. For example, in a subsistence-
based agricultural system, interventions 
aimed directly at improving the nutritional 
content of crops for own consumption would 
be promising. in urban areas where the 
food system is almost entirely commercial, 
interventions in processing and retailing could 
be more effective in shaping the system to 
support better nutrition. many developing 
countries have food systems that exhibit a mix 
of characteristics.
promoting nutrition-specific and 
nutrition-sensitive actions 
many of the nutrition opportunities 
highlighted in Figure 1 and in later chapters 
of this report are nutrition-specific. they are 
pursued with the primary purpose of making 
the system more attuned to producing good 
nutritional outcomes. For example, the 
principal impetus in developing biofortified 
crops is to improve nutrition. At the same 
time, these crops may also be more disease-
resistant and better adapted to grow in 
micronutrient-deficient soils. they may 
improve nutrition but also produce higher 
crop yields and increase producer incomes 
– a win for both consumers and producers 
(Harvest Plus, 2011). 
other interventions, particularly those 
that improve the general economic, social or 
political environment, may not be specifically 
designed to improve nutrition but will almost 
certainly have a positive effect. examples of 
these “nutrition-sensitive actions” include 
policies that increase agricultural productivity 
(which can raise producer incomes, lower 
the cost of food for consumers and allow 
producers and consumers to increase 
expenditures on more adequate, diverse diets) 
or that improve the social status of women 
(and so can lead to increased expenditures on 
health, education and food, which are all key 
inputs into better nutrition). 
similarly, in a nutrition-sensitive 
environment, governments or companies may 
simply take into account the potential impacts 
of their actions on nutrition and seek to 
leverage any positive effects or mitigate any 
negative ones. For instance, the introduction 
of new crops might lead to higher 
productivity and household incomes, but 
might also make higher demands on women’s 
labour. this could lead to negative impacts on 
child care that a nutrition-sensitive approach 
would address. in sum, the difference in 
primary purpose (often driven by the context 
of the opportunity) is what distinguishes 
nutrition-specific interventions from ones 
that are nutrition-sensitive. Although the 
overall objective may be to create a nutrition-
sensitive food system, interventions in 
agriculture and food systems may be both 
nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive. 
Cross-cutting issues in nutrition-
sensitive food systems
many interventions are specific to a particular 
part of the food system, but there are 
some issues that nearly all interventions 
need to address. For example, gender 
issues are always relevant because men and 
women, who participate in every part of 
the food system, have different roles and 
therefore will be affected differently by any 
intervention aimed at making food systems 
more nutrition-sensitive. similarly, concerns 
related to environmental sustainability 
touch every aspect of the food system and 
have fundamental implications for nutrition. 
diets that are diverse and environmentally 
sustainable are the foundation for better 
nutritional outcomes for everyone and should 
be a long-term goal for all food systems. 
Gender roles for better nutritional 
outcomes
men and women typically play differentiated 
roles in food systems and within the 
household, although these differences vary 
widely by region and are changing rapidly 
(FAo, 2011b). Women make important and 
growing contributions to food production, 
processing, marketing and retailing, and 
other parts of the food system. Within the 
household, women traditionally bear the 
primary responsibility for preparing meals 
and caring for children and other family 
members, although men are assuming 
more responsibilities for these roles in many 
societies. Gender differences in the rights, 
resources and responsibilities – particularly 
resources necessary for achieving food 
and nutrition security for and within the 
household and responsibilities for food 
provisioning and caretaking – often impede 
the achievement of household food and 
nutrition security. 
application software cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to Image; Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF;
www.rasteredge.com
application software cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
10
Gender-sensitive interventions can improve 
nutritional outcomes by recognizing women’s 
role in nutrition through agricultural 
production, food provision and child care and 
by promoting gender equality throughout the 
system, including in some cases by increasing 
the participation of men in household 
maintenance, food preparation and child 
care. in agriculture, technologies that enhance 
the labour productivity of rural women 
(such as better farm tools, water provision, 
modern energy services and household food 
preparation) can free their time for other 
activities. For example, a study from india 
demonstrated that women who used a 
groundnut decorticator were able to process 
around 14 times more groundnuts and used 
significantly less physical effort than those 
doing so by hand. similarly, a new hand tool 
designed for making ridges for vegetable 
crops allowed women to double the number 
of rows finished in one hour (singh, Puna Ji 
Gite and Agarwal, 2006). such innovations 
in technology may open up opportunities 
for women to earn higher incomes or to use 
their time (and increased income) for added 
attention to the family.
Women are also active in other parts of the 
food system, including food marketing and 
processing. For example, in Latin America and 
the Caribbean and in Africa, women dominate 
employment in many of the high-value 
agricultural commodity chains. Although 
new jobs in export-oriented agro-industries 
may not employ men and women on equal 
terms, they often provide better opportunities 
for women than exist within the confines of 
traditional agriculture (FAo, 2011b). 
raising women’s incomes has important 
implications for nutritional outcomes, because 
women still play a central role in shaping 
household food consumption patterns. 
Women who earn more income have stronger 
bargaining power within the household. this 
enables them to exert more influence over 
decisions regarding consumption, investment 
and production, which results in better 
nutrition, health and education outcomes for 
children (smith et al., 2003; Quisumbing, 2003; 
FAo, 2011b; duflo, 2012; World bank, 2011). 
Sustainable food systems
the importance of managing the agriculture 
system in a way that is conducive to the health 
of the ecosystem is already well established. 
to date, most of the focus has been on 
the production side, with the emphasis on 
sustainable intensification that can close yield 
and productivity gaps in underperforming 
systems (FAo, 2011c). this continues to be of 
great importance, especially for poor farmers. 
yet improving the sustainability of food 
systems is equally important. environmentally 
and economically sustainable production is 
important for the well-being of current and 
future generations. reductions in food losses 
and waste throughout the system can help 
to maintain or improve consumption levels 
and at the same time alleviate pressures on 
production systems. the costs and benefits 
of a sustainable system must be reflected in 
decisions made by producers and consumers 
of food, as well as those who help shape 
decisions (FAo, 2012a). 
Attempts to improve the sustainability of 
food systems face a number of challenges, 
such as market and non-market constraints 
to more diversified production and to 
higher levels of productivity, particularly for 
smallholders; unequal access to resources for 
women, the poor and other economically and 
socially marginalized groups; and increasing 
demands on natural resources, such as 
competition for water between agriculture 
and human settlements. in the context of 
weak governance, power asymmetries and 
the lack of clear and enforced property rights, 
production and consumption patterns are 
likely to be unsustainable. When combined 
with continuing inequities, the situation can 
have devastating consequences for nutrition, 
affecting both availability and accessibility of 
food, particularly for the poor. 
Dietary diversity and nutrition 
Healthy diets
5
contain a balanced and 
adequate combination of macronutrients 
(carbohydrates, fats and protein) and essential 
micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). 
some questions remain controversial, such 
as whether animal-source foods are an 
essential part of the diet and whether all 
people, especially young children, can acquire 
adequate nutrients from food without 
We recognize that what constitutes a healthy diet is a 
matter of great debate and are therefore careful not to 
suggest what foods consumers should and should not 
consume. We do, however, report on efforts made to 
change consumption patterns based on others’ judgements 
of what foods are more or less nutritious.
application software cloud:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. C# Demo: Convert PowerPoint to PDF Document. Add references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
application software cloud:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
www.rasteredge.com
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
11
supplementation (see box 2 for a discussion 
of animal-source foods and diets). nutrition 
guidelines generally maintain that diverse diets 
that combine a variety of cereals, legumes, 
vegetables, fruits and animal-source foods will 
provide adequate nutrition for most people 
to meet energy and nutrient requirements, 
although supplements may be needed for 
certain populations.
nutritionists consider dietary diversity, or 
dietary variety – defined as the number of 
different foods or food groups consumed over 
a given reference period – as a key indicator 
of a high-quality diet (ruel, 2003).
6
evidence 
indicates that dietary diversity is strongly and 
positively associated with child nutritional 
Kennedy (2004) makes the point that while dietary 
diversity is generally beneficial, adding foods that are high 
in fats (energy) will not help to reduce overweight and 
obesity, so the nature of the diversity also needs to be taken 
into account. Experts differ on how to categorize foods into 
different groups, so “counting the diversity” of the diet is a 
complex task (Arimond et al., 2010). 
status and growth, even after socio-economic 
factors have been controlled for (Arimond 
and ruel, 2004; Arimond et al., 2010). 
Knowledge and information gaps
A significant body of direct and indirect 
evidence exists about the causal and 
synergistic links between food, agriculture 
and nutrition. the available knowledge, 
much of which is covered in this report, 
supports the proposition that the food 
and agriculture sector can play a central 
role in reducing malnutrition and that 
decisive policy action in this sector can 
improve nutritional outcomes, especially 
when accompanied by complementary 
interventions in education, health and 
sanitation, and social protection. Food system 
interventions can raise producers’ incomes; 
improve the availability, affordability, 
acceptability and quality of food; and help 
boX 2
The importance of animal-source foods in diets
Animal foods are recognized as having 
high energy density and as good sources 
of high-quality protein; readily available 
iron and zinc; vitamins b
6
, b
12
and b
2;
and, 
in liver, vitamin A. they enhance the 
absorption of iron and zinc from plant-
based foods (Gibson, 2011). evidence 
from the nutrition Collaborative research 
support Programme (nCrsP) for egypt, 
Kenya and mexico indicated strong 
associations between the intake of foods 
from animal sources and better physical 
and cognitive development in children 
(Allen et al., 1992; neuman, bwibo and 
sigman, 1992; Kirksey et al., 1992). 
increasing access to affordable animal-
source foods could significantly improve 
nutritional status and health for many 
poor people, especially children. However, 
excessive consumption of livestock 
products is associated with increased risk of 
overweight and obesity, heart disease and 
other non-communicable diseases (WHo 
and FAo, 2003). Furthermore, the rapid 
growth of the livestock sector means that 
competition for land and other productive 
resources puts upward pressure on prices 
for staple grains as well as negative 
pressures on the natural resource base, 
potentially reducing food security in the 
longer term. Policy-makers need to take 
into consideration the trade-offs inherent 
when designing policies and interventions 
to promote animal-source foods.
Fish is also an important source of 
many nutrients, including protein of high 
quality, retinol, vitamins d and e, iodine 
and selenium. evidence increasingly links 
the consumption of fish to enhanced brain 
development and learning in children, 
improved vision and eye health, and 
protection from cardiovascular disease 
and some cancers. the fats and fatty 
acids from fish are highly beneficial and 
difficult to obtain from other food sources. 
evidence from Zambia documented 
that children whose main staple food is 
cassava and whose diets regularly include 
fish and other foods containing high-
quality protein had a significantly lower 
prevalence of stunting than those whose 
diets did not (FAo, 2000). 
application software cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
application software cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
12
people make better food choices (Pinstrup-
Andersen and Watson, 2011; thompson and 
Amoroso, 2011; Fan and Pandya-Lorch, 2012).
Knowledge about many of the issues 
covered in this report remains incomplete, 
however. many countries lack basic 
data and indicators for evaluating and 
monitoring the nutrition landscape. 
Agricultural interventions are difficult 
to evaluate
7
and many questions remain 
about the effectiveness of home gardens, 
the role of gender, agronomic fortification, 
technological innovations, biodiversity 
and the potential of local foods in the 
nutrition transition. research on supply chain 
interventions and their impact on nutrition 
is scarce, but improved efficiency along 
the chain, reducing waste and losses, and 
raising the nutritional content of foods are 
among the least contentious issues in the 
food system and nutrition debate. the roles 
of trade, investment and market structure 
in nutritional outcomes remain contentious. 
Knowledge gaps also exist with regard to 
consumer choice and nutritional outcomes, 
and concepts such as “dietary diversity” and 
“healthy diets” remain fuzzy and difficult 
to measure objectively. Further research 
is needed on nutrition education and 
behaviour change, the link between food 
system policies and nutrition, and the nexus 
between the food industry, healthy diets and 
consumers. Finally, many questions remain 
about how food systems can contribute 
to better nutritional outcomes while also 
adhering to sustainable production and 
consumption patterns.
Structure of the report 
Chapter 2 frames the debate by reviewing 
trends in malnutrition and illustrating 
how the transformation of food systems 
worldwide has been accompanied by 
dramatic changes in nutritional status. this 
implies that the nature of food system 
interventions to address malnutrition will 
vary according to the level of agricultural 
and economic development of a country 
The recent review by Masset et al. (2011) finds that a 
range of methodological and statistical reasons account 
for the sparse body of evidence by which to evaluate 
agricultural interventions.
and the nature of the malnutrition burden it 
faces. in all cases, however, making the food 
system more nutrition-sensitive can improve 
nutritional outcomes. 
Chapter 3 looks at opportunities to 
enhance nutrition in agricultural production 
from inputs up to the farm gate. these 
include making general agricultural policies 
and institutions more nutrition-sensitive and 
employing nutrition-specific interventions 
to enhance the nutritional quality of staple 
crops, diversify production and improve farm 
management in ways that promote more 
nutritious and sustainable food systems. 
Chapter 4 turns to nutrition-sensitive 
interventions in the supply chain from the 
farm gate to the retailer, through storage, 
processing and distribution. Food supply 
chains are evolving rapidly in all countries, 
and these changes have implications for 
the availability and affordability of diverse, 
nutritious foods for consumers in different 
areas and at different income levels. specific 
interventions to enhance efficiency, reduce 
nutrient losses and waste and improve the 
nutritional content of foods can improve 
nutritional outcomes by making food more 
available, accessible, diverse and nutritious. 
Chapter 5 focuses on interventions in the 
food system aimed at changing consumer 
behaviour. While these challenges relate 
more to education and behaviour change, 
they still involve improving the nutritional 
performance of the food system. 
Chapter 6 provides an overview of global 
governance of the food system for better 
nutritional outcomes. 
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
13
the multiple burdens of malnutrition – 
undernourishment and undernutrition, 
micronutrient deficiencies, and overweight and 
obesity – impose high and, in some cases, rising 
economic and social costs in countries at all 
income levels. different types of malnutrition 
may coexist within the same country, 
household or individual, and their prevalence 
is changing rapidly along with changes in food 
systems. the often confusing terminology 
used to describe malnutrition is it itself a 
reflection of the complex, multidimensional, 
dynamic nature of the problem and the policy 
challenges associated with it.
Malnutrition concepts, trends and 
costs
malnutrition is an abnormal physiological 
condition caused by inadequate, 
unbalanced or excessive consumption of 
the macronutrients that provide dietary 
energy (carbohydrates, protein and fats) and 
the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) 
that are essential for physical and cognitive 
growth and development (FAo, 2011c). Good 
nutrition both depends on and contributes 
to good health.
Undernourishment and undernutrition
undernourishment refers to food intake 
that is insufficient to meet dietary energy 
requirements for an active and healthy life. 
undernourishment, or hunger, is estimated 
by FAo as the prevalence and number of 
people whose food intake is insufficient to 
meet their requirements on a continuous 
basis; dietary energy supply is used as a 
proxy for food intake. since 1990–92, the 
estimated number of undernourished people 
in developing countries has declined from 
980 million to 852 million and the prevalence 
of undernourishment has declined from 
23 percent to 15 percent (FAo, iFAd and 
WFP, 2012).
undernutrition is the outcome of insufficient 
food intake and repeated infections (unsCn, 
2010). undernutrition or underweight in 
adults is measured by the body mass index 
(bmi), with individuals with a bmi of 18.5 or 
less considered to be underweight.
8
measures of undernutrition are more 
widely available for children: underweight 
(being too thin for one’s age), wasting (being 
too thin for one’s height) and stunting (being 
too short for one’s age). this report uses 
stunting in children under the age of five 
as the primary indicator of undernutrition 
because stunting captures the effects of 
long-term deprivation and disease and is a 
powerful predictor of the life-long burden of 
undernutrition (Victora et al., 2008). 
stunting is caused by long-term 
inadequate dietary intake and continuing 
bouts of infection and disease, often 
beginning with maternal malnutrition, 
which leads to poor foetal growth, low 
birth weight and poor growth. stunting 
causes permanent impairment to cognitive 
and physical development that can lower 
educational attainment and reduce adult 
income. between 1990 and 2011, the 
prevalence of stunting in developing 
countries declined by an estimated 16.6 
percentage points, from 44.6 percent to 
28 percent. there are 160 million stunted 
children in developing countries today, 
compared with 248 million in 1990 (uniCeF, 
WHo and the World bank, 2012). Country-
level malnutrition data mask considerable 
socio-economic or regional differences within 
countries. Although data are limited, a stark 
division between rural and urban areas in 
the burden of undernutrition is apparent in 
many countries (box 3).
  The BMI equals the body weight in kilograms divided by 
height in metres squared (kg/m
2
) and is commonly measured 
in adults to assess underweight, overweight and obesity. The 
international references are as follows: underweight = BMI < 
18.5; overweight = BMI ≥ 25; obese = BMI ≥ 30. Obesity is 
thus a subset of the overweight category.
2.  malnutrition and changing 
food systems
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
14
Micronutrient deficiencies
micronutrient malnutrition is defined as 
being deficient in one or more vitamins and 
minerals of importance for human health.
it is an outcome of inappropriate dietary 
composition and disease. it is technically 
a form of undernutrition (unsCn, 2010), 
but is often referred to separately because 
it can coexist with adequate or excessive 
consumption of macronutrients and carries 
health consequences that are distinct from 
those associated with stunting.
several micronutrients have been 
identified as being important for human 
health, but most of these are not widely 
measured. three of the most commonly 
measured micronutrient deficiencies and 
related disorders refer to vitamin A, anaemia 
(related to iron) and iodine (Figure 2 and 
Annex table). other micronutrients, such 
as zinc, selenium and vitamin b
12
, are also 
important for health, but comprehensive 
data do not exist to provide global estimates 
of deficiencies in these micronutrients. this 
report also tends to report micronutrient 
deficiencies among children, again because 
data across countries are more consistently 
available for children than for adults.
boX 3
The urban–rural malnutrition divide 
Available cross-country evidence on child 
nutritional status consistently shows that, 
on average, children in urban areas are 
better nourished than children in rural 
areas (smith, ruel and ndiaye, 2005; Van 
de Poel, o’donnell and Van doorslaer, 
2007). the most recent data compiled by 
uniCeF (2013) shows that in 82 out of 
95 developing countries for which data 
are available the prevalence of child 
underweight is higher in rural areas than 
in urban areas.
evidence from india indicates that the 
rural–urban divide may also hold for 
adults. Guha-Khasnobis and James (2010) 
found a prevalence of adult underweight 
of around 23 percent in the slum areas of 
eight indian cities, while the prevalence 
in rural areas in the same states was close 
to 40 percent. Headey, Chiu and Kadiyala 
(2011) argue that the combination of 
laborious farm employment and weaker 
access to education and health services 
jointly contribute to rural adult nutrition 
indicators being substantially worse than 
those of urban slum populations. 
the socio-economic determinants of 
child nutritional status, such as maternal 
education and status within the family, 
are generally consistent between urban 
and rural areas, but the levels of these 
determinants often differ markedly 
between urban and rural areas. urban 
mothers have approximately twice as 
much education and considerably higher 
decision-making power than their rural 
counterparts (Garrett and ruel, 1999; 
menon, ruel and morris, 2000). 
other evidence supporting the 
advantage of urban children over their 
rural counterparts is provided by country-
level analyses. they show that urban 
children tend to have better access to 
health services, which in turn is reflected 
by higher immunization rates (ruel et al., 
1998). urban households are also more 
likely to have access to water and sanitation 
facilities, although they may come at 
high cost, especially for the poor (World 
resources institute, 1996). Finally, except for 
breastfeeding practices, which are more likely 
to be optimal among rural mothers, children’s 
diets in urban areas are generally more 
diverse and more likely to include nutrient-
rich foods such as meat, dairy products 
and fresh fruits and vegetables (ruel, 
2000; Arimond and ruel, 2002). examples 
from iFPri’s analysis of 11 demographic 
and health surveys show the consistently 
higher intake of milk and meat products by 
toddlers in urban areas compared with rural 
areas (Arimond and ruel, 2004). 
thus, the lower prevalence of 
undernutrition among children in urban 
areas appears to be the result of the 
cumulative effect of a series of more 
favourable socio-economic conditions, 
which in turn lead to a healthier 
environment and better feeding and caring 
practices for children. 
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
15
deficiency in vitamin A impairs normal 
functioning of the visual system and 
maintenance of cell function for growth, 
red blood cell production, immunity and 
reproduction (WHo, 2009). Vitamin A 
deficiency is the leading cause of blindness 
in children. in 2007, 163 million children 
under five in developing countries were 
estimated to be vitamin A deficient, with a 
prevalence of about 31 percent, down from 
approximately 36 percent in 1990 (unsCn, 
2010).
9
iron is important for red blood cell 
production. A deficiency in iron intake leads 
to anaemia (other factors also contribute 
to anaemia, but iron deficiency is the main 
cause). iron-deficiency anaemia negatively 
affects the cognitive development of 
children, pregnancy outcomes, maternal 
mortality and the work capacity of adults. 
estimates indicate modest progress overall 
in reducing iron-deficiency anaemia among 
children under five and pregnant and non-
pregnant women (unsCn, 2010).
iodine deficiency impairs the mental 
function of 18 million children born each 
year. overall, iodine deficiency – as measured 
by both total goitre rate and low urinary 
iodine – is falling. estimates indicate that 
goitre prevalence (indicative of an extended 
period of deprivation, assessed in adults and/
or children) in developing countries fell from 
around 16 percent to 13 percent between 
1995–2000 and 2001–07 (regional averages 
shown for only two time periods in Figure 2 
due to data limitations). Low urinary iodine 
(indicative of a current iodine deficiency) 
fell from around 37 percent to 33 percent 
(unsCn, 2010).
10
despite considerable variation at country 
level (see Annex table), a number of regional 
and subregional trends and patterns in 
stunting and micronutrient deficiencies 
are discernible, as shown in Figure 2 and 
  The UNSCN (2010) estimates of the prevalence of 
vitamin A, iodine and anaemia deficiencies at the world, 
developing region and regional levels presented in Figure 
2 are slightly different from those presented in the Annex 
table. The latter are calculated using weighted averages 
of the country prevalences reported in the Micronutrient 
Initiative (2009) report.
10   
Both sets of estimates are based on multivariate 
models applied to all countries for those time periods. The 
estimates are not very different from those obtained by 
simply averaging over the available surveys (UNSCN, 2010).
the Annex table.
11
in general, sub-saharan 
Africa and southern Asia have high levels of 
stunting and micronutrient deficiencies, with 
relatively modest improvements over the last 
two decades. Prevalence rates for stunting 
and micronutrient deficiencies are relatively 
low in Latin America and the Caribbean. 
in terms of numbers, most of the severely 
affected population lives in Asia, but with 
wide subregional variation. 
Overweight and obesity 
overweight and obesity, defined as abnormal 
or excessive fat accumulation that may 
impair health (WHo, 2013a), are most 
commonly measured using bmi (see footnote 
8 and box 4). A high body mass index is 
recognized as increasing the likelihood 
of incurring various non-communicable 
diseases and health problems, including 
cardiovascular disease, diabetes, various 
cancers and osteoarthritis (WHo, 2011a). the 
health risks associated with overweight and 
obesity increase with the degree of excess 
body fat.
the global prevalence of combined 
overweight and obesity has risen in all 
regions, with prevalence among adults 
increasing from 24 percent to 34 percent 
between 1980 and 2008. the prevalence of 
obesity has increased even faster, doubling 
from 6 percent to 12 percent. (Figure 3) 
(stevens et al., 2012).
the prevalence of overweight and obesity 
is increasing in nearly all countries, even 
in low-income countries where it coexists 
with high rates of undernutrition and 
micronutrient deficiencies. stevens et al. 
(2012) found that, in 2008, Central and south 
America, north Africa and the middle east, 
northern America and southern Africa were 
the subregions with the highest prevalence 
of obesity (ranging from 27 percent to 
31 percent).  
Social and economic costs of malnutrition
the social and economic costs of malnutrition 
can be quantified in different ways, although 
any methodology has limitations. disability-
adjusted life years (dALys) measure the 
social burden of disease, or the health gap 
11   Regional groupings follow the M49 UN classification. For 
more details, see Statistical annex.
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
16
between current health status and an ideal 
situation where everyone lives into old 
age, free of disease and disability (WHo, 
2008a). one dALy represents the loss of the 
equivalent of one full year of “healthy” life. 
dALys are used in a number of ways in 
making health policy decisions, including 
identifying national disease control priorities 
and allocating time for health practitioners 
and resources across health interventions 
and r&d (World bank, 2006b). because 
the dALy framework takes into account 
the interrelationships between nutrition, 
health and well-being (stein et al., 2005), 
it can also be used in economic analyses 
and assessments of the cost-effectiveness of 
health and nutrition interventions to assess 
the relative progress of health policies across 
countries (robberstadt, 2005; suárez, 2011). 
the most recent work on the global 
burden of disease shows that child and 
maternal malnutrition still imposes by 
far the largest nutrition-related health 
burden globally, with more than 166 million 
dALys lost per year in 2010 compared 
with 94 million dALys lost due to adult 
overweight and obesity (table 1). Worldwide, 
dALys attributed to high bmi (overweight 
and obesity) and related risk factors, such 
as diabetes and high blood pressure, 
have increased dramatically, while those 
attributed to child and maternal malnutrition 
have decreased. However, in most of sub-
saharan Africa, child underweight remains 
Notes: *Data for stunting, vitamin A deficiency and anaemia data refer to children under five years of age; data for low 
urinary iodine refer to the entire population.
**Anaemia is caused by several conditions, including iron deficiency.
Sources: Authors’ compilation using data on stunting from UNICEF, WHO and The World Bank, 2012 (see also the Annex 
table of this report), and data on vitamin A deficiency, anaemia and low urinary iodine from UNSCN, 2010.
Percentage of children
Africa
Asia
Developing regions
Latin America and the Caribbean
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
1990
1995
2000
2005
2011
1990
1995
2000
2005
2007
2000
2005
2007
2000−2007
1995−2000
Stunting
Vitamin A deficiency
Anaemia** 
Low urinary iodine
Africa
Asia
Latin America and the Caribbean
Oceania
Developing regions
FIGURE 2
Prevalence of stunting, anaemia and micronutrient deficiencies among children,*
by developing region
Percentage of children
Percentage of children
Percentage of population
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested