Section 1.2  Binary Numbers    3
because of advances in digital integrated circuit technology. As the number of transistors 
that can be put on a piece of silicon increases to produce complex functions, the cost per 
unit decreases and digital devices can be bought at an increasingly reduced price. Equip-
ment built with digital integrated circuits can perform at a speed of hundreds of millions 
of operations per second. Digital systems can be made to operate with extreme reli-
ability by using error‐correcting codes. An example of this strategy is the digital versa-
tile disk (DVD), in which digital information representing video, audio, and other data 
is recorded without the loss of a single item. Digital information on a DVD is recorded 
in such a way that, by examining the code in each digital sample before it is played back, 
any error can be automatically identified and corrected. 
A digital system is an interconnection of digital modules.  To understand the opera-
tion of each digital module, it is necessary to have a basic knowledge of digital circuits 
and their logical function.  The first seven chapters of this book present the basic tools 
of digital design, such as logic gate structures, combinational and sequential circuits, and 
programmable logic devices.  Chapter   8    introduces digital design at the register transfer 
level (RTL) using a modern hardware description language (HDL).  Chapter   9    concludes 
the text with laboratory exercises using digital circuits. 
A major trend in digital design methodology is the use of a HDL to describe and simulate 
the functionality of a digital circuit. An HDL resembles a programming language and is 
suitable for describing digital circuits in textual form. It is used to simulate a digital system 
to verify its operation before hardware is built. It is also used in conjunction with logic syn-
thesis tools to automate the design process. Because  it is important that students become 
familiar with an HDL‐based design methodology , HDL descriptions of digital circuits are 
presented throughout the book. While these examples help illustrate the features of an HDL, 
they also demonstrate the best practices used by industry to exploit HDLs. Ignorance of 
these practices will lead to cute, but worthless, HDL models that may simulate a phenom-
enon, but that cannot be synthesized by design tools, or to models that waste silicon area or 
synthesize to hardware that cannot operate correctly. 
As previously stated, digital systems manipulate discrete quantities of information 
that are represented in binary form. Operands used for calculations may be expressed 
in the binary number system. Other discrete elements, including the decimal digits and 
characters of the alphabet, are represented in binary codes. Digital circuits, also referred 
to as logic circuits, process data by means of binary logic elements (logic gates) using 
binary signals. Quantities are stored in binary (two‐valued) storage elements (flip‐flops). 
The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the various binary concepts as a frame of 
reference for further study in the succeeding chapters.  
1.2    BINARY NUMBERS 
A decimal number such as 7,392 represents a quantity equal to 7 thousands, plus 3 hun-
dreds, plus 9 tens, plus 2 units. The thousands, hundreds, etc., are powers of 10 implied 
by the position of the coefficients (symbols) in the number. To be more exact, 7,392 is a 
shorthand notation for what should be written as 
7 * 10
3
+ 3* 10
2
+ 9 *10
1
+ 2 * 10
0
Add pdf to powerpoint slide - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
drag and drop pdf into powerpoint; pdf into powerpoint
Add pdf to powerpoint slide - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
how to convert pdf to powerpoint in; convert pdf back to powerpoint
   Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
However, the convention is to write only the numeric coefficients and, from their posi-
tion, deduce the necessary powers of 10 with powers increasing from right to left. In 
general, a number with a decimal point is represented by a series of coefficients: 
a
5
a
4
a
3
a
2
a
1
a
0
a
-1
a
-2
a
-3
The coefficients    a
j
are any of the 10 digits    (0,1,2, , c,9),    and the subscript value j gives 
the place value and, hence, the power of 10 by which the coefficient must be multiplied. 
Thus, the preceding decimal number can be expressed as 
10
5
a
5
+ 10
4
a
4
+ 10
3
a
3
+ 10
2
a
2
+ 10
1
a
1
+ 10
0
a
0
+ 10
-1
a
-1
+ 10
-2
a
-2
+ 10
-3
a
-3
with a 
3
= 7, a 
2
= 3, a 
1
= 9, and a 
0
= 2. 
The decimal number system is said to be of base, or radix, 10 because it uses 10 digits 
and the coefficients are multiplied by powers of 10. The binary system is a different 
number system. The coefficients of the binary number system have only two possible 
values: 0 and 1. Each coefficient    a
j
is multiplied by a power of the radix, e.g.,    2
j
,    and 
the results are added to obtain the decimal equivalent of the number. The radix 
point (e.g., the decimal point when 10 is the radix) distinguishes positive powers of 
10 from negative powers of 10. For example, the decimal equivalent of the binary 
number 11010.11 is 26.75, as shown from the multiplication of the coefficients by 
powers of2: 
1* 2
4
+ 1 * 2
3
+ 0 * 2
2
+ 1* 2
1
+0 * 2
0
+ 1 * 2
-1
+ 1* 2
-2
=26.75   
There are many different number systems. In general, a number expressed in a base‐r 
system has coefficients multiplied by powers of r
a
n
#
r
n
a
n-1
#
r
n-1
+
g
a
2
#
r
2
+a
1
#
a
0
a
-1
#
r
-1
a
-2
#
r
-2
+
g
a
-m
#
r
-m
The coefficients    a
j
range in value from 0 to    - 1.    To distinguish between numbers of 
different bases, we enclose the coefficients in parentheses and write a subscript equal to 
the base used (except sometimes for decimal numbers, where the content makes it obvi-
ous that the base is decimal). An example of a base‐5 number is 
(4021.2)
5
= 4* 5
3
+ 0 * 5
2
+ 2 * 5
1
+ 1* 5
0
+2 * 5
-1
= (511.4)
10
The coefficient values for base 5 can be only 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4. The octal number system 
is a base‐8 system that has eight digits: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. An example of an octal number 
is 127.4. To determine its equivalent decimal value, we expand the number in a power 
series with a base of 8: 
(127.4)
8
=1 * 8
2
+ 2 * 8
1
+ 7 *8
0
+ 4* 8
-1
= (87.5)
10
Note that the digits 8 and 9 cannot appear in an octal number. 
It is customary to borrow the needed r digits for the coefficients from the decimal 
system when the base of the number is less than 10.  The letters of the alphabet are used 
to supplement the 10 decimal digits when the base of the number is greater than 10.  For 
example, in the hexadecimal (base‐16) number system, the first 10 digits are borrowed 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to and effective VB.NET solution to add desired watermark on source PowerPoint slide at specified
convert pdf to ppt; conversion of pdf to ppt online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
& editing library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add-on can to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
converter pdf to powerpoint; how to convert pdf into powerpoint presentation
Section 1.2  Binary Numbers    5
from the decimal system. The letters A, B, C, D, E, and F are used for the digits 10, 11, 
12, 13, 14, and 15, respectively. An example of a hexadecimal number is 
(B65F)
16
= 11 * 16
3
+ 6* 16
2
+ 5 * 16
1
+ 15 * 16
0
=(46,687)
10
The hexadecimal system is used commonly by designers to represent long strings of bits 
in the addresses, instructions, and data in digital systems. For example, B65F is used to 
represent 1011011001010000. 
As noted before, the digits in a binary number are called bits. When a bit is equal to 
0, it does not contribute to the sum during the conversion. Therefore, the conversion 
from binary to decimal can be obtained by adding only the numbers with powers of two 
corresponding to the bits that are equal to 1. For example, 
(110101)
2
= 32 +16 + 4+ 1 =(53)
10
There are four 1’s in the binary number. The corresponding decimal number is the sum 
of the four powers of two. Zero and the first 24 numbers obtained from 2 to the power of 
n are listed in  Table   1.1   . In computer work,    2
10
is referred to as K (kilo),    2
20
as M (mega), 
2
30
as G (giga), and    2
40
as T (tera). Thus,    4K K =2
12
= 4,096    and    16M M = 2
24
= 16,777,216.    
Computer capacity is usually given in bytes. A byte is equal to eight bits and can accom-
modate (i.e., represent the code of) one keyboard character. A computer hard disk with 
four gigabytes of storage has a capacity of    4G G =2
32
bytes (approximately 4 billion bytes). 
A terabyte is 1024 gigabytes, approximately 1 trillion bytes.  
Arithmetic operations with numbers in base r follow the same rules as for decimal 
numbers. When a base other than the familiar base 10 is used, one must be careful to 
use only the r‐allowable digits. Examples of addition, subtraction, and multiplication of 
two binary numbers are as follows: 
augend:
101101
minuend:  
101101 multiplicand:
1011
addend: +100111
subtrahend:
-100111
multiplier:  
* 101
sum:     1010100
difference:  
000110
1011
0000 
1011  
product:  
110111
Table 1.1 
Powers of Two 
2
n
2
n
2
n
256 
16 
65,536 
512 
17 
131,072 
10 
1,024 (1K) 
18 
262,144 
11 
2,048 
19 
524,288 
16 
12 
4,096 (4K) 
20 
1,048,576 (1M) 
32 
13 
8,192 
21 
2,097,152 
64 
14 
16,384 
22 
4,194,304 
128 
15 
32,768 
23 
8,388,608 
partial product:
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
With our C#.NET PowerPoint control, developers are able to split a PowerPoint into two or more small files. Add & Insert PowerPoint Page/Slide in C#.
how to change pdf to powerpoint slides; change pdf to powerpoint online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Edit PowerPoint Slide; Insert, Add or Delete
NET PowerPoint slide modifying control add-on enables view more VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing functions & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf slides to powerpoint; adding pdf to powerpoint
   Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
The sum of two binary numbers is calculated by the same rules as in decimal, except 
that the digits of the sum in any significant position can be only 0 or 1. Any carry 
obtained in a given significant position is used by the pair of digits one significant posi-
tion higher. Subtraction is slightly more complicated. The rules are still the same as in 
decimal, except that the borrow in a given significant position adds 2 to a minuend digit. 
(A borrow in the decimal system adds 10 to a minuend digit.) Multiplication is simple: 
The multiplier digits are always 1 or 0; therefore, the partial products are equal either 
to a shifted (left) copy of the multiplicand or to 0.  
1.3    NUMBER‐BASE CONVERSIONS 
Representations of a number in a different radix are said to be equivalent if they have 
the same decimal representation. For example, (0011) 
8
and (1001) 
2
are equivalent—both 
have decimal value 9. The conversion of a number in base r to decimal is done by 
expanding the number in a power series and adding all the terms as shown previously. 
We now present a general procedure for the reverse operation of converting a decimal 
number to a number in base r. If the number includes a radix point, it is necessary to 
separate the number into an integer part and a fraction part, since each part must be 
converted differently. The conversion of a decimal integer to a number in base r is done 
by dividing the number and all successive quotients by r and accumulating the remain-
ders. This procedure is best illustrated by example. 
EXAMPLE1.1 
Convert decimal 41 to binary. First, 41 is divided by 2 to give an integer quotient of 20 
and a remainder of    
1
2
.    Then the quotient is again divided by 2 to give a new quotient and 
remainder. The process is continued until the integer quotient becomes 0. The coefficients 
of the desired binary number are obtained from the remainders as follows: 
Integer 
Quotient 
Remainder 
Coefficient 
41>2 =     
20 
+    
1
2
a
0
= 1    
20>2 =     
10 
+    
a
1
= 0    
10>2 =     
+    
a
2
= 0    
5>2=     
+    
1
2
a
3
= 1    
2>2=     
+    
a
4
= 0    
1>2=     
+    
1
2
a
5
= 1    
Therefore, the answer is    (41)
10
= (a
5
a
4
a
3
a
2
a
1
a
0
)
2
= (101001)
2
.    
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode How to customize VB.NET PowerPoint QR Code barcode scanning VB.NET PPT barcode scanner add-on to detect
create powerpoint from pdf; export pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
to convert one certain PowerPoint slide or a specified range of slides into .pdf document format using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion library add-on.
how to convert pdf to powerpoint; how to change pdf to powerpoint on
Section 1.3  Number‐Base Conversions    7
The arithmetic process can be manipulated more conveniently as follows: 
Integer 
Remainder 
41 
20 
10 
1 101001= = answer    
Conversion from decimal integers to any base‐r system is similar to this example, except 
that division is done by r instead of 2.  
EXAMPLE1.2 
Convert decimal 153 to octal. The required base r is 8. First, 153 is divided by 8 to give 
an integer quotient of 19 and a remainder of 1. Then 19 is divided by 8 to give an integer 
quotient of 2 and a remainder of 3. Finally, 2 is divided by 8 to give a quotient of 0 and 
a remainder of 2. This process can be conveniently manipulated as follows: 
153 
19 
2= (231)
8
The conversion of a decimal fraction to binary is accomplished by a method similar 
to that used for integers. However, multiplication is used instead of division, and integers 
instead of remainders are accumulated. Again, the method is best explained by example.  
EXAMPLE1.3 
Convert    (0.6875)
10
to binary. First, 0.6875 is multiplied by 2 to give an integer and a fraction. 
Then the new fraction is multiplied by 2 to give a new integer and a new fraction. The process 
is continued until the fraction becomes 0 or until the number of digits has sufficient 
accuracy. The coefficients of the binary number are obtained from the integers as follows: 
Integer 
Fraction 
Coefficient 
0.6875 * 2=     
+    
0.3750 
a
-1
= 1    
0.3750 * 2=     
+    
0.7500 
a
-2
= 0    
0.7500 * 2=     
+    
0.5000 
a
-3
= 1    
0.5000 * 2=     
+    
0.0000 
a
-4
= 1    
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS to install and use Microsoft PowerPoint software and what would you do to add and draw
convert pdf to powerpoint slide; convert pdf slides to powerpoint online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without affecting the & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change pdf to powerpoint; and paste pdf into powerpoint
   Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
Therefore, the answer is    (0.6875)
10
= (0.a
-1
a
-2
a
-3
a
-4
)
2
= (0.1011)
2
.    
To convert a decimal fraction to a number expressed in base r, a similar procedure is 
used. However, multiplication is by r instead of 2, and the coefficients found from the 
integers may range in value from 0 to    - 1    instead of 0 and 1.  
EXAMPLE1.4 
Convert    (0.513)
10
to octal. 
0.513 * 8 =4.104
0.104 * 8 =0.832
0.832 * 8 =6.656
0.656 * 8 =5.248
0.248 * 8 =1.984
0.984 * 8 =7.872   
The answer, to seven significant figures, is obtained from the integer part of the products: 
(0.513)
10
=(0.406517c)
8
The conversion of decimal numbers with both integer and fraction parts is done by 
converting the integer and the fraction separately and then combining the two answers. 
Using the results of Examples 1.1 and 1.3, we obtain 
(41.6875)
10
=(101001.1011)
2
From Examples 1.2 and 1.4, we have 
(153.513)
10
= (231.406517)
8
1.4    OCTAL AND HEXADECIMAL NUMBERS 
The conversion from and to binary, octal, and hexadecimal plays an important role in digi-
tal computers, because shorter patterns of hex characters are easier to recognize than long 
patterns of 1’s and 0’s. Since    2
3
= 8    and    2
4
= 16,    each octal digit corresponds to three 
binary digits and each hexadecimal digit corresponds to four binary digits. The first 16 num-
bers in the decimal, binary, octal, and hexadecimal number systems are listed in  Table   1.2   .  
The conversion from binary to octal is easily accomplished by partitioning the binary 
number into groups of three digits each, starting from the binary point and proceeding 
to the left and to the right. The corresponding octal digit is then assigned to each group. 
The following example illustrates the procedure: 
(10 110 001 101 011
#
111 100 0 000 110)
2
= (26153.7406)
8
2
6
1
5
3
7
4
0
6
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
Here is a market-leading PowerPoint barcode add-on within VB.NET class, which means it as well as 2d barcodes QR Code, Data Matrix, PDF-417, etc.
converting pdf to powerpoint online; convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation
VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
Add(tmpFilePath1) docPathList.Add(tmpFilePath2) PPTXDocument this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing tutorial & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add pdf to powerpoint presentation; convert pdf to editable ppt online
Section 1.4  Octal and Hexadecimal Numbers    9
Conversion from binary to hexadecimal is similar, except that the binary number is 
divided into groups of four digits: 
(10 1100 0 0110 0 1011
#
1111 0010)
2
=(2C6B.F2)
16
2
C
6
B
F
2
The corresponding hexadecimal (or octal) digit for each group of binary digits is easily 
remembered from the values listed in  Table   1.2   . 
Conversion from octal or hexadecimal to binary is done by reversing the preceding 
procedure. Each octal digit is converted to its three‐digit binary equivalent. Similarly, 
each hexadecimal digit is converted to its four‐digit binary equivalent. The procedure is 
illustrated in the following examples: 
(673.124)
8
= (110 0 111 011
#
001 010 100)
2
6
7
3
1
2
4
and 
(306.D)
16
= (0011 1 0000 0110
#
1101)
2
3
0
6
D
Binary numbers are difficult to work with because they require three or four times 
as many digits as their decimal equivalents. For example, the binary number 111111111111 
is equivalent to decimal 4095. However, digital computers use binary numbers, and it is 
sometimes necessary for the human operator or user to communicate directly with the 
Table 1.2 
Numbers with Different Bases 
Decimal 
(base 10) 
Binary 
(base 2) 
Octal 
(base 8) 
Hexadecimal 
(base 16) 
00 
0000 
00 
01 
0001 
01 
02 
0010 
02 
03 
0011 
03 
04 
0100 
04 
05 
0101 
05 
06 
0110 
06 
07 
0111 
07 
08 
1000 
10 
09 
1001 
11 
10 
1010 
12 
11 
1011 
13 
12 
1100 
14 
13 
1101 
15 
14 
1110 
16 
15 
1111 
17 
10    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
machine by means of such numbers. One scheme that retains the binary system in the 
computer, but reduces the number of digits the human must consider, utilizes the rela-
tionship between the binary number system and the octal or hexadecimal system. By this 
method, the human thinks in terms of octal or hexadecimal numbers and performs the 
required conversion by inspection when direct communication with the machine is nec-
essary. Thus, the binary number 111111111111 has 12 digits and is expressed in octal as 
7777 (4 digits) or in hexadecimal as FFF (3 digits). During communication between 
people (about binary numbers in the computer), the octal or hexadecimal representa-
tion is more desirable because it can be expressed more compactly with a third or a 
quarter of the number of digits required for the equivalent binary number. Thus,  most 
computer manuals use either octal or hexadecimal numbers to specify binary quantities . 
The choice between them is arbitrary, although hexadecimal tends to win out, since it 
can represent a byte with two digits.  
1.5    COMPLEMENTS OF NUMBERS 
Complements are used in digital computers to  simplify the subtraction operation  and for 
logical manipulation. Simplifying operations leads to simpler, less expensive circuits to 
implement the operations. There are two types of complements for each base‐r system: 
the radix complement and the diminished radix complement. The first is referred to as 
the r’s complement and the second as the    (- 1)>s    complement. When the value of the 
base r is substituted in the name, the two types are referred to as the 2’s complement and 
1’s complement for binary numbers and the 10’s complement and 9’s complement for 
decimal numbers. 
Diminished Radix Complement 
Given a number N in base r having n digits, the    (- 1)>s    complement of  N , i.e., its 
diminished radix complement, is defined as    (r
n
- 1) ) - N.    For decimal numbers,    = 10
and    - 1 =9,    so the 9’s complement of N is    (10
n
- 1) - N.    In this case,    10
n
represents 
a number that consists of a single 1 followed by n 0’s.    10
n
- 1    is a number represented 
by n 9’s. For example, if    =4,    we have    10
4
= 10,000    and    10
4
- 1 = 9999.    It follows 
that the 9’s complement of a decimal number is obtained by subtracting each digit from 9. 
Here are some numerical examples: 
The 9>s complement of 546700 is 999999 9 - 546700 =453299.
The 9>s complement of 012398 is 999999 9 - 012398 =987601.   
For binary numbers,    r=2    and    r-1=1,    so the 1’s complement of N is    (2
n
-1)-N.    
Again, 2
n
is represented by a binary number that consists of a 1 followed by n 0’s.    2
n
- 1    
is a binary number represented by n 1’s. For example, if    n= 4,    we have    2
4
=(10000)
2
and    2
4
- 1= (1111)
2
.    Thus, the 1’s complement of a binary number is obtained by 
subtracting each digit from 1. However, when subtracting binary digits from 1, we can 
Section 1.5  Complements of Numbers    11
have either    1 1 - 0= 1    or    1 1 - 1 =0,    which causes the bit to change from 0 to 1 or from 
1 to 0, respectively. Therefore,  the 1’s complement of a binary number is formed by 
changing 1’s to 0’s and 0’s to 1’s.  The following are some numerical examples: 
The 1’s complement of 1011000 is 0100111.       
The 1’s complement of 0101101 is 1010010.  
The    (- 1)>s    complement of octal or hexadecimal numbers is obtained by subtracting 
each digit from 7 or F (decimal 15), respectively.  
Radix Complement 
The r’s complement of an n‐digit number N in base r is defined as    r
n
N    for    N  0    and 
as 0 for    N= 0.    Comparing with the    (- 1)>s    complement, we note that the r’s complement 
is obtained by adding 1 to the    (- 1)>s    complement, since    r
n
-N=[(r
n
-1)-N]+1.    
Thus, the 10’s complement of decimal 2389 is    7610 0 + 1 =7611    and is obtained by adding 
1 to the 9’s complement value. The 2’s complement of binary 101100 is    010011 1 +1 = 010100    
and is obtained by adding 1 to the 1’s‐complement value. 
Since    10    is a number represented by a 1 followed by n 0’s,    10
n
N,    which is the 10’s 
complement of N, can be formed also by leaving all least significant 0’s unchanged, 
subtracting the first nonzero least significant digit from 10, and subtracting all higher 
significant digits from 9. Thus, 
the 10’s complement of 012398 is 987602  
and 
the 10’s complement of 246700 is 753300  
The 10’s complement of the first number is obtained by subtracting 8 from 10 in the least 
significant position and subtracting all other digits from 9. The 10’s complement of the 
second number is obtained by leaving the two least significant 0’s unchanged, subtract-
ing 7 from 10, and subtracting the other three digits from 9. 
Similarly, the 2’s complement can be formed by leaving all least significant 0’s and 
the first 1 unchanged and replacing 1’s with 0’s and 0’s with 1’s in all other higher sig-
nificant digits. For example, 
the 2’s complement of 1101100 is 0010100  
and 
the 2’s complement of 0110111 is 1001001  
The 2’s complement of the first number is obtained by leaving the two least significant 
0’s and the first 1 unchanged and then replacing 1’s with 0’s and 0’s with 1’s in the other 
four most significant digits. The 2’s complement of the second number is obtained by 
leaving the least significant 1 unchanged and complementing all other digits. 
12    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
In the previous definitions, it was assumed that the numbers did not have a radix point. 
If the original number N contains a radix point, the point should be removed temporarily 
in order to form the r’s or    (-1)>s    complement. The radix point is then restored to the 
complemented number in the same relative position. It is also worth mentioning that  the 
complement of the complement restores the number to its original value . To see this 
relationship, note that the r’s complement of N is    r
n
N,    so that the complement of the 
complement is    r
n
- (r
n
-N) = N    and is equal to the original number.  
Subtraction with Complements 
The direct method of subtraction taught in elementary schools uses the borrow concept. 
In this method, we borrow a 1 from a higher significant position when the minuend digit 
is smaller than the subtrahend digit. The method works well when people perform sub-
traction with paper and pencil. However, when subtraction is implemented with digital 
hardware, the method is less efficient than the method that uses complements. 
The subtraction of two n‐digit unsigned numbers    N    in base r can be done as 
follows: 
 
1.   Add the minuend M to the r’s complement of the subtrahend N. Mathematically, 
+ (r
n
N) =Nr
n
.     
 
2.   If    Ú N,    the sum will produce an end carry    r
n
,    which can be discarded; what is 
left is the result    MN.     
 
3.   If    M 6 N,    the sum does not produce an end carry and is equal to    r
n
- (-M),    
which is the r’s complement of    (NM).    To obtain the answer in a familiar form, 
take the r’s complement of the sum and place a negative sign in front.   
The following examples illustrate the procedure: 
EXAMPLE1.5 
Using 10’s complement, subtract    72532 2 - 3250.    
  72532
10>s complement of N= +   96750
Sum =    169282
Discard end carry 10
5
= - 100000
Answer    69282
Note that M has five digits and N has only four digits. Both numbers must have the same 
number of digits, so we write N as 03250. Taking the 10’s complement of N produces a 
9 in the most significant position. The occurrence of the end carry signifies that    Ú Ú N    
and that the result is therefore positive.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested