Section 1.5  Complements of Numbers    13
EXAMPLE1.6 
Using 10’s complement, subtract    3250 0 - 72532.    
M    03250
10>s complement of N= + 27468
Sum =     30718   
There is no end carry. Therefore, the answer is    -(10>s complement of 30718) ) = = -69282.    
Note that since    3250 6 72532,    the result is negative. Because we are dealing with 
unsigned numbers, there is really no way to get an unsigned result for this case. When 
subtracting with complements, we recognize the negative answer from the absence 
of the end carry and the complemented result. When working with paper and pencil, 
we can change the answer to a signed negative number in order to put it in a famil-
iar form. 
Subtraction with complements is done with binary numbers in a similar manner, using 
the procedure outlined previously.  
EXAMPLE1.7 
Given the two binary numbers    =1010100    and    Y= 1000011,    perform the subtraction 
(a)    XY    and (b)    -X    by using 2’s complements. 
(a) 
X=
1010100      
2>s complement of =  + 0111101
Sum =      10010001
Discard end carry 2
7
=
- 10000000
Answer:-     0010001    
(b) 
     1000011
2>s complement of =  + + 0101100
Sum =     1101111     
There is no end carry. Therefore, the answer is    Y-X=-(2>s complement of 1101111)=    
-0010001.     
Subtraction of unsigned numbers can also be done by means of the    (- 1)>s    com-
plement. Remember that the    (- 1)>s    complement is one less than the r’s comple-
ment. Because of this, the result of adding the minuend to the complement of the 
subtrahend produces a sum that is one less than the correct difference when an end 
carry occurs. Removing the end carry and adding 1 to the sum is referred to as an 
end‐around carry. 
Add pdf to powerpoint slide - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
convert pdf to editable powerpoint online; change pdf to powerpoint online
Add pdf to powerpoint slide - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
convert pdf file to powerpoint online; image from pdf to powerpoint
14    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
EXAMPLE1.8 
Repeat Example 1.7, but this time using 1’s complement. 
 
(a)     -= 1010100 -1000011
X      1010100
1>s complement of = +  0111100
Sum =     10010000
End@around carry = = +   
1
Answer:X   0010001    
 
(b)     X= 1000011- 1010100
Y     1000011
1>s complement of X= +  0101011
Sum =      1101110     
There is no end carry. Therefore, the answer is    Y-X=-(1>s complement of 1101110)=    
-0010001.     
Note that the negative result is obtained by taking the 1’s complement of the sum, since 
this is the type of complement used. The procedure with end‐around carry is also appli-
cable to subtracting unsigned decimal numbers with 9’s complement.   
1.6    SIGNED BINARY NUMBERS 
Positive integers (including zero) can be represented as unsigned numbers. However, to 
represent negative integers, we need a notation for negative values. In ordinary arith-
metic, a negative number is indicated by a minus sign and a positive number by a plus 
sign. Because of hardware limitations, computers must represent everything with binary 
digits. It is customary to represent the sign with a bit placed in the leftmost position of 
the number. The convention is to make the sign bit 0 for positive and 1 for negative. 
It is important to realize that both signed and unsigned binary numbers consist of a 
string of bits when represented in a computer. The user determines whether the number 
is signed or unsigned. If the binary number is signed, then the leftmost bit represents the 
sign and the rest of the bits represent the number. If the binary number is assumed to 
beunsigned, then the leftmost bit is the most significant bit of the number. For example, 
the string of bits 01001 can be considered as 9 (unsigned binary) or as    +9    (signed binary) 
because the leftmost bit is 0. The string of bits 11001 represents the binary equivalent of 
25 when considered as an unsigned number and the binary equivalent of    -9    when con-
sidered as a signed number. This is because the 1 that is in the leftmost position designates 
a negative and the other four bits represent binary 9. Usually, there is no confusion in 
interpreting the bits if the type of representation for the number is known in advance. 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to and effective VB.NET solution to add desired watermark on source PowerPoint slide at specified
conversion of pdf into ppt; pdf to ppt converter online for large
VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
& editing library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add-on can to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change pdf to ppt; pdf to powerpoint converter online
Section 1.6  Signed Binary Numbers    15
The representation of the signed numbers in the last example is referred to as the 
signed‐magnitude convention. In this notation, the number consists of a magnitude and 
a symbol (   +    or    -   ) or a bit (0 or 1) indicating the sign. This is the representation of signed 
numbers used in ordinary arithmetic. When arithmetic operations are implemented in 
a computer, it is more convenient to use a different system, referred to as the signed‐
complement system, for representing negative numbers. In this system, a negative num-
ber is indicated by its complement. Whereas the signed‐magnitude system negates a 
number by changing its sign, the signed‐complement system negates a number by taking 
its complement. Since positive numbers always start with 0 (plus) in the leftmost posi-
tion, the complement will always start with a 1, indicating a negative number. The 
signed‐complement system can use either the 1’s or the 2’s complement, but the 2’s 
complement is the most common. 
As an example, consider the number 9, represented in binary with eight bits.    +9    is 
represented with a sign bit of 0 in the leftmost position, followed by the binary equiva-
lent of 9, which gives 00001001. Note that all eight bits must have a value; therefore, 0’s 
are inserted following the sign bit up to the first 1. Although there is only one way to 
represent    +9,    there are three different ways to represent    -9    with eight bits: 
signed‐magnitude representation: 
10001001 
signed‐1’s‐complement representation: 
11110110 
signed‐2’s‐complement representation: 
11110111  
In signed‐magnitude,    -9    is obtained from    +9    by changing only the sign bit in the leftmost 
position from 0 to 1. In signed‐1’s-complement,    -9    is obtained by complementing all the 
bits of    +9,    including the sign bit. The signed‐2’s‐complement representation of    -9    is 
obtained by taking the 2’s complement of the positive number, including the sign bit. 
Table   1.3    lists all possible four‐bit signed binary numbers in the three representations. 
The equivalent decimal number is also shown for reference. Note that the positive num-
bers in all three representations are identical and have 0 in the leftmost position. The 
signed‐2’s‐complement system has only one representation for 0, which is always posi-
tive. The other two systems have either a positive 0 or a negative 0, something not 
encountered in ordinary arithmetic. Note that all negative numbers have a 1 in the 
leftmost bit position; that is the way we distinguish them from the positive numbers. 
With four bits, we can represent 16 binary numbers. In the signed‐magnitude and the 
1’s‐complement representations, there are eight positive numbers and eight negative 
numbers, including two zeros. In the 2’s‐complement representation, there are eight 
positive numbers, including one zero, and eight negative numbers.  
The signed‐magnitude system is used in ordinary arithmetic, but is awkward when 
employed in computer arithmetic because of the separate handling of the sign and the 
magnitude. Therefore, the signed‐complement system is normally used. The 1’s com-
plement imposes some difficulties and is seldom used for arithmetic operations. It is 
useful as a logical operation, since the change of 1 to 0 or 0 to 1 is equivalent to a 
logical complement operation, as will be shown in the next chapter. The discussion of 
signed binary arithmetic that follows deals exclusively with the signed‐2’s‐complement 
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
With our C#.NET PowerPoint control, developers are able to split a PowerPoint into two or more small files. Add & Insert PowerPoint Page/Slide in C#.
converting pdf to ppt online; and paste pdf into powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Edit PowerPoint Slide; Insert, Add or Delete
NET PowerPoint slide modifying control add-on enables view more VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing functions & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
chart from pdf to powerpoint; how to convert pdf to ppt using
16    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
representation of negative numbers. The same procedures can be applied to the 
signed‐1’s‐complement system by including the end‐around carry as is done with 
unsigned numbers. 
Arithmetic Addition 
The addition of two numbers in the signed‐magnitude system follows the rules of 
ordinary arithmetic. If the signs are the same, we add the two magnitudes and give 
the sum the common sign. If the signs are different, we subtract the smaller magni-
tude from the larger and give the difference the sign of the larger magnitude. For 
example,    (+25) ) + (-37) = = -(37- - 25) ) = -12    is done by subtracting the smaller mag-
nitude, 25, from the larger magnitude, 37, and appending the sign of 37 to the result. 
This is a process that requires a comparison of the signs and magnitudes and then per-
forming either addition or subtraction. The same procedure applies to binary numbers 
in signed‐magnitude representation. In contrast, the rule for adding numbers in the 
signed‐complement system does not require a comparison or subtraction, but only 
addition. The procedure is very simple and can be stated as follows for binary numbers: 
The addition of two signed binary numbers with negative numbers represented in  
signed‐ 2’s‐complement form is obtained from the addition of the two numbers, includ-
ing their sign  bits.  A carry out of the sign‐bit position is discarded.  
Table 1.3 
Signed Binary Numbers 
Decimal 
Signed‐2’s 
Complement 
Signed‐1’s 
Complement 
Signed 
Magnitude 
+7    
0111 
0111 
0111 
+6    
0110 
0110 
0110 
+5    
0101 
0101 
0101 
+4    
0100 
0100 
0100 
+3    
0011 
0011 
0011 
+2    
0010 
0010 
0010 
+1    
0001 
0001 
0001 
+0    
0000 
0000 
0000 
-0    
— 
1111 
1000 
-1    
1111 
1110 
1001 
-2    
1110 
1101 
1010 
-3    
1101 
1100 
1011 
-4    
1100 
1011 
1100 
-5    
1011 
1010 
1101 
-6    
1010 
1001 
1110 
-7    
1001 
1000 
1111 
-8    
1000 
— 
— 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode How to customize VB.NET PowerPoint QR Code barcode scanning VB.NET PPT barcode scanner add-on to detect
how to change pdf to ppt on; convert pdf to powerpoint online for
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
to convert one certain PowerPoint slide or a specified range of slides into .pdf document format using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion library add-on.
how to convert pdf slides to powerpoint; export pdf to powerpoint
Section 1.6  Signed Binary Numbers    17
Numerical examples for addition follow: 
+ 6 6 00000110
- 6 6 11111010
+13
00001101
+13
00001101
+19 00010011
+ 7 7 00000111
+ 6 6 00000110
- 6 6 11111010
-13
11110011
-13
11110011
- 7 7 11111001
-19 11101101
Note that negative numbers must be initially in 2’s‐complement form and that if the sum 
obtained after the addition is negative, it is in 2’s‐complement form. For example, -7 is 
represented as 11111001, which is the 2s complement of +7. 
In each of the four cases, the operation performed is addition with the sign bit 
included. Any carry out of the sign‐bit position is discarded, and negative results are 
automatically in 2’s‐complement form. 
In order to obtain a correct answer, we must ensure that the result has a sufficient 
number of bits to accommodate the sum. If we start with two n‐bit numbers and the sum 
occupies    + 1    bits, we say that an overflow occurs. When one performs the addition with 
paper and pencil, an overflow is not a problem, because we are not limited by the width 
of the page. We just add another 0 to a positive number or another 1 to a negative number 
in the most significant position to extend the number to    +1    bits and then perform the 
addition. Overflow is a problem in computers because the number of bits that hold a 
number is finite, and a result that exceeds the finite value by 1 cannot be accommodated. 
The complement form of representing negative numbers is unfamiliar to those used 
to the signed‐magnitude system. To determine the value of a negative number in signed‐2’s 
complement, it is necessary to convert the number to a positive number to place it in a 
more familiar form. For example, the signed binary number 11111001 is negative because 
the leftmost bit is 1. Its 2’s complement is 00000111, which is the binary equivalent of 
+7.    We therefore recognize the original negative number to be equal to    -7.     
Arithmetic Subtraction 
Subtraction of two signed binary numbers when negative numbers are in 2’s‐complement 
form is simple and can be stated as follows: 
Take the 2’s complement of the subtrahend (including the sign bit) and add it to the 
minuend (including the sign bit). A carry out of the sign‐bit position is discarded.  
This procedure is adopted because a subtraction operation can be changed to an addi-
tion operation if the sign of the subtrahend is changed, as is demonstrated by the 
following relationship: 
({A)- (+B) =({A) +(-B);
({A)- (-B) = ({A)+ (+B).   
But changing a positive number to a negative number is easily done by taking the 2’s 
complement of the positive number. The reverse is also true, because the complement 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS to install and use Microsoft PowerPoint software and what would you do to add and draw
convert pdf into ppt online; convert pdf to powerpoint presentation
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without affecting the & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
online pdf converter to powerpoint; copying image from pdf to powerpoint
18    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
of a negative number in complement form produces the equivalent positive number. To 
see this, consider the subtraction    (-6) ) - (-13) = = +7.    In binary with eight bits, this 
operation is written as    (11111010 0 - 11110011).    The subtraction is changed to addition 
by taking the 2’s complement of the subtrahend    (-13),    giving    (+13).    In binary, this is 
11111010+ 00001101= 100000111.    Removing the end carry, we obtain the correct 
answer:    00000111(+7).    
It is worth noting that binary numbers in the signed‐complement system are added 
and subtracted by the same basic addition and subtraction rules as unsigned numbers. 
Therefore,  computers need only one common hardware circuit to handle both types of 
arithmetic . This consideration has resulted in the signed‐complement system being used 
in virtually all arithmetic units of computer systems. The user or programmer must 
interpret the results of such addition or subtraction differently, depending on whether 
it is assumed that the numbers are signed or unsigned.   
1.7    BINARY CODES 
Digital systems use signals that have two distinct values and circuit elements that 
have two stable states. There is a direct analogy among binary signals, binary circuit 
elements, and binary digits. A binary number of n digits, for example, may be repre-
sented by n binary circuit elements, each having an output signal equivalent to 0 or 1. 
Digital systems represent and manipulate not only binary numbers, but also many 
other discrete elements of information. Any discrete element of information that is 
distinct among a group of quantities can be represented with a binary code (i.e., a 
pattern of 0’s and 1’s). The codes must be in binary because, in today’s technology, 
only circuits that represent and manipulate patterns of 0’s and 1’s can be manufac-
tured economically for use in computers. However, it must be realized that binary 
codes merely change the symbols, not the meaning of the elements of information 
that they represent. If we inspect the bits of a computer at random, we will find that 
most of the time they represent some type of coded information rather than binary 
numbers. 
An n‐bit binary code is a group of n bits that assumes up to    2
n
distinct combinations 
of 1’s and 0’s, with each combination representing one element of the set that is being 
coded. A set of four elements can be coded with two bits, with each element assigned 
one of the following bit combinations: 00, 01, 10, 11. A set of eight elements requires a 
three‐bit code and a set of 16 elements requires a four‐bit code. The bit combination of 
an n‐bit code is determined from the count in binary from 0 to    2
n
- 1.    Each element 
must be assigned a unique binary bit combination, and no two elements can have the 
same value; otherwise, the code assignment will be ambiguous. 
Although the minimum number of bits required to code    2
n
distinct quantities is n, 
there is no maximum number of bits that may be used for a binary code. For example, 
the 10 decimal digits can be coded with 10 bits, and each decimal digit can be assigned 
a bit combination of nine 0’s and a 1. In this particular binary code, the digit 6 is assigned 
the bit combination 0001000000. 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
Here is a market-leading PowerPoint barcode add-on within VB.NET class, which means it as well as 2d barcodes QR Code, Data Matrix, PDF-417, etc.
embed pdf into powerpoint; adding pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
Add(tmpFilePath1) docPathList.Add(tmpFilePath2) PPTXDocument this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing tutorial & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
converting pdf to ppt; conversion of pdf to ppt online
Section 1.7  Binary Codes    19
Binary-Coded Decimal Code 
Although the binary number system is the most natural system for a computer because 
it is readily represented in today’s electronic technology, most people are more accus-
tomed to the decimal system. One way to resolve this difference is to convert decimal 
numbers to binary, perform all arithmetic calculations in binary, and then convert the 
binary results back to decimal. This method requires that we store decimal numbers in 
the computer so that they can be converted to binary. Since the computer can accept 
only binary values, we must represent the decimal digits by means of a code that contains 
1’s and 0’s. It is also possible to perform the arithmetic operations directly on decimal 
numbers when they are stored in the computer in coded form. 
A binary code will have some unassigned bit combinations if the number of elements 
in the set is not a multiple power of 2. The 10 decimal digits form such a set. A binary 
code that distinguishes among 10 elements must contain at least four bits, but 6 out of 
the 16 possible combinations remain unassigned. Different binary codes can be obtained 
by arranging four bits into 10 distinct combinations. The code most commonly used for 
the decimal digits is the straight binary assignment listed in  Table   1.4   . This scheme is 
called binary‐coded decimal and is commonly referred to as BCD. Other decimal codes 
are possible and a few of them are presented later in this section.  
Table   1.4    gives the four‐bit code for one decimal digit. A number with k decimal 
digits will require 4k bits in BCD. Decimal 396 is represented in BCD with 12 bits as 
0011 1001 0110, with  each group of 4 bits representing one decimal digit.  A decimal 
number in BCD is the same as its equivalent binary number only when the number is 
between 0 and 9. A BCD number greater than 10 looks different from its equivalent 
binary number, even though both contain 1’s and 0’s. Moreover,  the binary combina-
tions 1010 through 1111 are not used and have no meaning in BCD.  Consider decimal 
185 and its corresponding value in BCD and binary: 
(185)
10
= (000110000101)
BCD
= (10111001)
2
Table 1.4 
Binary‐Coded Decimal (BCD) 
Decimal 
Symbol 
BCD 
Digit 
0000 
0001 
0010 
0011 
0100 
0101 
0110 
0111 
1000 
1001 
20    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
The BCD value has 12 bits to encode the characters of the decimal value, but the equiv-
alent binary number needs only 8 bits. It is obvious that the representation of a BCD 
number needs more bits than its equivalent binary value. However, there is an advantage 
in the use of decimal numbers, because computer input and output data are generated 
by people who use the decimal system. 
It is important to realize that BCD numbers are decimal numbers and not binary 
numbers, although they use bits in their representation. The only difference between a 
decimal number and BCD is that decimals are written with the symbols 0, 1, 2,    c,    9 
and BCD numbers use the binary code 0000, 0001, 0010,    c,    1001. The decimal value 
is exactly the same. Decimal 10 is represented in BCD with eight bits as 0001 0000 and 
decimal 15 as 0001 0101. The corresponding binary values are 1010 and 1111 and have 
only four bits.  
BCD Addition 
Consider the addition of two decimal digits in BCD, together with a possible carry 
from a previous less significant pair of digits. Since each digit does not exceed 9, the 
sum cannot be greater than    9 9 + 9+ 1 =19,    with the 1 being a previous carry. Sup-
pose we add the BCD digits as if they were binary numbers. Then the binary sum will 
produce a result in the range from 0 to 19. In binary, this range will be from 0000 to 
10011, but in BCD, it is from 0000 to 1 1001, with the first (i.e., leftmost) 1 being a 
carry and the next four bits being the BCD sum. When the binary sum is equal to or 
less than 1001 (without a carry), the corresponding BCD digit is correct. However, 
when the binary sum is greater than or equal to 1010, the result is an invalid BCD 
digit. The addition of    6 6 =(0110)
2
to the binary sum converts it to the correct digit and 
also produces a carry as required. This is because a carry in the most significant bit 
position of the binary sum and a decimal carry differ by    16 6 - 10= 6.    Consider the 
following three BCD additions: 
4
0100
4
0100
8
1000
+5
+0101
+8
+1000
+9
1001
9
1001
12
1100
17
10001
+0110
+0110
10010
10111   
In each case, the two BCD digits are added as if they were two binary numbers. If the 
binary sum is greater than or equal to 1010, we add 0110 to obtain the correct BCD sum 
and a carry. In the first example, the sum is equal to 9 and is the correct BCD sum. In 
the second example, the binary sum produces an invalid BCD digit. The addition of 0110 
produces the correct BCD sum, 0010 (i.e., the number 2), and a carry. In the third 
example, the binary sum produces a carry. This condition occurs when the sum is greater 
than or equal to 16. Although the other four bits are less than 1001, the binary sum 
requires a correction because of the carry. Adding 0110, we obtain the required BCD 
sum 0111 (i.e., the number 7) and a BCD carry. 
Section 1.7  Binary Codes    21
The addition of two n‐digit unsigned BCD numbers follows the same procedure. 
Consider the addition of    184 4 +576= 760    in BCD: 
BCD     
1
1
0001
1000 0100
184
+0101
0111
0110
+576
Binary sum
0111 10000 1010
Add 6     
0110
0110
BCD sum 
0111
0110 0000
760
The first, least significant pair of BCD digits produces a BCD digit sum of 0000 and a 
carry for the next pair of digits. The second pair of BCD digits plus a previous carry 
produces a digit sum of 0110 and a carry for the next pair of digits. The third pair of 
digits plus a carry produces a binary sum of 0111 and does not require a correction.  
Decimal Arithmetic 
The representation of signed decimal numbers in BCD is similar to the representation 
of signed numbers in binary. We can use either the familiar signed‐magnitude system or 
the signed‐complement system. The sign of a decimal number is usually represented 
with four bits to conform to the four‐bit code of the decimal digits. It is customary to 
designate a plus with four 0’s and a minus with the BCD equivalent of 9, which is 1001. 
The signed‐magnitude system is seldom used in computers. The signed‐complement 
system can be either the 9’s or the 10’s complement, but the 10’s complement is the one 
most often used. To obtain the 10’s complement of a BCD number, we first take the 9’s 
complement and then add 1 to the least significant digit. The 9’s complement is calcu-
lated from the subtraction of each digit from 9. 
The procedures developed for the signed‐2’s‐complement system in the previous 
section also apply to the signed‐10’s‐complement system for decimal numbers. Addition 
is done by summing all digits, including the sign digit, and discarding the end carry. This 
operation assumes that all negative numbers are in 10’s‐complement form. Consider the 
addition    (+375) ) +(-240) ) = = +135,    done in the signed‐complement system: 
0 375
+9 760
0 135
The 9 in the leftmost position of the second number represents a minus, and 9760 is 
the 10’s complement of 0240. The two numbers are added and the end carry is dis-
carded to obtain    +135.    Of course, the decimal numbers inside the computer, including 
the sign digits, must be in BCD. The addition is done with BCD digits as described 
previously. 
The subtraction of decimal numbers, either unsigned or in the signed‐10’s‐complement 
system, is the same as in the binary case: Take the 10’s complement of the subtrahend and 
add it to the minuend. Many computers have special hardware to perform arithmetic 
22    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
calculations directly with decimal numbers in BCD. The user of the computer can specify 
programmed instructions to perform the arithmetic operation with decimal numbers 
directly, without having to convert them to binary.  
Other Decimal Codes 
Binary codes for decimal digits require a minimum of four bits per digit. Many different 
codes can be formulated by arranging four bits into 10 distinct combinations. BCD and 
three other representative codes are shown in  Table   1.5   . Each code uses only 10 out of 
a possible 16 bit combinations that can be arranged with four bits. The other six unused 
combinations have no meaning and should be avoided.  
BCD and the 2421 code are examples of weighted codes. In a weighted code, each bit 
position is assigned a weighting factor in such a way that each digit can be evaluated by 
adding the weights of all the 1’s in the coded combination. The BCD code has weights 
of 8, 4, 2, and 1, which correspond to the power‐of‐two values of each bit. The bit assign-
ment 0110, for example, is interpreted by the weights to represent decimal 6 because 
8*0+4*1+2*1+1*0=6.    The bit combination 1101, when weighted by the 
respective digits 2421, gives the decimal equivalent of    2*1+4*1+2*0+1*1=7.    
Note that some digits can be coded in two possible ways in the 2421 code. For instance, 
decimal 4 can be assigned to bit combination 0100 or 1010, since both combinations add 
up to a total weight of 4. 
Table 1.5 
Four Different Binary Codes for the Decimal Digits 
Decimal 
Digit 
BCD 
8421 
2421 
Excess‐3 
8, 4, 2, 1       
0000 
0000 
0011 
0000 
0001 
0001 
0100 
0111 
0010 
0010 
0101 
0110 
0011 
0011 
0110 
0101 
0100 
0100 
0111 
0100 
0101 
1011 
1000 
1011 
0110 
1100 
1001 
1010 
0111 
1101 
1010 
1001 
1000 
1110 
1011 
1000 
1001 
1111 
1100 
1111 
1010 
0101 
0000 
0001 
Unused  
1011 
0110 
0001 
0010 
bit 
1100 
0111 
0010 
0011 
combi- 
1101 
1000 
1101 
1100 
nations 
1110 
1001 
1110 
1101 
1111 
1010 
1111 
1110 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested