FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
17
FIGURE 3
Prevalence of overweight and obesity among adults, by region
Sources: Authors’ calculations using data presented in Finucane et al., 2011 and Stevens et al., 2012.
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
1980 2008
Africa
Asia
Latin 
America 
and the 
Caribbean
Oceania
Asia 
and 
Oceania
Europe
Northern 
America
World
Developing regions
Developed regions
Obesity
Overweight, excluding obesity
1980 2008 1980 2008 1980 2008 1980 2008 1980 2008 1980 2008 1980 2008
Percentage
boX 4
Limitations of using the body mass index in measuring excessive body fat
body mass index (bmi) is a convenient and 
widely available measure of underweight, 
overweight and obesity. it is a proxy 
measure of excessive body fat. bmi does 
not distinguish between weight from 
fatty tissue and that from muscle tissue; 
nor does it indicate how an individual’s 
body mass is distributed. People who 
carry a disproportionate amount of 
weight around their abdomen are at a 
higher risk of various health problems; 
waist circumference can therefore be 
a useful measure to gain additional 
insight, but it is measured less often and 
less easily than bmi (national obesity 
observatory, 2009).
bmi classifications were established 
based on risks of type 2 diabetes and 
cardiovascular disease, but populations 
and individuals vary in terms of how bmi 
relates to both body fat composition and 
the prevalence of disease (WHo, 2000). 
the limitations of the international bmi 
classifications are particularly evident 
among Asian populations. For example, 
in 2002 an expert group, convened by the 
World Health organization (WHo), found 
that the Asian populations considered 
have a higher percentage of body fat 
as well as higher incidence of diabetes 
and cardiovascular disease at lower 
bmis than do Caucasians (controlling for 
age and sex). However, the experts also 
found differences in the appropriate 
bmi cut-off points among the Asian 
populations themselves. the expert 
group decided to maintain the existing 
international standard classifications, but 
also recommended the development of an 
additional classification system for Asian 
populations that uses lower cut-offs and 
encouraged the use of country-specific 
cut-offs and the waist circumference 
measure (nishida, 2004). 
Convert pdf to powerpoint - control Library platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint - control Library platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
18
the leading risk factor underlying the disease 
burden (Lim et al., 2012).
Population-adjusted dALys show substantial 
decreases in the burden of underweight, one 
of the components of child and maternal 
malnutrition (table 1).
12
nevertheless, they 
also show that the burden of underweight 
remains particularly high in sub-saharan Africa 
and in southern Asia. Population-adjusted 
dALys further show that in most developing 
regions underweight imposes a much larger 
cost than overweight and obesity (for their 
respective reference populations). Conversely, 
in Latin America and the Caribbean as well 
12   Population refers to the particular population group, 
i.e. children under five for underweight and adults for 
overweight and obesity. 
as in some Asian subregions, overweight 
and obesity impose a larger burden than 
underweight. in several developing regions, 
notably oceania, the burden of overweight 
and obesity per 1 000 population is higher 
than in developed regions. 
beyond the social costs of malnutrition 
reflected in dALys, malnutrition also imposes 
economic costs on society. As noted in Chapter 
1, the economic costs of undernutrition, which 
arise through its negative effects on human 
capital formation (physical and cognitive 
development), productivity, poverty reduction 
and economic growth, may reach as high 
as 2–3 percent of global GdP (World bank, 
2006a). these costs can be much higher in 
individual countries than the global average 
implies. For example, one study estimated 
TABLE 1
Disability-adjusted life years in 1990 and 2010, by malnutrition-related risk factor, population group and region
REGION
CHILD AND 
MATERNAL 
MALNUTRITION
UNDERWEIGHT
OvERWEIGHT AND OBESITY
Total DALYs 
(Thousands)
Total DALYs 
(Thousands)
DALYS per 1 000 
population 
(Number)
Total DALYs 
(Thousands)
DALYs per 1 000 
population 
(Number)
1990
2010
1990
2010
1990
2010
1990
2010
1990
2010
World
339 951
166 147
197 774
77 346
313
121
51 613
93 840
20
25
Developed regions
2 243
1 731
160
51
2
1
29 956
37 959
41
44
Developing regions
337 708
164 416
197 614
77 294
356
135
21 657
55 882
12
19
Africa
121 492
78 017
76 983
43 990
694
278
3 571
9 605
15
24
eastern Africa
42 123
21 485
27 702
11 148
779
205
353
1 231
5
11
middle Africa
18 445
17 870
12 402
11 152
890
488
157
572
6
13
northern Africa
10 839
4 740
4 860
1 612
216
68
2 030
4 773
36
47
southern Africa
2 680
1 814
930
382
155
63
620
1 442
36
51
Western Africa
47 405
32 108
31 089
19 696
947
383
412
1 588
6
14
Asia
197 888
80 070
115 049
32 210
297
90
12 955
34 551
9
16
Central Asia
3 182
1 264
967
169
133
27
953
1 709
43
57
eastern Asia
21 498
4 645
6 715
347
53
4
5 427
13 331
9
14
southern Asia
138 946
60 582
89 609
27 325
514
150
2 953
9 281
6
11
south-eastern Asia
27 971
9 736
15 490
3 318
270
61
1 045
5 032
5
16
Western Asia
6 291
3 843
2 269
1 051
104
41
2 577
5 198
42
45
Latin America and the Caribbean
17 821
6 043
5 292
979
94
18
5 062
11 449
26
36
Caribbean
2 559
1 073
849
252
204
67
401
854
25
38
Central America
5 437
1 491
2 124
366
133
22
1 228
3 309
28
42
south America
9 826
3 479
2 319
361
64
11
3 433
7 286
25
34
Oceania
507
286
290
115
302
87
69
276
30
67
Notes: dALy (disability-adjusted life year) estimates for child and maternal malnutrition include factors such as child underweight, iron deficiency, 
vitamin A deficiency, zinc deficiency and suboptimal breastfeeding. they also include maternal haemorrhage and maternal sepsis and iron-deficiency 
anaemia among women. estimates for overweight and obesity refer to adults aged 25 and older. 
Source: Compiled by the institute for Health metrics and evaluation using data presented in Lim et al., 2012 from the Global burden of disease study 
2010.
control Library platform:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
19
the total cost of underweight for five Central 
American countries and the dominican 
republic at us$6.7 billion, ranging from 
1.7 percent to 11.4 percent of GdP (martínez 
and Fernández, 2008). Around 90 percent of 
the cost was accounted for by productivity 
losses due to higher mortality and lower 
educational attainment. 
the economic costs of undernutrition are 
cumulative through an inter-generational life 
cycle of deprivation. An estimated 15.5 percent 
of babies are born each year with low birth 
weight (unsCn, 2010). Low birth weight, 
childhood undernutrition, exposure to poor 
sanitary conditions and inadequate health 
care are reflected in poor physical growth and 
mental development, resulting in lower adult 
productivity.
13
in addition, the “developmental 
origins of adult disease” hypothesis (also 
known as the barker hypothesis) posits 
that low birth weight has lasting negative 
health effects, such as being at greater risk 
of overweight, diabetes and coronary heart 
disease in adulthood (de boo and Harding, 
2006). more insidiously, stunted girls grow up 
to be stunted mothers, and maternal stunting 
is one of the strongest predictors for giving 
birth to a low-birth-weight infant. maternal 
and child malnutrition thus perpetuate the 
cycle of poverty. 
micronutrient deficiencies, as distinct from 
undernutrition, also impose significant costs 
on society. the median total economic loss 
due to physical and cognitive impairment 
resulting from anaemia was estimated 
at 4 percent of GdP for ten developing 
countries, ranging from 2 percent in 
Honduras to 8 percent in bangladesh (Horton 
and ross, 2003). this study also suggested that 
while the productivity losses associated with 
anaemia are higher for individuals who must 
perform heavy manual work (17 percent), 
they are also serious for those doing light 
manual work (5 percent) and cognitive tasks 
(4 percent). Further evidence shows that 
treating anaemia can increase productivity 
even for people whose work is not physically 
demanding (schaetzel and sankar, 2002).
Vitamin and mineral deficiencies have been 
estimated to represent an annual loss of 
13   
Alderman and Behrman (2004) calculate that the 
economic benefits from preventing one child from being 
born with a low birth-weight are about US$580 (the 
present discounted value).
between 0.2 and 0.4 percent of GdP in China; 
this represents a loss of us$2.5–5.0 billion 
(World bank, 2006a). ma et al. (2007) found 
that actions to solve iron and zinc deficiencies in 
China would cost less than 0.3 percent of GdP, 
but failure to take action could result in a loss 
of 2–3 percent of GdP. For india, stein and Qaim 
(2007) estimated that the combined economic 
cost of iron-deficiency anaemia, zinc deficiency, 
vitamin A deficiency and iodine deficiency 
amounts to around 2.5 percent of GdP.
overweight and obesity also impose 
economic costs on society directly through 
increased health care spending and indirectly 
through reduced economic productivity. 
most of the losses occur in high-income 
countries. A recent study by bloom et al. 
(2011) estimates a cumulative output loss 
due to non-communicable diseases, for which 
overweight and obesity are key risk factors, 
of us$47 trillion over the next two decades; 
assuming a 5 percent rate of inflation, this 
would amount to around us$1.4 trillion, or 
2 percent of global GdP in 2010.
A meta-analysis of 32 studies from 1990 to 
2009 compared estimates of the direct costs 
of health care spending related to overweight 
and obesity in several high-income countries 
as well as in brazil and China. estimates of the 
direct costs for adults ranged from 0.7 percent 
to 9.1 percent of the individual countries’ 
total health care expenditures. the cost of 
health care for overweight and obese people 
is around 30 percent higher than for other 
people (Withrow and Alter, 2010). in the 
united states of America, around 10 percent 
of total health care spending is obesity-
related (Finkelstein et al., 2009). 
total costs (direct and indirect costs) 
are, of course, higher. total costs arising 
from overweight and obesity in the united 
Kingdom were estimated at £20 billion in 
2007 (Government office for science, 2012). 
the indirect costs of overweight and obesity 
among adults in China were estimated at 
around us$43.5 billion (3.6 percent of GnP) 
in 2000, compared with direct costs of around 
us$5.9 billion (0.5 percent of GnP) (Popkin et 
al., 2006). 
Multiple burdens of malnutrition
the burdens of malnutrition can overlap, 
as shown in Figure 4. it is common to 
describe a double or even triple burden of 
malnutrition (FAo, iFAd and WFP, 2012), yet 
control Library platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to Image; Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF;
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
20
the three types of malnutrition considered 
here (designated as A = child stunting, 
b = child micronutrient deficiencies and 
C = adult obesity) occur in different 
combinations around the world. the figure 
also shows the very few countries in the 
world that have no significant malnutrition 
problems in these categories.
the first group (Ab) includes countries 
where rates of child stunting and 
micronutrient deficiencies are classified by 
the World Health organization (WHo) as 
moderate or severe. All countries where 
stunting is a public health concern also 
have prevalence rates for micronutrient 
deficiencies classified by WHo as moderate 
or severe. the second group (b) includes 
countries where stunting rates have declined 
but micronutrient deficiencies remain 
widespread. these countries illustrate that 
simply addressing the factors influencing 
stunting, including increasing the energy 
content of diets, is not sufficient to provide 
the necessary range of micronutrients. 
the next three groups include countries 
where the prevalence of adult obesity exceeds 
the global median. the third (AbC) includes 
countries where stunting, micronutrient 
deficiencies and obesity occur simultaneously. 
the fourth (bC) includes countries where 
the prevalence of stunting has declined 
but micronutrient deficiencies remain and 
obesity is a significant problem. Countries 
in the fifth group (C) have reduced stunting 
and micronutrient deficiencies but have 
serious obesity problems. only 14 countries 
in this sample, all of them high-income 
countries, have no malnutrition problems of 
public health significance according to the 
malnutrition types and thresholds defined 
here.
14
 
Food system transformation and 
malnutrition 
the variations in malnutrition shown in 
Figure 4 reflect the changes in diets and 
lifestyles, known as the nutrition transition, 
that occur with economic growth and 
transformation of the food system. this 
14   Most of these countries may have nutrition-related 
public health concerns, but at rates below the thresholds 
defined here. 
process, also commonly referred to as 
agricultural transformation or the food 
system revolution, is typically characterized 
by rising labour productivity in agriculture, 
declining shares of population in agriculture 
and increasing rates of urbanization. As 
the food system transforms, centralized 
food-processing facilities develop along 
with large-scale wholesale and logistics 
companies, supermarkets emerge in the 
retail sector and fast-food restaurants 
become widespread. the transformation thus 
affects the whole system, changing the ways 
food is produced, harvested, stored, traded, 
processed, distributed, sold and consumed 
(reardon and timmer, 2012). 
Figure 5 presents a stylized depiction of 
this transformation. in subsistence farming, 
the food system is basically “closed“ – 
producers essentially consume what they 
produce. With economic development, 
subsistence farming gives way to commercial 
agriculture in which producers and 
consumers are increasingly separated in space 
and time and their interactions are mediated 
via markets. in the later stages of the food 
system transformation, very little overlap 
exists between producers and consumers and 
the system “opens up”, reaching beyond the 
local economy to tie together producers and 
consumers, who may even live in different 
countries. the introduction of new actors 
may lead to consolidation of certain stages 
(for example, when wholesalers affiliated 
with supermarket chains buy directly from 
the producers and bypass the previous 
multiplicity of rural traders), but with 
additional processing the actual number of 
actors in the system may increase.  
the relationships in Figure 6 are striking. 
All countries with agricultural GdP per 
worker below us$1 000 have severe 
problems of stunting and micronutrient 
deficiencies (category Ab as described 
above). A large share of the population in 
these countries is rural and earns a living 
from agriculture. in burundi, for example, 
90 percent of the economically active 
population are in agriculture, and for 
all countries in this category this share is 
62 percent. 
As labour productivity rises to us$1 000–
4 499 per worker, stunting declines sharply 
but all countries continue to suffer from 
micronutrient deficiencies, either alone 
control Library platform:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. C# Demo: Convert PowerPoint to PDF Document. Add references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
www.rasteredge.com
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
21
FiGure 4  
The multiple burdens of malnutrition
Category A: Child stunting
Category B: Child micronutrient deficiencies
Africa: Angola, benin, botswana, burkina Faso, burundi, Cameroon, 
Central African republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, democratic republic 
of the Congo, Côte d’ivoire, djibouti, equatorial Guinea, eritrea, ethiopia, 
Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, 
madagascar, malawi, mali, mauritania, mozambique, namibia, niger, 
nigeria, rwanda, sao tome and Principe, senegal, sierra Leone, somalia, 
sudan,* togo, united republic of tanzania, uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Asia: Afghanistan, bangladesh, bhutan, Cambodia, india, indonesia, 
democratic People’s republic of Korea, Lao People’s democratic republic, 
maldives, mongolia, myanmar, nepal, Pakistan, Papua new Guinea, 
Philippines, tajikistan, turkmenistan, timor-Leste, Viet nam, yemen
Latin America and the Caribbean: bolivia (Plurinational state of), Haiti, 
Honduras
Africa: egypt, Libya, south Africa, swaziland
Asia: Armenia, Azerbaijan, iraq, syrian Arab 
republic
Europe: Albania
Latin America and the Caribbean: belize, ecuador, 
el salvador, Guatemala
Oceania: nauru, solomon islands, Vanuatu
Africa: Algeria, morocco
Asia: brunei darussalam, China, Kyrgyzstan, malaysia, 
sri Lanka, thailand, uzbekistan
Europe: estonia, romania
Latin America and the Caribbean: brazil, Colombia, 
Guyana, Paraguay, Peru
Africa: tunisia
Asia: Georgia, iran (islamic rep. of), Jordan, 
Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lebanon, oman, saudi Arabia, 
turkey, united Arab emirates
Europe: belarus, bosnia and Herzegovina, bulgaria, 
Croatia, Latvia, Lithuania, the former yugoslav republic 
of macedonia, montenegro, Poland, republic of 
moldova, russian Federation, serbia, slovakia, ukraine
Latin America and the Caribbean: Argentina, Chile, 
Costa rica, Cuba, dominica, dominican republic, 
Jamaica, mexico, Panama, suriname, trinidad and 
tobago, uruguay, Venezuela (bolivarian rep. of)
Oceania: samoa, tuvalu
Category C: Adult obesity
Asia: Cyprus, israel
Europe: Andorra, Czech republic, Germany, Hungary, iceland, ireland, Portugal, Luxembourg, malta, slovenia, spain, united Kingdom
Northern America: Canada, united states of America
Oceania: Australia, new Zealand
Malnutrition category:
stunting and micronutrient deficiencies (Ab)  
stunting, micronutrient deficiencies and obesity (AbC)
micronutrient deficiencies (b)  
obesity (C)
micronutrient deficiencies and obesity (bC)   
no malnutrition problem (d)
Category D: No malnutrition problem of public health significance
Africa: mauritius
Asia: Japan, republic of Korea, singapore
Europe: Austria, belgium, denmark, Finland, France, Greece, italy, netherlands, norway, sweden, switzerland
Notes: data for stunting among children are from uniCeF, WHo and the World bank (2012). A country is designated as having a public health threat 
related to stunting if at least 20 percent of its children are stunted (WHo, 2013b); data on stunting are not available for some high-income countries and 
these countries are assumed to have a prevalence of stunting that is far lower than 20 percent. data on anaemia and vitamin A deficiency among children 
are from micronutrient initiative (2009). Countries face micronutrient deficiency-related public health threats if 10 percent or more of their children are 
deficient in vitamin A (WHo, 2009) or if at least 20 percent of children suffer from anaemia (WHo, 2008b). Countries with a per capita GdP of at least 
us$15 000 are assumed to be free of vitamin A deficiency (micronutrient initiative, 2009). data on obesity among adults are from WHo (2013c). Countries 
where 20 percent or more of the adult population are obese (equivalent to the global median prevalence for that indicator) are considered to be facing a 
public health threat related to obesity. 
* data for sudan was collected prior to 2011 and refer therefore to sudan and south sudan. 
Source: Croppenstedt et al., 2013. see also Annex table.
control Library platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
22
Low levels of productivity 
and market integration
Consumers
Agricultural transformation
Producers
High levels of productivity 
and market integration
Consumers
Producers
Consumers
Producers
Source: FAO.
FIGURE 5
The food system transformation
FIGURE 6
Share of countries in each malnutrition category, by level of agricultural productivity
Notes: n is the number of countries characterized by each level of agricultural productivity. Agricultural productivity 
is derived by dividing agricultural GDP (in 2010 measured in current US dollars) by the population economically active 
in agriculture. Malnutrition categories are those illustrated in Figure 4.
Sources: Authors’ calculations using agricultural GDP data from the United Nations (2012) and data on agricultural 
workers from FAO, 2013. Sources used to determine malnutrition categories are those used for Figure 4.
100
80
60
40
20
0
Low (≤ US$999) 
Medium (US$1 000–4 499)  High (US$4 500–11 999)  Very high (≥ US$12 000)
Percentage of countries
Level of agricultural productivity (agricultural GDP per worker)
n = 38 
n = 52 
n = 36 
n = 44 
Malnutrition category:
Stunting and micronutrient deficiencies (AB)
Stunting, micronutrient deficiencies and obesity (ABC)
Micronutrient deficiencies (B) 
Obesity (C)
Micronutrient deficiencies and obesity (BC) 
No malnutrition problem (D)
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
23
(category b) or in combination with stunting 
(Ab), obesity (bC) or both (AbC). Already, 
at this medium level of agricultural labour 
productivity, obesity is a public health problem 
in more than one-third of all countries, 
always in combination with micronutrient 
deficiencies. Agriculture is still an important 
part of the economy in these countries, 
although the average share of the labour 
force in agriculture is lower, at 45 percent. 
As labour productivity in agriculture rises 
above us$4 500, few countries continue to 
suffer from stunting, though most that do 
also add obesity to their woes (AbC). the 
majority of these relatively well-off countries 
suffer from micronutrient deficiencies 
and obesity (bC). once agricultural labour 
productivity reaches very high levels per-
worker, above us$12 000, a majority of 
countries manage to eliminate micronutrient 
deficiencies and a significant number 
manage to solve all three malnutrition 
problems. these countries typically have 
a very small share of the population in 
agriculture, are highly urbanized and have 
food systems that are globally integrated. 
Figure 7 depicts this transition as it 
accompanies greater urbanization. the 
transformation of the malnutrition situation 
is remarkable and strikingly similar to that 
shown by growth in agricultural labour 
productivity: stunting falls and obesity 
rises almost in tandem. At the same time, 
micronutrient deficiencies fall very slowly 
as the rates of urbanization rise, and they 
remain remarkably prevalent even in higher-
income, highly urbanized countries. 
these changes in the food system, in 
agriculture and in levels of urbanization pose 
significant challenges. the nature of the 
malnutrition problem will itself transition, 
but problems of undernutrition, associated 
with deprivation, will continue to pose a 
major nutritional challenge, especially in 
low-income countries.   
Dietary diversity in changing food 
systems 
one of the key means of addressing 
micronutrient deficiencies – which seem to 
persist even with agricultural transformation, 
increased urbanization and higher incomes 
FIGURE 7
Share of countries in each malnutrition category, by degree of urbanization
Notes: n is the number of countries characterized by each degree of urbanization. The degree of urbanization 
is the share of the urban population in the total population. Malnutrition categories are those illustrated in Figure 4.
Sources: Authors’ calculations, using data for total and urban population from FAO, 2013. Sources used to determine 
malnutrition categories are those used for Figure 4.
100
80
60
40
20
0
Low (≤ 30%) 
Medium (30–49.9%) 
High (50–69.9%) 
Very high (≥ 70%)
Percentage of countries
Degree of urbanization (urban share of population) 
n = 30 
n = 38 
n = 52 
n = 50
Malnutrition category:
Stunting and micronutrient deficiencies (AB)
Stunting, micronutrient deficiencies and obesity (ABC)
Micronutrient deficiencies (B) 
Obesity (C)
Micronutrient deficiencies and obesity (BC) 
No malnutrition problem (D)
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
24
– is through consumption of a high-quality, 
diverse diet. the relationship between 
dietary diversity and changes in food 
systems is complex. dietary diversity is 
determined by relative prices, incomes and 
the tastes and preferences of individuals 
and households, all of which are affected 
by changes in food systems. evidence at the 
global level strongly suggests that rising 
household incomes lead to greater variety 
in the diet. At higher incomes, an increasing 
share of the household’s diet comes from 
animal products, vegetable oils and fruits 
and vegetables, that is, non-staples. meat 
and dairy consumption increases strongly 
with income growth; fruit and vegetable 
consumption increases also but more slowly, 
and consumption of cereals and pulses 
declines (regmi et al., 2001). 
Household surveys from bangladesh, 
egypt, Ghana, india, Kenya, malawi, mexico, 
mozambique and the Philippines also find 
that dietary diversity is strongly associated 
with household consumption expenditure 
(Hoddinott and yohannes, 2002). evidence 
from bangladesh shows that income growth 
leads to strong growth in expenditures on 
meat, fish, fruits and eggs but little change in 
expenditure on rice, a staple (thorne-Lyman 
et al., 2010). 
Absolute and relative price changes 
also significantly affect household dietary 
diversity. if prices rise, consumers tend 
to maintain their level of staple food 
consumption by switching to cheaper, less- 
diverse and nutritionally inferior diets. in 
indonesia, when staple food prices rose 
sharply following the Asian financial crisis, 
poor households protected staple food 
consumption and reduced non-staples, 
which reduced dietary diversity and 
adversely affected nutritional status (block 
et al., 2004). in bangladesh, it is estimated 
that a 50 percent increase in the price of 
both staple foods (such as rice) and non-
staple foods (such as meat, milk, fruits and 
vegetables) would lead consumers to reduce 
staple food intake by only 15 percent but 
reduce non-staple foods disproportionately 
more (bouis, eozenou and rahman, 2011). 
Households may react similarly to price 
variations that accompany seasonality; 
for example, a save the Children pilot 
programme in the united republic of 
tanzania found that dietary diversity 
diminished during the lean season before 
harvest (nugent, 2011). in such situations, 
social protection instruments are needed to 
avoid a deterioration in nutritional outcomes 
as well as to help households maintain assets, 
both human and physical, so as to prevent a 
short-term shock from turning into a long-
term disaster.
Conclusions and key messages
the nature of the malnutrition burden facing 
the world is increasingly complex. significant 
progress has been made in reducing 
food insecurity, undernourishment and 
undernutrition; however, prevalence rates 
remain high in some regions, most notably 
in sub-saharan Africa and in southern Asia. 
At the same time, micronutrient deficiencies 
remain stubbornly high and rates of 
overweight and obesity are rising rapidly 
in many regions, even in countries where 
undernutrition persists.
the social and economic costs of 
undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, 
and overweight and obesity are high. 
While costs associated with overweight and 
obesity are rising rapidly, those associated 
with undernutrition and micronutrient 
deficiencies remain much higher both in 
absolute terms of dALys and relative to 
the affected populations. the economic 
cost of undernutrition may reach as high as 
2–3 percent of GdP in developing countries. 
moreover, undernutrition is one of the 
main pathways through which poverty is 
transmitted from one generation to the next. 
evidence shows that rates of 
undernutrition, as measured by child 
stunting, tend to fall with per capita income 
growth and the transformation of the food 
system, but progress does not come quickly 
and it is not automatic. micronutrient 
deficiencies are even more persistent than 
stunting, and obesity can emerge even at 
fairly early stages of economic development 
and food system transformation. 
dietary diversity, given adequate levels of 
energy consumption, is a key determinant 
of nutritional outcomes but it is sensitive to 
changes in income levels and prices of staple 
and non-staple foods. in the face of a shock 
to food prices or incomes, households tend 
to maintain a minimum level of staple food 
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
25
consumption even if it means sacrificing 
more nutritious foods that are necessary to 
provide the vitamins and minerals needed 
for good health. 
Food system transformation and the 
nutrition transition go hand in hand. to 
address the nutritional challenges in a given 
context it is first necessary to understand 
the nature of the food system and identify 
key entry points throughout the system. the 
next three chapters of this report look at the 
various stages of the food system to identify 
the major pathways through which food 
system interventions can improve nutritional 
outcomes.
Key messages
•  malnutrition in all its forms imposes 
unacceptably high costs on society in 
human and economic terms. Globally, 
the social burdens associated with 
undernutrition and micronutrient 
deficiencies are still much larger than 
those associated with overweight and 
obesity. rural people in low- and middle-
income countries bear by far the highest 
burden of malnutrition. Addressing 
undernutrition and micronutrient 
deficiencies must remain the highest 
priority of the global nutrition 
community, even as efforts are made 
to prevent or reverse the emergence of 
obesity.
•  All forms of malnutrition share a 
common cause: inappropriate diets 
that provide inadequate, unbalanced 
or excessive macronutrients and 
micronutrients. the only sustainable 
means of addressing malnutrition is 
through the consumption of a high-
quality, diverse diet that provides 
adequate but not excessive energy. 
Food systems determine the availability, 
affordability, diversity and quality of the 
food supply and thus play a major role in 
shaping healthy diets.
•  income growth, whether from agriculture 
or other sources, is closely associated 
with reductions in undernutrition, but 
income growth alone is not enough. it 
must be accompanied by specific actions 
aimed at improving dietary adequacy 
and quality if rapid progress is to be 
made in eradicating undernutrition and 
micronutrient deficiencies.
•  dietary diversity is a key determinant 
of nutritional outcomes, but the 
consumption of nutrient-dense foods is 
very sensitive to income and price shocks, 
especially for low-income consumers. 
Protecting the nutritional quality of diets 
– not just the adequacy of staple food 
consumption – should be a priority for 
policy-makers.
•  the malnutrition burden in a country 
changes rapidly with the transformation 
of the food system. Policy-makers must 
therefore understand the specific nature 
of the malnutrition problem to design 
interventions throughout the food 
system. up-to-date data and analysis are 
necessary to support decision-making.
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
26
3.  Agricultural production 
for better nutrition
15
15 
This chapter is based in part on Miller and Welch (2012).
world food and feed prices would be 35– 
65 percent higher, average caloric availability 
11–13 percent lower and the percentage 
of children malnourished in developing 
countries 6–8 percent higher had the Green 
revolution not occurred (evenson and 
rosegrant, 2003).
Agricultural r&d for staple food 
productivity growth continues to be one 
of the most effective means of reducing 
hunger and food insecurity. estimates from 
madagascar show that a doubling of rice 
yields would reduce the share of households 
that are food-insecure by 38 percent, shorten 
the average hungry period by one-third, 
increase real unskilled wages in the lean 
season by 89 percent (due to both price 
and labour demand effects) and benefit all 
of the poor, including unskilled workers, 
consumers and net-selling rice farmers. 
moreover, it would provide the biggest gains 
to the poorest through lower food prices 
and higher real wages for unskilled workers 
(minten and barrett, 2008). 
Productivity growth allows farmers to 
produce more food with the same amount 
of resources, making the sector more 
economically efficient and environmentally 
sustainable. Farmers benefit directly: they 
earn higher incomes and can use the extra 
production to enhance their own household 
food consumption. in a second round of 
benefits, productivity growth enables 
farmers to hire additional workers and buy 
other goods and services, creating “multiplier 
effects” that can ripple throughout the 
economy, stimulating overall economic 
growth and reducing poverty (Hayami et al., 
1978; david and otsuka, 1994). 
Agricultural growth has been found to be 
much more effective than general economic 
growth at reducing poverty for the very poor. 
Growth in agriculture reduces 1 dollar-a-day 
headcount poverty more than three times 
faster than growth in non-agricultural sectors 
(Christiaensen, demery and Kuhl, 2011). the 
many opportunities exist to increase the 
contribution of agricultural production to 
improving nutrition. this chapter reviews 
strategies for enhancing the nutritional 
performance of agricultural production 
in three main areas: making food more 
available and accessible; making food more 
diverse and production more sustainable; 
and making food itself more nutritious. 
Making food more available and 
accessible 
the most fundamental way in which 
agricultural production contributes to 
nutrition is by making food more available 
and affordable through agricultural 
productivity growth. this strategy is 
particularly appropriate in settings 
where undernutrition and micronutrient 
deficiencies are the primary malnutrition 
concern. the foundation of the strategy 
rests on enhancing the productivity of the 
agriculture sector and providing an enabling 
environment for agricultural investment 
and growth (FAo, 2012c). the economic 
pathways through which productivity growth 
in agriculture makes food more available 
and affordable are through income growth, 
broader economic growth and poverty 
reduction, and lower real food prices. 
Agricultural productivity growth and 
malnutrition 
one of the key drivers of agricultural 
productivity growth is agricultural r&d. the 
introduction of higher-yielding varieties 
of rice, wheat and maize during the Green 
revolution led to major improvements in 
nutrition through higher incomes and lower 
prices for staple foods (Alston, norton and 
Pardey, 1995). it has been estimated that 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested