Section 5.7  State Reduction and Assignment    233
Table 5.6 
State Table 
Next State 
Output 
Present State 
x 0   x 
x 0   x 
a  
a  
b  
b  
c  
d  
c  
a  
d  
d  
e  
f  
e  
a  
f  
f  
g  
f  
g  
a  
f  
We now proceed to reduce the number of states for this example. First, we need the 
state table; it is more convenient to apply procedures for state reduction with the use of 
a table rather than a diagram. The state table of the circuit is listed in  Table   5.6    and is 
obtained directly from the state diagram. 
The following algorithm for the state reduction of a completely specified state table 
is given here without proof: “Two states are said to be equivalent if, for each member of 
the set of inputs, they give exactly the same output and send the circuit either to the 
same state or to an equivalent state.” When two states are equivalent, one of them can 
be removed without altering the input–output relationships.   
Now apply this algorithm to  Table   5.6   . Going through the state table, we look for two 
present states that go to the same next state and have the same output for both input 
combinations. States  e  and  g  are two such states: They both go to states  a  and  f  and have 
outputs of 0 and 1 for    x= 0    and    = 1,    respectively. Therefore, states  g  and  e  are equiv-
alent, and one of these states can be removed. The procedure of removing a state and 
replacing it by its equivalent is demonstrated in  Table   5.7   . The row with present state  g  
is removed, and state  g  is replaced by state  e  each time it occurs in the columns headed 
“Next State.” 
Present state  f  now has next states  e  and  f  and outputs 0 and 1 for    x= 0    and    = 1,    
respectively. The same next states and outputs appear in the row with present state  d . 
Therefore, states  f  and  d  are equivalent, and state  f  can be removed and replaced by  d . 
The final reduced table is shown in  Table   5.8   . The state diagram for the reduced table 
consists of only five states and is shown in  Fig.   5.26   . This state diagram satisfies the 
original input–output specifications and will produce the required output sequence for 
any given input sequence. The following list derived from the state diagram of  Fig.   5.26    
is for the input sequence used previously (note that the same output sequence results, 
although the state sequence is different):   
state 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
input 
output 
How to change pdf to powerpoint format - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
how to change pdf to ppt on; pdf to powerpoint converter online
How to change pdf to powerpoint format - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
convert pdf to ppt online without email; online pdf converter to powerpoint
234    Chapter 5  Synchronous Sequential Logic
a
b
c
e
d
0/0
1/1
1/0
1/0
1/0
1/1
0/0
0/0
0/0
0/0
FIGURE 5.26 
Reduced state diagram       
In fact, this sequence is exactly the same as that obtained for  Fig.   5.25    if we replace  g  by 
e  and  f  by  d . 
Checking each pair of states for equivalency can be done systematically by means of 
a procedure that employs an implication table, which consists of squares, one for every 
suspected pair of possible equivalent states. By judicious use of the table, it is possible 
to determine all pairs of equivalent states in a state table.  
Table 5.8 
Reduced State Table 
Next State 
Output 
Present State 
x 0   x 
x 0   x 
a  
a  
b  
b  
c  
d  
c  
a  
d  
d  
e  
d  
e  
a  
d  
Table 5.7 
Reducing the State Table 
Next State 
Output 
Present State 
x 0   x 
x 0   x 
a  
a  
b  
b  
c  
d  
c  
a  
d  
d  
e  
f  
e  
a  
f  
f  
e  
f  
How to C#: File Format Support
Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Home ›› XDoc.PowerPoint ›› C# PowerPoint: File Format PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML
convert pdf to powerpoint slide; pdf conversion to powerpoint
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An attempt to load a program with an incorrect format", please check your configure as follows: You can also directly change PDF to Gif image file in C# program
how to convert pdf to ppt using; convert pdf to powerpoint online for
Section 5.7  State Reduction and Assignment    235
The sequential circuit of this example was reduced from seven to five states. In 
general, reducing the number of states in a state table may result in a circuit with 
less equipment. However, the fact that a state table has been reduced to fewer states 
does not guarantee a saving in the number of flip-flops or the number of gates. In 
actual practice designers may skip this step because target devices are rich in 
resources.  
State Assignment 
In order to design a sequential circuit with physical components, it is necessary to assign 
unique coded binary values to the states. For a circuit with  m  states, the codes must con-
tain  n  bits, where    2
n
Ú m.    For example, with three bits, it is possible to assign codes to 
eight states, denoted by binary numbers 000 through 111. If the state table of  Table   5.6    is 
used, we must assign binary values to seven states; the remaining state is unused. If the 
state table of  Table   5.8    is used, only five states need binary assignment, and we are left 
with three unused states. Unused states are treated as don’t-care conditions during the 
design. Since don’t-care conditions usually help in obtaining a simpler circuit, it is more 
likely but not certain that the circuit with five states will require fewer combinational 
gates than the one with seven states. 
The simplest way to code five states is to use the first five integers in binary counting 
order, as shown in the first assignment of  Table   5.9   . Another similar assignment is the 
Gray code shown in assignment 2. Here, only one bit in the code group changes when 
going from one number to the next. This code makes it easier for the Boolean functions 
to be placed in the map for simplification. Another possible assignment often used in 
the design of state machines to control data-path units is the one-hot assignment. This 
configuration uses as many bits as there are states in the circuit. At any given time, only 
one bit is equal to 1 while all others are kept at 0. This type of assignment uses one flip-
flop per state, which is not an issue for register-rich field-programmable gate arrays. (See 
Chapter   7   .)  One-hot encoding usually leads to simpler decoding logic for the next state 
and output.  One-hot machines can be faster than machines with sequential binary 
encoding, and the silicon area required by the extra flip-flops can be offset by the area 
Table 5.9 
Three Possible Binary State Assignments 
State 
Assignment 1, 
Binary 
Assignment 2, 
Gray Code 
Assignment 3, 
One-Hot 
a  
000 
000 
00001 
b  
001 
001 
00010 
c  
010 
011 
00100 
d  
011 
010 
01000 
e  
100 
110 
10000 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
NET control to batch convert PDF documents to Tiff format in Visual Basic. Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET.
convert pdf file to powerpoint; convert pdf to powerpoint slides
How to C#: File Format Support
Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET
conversion of pdf into ppt; convert pdf into ppt online
236    Chapter 5  Synchronous Sequential Logic
saved by using simpler decoding logic. This trade-off is not guaranteed, so it must be 
evaluated for a given design.   
Table   5.10    is the reduced state table with binary assignment 1 substituted for the let-
ter symbols of the states. A different assignment will result in a state table with different 
binary values for the states. The binary form of the state table is used to derive the next-
state and output-forming combinational logic part of the sequential circuit. The com-
plexity of the combinational circuit depends on the binary state assignment chosen. 
Sometimes, the name  transition table  is used for a state table with a binary assignment. 
This convention distinguishes it from a state table with symbolic names for the states. 
In this book, we use the same name for both types of state tables.   
5.8    DESIGN PROCEDURE 
Design procedures or methodologies specify hardware that will implement a desired 
behavior. The design effort for small circuits may be manual, but industry relies on 
automated synthesis tools for designing massive integrated circuits. The sequential build-
ing block used by synthesis tools is the  D  flip-flop. Together with additional logic, it can 
implement the behavior of  JK  and  T  flip-flops. In fact, designers generally do not con-
cern themselves with the type of flip-flop; rather, their focus is on correctly describing 
the sequential functionality that is to be implemented by the synthesis tool. Here we 
will illustrate manual methods using  D,   JK,  and  T  flip-flops. 
The design of a clocked sequential circuit starts from a set of specifications and cul-
minates in a logic diagram or a list of Boolean functions from which the logic diagram 
can be obtained. In contrast to a combinational circuit, which is fully specified by a truth 
table, a sequential circuit requires a state table for its specification. The first step in the 
design of sequential circuits is to obtain a state table or an equivalent representation, 
such as a state diagram.
3
A synchronous sequential circuit is made up of flip-flops and combinational gates. The 
design of the circuit consists of choosing the flip-flops and then finding a combinational 
Table 5.10 
Reduced State Table with Binary Assignment 1 
Next State 
Output 
Present State 
x 0   x 
x 
x 
000 
000 
001 
001 
010 
011 
010 
000 
011 
011 
100 
011 
100 
000 
011 
We will examine later another important representation of a machine’s behavior—the algorithmic state 
machine (ASM) chart.
C#: How to Determine the Display Format for Web Doucment Viewing
convert PDF, Word, Excel and PowerPoint format files into _pptViewer are corresponding to setting PDF, Word, Excel on C#.NET web viewer, please change value to
changing pdf to powerpoint file; how to convert pdf to ppt
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
In some situations, it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into SVG image format. Here is a brief introduction to SVG image.
convert pdf to powerpoint online; convert pdf file to ppt online
Section 5.8  Design Procedure    237
gate structure that, together with the flip-flops, produces a circuit which fulfills the stated 
specifications. The number of flip-flops is determined from the number of states needed 
in the circuit and the choice of state assignment codes. The combinational circuit is 
derived from the state table by evaluating the flip-flop input equations and output equa-
tions. In fact, once the type and number of flip-flops are determined, the design process 
involves a transformation from a sequential circuit problem into a combinational circuit 
problem. In this way, the techniques of combinational circuit design can be applied. 
The procedure for designing synchronous sequential circuits can be summarized by 
a list of recommended steps: 
 
1.   From the word description and specifications of the desired operation, derive a 
state diagram for the circuit.  
 
2.   Reduce the number of states if necessary.  
 
3.   Assign binary values to the states.  
 
4.   Obtain the binary-coded state table.  
 
5.   Choose the type of flip-flops to be used.  
 
6.   Derive the simplified flip-flop input equations and output equations.  
 
7.   Draw the logic diagram.   
The word specification of the circuit behavior usually assumes that the reader is famil-
iar with digital logic terminology. It is necessary that the designer use intuition and expe-
rience to arrive at the correct interpretation of the circuit specifications, because word 
descriptions may be incomplete and inexact. Once such a specification has been set down 
and the state diagram obtained, it is possible to use known synthesis procedures to com-
plete the design. Although there are formal procedures for state reduction and assign-
ment (steps 2 and 3), they are seldom used by experienced designers. Steps 4 through 7 
in the design can be implemented by exact algorithms and therefore can be automated. 
The part of the design that follows a well-defined procedure is referred to as  synthesis . 
Designers using logic synthesis tools (software) can follow a simplified process that devel-
ops an HDL description directly from a state diagram, letting the synthesis tool deter-
mine the circuit elements and structure that implement the description. 
The first step is a critical part of the process, because succeeding steps depend on it. 
We will give one simple example to demonstrate how a state diagram is obtained from 
a word specification.  
Suppose we wish to design a circuit that detects a sequence of three or more con-
secutive 1’s in a string of bits coming through an input line (i.e., the input is a  serial bit 
stream ). The state diagram for this type of circuit is shown in  Fig.   5.27   . It is derived by 
starting with state    S
0
,    the reset state. If the input is 0, the circuit stays in    S
0
,    but if the 
input is 1, it goes to state    S
1
to indicate that a 1 was detected. If the next input is 1, the 
change is to state    S
2
to indicate the arrival of two consecutive 1’s, but if the input is 0, 
the state goes back to    S
0
.    The third consecutive 1 sends the circuit to state    S
3
.    If more 
1’s are detected, the circuit stays in    S
3
.    Any 0 input sends the circuit back to    S
0
.    In this 
way, the circuit stays in    S
3
as long as there are three or more consecutive 1’s received. 
This is a Moore model sequential circuit, since the output is 1 when the circuit is in state 
S
3
and is 0 otherwise. 
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
you integrate these functions into your VB.NET project, you are able to convert image to byte array or stream and convert Word or PDF document to image format.
how to convert pdf to powerpoint on; how to change pdf to powerpoint
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
Why do we need this PowerPoint to PDF converting library? Under this situation, you need to convert PowerPoint document to some image format document.
how to change pdf to powerpoint on; convert pdf back to powerpoint
238    Chapter 5  Synchronous Sequential Logic
Table 5.11 
State Table for Sequence Detector 
Present 
State 
Input 
Next 
State 
Output 
A  
B  
x  
A  
B  
y  
S
0
/0
S
1
/0
S
3
/1
S
2
/0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
FIGURE 5.27 
State diagram for sequence detector       
Synthesis Using  D  Flip-Flops 
Once the state diagram has been derived, the rest of the design follows a straight-
forward synthesis procedure. In fact, we can design the circuit by using an HDL 
description of the state diagram and the proper HDL synthesis tools to obtain a 
synthesized netlist. (The HDL description of the state diagram will be similar to 
HDL Example 5.6 in Section 5.6.) To design the circuit by hand, we need to assign 
binary codes to the states and list the state table. This is done in  Table   5.11   . The table 
is derived from the state diagram of  Fig.   5.27    with a sequential binary assignment. 
We choose two  D  flip-flops to represent the four states, and we label their outputs 
A  and  B . There is one input  x  and one output  y . The characteristic equation of the 
D  flip-flop is    Q(t+ 1) = D
Q
,    which means that the next-state values in the state 
table specify the  D  input condition for the flip-flop. The flip-flop input equations 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
image or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF corresponding VB.NET guide for converting PowerPoint document to your required image or document format.
pdf to ppt converter online for large; change pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.
Description: Convert the PDF page to bitmap with specified format and save it on the disk. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
how to change pdf to powerpoint format; chart from pdf to powerpoint
Section 5.8  Design Procedure    239
can be obtained directly from the next-state columns of  A  and  B  and expressed in 
sum-of-minterms form as 
A(+ 1) = D
A
(A,B,x) =©(3, 5, 7)
B(+ 1) = D
B
(A,B,x) =©(1, 5, 7)
y(A,B,x) = ©(6, 7)   
where  A  and  B  are the present-state values of flip-flops  A  and  B  x  is the input, and    D
A
and    D
B
are the input equations. The minterms for output  y  are obtained from the output 
column in the state table. 
The Boolean equations are simplified by means of the maps plotted in  Fig.   5.28   . The 
simplified equations are 
D
A
Ax Bx
D
B
Ax Bx
AB   
The advantage of designing with  D  flip-flops is that the Boolean equations describing 
the inputs to the flip-flops can be obtained directly from the state table. Software tools 
automatically infer and select the  D -type flip-flop from a properly written HDL model. 
The schematic of the sequential circuit is drawn in  Fig.   5.29   .   
Excitation Tables 
The design of a sequential circuit with flip-flops other than the  D  type is complicated 
by the fact that the input equations for the circuit must be derived indirectly from the 
state table. When  D -type flip-flops are employed, the input equations are obtained 
directly from the next state. This is not the case for the  JK  and  T  types of flip-flops. In 
order to determine the input equations for these flip-flops, it is necessary to derive a 
functional relationship between the state table and the input equations. 
The flip-flop characteristic tables presented in  Table   5.1    provide the value of the 
next state when the inputs and the present state are known. These tables are useful 
0
00
01
11
10
x
B
A
Bx
m
0
m
1
m
3
m
2
m
4
m
5
m
7
m
6
1
1
1
1
m
1
m
3
m
2
m
4
m
0
m
5
m
7
m
6
0
00
01
11
10
B
A
Bx
1
1
1
x
1
m
0
m
1
m
3
m
2
m
4
m
5
m
7
m
6
0
00
01
11
10
B
A
Bx
1
1
1
x
D
A
= Ax + Bx
D
B
= Ax + Bx
= AB
FIGURE 5.28 
K-Maps for sequence detector       
240    Chapter 5  Synchronous Sequential Logic
D
Clk
x
A
D
Clk
B
B
Clock
y
FIGURE 5.29 
Logic diagram of a Moore-type sequence detector       
for analyzing sequential circuits and for defining the operation of the flip-flops. Dur-
ing the design process, we usually know the transition from the present state to the 
next state and wish to find the flip-flop input conditions that will cause the required 
transition. For this reason, we need a table that lists the required inputs for a given 
change of state. Such a table is called an  excitation table . 
Table   5.12    shows the excitation tables for the two flip-flops (JK and T). Each table 
has a column for the present state  Q ( t ), a column for the next state    Q(+ 1),    and a 
column for each input to show how the required transition is achieved. There are four 
possible transitions from the present state to the next state. The required input condi-
tions for each of the four transitions are derived from the information available in the 
characteristic table. The symbol X in the tables represents a don’t-care condition, which 
means that it does not matter whether the input is 1 or 0.  
The excitation table for the  JK  flip-flop is shown in part (a). When both present state 
and next state are 0, the  J  input must remain at 0 and the  K  input can be either 0 or 1. 
Similarly, when both present state and next state are 1, the  K  input must remain at 0, 
Section 5.8  Design Procedure    241
while the  J  input can be 0 or 1. If the flip-flop is to have a transition from the 0-state 
to the 1-state,  J  must be equal to 1, since the  J  input sets the flip-flop. However, input 
K  may be either 0 or 1. If    K= 0,    the    = 1    condition sets the flip-flop as required; if 
K= 1    and    =1,    the flip-flop is complemented and goes from the 0-state to the 
1-state as required. Therefore, the  K  input is marked with a don’t-care condition for the 
0-to-1 transition. For a transition from the 1-state to the 0-state, we must have    K= 1,    
since the  K  input clears the flip-flop. However, the  J  input may be either 0 or 1, since 
J= 0    has no effect and    =1    together with    K= 1    complements the flip-flop with a 
resultant transition from the 1-state to the 0-state. 
The excitation table for the  T  flip-flop is shown in part (b). From the characteristic 
table, we find that when input    = 1,    the state of the flip-flop is complemented, and 
when    T= 0,    the state of the flip-flop remains unchanged. Therefore, when the state of 
the flip-flop must remain the same, the requirement is that    T= 0.    When the state of the 
flip-flop has to be complemented,  T  must equal 1.  
Synthesis Using  JK  Flip-Flops 
The manual synthesis procedure for sequential circuits with  JK  flip-flops is the same as 
with  D  flip-flops, except that the input equations must be evaluated from the present-
state to the next-state transition derived from the excitation table. To illustrate the pro-
cedure, we will synthesize the sequential circuit specified by  Table   5.13   . In addition to 
having columns for the present state, input, and next state, as in a conventional state table, 
the table shows the flip-flop input conditions from which the input equations are derived. 
The flip-flop inputs are derived from the state table in conjunction with the excitation 
table for the  JK  flip-flop. For example, in the first row of  Table   5.13   , we have a transition 
for flip-flop  A  from 0 in the present state to 0 in the next state. In  Table   5.12   , for the  JK  
flip-flop, we find that a transition of states from present state 0 to next state 0 requires 
that input  J  be 0 and input  K  be a don’t-care. So 0 and X are entered in the first row under 
J
A
and    K
A
,    respectively. Since the first row also shows a transition for flip-flop  B  from 0 
in the present state to 0 in the next state, 0 and X are inserted into the first row under    J
B
and    K
B
,    respectively. The second row of the table shows a transition for flip-flop  B  from 
0 in the present state to 1 in the next state. From the excitation table, we find that a tran-
sition from 0 to 1 requires that  J  be 1 and  K  be a don’t-care, so 1 and X are copied into 
Table 5.12 
Flip-Flop Excitation Tables 
Q ( t ) 
Q ( t 1)   J  
K  
Q ( t ) 
Q ( t 1)   T  
(a)  JK  Flip-Flop 
(b)  T  Flip-Flop 
242    Chapter 5  Synchronous Sequential Logic
the second row under    J
B
and    K
B
,    respectively. The process is continued for each row in 
the table and for each flip-flop, with the input conditions from the excitation table copied 
into the proper row of the particular flip-flop being considered.  
The flip-flop inputs in  Table   5.13    specify the truth table for the input equations as a 
function of present state  A present state  B and input  x . The input equations are simpli-
fied in the maps of  Fig.   5.30   . The next-state values are not used during the simplification, 
1
A
m
0
m
1
m
3
m
2
m
4
m
5
m
7
m
6
0
00
01
11
10
x
A
Bx
X
X
1
X
X
1
B
1
A
B
m
0
m
1
m
3
m
2
m
5
m
2
m
6
m
4
0
00
01
11
10
x
A
Bx
1
X
X
1
X
X
1
A
B
m
0
m
1
m
3
m
2
m
6
m
7
m
5
m
4
0
00
01
11
10
A
Bx
X
X
X
X
1
x
1
A
0
00
01
11
10
A
Bx
m
0
m
1
m
3
m
2
m
4
m
5
m
7
m
6
1
X
X
X
X
B
x
J
A
= Bx
J
B
= x
K
B
=(A x)′
K
A
= Bx
FIGURE 5.30 
Maps for  J  and  K  input equations       
Table 5.13 
State Table and JK Flip-Flop Inputs 
Present 
State 
Input 
Next 
State 
Flip-Flop Inputs 
A  
B  
x  
A  
B  
A
  
A
    
B
  
B
  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested