Section 4.5  Binary Adder–Subtractor    143
Overflow 
When two numbers with  n  digits each are added and the sum is a number occupying 
+1    digits, we say that an overflow occurred. This is true for binary or decimal num-
bers, signed or unsigned. When the addition is performed with paper and pencil, an 
overflow is not a problem, since there is no limit by the width of the page to write down 
the sum. Overflow is a problem in digital computers because the number of bits that 
hold the number is finite and a result that contains    n+ 1    bits cannot be accommodated 
by an  n -bit word. For this reason, many computers detect the occurrence of an overflow, 
and when it occurs, a corresponding flip-flop is set that can then be checked by the user. 
The detection of an overflow after the addition of two binary numbers depends on 
whether the numbers are considered to be signed or unsigned. When two unsigned 
numbers are added, an overflow is detected from the end carry out of the most signifi-
cant position. In the case of signed numbers, two details are important: the leftmost bit 
always represents the sign, and negative numbers are in 2’s-complement form. When 
two signed numbers are added, the sign bit is treated as part of the number and the end 
carry does not indicate an overflow. 
An overflow cannot occur after an addition if one number is positive and the other 
is negative, since adding a positive number to a negative number produces a result 
whose magnitude is smaller than the larger of the two original numbers. An overflow 
may occur if the two numbers added are both positive or both negative. To see how this 
can happen, consider the following example: Two signed binary numbers,    +70    and    +80,    
are stored in two eight-bit registers. The range of numbers that each register can accom-
modate is from binary    +127    to binary    -128.    Since the sum of the two numbers is    +150,    
it exceeds the capacity of an eight-bit register. This is also true for    -70    and    -80.    The two 
additions in binary are shown next, together with the last two carries: 
carries:
0 1
carries:
 0
+70
 1000110
-70
 0111010
+80
 1010000
-80
1  0110000
+150
1  0010110
-150
 1101010
Note that the eight-bit result that should have been positive has a negative sign bit (i.e., 
the eighth bit) and the eight-bit result that should have been negative has a positive sign 
bit. If, however, the carry out of the sign bit position is taken as the sign bit of the result, 
then the nine-bit answer so obtained will be correct. But since the answer cannot be 
accommodated within eight bits, we say that an overflow has occurred. 
An overflow condition can be detected by observing the carry into the sign bit position 
and the carry out of the sign bit position. If these two carries are not equal, an overflow 
has occurred. This is indicated in the examples in which the two carries are explicitly 
shown. If the two carries are applied to an exclusive-OR gate, an overflow is detected 
when the output of the gate is equal to 1. For this method to work correctly, the 2’s comple-
ment of a negative number must be computed by taking the 1’s complement and adding1. 
This takes care of the condition when the maximum negative number is complemented. 
How to add pdf to powerpoint slide - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
how to convert pdf to ppt using; pdf to powerpoint conversion
How to add pdf to powerpoint slide - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
converting pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf into powerpoint
144    Chapter 4  Combinational Logic
The binary adder–subtractor circuit with outputs  C  and  V  is shown in  Fig.   4.13   . If the 
two binary numbers are considered to be unsigned, then the  C  bit detects a carry after 
addition or a borrow after subtraction. If the numbers are considered to be signed, then 
the  V  bit detects an overflow. If    V=0      after an addition or subtraction, then no overflow 
occurred and the  n -bit result is correct. If    V=1,      then the result of the operation contains 
+1    bits, but only the rightmost  n  bits of the number fit in the space available, so an 
overflow has occurred. The    1n+12    th bit is the actual sign and has been shifted out of 
position.   
4.6    DECIMAL ADDER 
Computers or calculators that perform arithmetic operations directly in the decimal 
number system represent decimal numbers in binary coded form. An adder for such 
a computer must employ arithmetic circuits that accept coded decimal numbers and 
present results in the same code. For binary addition, it is sufficient to consider a 
pair of significant bits together with a previous carry. A decimal adder requires a 
minimum of nine inputs and five outputs, since four bits are required to code each 
decimal digit and the circuit must have an input and output carry. There is a wide 
variety of possible decimal adder circuits, depending upon the code used to repre-
sent the decimal digits. Here we examine a decimal adder for the BCD code. (See 
Section 1.7.) 
BCD Adder 
Consider the arithmetic addition of two decimal digits in BCD, together with an input 
carry from a previous stage. Since each input digit does not exceed 9, the output sum 
cannot be greater than    9 9 + 9+ 1 = 19,    the 1 in the sum being an input carry. Sup-
pose we apply two BCD digits to a four-bit binary adder. The adder will form the sum 
in  binary  and produce a result that ranges from 0 through 19. These binary numbers 
are listed in  Table   4.5    and are labeled by symbols    K, Z
8
Z
4
Z
2
,    and    Z
1
.     K  is the carry, 
and the subscripts under the letter  Z  represent the weights 8, 4, 2, and 1 that can be 
assigned to the four bits in the BCD code. The columns under the binary sum list the 
binary value that appears in the outputs of the four-bit binary adder. The output sum 
of two decimal digits must be represented in BCD and should appear in the form 
listed in the columns under “BCD Sum.” The problem is to find a rule by which the 
binary sum is converted to the correct BCD digit representation of the number in the 
BCD sum. 
In examining the contents of the table, it becomes apparent that when the binary sum 
is equal to or less than 1001, the corresponding BCD number is identical, and therefore 
no conversion is needed. When the binary sum is greater than 1001, we obtain an invalid 
BCD representation. The addition of binary 6 (0110) to the binary sum converts it to 
the correct BCD representation and also produces an output carry as required. 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to and effective VB.NET solution to add desired watermark on source PowerPoint slide at specified
how to change pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf pages into powerpoint slides
VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
& editing library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add-on can to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to change pdf file to powerpoint; converting pdf to powerpoint slides
Section 4.6  Decimal Adder    145
The logic circuit that detects the necessary correction can be derived from the 
entries in the table. It is obvious that a correction is needed when the binary sum has 
an output carry    K= 1.    The other six combinations from 1010 through 1111 that need 
a correction have a 1 in position    Z
8
.    To distinguish them from binary 1000 and 1001, 
which also have a 1 in position    Z
8
,    we specify further that either    Z
4
or    Z
2
must have 
a 1. The condition for a correction and an output carry can be expressed by the Bool-
ean function 
KZ
8
Z
4
Z
8
Z
2
When    C= 1,    it is necessary to add 0110 to the binary sum and provide an output carry 
for the next stage. 
A BCD adder that adds two BCD digits and produces a sum digit in BCD is shown 
in  Fig.   4.14   . The two decimal digits, together with the input carry, are first added in the 
top four-bit adder to produce the binary sum. When the output carry is equal to 0, noth-
ing is added to the binary sum. When it is equal to 1, binary 0110 is added to the binary 
sum through the bottom four-bit adder. The output carry generated from the bottom 
Table 4.5 
Derivation of BCD Adder 
Binary Sum 
BCD Sum 
Decimal 
 
 
8
 
4
 
2
 
1
 
 
8
 
4
 
2
 
1
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
With our C#.NET PowerPoint control, developers are able to split a PowerPoint into two or more small files. Add & Insert PowerPoint Page/Slide in C#.
how to change pdf to powerpoint on; converting pdf to ppt
VB.NET PowerPoint: Edit PowerPoint Slide; Insert, Add or Delete
NET PowerPoint slide modifying control add-on enables view more VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing functions & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to convert pdf to ppt online; picture from pdf to powerpoint
146    Chapter 4  Combinational Logic
adder can be ignored, since it supplies information already available at the output carry 
terminal. A decimal parallel adder that adds  n  decimal digits needs  n  BCD adder stages. 
The output carry from one stage must be connected to the input carry of the next higher 
order stage. 
4.7    BINARY MULTIPLIER 
Multiplication of binary numbers is performed in the same way as multiplication of 
decimal numbers. The multiplicand is multiplied by each bit of the multiplier, starting 
from the least significant bit. Each such multiplication forms a partial product. Succes-
sive partial products are shifted one position to the left. The final product is obtained 
from the sum of the partial products. 
To see how a binary multiplier can be implemented with a combinational circuit, 
consider the multiplication of two 2-bit numbers as shown in  Fig.   4.15   . The multiplicand 
Output
carry
Carry
out
Carry
in
Addend
Augend
4-bit binary adder
4-bit binary adder
K
0
Z
8
Z
4
Z
2
Z
1
S
8
S
4
S
2
S
1
FIGURE 4.14 
Block diagram of a BCD adder       
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode How to customize VB.NET PowerPoint QR Code barcode scanning VB.NET PPT barcode scanner add-on to detect
pdf to ppt converter online; convert pdf to powerpoint online for
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
to convert one certain PowerPoint slide or a specified range of slides into .pdf document format using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion library add-on.
pdf picture to powerpoint; how to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation
Section 4.7  Binary Multiplier    147
bits are    B
1
and    B
0
,    the multiplier bits are    A
1
and    A
0
,    and the product is    C
3
C
2
C
1
C
0
.    The 
first partial product is formed by multiplying    B
1
B
0
by    A
0
.    The multiplication of two bits 
such as    A
0
and    B
0
produces a 1 if both bits are 1; otherwise, it produces a 0. This is iden-
tical to an AND operation. Therefore, the partial product can be implemented with 
AND gates as shown in the diagram. The second partial product is formed by multiply-
ing    B
1
B
0
by    A
1
and shifting one position to the left. The two partial products are added 
with two half-adder (HA) circuits. Usually, there are more bits in the partial products 
and it is necessary to use full adders to produce the sum of the partial products. Note 
that the least significant bit of the product does not have to go through an adder, since 
it is formed by the output of the first AND gate. 
A combinational circuit binary multiplier with more bits can be constructed in a 
similar fashion. A bit of the multiplier is ANDed with each bit of the multiplicand in as 
many levels as there are bits in the multiplier. The binary output in each level of AND 
gates is added with the partial product of the previous level to form a new partial prod-
uct. The last level produces the product. For  J  multiplier bits and  K  multiplicand bits, we 
need    1*K2    AND gates and    1- 12     K -bit adders to produce a product of    (K)    
bits. 
As a second example, consider a multiplier circuit that multiplies a binary number 
represented by four bits by a number represented by three bits. Let the multiplicand be 
represented by    B
3
B
2
B
1
B
0
and the multiplier by    A
2
A
1
A
0
.    Since    =4    and    =3,    we 
need 12 AND gates and two 4-bit adders to produce a product of seven bits. The logic 
diagram of the multiplier is shown in  Fig.   4.16   . 
HA
HA
C
3
B
1
B
1
C
3
C
2
C
1
C
0
B
0
A
1
A
1
B
1
A
1
B
0
A
0
B
1
A
0
B
0
A
0
A
1
A
0
B
0
B
1
B
0
C
2
C
1
C
0
FIGURE 4.15 
Two-bit by two-bit binary multiplier       
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS to install and use Microsoft PowerPoint software and what would you do to add and draw
convert pdf to editable ppt; converting pdf to powerpoint online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without affecting the & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
and paste pdf to powerpoint; and paste pdf into powerpoint
148    Chapter 4  Combinational Logic
B
3
A
0
A
1
B
2
B
1
B
0
B
3
B
2
B
1
B
0
0
Addend
Augend
Sum and output carry
4-bit adder
B
3
A
2
B
2
B
1
B
0
Addend
Sum and output carry
4-bit adder
C
2
C
1
C
0
C
3
C
4
C
5
C
6
Augend
FIGURE 4.16 
Four-bit by three-bit binary multiplier         
4.8    MAGNITUDE COMPARATOR 
The comparison of two numbers is an operation that determines whether one number 
is greater than, less than, or equal to the other number. A  magnitude comparator  is a 
combinational circuit that compares two numbers  A  and  B  and determines their relative 
magnitudes. The outcome of the comparison is specified by three binary variables that 
indicate whether    AB, AB,    or    AB.    
On the one hand, the circuit for comparing two  n -bit numbers has    2
2n
entries in the 
truth table and becomes too cumbersome, even with    n= 3.    On the other hand, as one 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
Here is a market-leading PowerPoint barcode add-on within VB.NET class, which means it as well as 2d barcodes QR Code, Data Matrix, PDF-417, etc.
how to convert pdf into powerpoint; pdf to ppt converter
VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
Add(tmpFilePath1) docPathList.Add(tmpFilePath2) PPTXDocument this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing tutorial & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change pdf to powerpoint on; pdf to powerpoint
Section 4.8  Magnitude Comparator    149
may suspect, a comparator circuit possesses a certain amount of regularity. Digital func-
tions that possess an inherent well-defined regularity can usually be designed by means 
of an algorithm—a procedure which specifies a finite set of steps that, if followed, give 
the solution to a problem. We illustrate this method here by deriving an algorithm for 
the design of a four-bit magnitude comparator. 
The algorithm is a direct application of the procedure a person uses to compare the 
relative magnitudes of two numbers. Consider two numbers,  A  and  B , with four digits 
each. Write the coefficients of the numbers in descending order of significance: 
AA
3  
A
 
A
1  
A
0
BB
B
B
B
0
Each subscripted letter represents one of the digits in the number. The two numbers are 
equal if all pairs of significant digits are equal:    A
3
B
3
A
2
=B
2
A
1
B
1
,    and 
A
0
=B
0
.    When the numbers are binary, the digits are either 1 or 0, and the equality of 
each pair of bits can be expressed logically with an exclusive-NOR function as 
x
i
A
i
B
i
A
i 
B
i
for = 0, 1, 2, 3    
where    x
i
= 1    only if the pair of bits in position  i  are equal (i.e., if both are 1 or both 
are 0). 
The equality of the two numbers  A  and  B  is displayed in a combinational circuit by 
an output binary variable that we designate by the symbol    1=B2   . This binary vari-
able is equal to 1 if the input numbers,  A  and  B , are equal, and is equal to 0 otherwise. 
For equality to exist, all    x
i
variables must be equal to 1, a condition that dictates an AND 
operation of all variables: 
1AB2 = x
3
x
2
x
1
x
0
The  binary  variable    1B2    is equal to 1 only if all pairs of digits of the two numbers 
are equal. 
To determine whether  A  is greater or less than  B , we inspect the relative magnitudes 
of pairs of significant digits, starting from the most significant position. If the two digits 
of a pair are equal, we compare the next lower significant pair of digits. The comparison 
continues until a pair of unequal digits is reached. If the corresponding digit of  A  is 1 
and that of  B  is 0, we conclude that    AB.    If the corresponding digit of  A  is 0 and that 
of  B  is 1, we have    AB.    The sequential comparison can be expressed logically by the 
two Boolean functions 
1AB2 =A
3
B
3
x
3  
A
2
B
2
x
3
x
2
A
1
B
1
x
3
x
2
x
1
A
0
B
0
1AB2 = A
3
B
3
x
3
A
2
B
2
x
3
x
2
A
1
B
1
x
3
x
2
x
1
An
0
B
0
The symbols    1AB2    and    1AB2    are  binary  output variables that are equal to 1 
when    AB    and    AB,    respectively. 
The gate implementation of the three output variables just derived is simpler than it 
seems because it involves a certain amount of repetition. The unequal outputs can use 
the same gates that are needed to generate the equal output. The logic diagram of the 
four-bit magnitude comparator is shown in  Fig.   4.17   . The four  x  outputs are generated 
150    Chapter 4  Combinational Logic
with exclusive-NOR circuits and are applied to an AND gate to give the output binary 
variable    1AB2   . The other two outputs use the  x  variables to generate the Boolean 
functions listed previously. This is a multilevel implementation and has a regular pattern. 
The procedure for obtaining magnitude comparator circuits for binary numbers with 
more than four bits is obvious from this example. 
4.9    DECODERS 
Discrete quantities of information are represented in digital systems by binary codes. 
Abinary code of  n  bits is capable of representing up to    2
n
distinct elements of coded 
information. A  decoder  is a combinational circuit that converts binary information from 
(A<B)
(A>B)
(A=B)
x
3
A
3
B
3
A
2
B
2
A
1
B
1
A
0
B
0
x
2
x
1
x
0
FIGURE 4.17 
Four-bit magnitude comparator       
Section 4.9  Decoders    151
n  input lines to a maximum of    2
n
unique output lines. If the  n -bit coded information has 
unused combinations, the decoder may have fewer than    2
n
outputs. 
The decoders presented here are called  n -to- m -line decoders, where    … … 2
n
.    Their 
purpose is to generate the    2
n
(or fewer) minterms of  n  input variables. Each combination 
of inputs will assert a unique output. The name  decoder  is also used in conjunction with 
other code converters, such as a BCD-to-seven-segment decoder. 
As an example, consider the three-to-eight-line decoder circuit of  Fig.   4.18   . The three 
inputs are decoded into eight outputs, each representing one of the minterms of the 
three input variables. The three inverters provide the complement of the inputs, and each 
one of the eight AND gates generates one of the minterms. A particular application of 
this decoder is binary-to-octal conversion. The input variables represent a binary num-
ber, and the outputs represent the eight digits of a number in the octal number system. 
However, a three-to-eight-line decoder can be used for decoding  any  three-bit code to 
provide eight outputs, one for each element of the code. 
D
0
xyz′ 
D
1
xyz
D
2
xyz′ 
D
3
xyz 
D
4
xyz′ 
D
5
xyz 
D
6
xyz′ 
D
7
xyz 
z
y
x
FIGURE 4.18 
Three-to-eight-line decoder       
152    Chapter 4  Combinational Logic
The operation of the decoder may be clarified by the truth table listed in  Table   4.6   . 
For each possible input combination, there are seven outputs that are equal to 0 and 
only one that is equal to 1. The output whose value is equal to 1 represents the minterm 
equivalent of the binary number currently available in the input lines. 
Some decoders are constructed with NAND gates. Since a NAND gate produces the 
AND operation with an inverted output, it becomes more economical to generate the 
decoder minterms in their complemented form. Furthermore, decoders include one or 
more  enable  inputs to control the circuit operation. A two-to-four-line decoder with an 
enable input constructed with NAND gates is shown in  Fig.   4.19   . The circuit operates 
with complemented outputs and a complement enable input. The decoder is enabled 
when  E  is equal to 0 (i.e., active-low enable). As indicated by the truth table, only one 
Table 4.6 
Truth Table of a Three-to-Eight-Line Decoder 
Inputs 
Outputs 
x  
y  
z  
D  
0
D  
1
D  
2
D  
3
D  
4
D  
5
D  
6
 
7
D
0
D
1
D
2
A
B
E
D
3
(a) Logic diagram
(b) Truth table
E
A
B
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
X
X
FIGURE 4.19 
Two-to-four-line decoder with enable input       
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested