Volume 35, Number 1&2, 2009
Could David Hume Have Known about Buddhism? 
15
Dolu and Desideri had much in common. Both had worked in Pondicherry, 
and both knew Jean Venance Bouchet there. They had both been deeply and 
passionately committed to evangelization. But both men also had experienced 
the tension between the typically Jesuit interest in indigenous religions and the 
demands of orthodoxy, and both had struggled with the Capuchins. It is not sur-
prising that Desideri specifically picks out Dolu by name among the fathers at La 
Flèche, and suggests that Dolu paid him particular attention.
5. Desideri’s Manuscript
Desideri’s manuscript describes Tibetan Buddhism in great and accurate detail. An 
entire book, twenty-two chapters long, is titled “Of the false and peculiar religion 
observed in Tibet.”
68
There are several extant versions of the manuscript.
69
One was 
discovered by Carlo Puini in a private Italian collection in 1875, and published in 
Italian in 1904. It is now in the library of Florence. It is possible that this manu-
script was sent by Desideri to his brother in Pistoia.
70
The other manuscripts are 
in the Jesuit archives in Rome.
The Florentine manuscript is the earliest. It is addressed to an unidentified 
superior at the French Jesuit mission in Pondicherry. Desideri had promised to 
send his colleague an account of Tibet, he says. And accordingly, he has written a 
description of his travels during the eight-month-long sea voyage home (typically, 
he returned from India to France by way of America, stopping off at Martinique). 
Jean Venance Bouchet, Dolu’s colleague, was the mission superior at the time and 
may have been the intended recipient. The Florentine manuscript itself is not in 
Desideri’s writing—it had been copied from the original by several different hands. 
According to Petech, the Florentine manuscript is typical of the travel accounts 
that regularly circulated among the Jesuits. Some, though by no means all of these 
reports, were eventually published in places like the Lettres edifiantes et curieuses, 
like Desideri’s earlier letter. In general the Jesuit institutions were ambivalent about 
publication and there was strict censorship, but they encouraged communication 
within the widespread Jesuit community.
The other manuscripts are revisions and partial revisions of the Florentine 
manuscript and two final fair copies of the revised version. The final versions are 
dated June 1728—six months after Desideri got back to Rome and five years before 
he died. The final versions seem intended for publication and we don’t know why 
they were never published. The religious content of the book may have meant 
that it was unable to get past the Jesuit censors. Interestingly, one of the final 
manuscripts is missing the section on the Tibetan religion, which is in the earlier 
versions. It is also possible that this section was circulated separately.
71
In the introduction to the second version of the book, rather than specifically 
addressing his superior in India, Desideri says he is writing because, “[w]hen I 
Convert pdf to powerpoint slides - Library application component:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint slides - Library application component:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Hume Studies
16 
Alison Gopnick
returned through France and Italy to Tuscany and Rome, I was strongly urged by 
many men of letters, by gentleman and by important personages to write down in 
proper order all I had told them at different times.”
72
And he goes on specifically 
to mention that an account of the religion of Tibet “founded on the Pythagorean 
system and so entirely different from any other deserves to be known in order 
to be contested.”
73
This not only shows that Desideri discussed the contents of 
his book with the French Jesuits but also suggests that the revised version was 
intended for them.
In the manuscript Desideri explains karma, reincarnation, and meditative 
practice. He describes the Buddha, down to the earrings, lotus flower and serene 
expression, and tells the classic story of his life. Moreover, as we will see, Desideri 
outlines some of the philosophical foundations of Tibetan Buddhism, in what is 
essentially a paraphrase of sections of the Lam Rim Chen Mo. The only thing missing 
is the word Buddha—Desideri calls him Sciacchia Thubba, The Great Legislator of 
the Tibetans. Desideri recognized that the Tibetan religion had originated in India, 
but in the manuscript he does not connect it to the religion that had been dismis-
sively described by the Jesuits in China or to Siamese or Ceylonese religions. Of 
course, “Buddhism” itself is a much later term, not used in the tradition itself.
6. Hume, Dolu and Desideri
In general Hume, in his published writing, and in contrast to Locke, for example, 
is more interested in conceptual arguments than empirical ethnographic detail. 
There are few details about specific religions in any of his writing, even in the 
Natural History of Religion. However, there is some evidence in both the Natural 
History and the Enquiry into Human Understanding that Hume had at least heard 
about both the Siamese and Hindu cultures. In the Natural History, Hume begins 
by stating, in very general terms, “Some nations have been discovered, who en-
tertained no sentiments of Religion, if travelers and historians may be credited.”
74
Later, he refers to the “excessive penances of the Brachmans and the Talapoins”
75
grouping together the Indian Hindu and Siamese Buddhist practices. Similarly, 
in “Of miracles,” Hume refers to the beliefs of “Ancient Rome, Turkey, Siam and 
China” (EHU 8.12; SBN 86) and he uses the example of an “Indian prince” who 
hears incredulously about ice for the first time (EHU 8.1, SBN 80).
76
Locke earlier 
used exactly the same example but attributed it to the King of Siam in discussion 
with a Dutch ambassador.
77
Hume rather mysteriously transposes the anecdote 
to India.
All this suggests that, by the 1750’s, Hume both knew about and associated 
and even confused the Indian and Siamese cultures and religions. Of course, this 
knowledge could have come from the published sources in Locke and other writ-
ers, as described below. But it is at least noteworthy that Dolu had had extensive 
Library application component:C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
Microsoft PowerPoint Document Processing Control in Visual C#.NET of RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK is a reliable and professional PowerPoint slides/pages editing
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
add image to slide, extract slides and merge library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Volume 35, Number 1&2, 2009
Could David Hume Have Known about Buddhism? 
17
first-hand experience of both the Brahmins of India and the Talapoins of Siam 
and would have discussed them at the same time.
There is also reason to believe that Hume knew something about the second 
embassy to Siam much earlier, possibly even before he reached La Flèche, and 
almost surely before the Treatise appeared. La Loubere’s book was translated 
into English in 1693 and continued to be highly respected and widely quoted 
throughout the eighteenth century. He was particularly widely cited in philo-
sophical discussions of atheism, most notably by Locke and Bayle, who were 
both influences on Hume. Locke describes not only La Loubere but all the other 
accounts of the Siamese embassies in his annotated list of travel books.
78
He also 
explicitly, and centrally, refers to La Loubere’s account of Siamese religion in 
his discussion of whether God is the result of an innate idea. “These [earlier ex-
amples of atheism] are instances of nations where uncultivated nature has been 
left to itself, without the help of letters and discipline, and the improvements of 
arts and sciences. But there are others to be found who have enjoyed these in a 
very great measure, who yet, for want of a due application of their thoughts this 
way, want the idea and knowledge of God. It will, I doubt not, be a surprise to 
others, as it was to me, to find the Siamites of this number. But for this, let them 
consult the King of France’s late envoy thither, who gives no better account of 
the Chinese themselves.”
79
Bayle includes an entire article on Sommona-Codom (the Siamese term for 
Buddha) in the Dictionary, quoting both La Loubere and Tachard extensively,
80
as well as referring to them in another article.
81
The Sommona-Codom entry is 
largely devoted to an argument that virtuous conduct need not require a belief in 
the existence of God. We know that Hume was very interested in atheism and in 
his early memoranda there is the following entry, implicitly contradicting Locke. “ 
’Tis a stronger objection to the argument against atheism drawn from the universal 
consent of mankind to find barbarous and ignorant nations Atheists than learned 
and polite ones. Baile.”
82
We do not know the exact date of these memoranda, of 
course, but they are before 1740, and as noted earlier, Hume explicitly cites Bayle 
as an influence on the Treatise.
It seems entirely possible, even likely, that the young Hume would have seized 
the chance to talk to someone who had actually been a member of the embassy 
La Loubere, Locke and Bayle had described, and who had experienced the surpris-
ing features of Siamite religion first-hand. In fact, by 1735 the octogenarian Dolu 
was the last surviving member of the Siamese embassies. It also seems likely that 
Dolu, who was happy to exchange stories of India with the ferociously anti-Jesuit 
Challes, would have wanted to talk to an intelligent, knowledgeable, and curious, 
albeit Protestant, young man like Hume. Joachim Bouvet, another Siamese emis-
sary and member of Dolu’s Jesuit cohort, corresponded extensively about Chinese 
Confucian religious texts with the Protestant Leibniz.
83
Library application component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide large amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
Besides, users also can get the precise PowerPoint slides count as soon as the PowerPoint document has been loaded by using the page number getting method.
www.rasteredge.com
Hume Studies
18 
Alison Gopnick
La Loubere described the atheism of the Siamese Buddhists—hence the in-
terest in them as the exemplar of a “polite” atheist nation. However, he did not 
discuss the more philosophical parts of Buddhism, such as the denial of the self. 
Dolu, however, should have known about these aspects of Buddhist thought as 
well, from his own experience, from discussion with Bouchet, who had lived and 
studied with the monks and was interested in other religions, and most saliently, 
from his relatively recent discussion with Desideri. If Hume had begun talking to 
Dolu to find out more about Siamite atheism, he might also have learned about 
doctrines like “emptiness” and “no self.”
It is even conceivable that a copy of Desideri’s manuscript, or sections of it, 
could have made its way to La Flèche. (We know that Hume learned Italian before 
he went to France.)
84
We know that at least one version of the book, the version 
now in Florence, went out to the copyists and the world. And since Desideri wrote 
the first version on board the ship from India, and, according to a local diarist, 
had it with him in Tuscany,
85
he must also have had it with him when he visited 
La Flèche. Such a manuscript could have been quickly copied. In fact, La Flèche 
even had its own private printing press.
86
Alternatively, he might have sent a copy 
of the revised version, which was explicitly addressed to the learned gentlemen 
he had met in France and Tuscany, back when he got to Rome. In spite of Jesuit 
control of publication, such accounts circulated widely within the Jesuit com-
munity itself.
It is more likely, though, that Hume would have heard about Desideri’s discov-
eries through conversation. Dolu had definitely spoken with Desideri. Moreover, 
according to the catalogs, eleven other fathers at La Flèche in Hume’s time had 
also been there during Desideri’s visit, including Robert Besnard, the Malebran-
chiste philosopher, and Michel Pernet, the missionary who went to Jakarta. It 
seems plausible that the Jesuits, especially Dolu, would have discussed Desideri’s 
discoveries about Buddhist ideas with a visitor like Hume, who was interested in 
similar ideas. This is all the more likely since there would have been no question 
of endorsing these ideas; the Jesuits would clearly have shared Desideri’s view that 
they were deeply wrong. But the Jesuits had a long tradition of clearly describing 
ideas that they simultaneously condemned (this had been the Jesuit response to 
Copernicanism).
87
Moreover, the Jesuits, unlike other orders, made a policy of 
seriously studying the cultures they were trying to convert.
88
7. philosophical Convergences between Hume and Theravada and 
Tibetan Buddhism
It is interesting in itself that Hume potentially had access to both Tibetan and 
Theravada Buddhist ideas at La Flèche. At the very least, it provides yet another 
example of just how much global intellectual contact was possible in the early 
Library application component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
want to combine these extracted slides into a please read this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
of the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
Volume 35, Number 1&2, 2009
Could David Hume Have Known about Buddhism? 
19
modern period. The question of how this might have interacted with Hume’s 
philosophical work is, of course, much more difficult to determine, and impos-
sible to settle for sure. Hume, in general, emphasizes the originality of his ideas 
and makes little reference to influences of any kind. He was clearly influenced by 
a general European skeptical tradition that had many features in common with 
Buddhism. And Hume would have been no more likely to endorse the Tibetan or 
Siamese religion as a whole than the Jesuits themselves. The “Pythagorean” idea 
of reincarnation, and the mythological and tantric ideas which Desideri discusses 
at length, would certainly have seemed as absurd to Hume as the Jesuit miracle.
Indeed, even if Hume was influenced by ideas that came from Buddhism 
through discussions with Dolu, he probably would not have tracked or remem-
bered exactly which foreign culture, India, China or Siam, was the original source 
of these ideas, or perhaps even that they had come from that source at all. (Such 
philosophical source amnesia is not unknown, after all, even among contemporary 
philosophers and concerning the influence of their immediate colleagues!)
Nevertheless, Buddhist ideas might have had an influence. In particular, the 
very fact of sophisticated and virtuous atheist civilizations, like Tibet and Siam, 
already interested Locke and Bayle and would have interested Hume as well. But 
more philosophical aspects of Buddhism would also have been relevant.
The Buddhist tradition is long, varied and complex. Central parts of the 
tradition such as the doctrines of karma and reincarnation are obviously alien to 
Humean thinking. Hume’s philosophical ideas are also complex and are clearly 
derived from other early modern European philosophical traditions. Still, the 
philosophical core of Buddhism is a kind of metaphysical skepticism and empiri-
cism that would have resonated with Hume’s developing ideas—the “topics of 
the Treatise” with which his “head was full” at the time he talked to the learned 
Jesuit. The Buddhist tradition rejects the quest for a metaphysical foundation of 
experience—an uncreated being or first cause outside of experience itself.
Three forms of this skeptical rejection are particularly relevant for early modern 
philosophy and for Hume. First, Buddhism rejects the idea of a metaphysically 
foundational God, though there may be particular gods. This is why writers like 
Desideri and La Loubere identified it as atheistic. Second, it rejects the idea that 
there is an independent substance that is the metaphysical foundation for our 
experience of the external world—the doctrine of “sunyata” or “emptiness.” 
Finally, and most radically, the tradition rejects the Cartesian idea that there is 
even a foundational self that is the locus of experience—the doctrine of “anat-
man” or “no-self.”
Although expressed in different forms, these arguments—particularly the 
arguments against the self—are a crucial feature of both the Theravada and the 
Tibetan tradition. One of the central Pali Theravada texts is the Milindapanha—a 
dialogue between the sage Nagasena and King Milinda of Greece. Nagasena denies 
Library application component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
VB.NET PowerPoint Conversion Control to render and convert target PowerPoint document to various image or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
Using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF converting demo code below, you can easily convert all slides of source PowerPoint document into a multi-page PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
Hume Studies
20 
Alison Gopnick
that he exists, and when this view is challenged by Milinda, Nagasena draws a fa-
mous analogy to the King’s chariot. The chariot is not to be identified with any of 
its individual parts (the reins, wheels, etc.), but it is not something different from 
its parts, either. “Chariot” is simply a conventional designation for the combined 
chariot parts. Similarly, “Nagasena” is nothing but a conventional designation, 
a name, for Nagasena’s physical and psychological parts—his body, perceptions, 
emotions, and so on. There is no Nagasena beyond them.
89
Bouchet would have 
been likely to come across this text as part of his training in the Siamese monastery. 
It seems plausible that Dolu would also have known about it.
In Tibetan Buddhism, and in Tsongkhapa, in particular, these ideas are much 
more explicit and much more clearly philosophical.
90
Nagasena’s argument 
against personal identity is the focus of many chapters of extended and elaborated 
discussion in Tsongkhapa. (For a clear and extended philosophical treatment of 
Tsongkhapa, see Jinpa.
91
Jinpa argues for an affinity between Tsongkhapa’s view of 
the self and the skeptical but non-reductionist views of Derek Parfitt. For similar 
explication of the arguments against the self in Theravada Buddhism, again with 
comparisons to Hume and William James, see Collins.)
92
Within the general Buddhist tradition, Tsongkhapa argues for a particularly 
Humean “middle way” position. He argues that there is no foundational, onto-
logical self, but that nevertheless the self-concept is psychologically real. “Thus 
there are two senses to the term ‘self’ a self conceived in terms of an intrinsic na-
ture that exists by means of intrinsic being, and a self in the sense of the object of 
our simple natural thought ‘I am.’ Of these two the first is the object of negation 
by reasoning, while the second is not negated.”
93
Tsongkhapa’s “middle way” is 
reminiscent of the “turn” at the end of Book 1 of the Treatise where Hume claims 
that the skeptical arguments of the first part of the book need not undermine the 
pragmatics of everyday life (T 1.4.7; SBN 263–74).
Desideri studied Tsongkhapa extensively and in his writings he captures 
the skeptical Buddhist empiricism that goes beyond even Cartesian skepticism. 
Desideri recognizes that “the Legislator,” as he calls Buddha, is not a god, and 
certainly not God. The Tibetans are self-declared atheists: “They not only do not 
recognize, but they absolutely deny the existence of a Creator of the Universe or 
a Supreme Lord of all things. In this they may be termed atheists.”
94
And yet their 
introspective practices lead to high moral and spiritual accomplishments: “The 
rules and directions imposed on the will not only prescribe hatred of vice and 
battling against passions, but what is more remarkable, lead man towards sublime 
and heroic perfection.”
95
Desideri also describes the philosophical foundations of Buddhism, the 
doctrines of “emptiness” and “no-self.” Desideri, of course, as a devoted Jesuit, 
completely rejects the false and peculiar religion. Nevertheless, his commitment 
to genuinely understanding it is apparent. He describes his successive efforts to 
Library application component:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without methods to reorder current PPT slides in both powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:C# PowerPoint: C# Guide to Add, Insert and Delete PPT Slide(s)
file and it includes all slides and properties to view detailed guide for each PowerPoint slide processing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
Volume 35, Number 1&2, 2009
Could David Hume Have Known about Buddhism? 
21
understand the central philosophical doctrine of “emptiness” (sunyata). Even the 
help of the most learned of the lamas leaves him in the dark, but “I continued my 
task until the dark clouds were pierced by a faint ray of light. This raised my hope 
of finally emerging into the bright sunshine: I read and reread and studied until, 
thanks to God, I not only understood but completely mastered (all glory being to 
God) all the subtle, sophisticated and abstruse matter which was so necessary and 
important for me to know.”
96
In a succeeding chapter, titled: “Exposition and explanation of another 
principal and great error of the Tibetans’ religion: their denial that there exists 
any uncaused being in itself, and that any primary cause of all things exists,”
97
Desideri reports the outcome of his efforts and goes on to describe the specific 
Tibetan philosophical doctrines of “sunyata” and the denial of self. According to 
Thupten Jinpa, Desideri’s manuscripts in Tibetan show an even more extensive 
understanding of Tibetan Buddhist philosophical doctrines.
98
Desideri clearly knew and understood the philosophical doctrines of Tibetan 
Buddhism. He discussed them with Dolu and other fathers at La Flèche who also 
knew the Cartesian and Malebranchiste philosophical traditions, even if they 
officially rejected them. Dolu independently knew at least something about the 
Theravada doctrines. In turn these fathers seem likely to have talked to Hume.
It’s impossible to know how this might have affected Hume’s philosophy, but 
the argument against personal identity is a particularly plausible candidate for 
potential influence. Hume’s argument in the Treatise, like Nagasena’s “chariot” 
argument, points to the fact that there is no evidence for a self beyond a collection 
of particular psychological parts. “There are some philosophers who imagine we 
are every moment intimately conscious of what we call our self . . . . For my part, 
when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some 
particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain 
or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never 
can observe any thing but the perception. When my perceptions are removed for 
any time, as by sound sleep, so long am I insensible of myself, and may truly be 
said not to exist . . . I may venture to affirm of the rest of mankind, that they are 
nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each 
other with an inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement” 
(T 1.6.4, 1–4; SBN 251–53).
99
The argument is rather isolated within Hume’s own philosophical system. 
He did not include it in the Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, his later 
streamlined presentation of the ideas in Book 1 of the Treatise. In addition, it is the 
kind of argument that doesn’t require extensive background to understand: simply 
reading Nagasena’s speech, or for that matter, Hume’s passage, is enough to make 
its force clear. It is just the sort of argument that might be transmitted through 
conversation, and also the sort of argument that might stimulate a line of thought 
Hume Studies
22 
Alison Gopnick
even if the source of that thought was not entirely retained. Hume’s thinking about 
personal identity was certainly influenced by European philosophers like Locke 
and Malebranche among others. But Hume’s argument is also clearly a fairly radi-
cal departure from what had gone before and it is characteristic of philosophical 
influence that many converging sources may result in a philosophically original 
idea. Moreover, the broader tenor of Buddhist empiricism and atheism would also, 
at the very least, have resonated with Hume’s ideas.
8. Conclusion
More generally, whether or not Hume’s philosophical doctrines were specifically 
influenced by Buddhism, it is interesting to see how much opportunity there was 
for this kind of global intellectual contact, even in the early eighteenth century. At 
least, we have to give up the apparently obvious assumption that Hume could not 
have known about Buddhism in the 1730s. The connection between Confucian-
ism and Leibniz has long been recognized
100
—it is interesting to see a potentially 
similar connection between Buddhism and Hume. Moreover, in both cases the 
connection came through the Jesuits. In fact, in the late seventeenth and early 
eighteenth centuries, the same relatively close-knit network of Jesuits had access 
to philosophical ideas from the Hindu, Confucian, and Buddhist traditions, and 
also knew about contemporary European philosophical ideas. Bouchet and Dolu 
linked Siam and India, Fontaney and Bouvet linked Siam and China, and Desideri 
linked Tibet to both Bouchet and Dolu—and Dolu, Bouvet, Fontaney, and Desid-
eri all spent time at La Flèche. In 1735 Hume, apparently rusticating in the peace 
of a small town in France, was only one remove from the ideas of philosophers 
thousands of miles and a cultural gulf away in Siam and Tibet.
The story is also interesting in that it suggests how complex and even para-
doxical the transmission of ideas may be, especially in a global context. It would 
be interestingly ironic if the fervently religious Jesuit missionaries actually 
provided some of the material for the great skeptic’s thought, even if neither 
the Jesuits, nor the Buddhists, nor even Hume himself recognized that that was 
what had happened.
At the same time, the story of Desideri, La Flèche, Dolu, and Hume is also a 
salutary one. It is easy to think of the Enlightenment and its values as a particular 
invention of a particular historical period in modern Europe. The fact that some 
of the central ideas in that tradition had been independently formulated in very 
different places and times suggests a broader view. Moreover, it is striking and en-
couraging that people as ideologically and culturally disparate as a Tibetan lama, 
a fervent Italian priest, a Siamese monk, an urbane French Jesuit and a skeptical 
Scots Presbyterian could nevertheless succeed in understanding and communicat-
ing philosophical ideas. The Tibetans, the Siamese, the Jesuits, and David Hume 
Volume 35, Number 1&2, 2009
Could David Hume Have Known about Buddhism? 
23
may have bridged the geographical, religious, cultural, and linguistic abysses that 
separated them, even if only by a single slender vine rope.
noTEs
1 See, for example, Stephen Batchelor, The Awakening of the West: The Encounter of 
Buddhism and Western Culture (Berkeley: Parallax Press, 1994); T. R. V. Murti, The Central 
Philosophy of Buddhism (London: George Allen & Unwin Ltd., 1960), 26–27; Nolan Pliny 
Jacobson, “The Possibility of Oriental Influence in Hume’s Philosophy,” Philosophy East 
and West 19.1 (1969): 17–37; James Giles, “The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and 
Personal Identity,” Philosophy East and West 43.2 (1993): 175–200.
 Batchelor, Awakening of the West, 170–76.
 See, for example, David E. Mungello, The Great Encounter of China and the West, 
1500–1800 (London: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999).
 See, for instance, M. K. Johnson, S. Hashtroudi and D. S. Lindsay, “Source Monitor-
ing,” Psychological Bulletin 114.1 (1993): 638–77.
 See, for example, R. E. Petty and J. T. Cacioppo, Communication and Persuasion: Central 
and Peripheral Routes to Attitude Change (New York: Springer-Verlag, 1986).
 For background on the French Jesuits, see Francois de Dainville, L’education des  
Jesuites: toXV1e–XVIIIe siecles (Paris: Editions de Minuit, 1978); Henri Fouqueray, Histoire 
de la compagnie de Jesus en France (Paris: Picard, 1910–25); A. Lynn Martin, The Jesuit Mind: 
the Mentality of an Elite in Early Modern France (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1988).
 M. A. Stewart, “Hume’s Intellectual Development, 1711–1752,” in Impressions of Hume, 
ed. Michael A. Stewart Frasca-Spada and P. J. E. Kail (New York: Oxford University Press, 
2006).
 Ernest Mossner and Raymond Klibansky, eds.,New Letters of David Hume (Oxford: 
The Clarendon Press, 1954), 1–2.
 Ernest Mossner, The Life of David Hume, 2nd ed. (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1980), 
100–105.
10  Mossner, Life of David Hume, 626–27; Ernest Mossner, “Hume at la Flèche, 1735: An 
Unpublished Letter,” University of Texas Studies in English 37 (1958): 30–33; The Letters 
of David Hume, ed. J. Y. T. Grieg (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1932), 19–23, 361.
11  Grieg, Letters of David Hume, 611.
12  Mossner and Klibansky, New Letters of David Hume, 1–2.
13  Mossner, “Hume at la Flèche, 1735,” 30–33.
14  Grieg, Letters of David Hume, 361.
15  Mossner, Life of David Hume, 280–81.
Hume Studies
24 
Alison Gopnick
16  See, for example, Jesuit Science and the Republic of Letters, ed. Mordechai Feingold 
(Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003); The Jesuits: Culture, Sciences and the Arts 1540–1773, 
ed. John W. O’Malley (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1999); Louis Caruna, 
“The Jesuits and the Quiet Side of the Scientific Revolution,” in The Cambridge Com-
panion to the Jesuits, ed. Thomas Worcester (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 
2008).
17  Inventory of the Old Society, Provincia Francia, Book 19, 40–44, Book 20, 39–45, 
ARSI.
18  Camille de Rochemonteix, Un Collège de Jésuites aux XVIIIe et XVIIIe siècles: le collège 
Henri IV de La Flèche, 4 vols. (Le Mans: Leguicheux, 1889), 4:214.
19  Ibid., 81–106.
20  A. Charma and G. Mancel, Le Père Andrè: documents inédits pour servir à l’histoire 
philosophique (Paris: Hachette, 1856), 383, 432.
21  Joseph Dehergne, Répertoire des Jésuites de Chine de 1552 à 1800 (Paris: Letouzy & 
Ane, 1973), 210.
22  Rochemonteix, Un Collège de Jésuites, 4:119.
23  Henri Bernard-Maitre, “Le Père Nicolas-Marie Roy, S.J.,” Revue d’ascétique et de 
mystique 29 (1953): 249–51.
24  Francois Uzureau, “Le Jansénisme A La Flèche,” Les Annales fléchoises et la Vallée 
du Loir 13 (1912): 139–40.
25  Bernard-Maitre, “Le Père Nicolas-Marie Roy, S.J.,” 249–51.
26  See, for example, David Hackett Fisher, Champlain’s Dream (New York: Simon and 
Schuster. 2009).
27  Carlos Sommervogel, Bibliotheque de la compagnie de Jesus (Paris: Picard, 1890–1900), 
123.
28  Michael Smithies, Mission Made Impossible: The Second French Embassy to Siam 1687 
(Bangkok, Thailand: Silkworm Books, 2002). This volume is an annotated translation 
of the accounts of Tachard and Ceberet.
29  D. Ferroli, Jesuits in Malabar (Banglaore, India: National Press, 1951); Joseph 
Bertrand, La Mission du Maduré: d’Après des Documents Inédits, vol. 4 (Paris: Poussielgue-
Rusand, 1854); Niccolao Manucci, Storia do Mogor: Or Mogul India 1653–1708, vol. 4, 
trans. William Lyons (London: J. Murray, 1907). All three of these volumes record similar 
events involving Dolu though with a marked partisan slant—Ferroli and Bertrand are 
pro-Jesuit while Manucci is anti-Jesuit.
30  Sommervogel, Bibliotheque, 123. Sommervogel lists Dolu’s birth as 1651 and his 
ordination as 1674 but these dates do not match the dates in the catalogs, which seem 
more plausible.
31  Guy Tachard, Voyage de Siam des pères jésuites envoyés pour le Roi aux Indes et à la 
Chine (Paris: Seneuze et Horthemels, 1686), trans. anon, 1688 Voyage to Siam (repr., 
Bangkok,Thailand: White Orchid, 1981); Guy Tachard, Second voyage du Père Tachard et 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested