FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
37
nutrition
17
Agricultural products reach consumers 
through food supply chains. each link in a 
food supply chain affects the availability, 
affordability, diversity and nutritional quality 
of foods. How foods are handled throughout 
a chain influences their nutritional content 
and prices as well as the ease with which 
consumers can access them. this, in turn, 
shapes consumer choices, dietary patterns 
and nutritional outcomes.
opportunities exist at each link in the chain 
to deliver more diverse and nutritious foods. 
For example, proper household storage can 
preserve nutrients; food processors can use 
more nutritious inputs or can fortify foods 
during processing; logistics firms can employ 
nutrient-preserving techniques for storage 
and transport; and retailers can provide a 
more diverse range of foods consistently 
throughout the year. At every link in the 
chain, better technologies and management 
practices can preserve nutrients, reduce food 
losses and waste, and enhance efficiency and 
lower prices for nutritious foods. 
this chapter reviews (i) transformations in 
traditional and modern food supply chains and 
the general impact pathways through which 
supply chains influence nutritional outcomes 
and (ii) specific opportunities to improve 
nutritional performance throughout the supply 
chain, including improving efficiency, reducing 
nutrient waste and losses and enhancing the 
nutritional quality of foods.
Transformation of food supply 
chains
Food supply chains are changing in complex 
ways, driven by economic development, 
urbanization and social change and facilitated 
in many cases by policy reforms. modern 
supply chains led by large food processors, 
17   
This chapter is based in part on Gómez and Ricketts 
(2012). 
distributors and retailers are expanding 
rapidly in many developing countries, 
where they may complement rather than 
replace traditional supply chains. modern 
supply chains exist alongside and integrate 
to varying degrees with traditional supply 
chains such as farmer/traders, wet markets, 
small independent stores and street vendors 
(Gómez and ricketts, 2012). At the same time, 
traditional farmers’ markets are re-emerging 
in many developed countries to satisfy 
consumer preferences for local, seasonal and 
artisanal products. the result is great diversity 
in the way food is supplied to consumers. 
supply chains differ according to 
the country context, the location and 
characteristics of producers and consumers, 
and the goods themselves (e.g. fresh 
produce, dairy products or processed goods). 
some of the modern food companies are 
international in scope and operate global 
procurement and distribution activities, 
although many are national or regional food 
companies that have emerged in Africa, Asia 
and Latin America and the Caribbean.
the increased industrialization of the 
food system has been accompanied by rapid 
consolidation and increasing integration 
of the different segments of the food 
industry (reardon and timmer, 2012). this 
consolidation is also cross-boundary, with 
multinational food companies investing 
heavily in developing countries over the 
last few decades. international food 
companies are major investors, producers 
and retailers in developing countries, but 
international trade comprises only 10 percent 
of total processed food sales, meaning that 
90 percent of processed foods are produced 
domestically (regmi and Gehlhar, 2005). 
there is a high degree of market 
concentration in the food manufacturing 
and food retail sectors globally and in many 
countries (stuckler and nestle, 2012). this 
has raised concerns about the power of food 
companies over prices and also, increasingly, 
4.  Food supply chains for better 
Pdf picture to powerpoint - application Library utility:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf picture to powerpoint - application Library utility:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
38
over the types of product marketed, the 
intensity of marketing and changes in local 
food cultures (monteiro and Cannon, 2012). 
Traditional and modern supply chains 
for different foods
in the traditional food systems of most 
developing countries, consumers in rural 
and urban areas typically buy most of their 
food from small independent retailers. meat, 
fish, fruits, vegetables and bulk grains are 
typically sold in “wet markets” at roadside 
stands and open markets, while processed 
goods such as pasta, rice, packaged and 
canned items and some meat and dairy 
products are sold in small shops or kiosks. 
Fresh produce usually comes from farms in 
relatively close proximity to these markets 
and generally reflects local and seasonal 
production. Packaged and processed goods 
may be produced nationally or imported.
multiple links connect producers to 
consumers through intricate networks. 
numerous traders, wholesalers, retailers and 
other intermediaries procure products from 
local markets or directly from farmers and then 
channel them to the next link in the chain. 
traditional market systems can include large 
regional markets that function like distribution 
hubs as well as smaller, local, weekly markets 
with a more limited range of products. 
Goods ripple out from these markets to 
smaller retailers in both urban and rural areas 
(reardon, Henson and Gulati, 2010; reddy, 
murthy and meena, 2010; Gorton, sauer and 
supatpongkul, 2011; ruben et al., 2007).
As the food system transforms, wet 
markets (including those for fish and meat 
as well as other fresh produce) may continue 
to be prevalent, but larger stores with 
a wider range of goods may replace the 
smaller kiosks. Production, purchasing and 
processing units all tend to increase in scale. 
Agribusiness input suppliers, food processors 
and retailers drive the integration of these 
activities, each of which may manage its 
own procurement and distribution activities. 
supermarket chains begin to appear, often 
linked to foreign investors. they bring with 
them new technologies, more integrated 
supply chains and often greater links to their 
own suppliers outside the country. Although 
supermarkets establish themselves first in the 
largest cities, they subsequently spread to 
secondary cities (reardon and timmer, 2012). 
Diverse supply chains for diverse diets
despite the growth of supermarkets, 
traditional food systems are still the main 
avenue through which people in developing 
countries purchase most of their food. 
even in those developing countries where 
supermarkets emerged earliest and have 
penetrated most, they control only about 
50–60 percent of food retail. in most 
developing countries, including China and 
india, the spread of supermarkets started 
later and the corresponding food retail share 
is below 50 percent (reardon and Gulati, 
2008). traditional retail outlets continue to 
be the preferred avenue for most consumers 
to access fresh, unprocessed products, such 
as fruits and vegetables (Figure 8). in Kenya, 
nicaragua and Zambia, over 90 percent of all 
fruits and vegetables are purchased through 
traditional outlets. 
At the same time, sales of processed 
and packaged foods are growing quickly 
in developing countries (Figure 9), and 
this growth is likely to continue. evidence 
indicates that even low-income consumers 
buy processed and packaged foods in 
supermarkets (Cadilhon, moustier and 
Poole, 2006; Goldman, ramaswami and 
Krider, 2002), but, more interestingly, much 
of this growth is being fuelled by modern 
global food manufacturers selling products 
through traditional outlets in both urban 
and rural areas (euromonitor, 2011a). in 
india, for example, small independent 
grocers called kirana stores, ubiquitous in 
urban and rural areas, sold over 53 percent 
of packaged foods at the retail level in 
2010. the figure for similar outlets in brazil, 
called mercadinhos, was over 21 percent 
(euromonitor, 2011a). between 1996 and 
2002, while retailing of packaged foods 
in high-income countries grew by only 
2.5 percent in per capita terms, it grew by 
28 percent in lower-middle income countries 
and 12 percent in low-income countries 
(Hawkes et al., 2010).  
these examples show that aspects of 
traditional and modern systems exist in 
parallel and that the transformation of food 
systems is not a simple linear transformation 
from one to the other. in fact, integration 
between modern and traditional channels 
is often a key part of a corporate strategy. 
Following a successful business model used 
in eastern europe and in Latin America 
application Library utility:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
drawing As RaterEdgeDrawing = New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
39
and the Caribbean, major importers and 
supermarkets use packaged goods to link 
to traditional retailers and form mini-hubs 
for their products across the country. over 
time, they increase their knowledge of 
local markets and leverage their brands to 
increase market share. Later, they expand 
into high-value fruit, vegetable, dairy and 
meat product categories (Hawkes et al., 
2010; Gorton, sauer and supatpongkul, 2011; 
tschirley et al., 2010; mcKinsey, 2007; minten 
and reardon, 2008). reardon and timmer 
(2007) describe this business model in terms 
of waves, whereby supermarkets first enter 
FIGURE 8
Modern and traditional retail outlet shares of fresh fruit and vegetable market 
in selected countries
Notes: Countries are presented in ascending order of GDP per capita according to World Bank (2008) figures.
Sources: Kenya and Zambia: Tschirley et al., 2010; Nicaragua and Mexico:  Reardon, Henson and Gulati, 2010; 
Thailand: Gorton, Sauer and Supatpongkul, 2011; Turkey: Bignebat, Koc and Lemelilleur, 2009.
100
80
60
40
20
0
Traditional retail outlets
Modern retail outlets
Market share (percentage)
Kenya 
Nicaragua 
Zambia 
Thailand 
Mexico 
Turkey
FIGURE 9
Retail sales of packaged food, by region
Notes: The size of the bubbles denotes the value of retail sales in US dollars for 2011 at fixed 2011 exchange rates 
and prices. The market values range from US$40.7 million in Australasia to US$581.6 million in Western Europe. 
Percentage growth refers to the period 2010–11. 
Source: Authors’ compilation using data supplied by Euromonitor.
Percentage growth in retail volume
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
-1
-2
Asia and the Pacific
Australasia
Eastern Europe
Latin America 
and the Caribbean
Middle East 
and Africa
Northern America
Western Europe
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
Percentage growth in retail value
application Library utility:VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we display the method that We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
40
certain product categories (processed and 
packaged goods), geographies (urban areas 
first) and socio-economic segments (high-
income consumers) before expanding in 
other areas. 
this business model may be harder to 
implement for perishable foods such as 
fresh fruits and vegetables, because their 
production and distribution tend to be highly 
fragmented. seasonal production patterns 
combined with the perishable nature of 
fresh produce make it difficult for businesses 
to ensure a predictable, year-round supply, 
which is critical for supermarkets. these 
products also face higher non-tariff barriers, 
such as quality and safety standards, 
that limit international trade and global 
procurement. they also require energy-
intensive distribution infrastructure, such 
as refrigeration, which is often lacking in 
developing countries. 
the market shares accruing to modern 
and traditional vendors in the fresh fruit 
and vegetable and packaged foods markets 
appear to support this analysis. Figure 10 
shows statistics from mexico, thailand and 
turkey, all countries with high modern 
supermarket penetration. even in these 
countries, traditional vendors have a larger 
share than modern ones in sales of fresh 
fruits and vegetables (around 60–85 percent), 
while the reverse is true for packaged foods 
(between 40 and 50 percent). the same 
occurs in China, where modern retailers in 
the largest cities dominate packaged foods 
(with almost 80 percent of market share), 
but only around 22 percent of market share 
in vegetables (reardon, Henson and Gulati, 
2010).  
As with fruits and vegetables, animal-
source foods are also more likely to be 
accessed by developing-country households 
through traditional retail outlets (Jabbar, 
baker and Fadiga, 2010). For example, 
around 90 percent of households in ethiopia, 
across all income groups, buy their beef 
through a local butcher in a wet market. 
the situation is similar in Kenya (camel 
milk, meat), bangladesh (meat, dairy) and 
Viet nam (pork), with traditional shops still 
the predominant location for purchase, 
especially for low-income households 
(Jabbar, baker and Fadiga, 2010). these 
traditional outlets, therefore, seem to be the 
primary point of purchase for foods that are 
the primary sources of micronutrients. 
FIGURE 10
Modern and traditional retail outlet shares of fresh fruit and vegetable market 
and packaged food market in selected countries
Note: Packaged foods include breakfast foods as well as preserved, canned, frozen and other ready-to-consume items. 
Countries are presented in ascending order of GDP per capita according to World Bank (2008) figures.
Sources: Euromonitor, 2012 and 2011b; and Gorton, Sauer and Supatpongkul, 2011. 
100
80
60
40
20
0
Traditional retail outlets
Modern retail outlets
Market share (percentage)
Fresh fruit 
and vegetables
Thailand
Mexico
Turkey
Packaged 
foods
Fresh fruit 
and vegetables
Packaged 
foods
Fresh fruit 
and vegetables
Packaged 
foods
application Library utility:VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
VB.NET DLLs to Scale Image / Picture. There are two dlls that will be involved in the process of VB.NET image scaling, which are RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
C# users can set paragraph properties and create content such as run, footnote, endnote and picture in a paragraph. Create Picture in Paragraph.
www.rasteredge.com
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
41
traditional outlets also continue 
to be important for sales of staples, 
which contribute a large part of energy 
requirements. in Kenya and Zambia, 
traditional retail outlets account for 
60 percent or more of staple sales, even in 
urban areas (Jayne et al., 2010). 
despite the rise of modern supply chains, 
traditional supply chains are still important 
for certain products and to certain types of 
consumer. the advantages of traditional 
outlets, particularly with respect to 
perishable products, appear to arise from 
three main interconnecting factors: ability 
to offer products at low prices, considerable 
flexibility in product standards, and 
convenience for consumers due to flexible 
retail market locations (schipmann and 
Qaim, 2010; Wanyoike et al., 2010; Jabbar 
and Admassu, 2010; minten, 2008).
traditional retailers typically operate 
under structures that give them 
pricing advantages relative to modern 
supermarkets. Lower labour and overhead 
costs, as well as higher product turnover 
rates, result in lower per-unit costs. modern 
supermarkets need to provide additional 
services (e.g. processing, sorting, re-packing, 
refrigeration) and control significant physical 
assets (e.g. buildings and equipment), which 
add to their costs (Goldman, ramaswami and 
Krider, 2002). 
these differences in cost structure 
appear to allow traditional retailers to 
develop flexible pricing strategies for 
different locations and different socio-
economic groups. Low-income consumers 
in thailand and Viet nam overwhelmingly 
purchase fruits and vegetables in traditional 
retail outlets because of lower prices 
(mergenthaler, Weinberger and Qaim, 
2009; Lippe, seens and isvilanonda, 2010). 
modern supermarkets in thailand charge 
significantly higher prices than traditional 
outlets, even controlling for differences in 
product quality (schipmann and Qaim, 2011). 
on the other hand, in Chile food prices in 
wet markets were found to be higher than 
those in supermarkets in higher-income 
neighbourhoods while the opposite was true 
in low-income neighbourhoods in the same 
city (dirven and Faiguenbaum, 2008). Price 
differences between modern and traditional 
outlets cannot be explained simply by the 
relevant processing and distribution model, 
but can also be linked to the economic 
landscape surrounding the store.
Product standards and consumer 
expectations for traditional food value 
chains may also be different, permitting 
the marketing of foods that modern 
supermarkets would reject and allowing 
traditional outlets to lower their prices. 
evidence shows that all consumers care 
about quality but that those who frequent 
traditional outlets may have different 
priorities than those shopping at modern 
retail outlets. in madagascar, consumers 
purchasing from traditional retailers 
considered meat type and smell highly 
important rather than other characteristics 
typically valued by supermarket buyers, 
such as origin, date of slaughter, fat content 
and whether or not the product had been 
under constant refrigeration (minten, 
2008). supermarket prices, especially for 
fresh produce and livestock, may be higher 
than those in traditional outlets, making 
micronutrient-rich foods available in 
supermarkets less affordable for the poor 
(dolan and Humphrey, 2000; schipmann 
and Qaim, 2011; reddy, murthy and meena, 
2010).
At the same time, proximity and 
convenience are major factors affecting 
decisions about where to shop, especially 
in urban areas where more choice exists 
(Zameer and mukherjee, 2011; tschirley et 
al., 2010; neven et al., 2005; Jabbar and 
Admassu, 2010). both of these factors are 
key advantages of traditional retailers. small 
independent shops often proliferate in 
low-income areas, even if product selection 
is limited. traditional retailers may also be 
more able to respond to the purchasing 
constraints of the poor and offer smaller, 
affordable quantities of goods and provide 
customers with shop credit if needed. 
in any case, the location of traditional and 
modern outlets does seem to be associated 
with income levels. traditional outlets are 
more likely to be located in low-income 
areas and so meet demand from low-income 
consumers. in contrast, modern value 
chains appear to be located where they 
can provide access to mostly urban, higher-
income households. in Kenya and Zambia, 
for example, modern supermarkets mostly 
serve households in the top 20 percent of 
the income range (tschirley et al., 2010). 
application Library utility:C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing or new creating blank TIFF are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
clip art or screenshot, the picture will be insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
42
traditional retailers also appear to be able to 
respond better to the demand for food from 
people living in more remote rural locations, 
regardless of their income level. this is 
likely to remain the case until improved 
roads make travel to urban areas, with their 
greater variety of products, easier and less 
time-consuming. 
the coexistence of traditional and modern 
supply chains appears to support the 
availability of diverse, affordable diets for a 
variety of different consumers. by providing 
convenient access to micronutrient-rich foods 
at a range of price and quality combinations, 
traditional food outlets can support lower-
income consumers in purchasing nutritious 
foods. 
Supply chain transformation and 
nutrition 
As the discussion above shows, a multiplicity 
of food options are available to today’s 
consumers. Consumers in both urban and 
rural areas in developing countries still 
seem to favour traditional outlets (e.g. 
small shops, open markets) for perishable 
items such as fruits and vegetables, fish and 
meat. supermarkets tend to be associated 
with urban, higher-income areas while 
low-income consumers, in both urban and 
rural areas, still do most of their shopping 
at traditional retailers. Consumers favour 
supermarkets for processed and packaged 
goods, although traditional outlets are also 
important retailers of packaged goods.
nutritionally, the result is that traditional 
retail outlets are the primary place for poor 
consumers to access fresh foods rich in 
micronutrients as well as packaged goods. 
interventions that can help shape nutritional 
outcomes through the traditional retail 
sector are those that can lower prices by 
making the supply chain more efficient and 
reducing waste. better infrastructure and 
market access for smallholder fruit, vegetable 
and livestock producers can increase the 
diversity of foods available in rural and urban 
markets. 
the increased availability of packaged 
and processed goods in traditional as 
well as modern retail outlets can increase 
the availability of energy for low-income 
consumers. However, such foods are often 
high in sugar, fats and salt and low in 
important micronutrients, and there is a risk 
that consumers could potentially replace other 
important elements of a diverse diet, such as 
fruits and vegetables, with these products. 
As a result, micronutrient deficiencies could 
potentially continue even as energy intake 
increases. Poorer diets could combine with 
other factors (such as changes in life style, 
reduced manual labour) and lead to increases 
in overweight and obesity (Harris and Graff, 
2012; Garde, 2008; Caballero, 2007). 
some argue that modern value chain 
processors and retailers could develop 
products with improved nutritional 
characteristics, such as micronutrient 
fortification or reduced trans-fats. Public–
private partnerships can play an important 
role when they facilitate the development of 
more nutritious foods by food manufacturers 
and their subsequent distribution through 
traditional retailers (World economic Forum, 
2009; Wojcicki and Heyman, 2010). 
this analysis underscores the complexity 
of the transformation that supply chains 
are currently undergoing. optimal diets 
are not a guaranteed outcome. but supply 
chains can be shaped to improve nutrition. 
in tandem with economic development 
and the nutrition transition, policies, 
programmes and investments should seek 
to take advantage of the transformation 
process to encourage provision of adequate, 
but not excessive, amounts of energy and 
of a high-quality, varied diet with sufficient 
micronutrients. 
Enhancing nutrition through food 
supply chains
the discussion so far provides an insight 
into the types of supply chain that exist 
and how they channel different foods 
from producer to consumer. this is helpful 
for understanding the entry points where 
interventions could be used to improve 
nutrition. this section presents some 
examples and evidence of measures that 
can improve the nutritional performance of 
supply chains, including through improving 
their overall efficiency in enhancing the 
availability and accessibility of a wide 
diversity of foods, reducing post-harvest 
nutrient losses and improving the nutritional 
quality of foods through fortification and 
reformulation. 
application Library utility:VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
png, gif, jpeg, bmp and tiff) and a document file (supported files are PDF, Word & Generate Planet Barcode on Picture & Image in VB.NET. In this part, we will
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
Write Code 11 barcode image on single-page or multi-page PDF, TIFF or Word document using VB.NET code. Code 11 Barcode Generation on PDF Using VB.NET Code.
www.rasteredge.com
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
43
Improving supply chain efficiency 
raising the efficiency of supply chains can 
help meet the simultaneous challenge of 
lowering the costs of food to consumers 
and increasing the revenue of supply 
chain participants. both lower prices 
(for consumers) and higher incomes (for 
smallholders and other producers) support 
the possibility of improving nutrition 
through a more adequate and varied diet. 
Companies driving the transformation 
of modern food systems seek greater 
integration through vertical coordination 
of primary producers, input suppliers and 
processors. such integration seems to hold 
the greatest potential for livestock and other 
capital-intensive food products (swinnen and 
maertens, 2006; Kaplinsky and morris, 2001; 
Gulati et al., 2007; burch and Lawrence, 
2007; iFAd, 2003). 
in an integrated system, consumer demand 
and product information flow upstream from 
retailers to suppliers, who make contractual 
arrangements with producers (reardon and 
barrett, 2000). these contracts may include 
provision of inputs, credit and technical and 
marketing assistance. this can enable farmers 
to increase their productivity and profits 
through better access to inputs and timely 
receipt of payments (swinnen and maertens, 
2006). to ensure that farmers do benefit and 
that lower costs translate into lower prices, 
appropriate regulatory policies that ensure a 
competitive manufacturing and retail sector 
will also be required. 
At the same time, integrated actions 
throughout a supply chain can improve the 
nutrient content of foods and nutritional 
outcomes for consumers (box 8). nutrition-
enhancing actions within the food supply 
boX 8
Improving livelihoods and nutrition throughout the bean value chain 
Women and men in east Africa typically 
cultivate small farms with variable soil 
fertility and erratic rainfall. they have 
limited access to high-quality seeds, 
advanced production and post-harvest 
technologies, credit, extension or training, 
all of which could help to improve yields 
and production and reduce post-harvest 
losses. typically, even if these farmers could 
increase production, they are not well-
linked to domestic and regional markets. 
in rwanda and uganda, a partnership 
involving universities, research institutions 
and nGos is addressing key points in the 
value chain for common beans. the goal is 
to improve food and nutrition security by 
improving production, linking producers 
to the market and increasing consumption 
of more nutritious foods. to improve bean 
yields and bean quality, the project focuses 
on improving management practices and 
technologies. in addition to improved 
production practices, this includes better 
techniques for harvesting, drying and 
storing beans. 
to increase the nutritional value 
and appeal of the beans, researchers 
developed improved processing 
procedures (de-hulling, soaking, milling, 
fermentation, germination and extrusion). 
the digestibility and nutritional value 
of the beans was enhanced by reducing 
phytates and polyphenols that limit iron 
uptake. to increase consumption, the 
project developed bean-based, protein-
rich composite flours for use in cooking 
and baking as well as a special weaning 
porridge. Additional research aims to 
produce and market a variety of bean-
flour-based snacks. 
extension materials were developed 
to increase knowledge about bean 
production and utilization. materials cover 
the basics of feeding children aged 6–59 
months, methods of preparing beans that 
reduce cooking time and enhance nutrient 
bio-availability, as well as how to prepare 
bean-based composite flour and use it 
in making porridges, cakes, biscuits and 
bread.  
Source: Contributed by robert mazur, Professor of 
sociology and Associate director for socioeconomic 
development, Center for sustainable rural 
Livelihoods, iowa state university, united states of 
America. 
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
44
chain are relevant for all households, urban 
and rural alike, because even rural dwellers 
in developing countries as diverse as malawi, 
nepal and Peru buy a third or more of their 
food via markets (Garrett and ersado, 2003).
integrating smallholders into domestic 
food value chains continues to pose 
challenges. Poor performance of other 
aspects of the value chain, such as 
storage, transport and distribution, can 
impede smallholder market participation. 
investments in public goods that support the 
development of transport, communication 
and service infrastructure can substantially 
reduce producer risk, improve value chain 
performance and so raise smallholder 
income. 
A study in Kenya showed that investments 
in infrastructure can reduce the significant 
marketing costs smallholders incur in 
delivering crops to buyers. if these costs, 
estimated at 15 percent of retail value, 
could be reduced, farmer earnings could 
be increased without driving up food prices 
(renkow, Hallstrom and Karanja, 2004). other 
programmes, such as a number of public–
private partnerships, have improved overall 
market efficiency and smallholders’ ability 
to engage with the market by using modern 
communication technologies to facilitate the 
flow of information (Aker, 2008; de silva and 
ratnadiwakara, 2005). Policies that support 
the development of financial markets in rural 
areas can also improve the ability of small- 
and medium-sized traders to purchase surplus 
production from smallholders (Coulter and 
shepherd, 1995). 
Reducing nutrient waste and losses 
A recent FAo report estimates that roughly 
one-third of food produced globally for 
human consumption is lost or wasted 
(Gustavsson et al., 2011). in addition to the 
quantitative food losses, qualitative losses 
also occur as nutrients deteriorate during 
storage, processing and distribution. nutrient 
losses occur both during on-farm storage, 
preservation and preparation, and during 
later storage, processing and transport 
from farms to points of sale. rodents, 
insects and microbial spoilage are the main 
reasons for loss and the underlying causes 
are limitations in techniques for harvesting, 
processing, preservation and storage; in 
methods of packaging and transportation; 
and in infrastructure, such as storage and 
cooling facilities. Food waste reduces the 
sustainability of food systems, as more 
production is required to feed the same 
number of people, which wastes seeds, 
fertilizer, irrigation water, labour, fossil fuels 
and other agricultural inputs (Floros et al., 
2010). 
in developing countries, most losses occur 
at the farm level and along the supply chain, 
before arriving at the consumer. Gustavsson 
et al. (2011) found that only 5–15 percent of 
food losses occur at the consumer level in the 
developing regions considered, compared 
with 30–40 percent in the developed regions. 
the consumer share of food losses and 
waste can be very high in specific locations; 
for example, the amount of food wasted 
in one community in new york state in the 
united states of America in one year was 
sufficient to feed everyone in the community 
for 1.5 months and 60 percent of the losses 
occurred after the food was purchased by the 
consumer (Griffin, sobal and Lyson, 2009).
With such large losses, reducing post-
harvest losses could increase food supplies 
and reduce food prices significantly 
(assuming efforts to reduce waste generate 
greater benefits than their costs). this 
could potentially improve affordability and 
diversity. the losses of some micronutrient-
rich foods such as fruits and vegetables 
and fish are typically greater than losses 
of cereals. Chadha et al. (2011) note that 
in Cambodia, Lao People’s democratic 
republic and Viet nam, about 17 percent 
of the vegetable crop is lost due to post-
harvest problems. A study covering several 
sub-saharan African countries concluded 
that losses in small-scale fisheries reached 
30 percent or more. Losses were particularly 
high at the drying, packaging, storage and 
transportation stages, with key constraints 
related to poor fish-handling practices and 
outdated techniques and facilities (Akande 
and diei-Quadi, 2010). 
Post-harvest food losses disproportionately 
affect the poor, who have less capacity 
for food preservation and safe storage 
(Gómez et al., 2011). At-home techniques 
for preservation, packaging, storage 
and preparation could be adapted to 
preserve nutrients (box 9). many effective 
FO O D   S Y S T E M S   F O R   B E T T E R   N U T R I T I O N
45
interventions for reducing post-harvest losses 
are known (e.g. small-scale post-harvest 
storage facilities, improved pre-harvest 
management and/or increased food-
processing opportunities); however, little is 
known about the impacts of such initiatives 
on nutrition (silva-barbeau et al., 2005).  
Enhancing the nutritional quality of 
foods
Fortification during processing is the most 
common means for improving the nutritional 
quality of foods.
18 
Food companies can also 
reformulate processed foods to change the 
nutritional profile of the products offered. 
18   
Food fortification is “..the addition of one or more 
essential nutrients to a food whether or not it is normally 
contained in the food for the purpose of preventing or 
correcting a demonstrated deficiency of one or more 
nutrients in the population or specific population groups” 
(FAO and WHO, 1991).
they frequently do so in response to 
consumer demand, for example, for foods 
with low-fat, low-carbohydrate, gluten-
free or other nutritional attributes. other 
than mandatory fortification, government 
policy has seldom directly influenced food 
reformulation for improved nutritional 
quality (such as reducing as trans-fats) 
beyond mandatory fortification. 
Fortifying commonly consumed foods 
with specific key micronutrients can be an 
effective and economically efficient way 
to treat nutrition-related disorders. the 
universal salt iodization initiative, which 
began in 1990, increased the proportion 
of the world’s population with access to 
iodized salt from 20 percent to 70 percent 
by 2008, although iodine deficiency remains 
a public health problem in more than 40 
countries (Horton, mannar and Wesley, 
2008). most food fortification efforts 
boX 9
Food processing, preservation and preparation in the home and micronutrient intakes 
the ways in which households process, 
preserve and cook food also contribute to 
micronutrient intakes as these activities 
affect the bioavailability of some key 
micronutrients. traditional food-processing 
methods can enhance micronutrient 
availability (Gibson, Perlas and Hotz, 2006). 
Germination and malting can improve 
the bioavailability of iron by a factor 
of 8–12. soaking grains and legumes, 
a fairly typical household practice, 
can remove anti-nutrients that inhibit 
iron absorption (tontisirin, nantel and 
bhattacharjeef, 2002). Gibson and Hotz 
(2001) describe interventions that can 
enhance the content and bioavailability 
of micronutrients in a representative daily 
menu for rural malawian preschoolers. 
For example, soaking maize flour used for 
maize porridges is one intervention that 
enhances the absorption of micronutrients.
traditional food preservation techniques 
used in the home, such as sun-drying, 
canning and pickling of fruits and 
vegetables can enhance the bioavailability 
of micronutrients and preserve surplus 
micronutrient-rich foods for year-round 
use (Aworh, 2008; Hotz and Gibson, 2007). 
A long-term study in malawi showed that 
a range of traditional strategies combined 
with promotion of micronutrient-rich 
foods resulted in improvements in both 
haemoglobin and lean body mass and a 
lower incidence of common infections 
(Hotz and Gibson, 2007). However, 
traditional processes can be time-
consuming and labour-intensive and some 
such processes can result in decreased 
micronutrient availability (Lyimo et al., 
1991; Aworh, 2008). 
Cooking using moderate heat and for 
short time periods as well as cooking closer 
to meal times, if possible, can help increase 
micronutrient bioavailability. For example, 
cooking green leafy vegetables with mild 
heat can increase the bioavailability of 
heat-sensitive nutrients such as vitamin C. 
use of appropriate quantities of fat or oil 
in stir frying or similar methods can also 
increase micronutrient bioavailability, 
because oils facilitate absorption of 
certain nutrients (tontisirin, nantel and 
bhattacharjeef, 2002).
TH E   S T A T E   O F   F O O D   A N D   A G R I C U LT U R E   2 0 1 3
46
involve key micronutrients such as vitamins 
A and d, iodine, iron
19
and zinc (box 10). 
Condiments such as salt and soy sauce and 
staple foods like maize and wheat flours, as 
well as vegetable oils, are good candidates 
for fortification because they are widely 
consumed, and low-cost technologies can 
produce varieties that are acceptable to 
consumers (darnton-Hill and nalubola, 2002). 
Fortified products need to reach 
micronutrient-deficient consumers through 
existing or newly established distribution 
channels. based on the analysis above, 
traditional supply chains such as corner stores, 
19   Some concerns have been expressed about the use 
of iron supplements, after some studies showed adverse 
effects when non-iron-deficient individuals received 
supplements in malarial areas. However, the doses of 
iron from the supplements were significantly higher than 
those delivered by fortification, even in populations with 
very high flour consumption. Expert reviews convened by 
WHO and UNICEF recommended iron fortification of staple 
foods, condiments and complementary foods even in areas 
affected by high malaria transmission rates because this 
avoids the need for preventive supplementation. Other 
reviews have found that fortification with appropriate levels 
of iron is also safe for the small proportion of people with 
clinical disorders relating to iron absorption and storage 
(Horton, Mannar and Wesley, 2008). 
wet markets and other small retail outlets 
are likely to be the most effective channels 
for reaching poor consumers. the companies 
typically involved in fortifying foods are 
often national and have well-established 
distribution and marketing networks that can 
effectively deliver products to urban and rural 
populations, although some fortification 
technologies are easily applied by small-
scale processors who may be more effective 
in reaching remote populations (Horton, 
mannar and Wesley, 2008).
micronutrient fortification of staple foods 
and condiments is generally inexpensive 
and highly cost-effective. salt iodization can 
reach 80–90 percent of a target population 
at an annual cost of approximately us$0.05 
per person. Fortification of flour with iron 
can reach up to 70 percent of a target 
population for about us$0.12 per person. 
the costs of reaching the remaining 
population, often in remote areas, will be 
higher, but these hard-to-reach individuals 
may derive a proportionally higher benefit 
from fortification, as they are often poorer, 
with less-nutritious diets and less access 
to health care. despite the low costs of 
fortification, consumer prices of fortified 
boX 10
The Grameen Danone partnership
Groupe danone, a multinational 
corporation, together with Grameen 
bank, a bangladeshi nGo known for 
expertise in micro-credit lending, founded 
Grameen danone Foods (GdF) in 2006. 
together with the Global Alliance for 
improved nutrition, GdF developed a 
yoghurt fortified with 30 percent of the 
recommended daily allowance (rdA) 
for zinc, iron, vitamin A and iodine and 
12.5 percent of the rdA for calcium 
(socialinnovator, 2012).
beyond producing a fortified and 
nutritious yogurt targeted towards 
improving the nutritional needs of poor 
children in bangladesh, the partnership 
also aimed to help the poor in the 
community by involving them in all stages 
of the value chain. the partnership set out 
to build up to 50 factories by 2020, with 
around 1 500 new jobs and 500 new milk 
producers associated with each factory. 
Although some of these goals have fallen 
short, there are currently up to 500 local 
women who sell yogurt throughout the 
bogra district, making roughly us$30 per 
month. in addition, rodrigues and baker 
(2012) report that GdF has redesigned its 
plants to use milk supplied by nearby dairy 
farmers with five cows or fewer and who 
lack working refrigeration. this, in turn, is 
promoting local community growth in the 
small-scale dairy sector that once existed 
purely for subsistence. 
GdF also now employs around 900 
saleswomen, who account for about 
20 percent of total sales, with the 
remainder generated by a network of small 
shops in provincial towns in the rajshahi 
district and by supermarkets in bangladesh’s 
large cities, including dhaka, sylhet and 
Chittagong (rodrigues and baker, 2012).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested