Section 1.7  Binary Codes    23
BCD adders add BCD values directly, digit by digit, without converting the numbers 
to binary. However, it is necessary to add 6 to the result if it is greater than 9. BCD 
adders require significantly more hardware and no longer have a speed advantage of 
conventional binary adders [5]. 
The 2421 and the excess‐3 codes are examples of self‐complementing codes. Such 
codes have the property that the 9’s complement of a decimal number is obtained 
directly by changing 1’s to 0’s and 0’s to 1’s (i.e., by complementing each bit in the pat-
tern). For example, decimal 395 is represented in the excess‐3 code as 0110 1100 1000. 
The 9’s complement of 604 is represented as 1001 0011 0111, which is obtained simply 
by complementing each bit of the code (as with the 1’s complement of binary numbers). 
The excess‐3 code has been used in some older computers because of its self‐
complementing property.  Excess‐3 is an unweighted code in which each coded com-
bination is obtained from the corresponding binary value plus 3.  Note that the BCD 
code is not self‐complementing. 
The 8, 4,    -2,-1    code is an example of assigning both positive and negative weights 
to a decimal code. In this case, the bit combination 0110 is interpreted as decimal 2 and 
is calculated from    8 8 * 0 + 4* 1 + (-2) ) * 1 1 +(-1) ) * 0 0 =2.     
Gray Code 
The output data of many physical systems are quantities that are continuous. These 
data must be converted into digital form before they are applied to a digital system. 
Continuous or analog information is converted into digital form by means of an ana-
log‐to‐digital converter. It is sometimes convenient to use the Gray code shown in 
Table   1.6    to represent digital data that have been converted from analog data. The 
advantage of the Gray code over the straight binary number sequence is that only 
one bit in the code group changes in going from one number to the next. For example, 
in going from 7 to 8, the Gray code changes from 0100 to 1100. Only the first bit 
changes, from 0 to 1; the other three bits remain the same. By contrast, with binary 
numbers the change from 7 to 8 will be from 0111 to 1000, which causes all four bits 
to change values.  
The Gray code is used in applications in which the normal sequence of binary numbers 
generated by the hardware may produce an error or ambiguity during the transition from 
one number to the next. If binary numbers are used, a change, for example, from 0111 to 
1000 may produce an intermediate erroneous number 1001 if the value of the rightmost 
bit takes longer to change than do the values of the other three bits. This could have seri-
ous consequences for the machine using the information. The Gray code eliminates this 
problem, since only one bit changes its value during any transition between two numbers. 
A typical application of the Gray code is the representation of analog data by a con-
tinuous change in the angular position of a shaft. The shaft is partitioned into segments, 
and each segment is assigned a number. If adjacent segments are made to correspond 
with the Gray‐code sequence, ambiguity is eliminated between the angle of the shaft 
and the value encoded by the sensor.  
And paste pdf to powerpoint - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
how to add pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf slides to powerpoint
And paste pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
how to convert pdf into powerpoint slides; picture from pdf to powerpoint
24    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
ASCII Character Code 
Many applications of digital computers require the handling not only of numbers, but 
also of other characters or symbols, such as the letters of the alphabet. For instance, 
consider a high‐tech company with thousands of employees. To represent the names 
and other pertinent information, it is necessary to formulate a binary code for the let-
ters of the alphabet. In addition, the same binary code must represent numerals and 
special characters (such as $). An alphanumeric character set is a set of elements that 
includes the 10 decimal digits, the 26 letters of the alphabet, and a number of special 
characters. Such a set contains between 36 and 64 elements if only capital letters are 
included, or between 64 and 128 elements if both uppercase and lowercase letters are 
included. In the first case, we need a binary code of six bits, and in the second, we need 
a binary code of seven bits. 
The standard binary code for the alphanumeric characters is the American Standard 
Code for Information Interchange (ASCII), which uses seven bits to code 128 charac-
ters, as shown in  Table   1.7   . The seven bits of the code are designated by    b
1
through    b
7
,    
with    b
7
the most significant bit. The letter A, for example, is represented in ASCII as 
1000001 (column 100, row 0001). The ASCII code also contains 94 graphic characters 
that can be printed and 34 nonprinting characters used for various control functions. 
The graphic characters consist of the 26 uppercase letters (A through Z), the 26 lower-
case letters (a through z), the 10 numerals (0 through 9), and 32 special printable char-
acters, such as %,    *,    and $.  
Table 1.6 
Gray Code 
Gray 
Code 
Decimal 
Equivalent 
0000 
0001 
0011 
0010 
0110 
0111 
0101 
0100 
1100 
1101 
1111 
10 
1110 
11 
1010 
12 
1011 
13 
1001 
14 
1000 
15 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
pdf picture to powerpoint; change pdf to powerpoint online
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page.
pdf to ppt converter online; how to convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation
Section 1.7  Binary Codes    25
Table 1.7 
American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) 
b
7
b
6
b
5
b
4
b
3
b
2
b
1
000 
001 
010 
011 
100 
101 
110 
111 
0000 
NUL  DLE 
SP 
0001 
SOH 
DC1 
0010 
STX 
DC2 
“ 
0011 
ETX 
DC3 
0100 
EOT 
DC4 
0101 
ENQ  NAK 
0110 
ACK 
SYN 
0111 
BEL 
ETB 
‘ 
1000 
BS 
CAN 
1001 
HT 
EM 
1010 
LF 
SUB 
1011 
VT 
ESC 
    
{
1100 
FF 
FS 
<    
1101 
CR 
GS 
-
    
 
1110 
SO 
RS 
>
¿     
 
1111 
SI 
US 
-
DEL 
Control Characters 
NUL 
Null 
DLE 
Data‐link escape 
SOH 
Start of heading 
DC1 
Device control 1 
STX 
Start of text 
DC2 
Device control 2 
ETX 
End of text 
DC3 
Device control 3 
EOT 
End of transmission 
DC4 
Device control 4 
ENQ 
Enquiry 
NAK 
Negative acknowledge 
ACK 
Acknowledge 
SYN 
Synchronous idle 
BEL 
Bell 
ETB 
End‐of‐transmission block 
BS 
Backspace 
CAN 
Cancel 
HT 
Horizontal tab 
EM 
End of medium 
LF 
Line feed 
SUB 
Substitute 
VT 
Vertical tab 
ESC 
Escape 
FF 
Form feed 
FS 
File separator 
CR 
Carriage return 
GS 
Group separator 
SO 
Shift out 
RS 
Record separator 
SI 
Shift in 
US 
Unit separator 
SP 
Space 
DEL 
Delete 
The 34 control characters are designated in the ASCII table with abbreviated names. They 
are listed again below the table with their functional names. The control characters are used 
for routing data and arranging the printed text into a prescribed format. There are three types 
of control characters: format effectors, information separators, and communication‐control 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
changing pdf to powerpoint file; convert pdf to editable ppt online
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
add pdf to powerpoint slide; image from pdf to powerpoint
26    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
characters. Format effectors are characters that control the layout of printing. They include 
the familiar word processor and typewriter controls such as backspace (BS), horizontal tabu-
lation (HT), and carriage return (CR). Information separators are used to separate the data 
into divisions such as paragraphs and pages. They include characters such as record separator 
(RS) and file separator (FS). The communication‐control characters are useful during 
thetransmission of text between remote devices so that it can be distinguished from other 
messages using the same communication channel before it and after it. Examples of 
communication‐control characters are STX (start of text) and ETX (end of text), which are 
used to frame a text message transmitted through a communication channel. 
ASCII is a seven‐bit code, but most computers manipulate an eight‐bit quantity 
as a single unit called a byte. Therefore, ASCII characters most often are stored one 
per byte. The extra bit is sometimes used for other purposes, depending on the appli-
cation. For example, some printers recognize eight‐bit ASCII characters with the 
most significant bit set to 0. An additional 128 eight‐bit characters with the most 
significant bit set to 1 are used for other symbols, such as the Greek alphabet or italic 
type font.  
Error‐Detecting Code 
To detect errors in data communication and processing, an eighth bit is sometimes added 
to the ASCII character to indicate its parity. A parity bit is an extra bit included with a 
message to make the total number of 1’s either even or odd. Consider the following two 
characters and their even and odd parity:    
With even parity 
With odd parity
ASCII A= = 1000001 
01000001 
11000001
ASCII T= = 1010100 
11010100 
01010100
In each case, we insert an extra bit in the leftmost position of the code to produce an 
even number of 1’s in the character for even parity or an odd number of 1’s in the char-
acter for odd parity. In general, one or the other parity is adopted, with even parity being 
more common. 
The parity bit is helpful in detecting errors during the transmission of information 
from one location to another. This function is handled by generating an even parity bit 
at the sending end for each character. The eight‐bit characters that include parity bits 
are transmitted to their destination. The parity of each character is then checked at the 
receiving end. If the parity of the received character is not even, then at least one bit has 
changed value during the transmission. This method detects one, three, or any odd com-
bination of errors in each character that is transmitted. An even combination of errors, 
however, goes undetected, and additional error detection codes may be needed to take 
care of that possibility. 
What is done after an error is detected depends on the particular application. One 
possibility is to request retransmission of the message on the assumption that the error 
was random and will not occur again. Thus, if the receiver detects a parity error, it sends 
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C# Guide C#.NET Demo Code: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. This C#
pdf to powerpoint conversion; convert pdf back to powerpoint
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; VB.NET: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page.
converting pdf to ppt; convert pdf to powerpoint slide
Section 1.8  Binary Storage and Registers    27
back the ASCII NAK (negative acknowledge) control character consisting of an even‐
parity eight bits 10010101. If no error is detected, the receiver sends back an ACK 
(acknowledge) control character, namely, 00000110. The sending end will respond to an 
NAK by transmitting the message again until the correct parity is received. If, after a 
number of attempts, the transmission is still in error, a message can be sent to the oper-
ator to check for malfunctions in the transmission path.   
1.8    BINARY STORAGE AND REGISTERS 
The binary information in a digital computer must have a physical existence in some 
medium for storing individual bits. A binary cell is a device that possesses two stable 
states and is capable of storing one bit (0 or 1) of information. The input to the cell 
receives excitation signals that set it to one of the two states. The output of the cell is 
a physical quantity that distinguishes between the two states. The information stored 
in a cell is 1 when the cell is in one stable state and 0 when the cell is in the other stable 
state. 
Registers 
register is a group of binary cells. A register with n cells can store any discrete quantity 
of information that contains n bits. The state of a register is an n‐tuple of 1’s and 0’s, with 
each bit designating the state of one cell in the register. The content of a register is a 
function of the interpretation given to the information stored in it. Consider, for example, 
a 16‐bit register with the following binary content: 
1100001111001001   
A register with 16 cells can be in one of    2
16
possible states. If one assumes that the con-
tent of the register represents a binary integer, then the register can store any binary 
number from 0 to    2
16
- 1.    For the particular example shown, the content of the register 
is the binary equivalent of the decimal number 50,121. If one assumes instead that the 
register stores alphanumeric characters of an eight‐bit code, then the content of the 
register is any two meaningful characters. For the ASCII code with an even parity placed 
in the eighth most significant bit position, the register contains the two characters C (the 
leftmost eight bits) and I (the rightmost eight bits). If, however, one interprets the con-
tent of the register to be four decimal digits represented by a four‐bit code, then the 
content of the register is a four‐digit decimal number. In the excess‐3 code, the register 
holds the decimal number 9,096. The content of the register is meaningless in BCD, 
because the bit combination 1100 is not assigned to any decimal digit. From this exam-
ple, it is clear that a register can store discrete elements of information and that the same 
bit configuration may be interpreted differently for different types of data depending 
on the application.  
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and paste PDF file page.
convert pdf file into ppt; how to change pdf file to powerpoint
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and paste PDF file page.
convert pdf to ppt online; how to convert pdf to ppt using
28    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
Register Transfer 
A digital system is characterized by its registers and the components that perform data 
processing. In digital systems, a register transfer operation is a basic operation that con-
sists of a transfer of binary information from one set of registers into another set of 
registers. The transfer may be direct, from one register to another, or may pass through 
data‐processing circuits to perform an operation.  Figure   1.1    illustrates the transfer of infor-
mation among registers and demonstrates pictorially the transfer of binary information 
from a keyboard into a register in the memory unit. The input unit is assumed to have a 
keyboard, a control circuit, and an input register. Each time a key is struck, the control 
circuit enters an equivalent eight‐bit alphanumeric character code into the input register. 
We shall assume that the code used is the ASCII code with an odd‐parity bit. The informa-
tion from the input register is transferred into the eight least significant cells of a processor 
register. After every transfer, the input register is cleared to enable the control to insert a 
new eight‐bit code when the keyboard is struck again. Each eight‐bit character transferred 
to the processor register is preceded by a shift of the previous character to the next eight 
cells on its left. When a transfer of four characters is completed, the processor register is 
full, and its contents are transferred into a memory  register. The content stored in the 
MEMORY UNIT
PROCESSOR UNIT
INPUT UNIT
J
O
H
N
Memory
Register
8 cells
8 cells
8 cells
8 cells
8 cells
Keyboard
CONTROL
01001010010011111100100011001110
Processor
Register
Input
Register
J
O
H
N
FIGURE 1.1 
Transfer of information among registers       
Section 1.8  Binary Storage and Registers    29
memory register shown in  Fig.   1.1    came from the transfer of the characters “J,” “O,” “H,” 
and “N” after the four appropriate keys were struck. 
To process discrete quantities of information in binary form, a computer must be 
provided with devices that hold the data to be processed and with circuit elements that 
manipulate individual bits of information.  The device most commonly used for holding 
data is a register.  Binary variables are manipulated by means of digital logic circuits. 
Figure   1.2    illustrates the process of adding two 10‐bit binary numbers. The memory unit, 
which normally consists of millions of registers, is shown with only three of its registers. 
The part of the processor unit shown consists of three registers—R1R2, and R3
together with digital logic circuits that manipulate the bits of R1 and R2 and transfer into 
R3 a binary number equal to their arithmetic sum. Memory registers store information 
and are incapable of processing the two operands. However, the information stored in 
memory can be transferred to processor registers, and the results obtained in processor 
registers can be transferred back into a memory register for storage until needed again. 
The diagram shows the contents of two operands transferred from two memory registers 
MEMORY UNIT
PROCESSOR UNIT
Operand 1
Operand 2
Sum
R1
R2
R3
0000000000
0011100001
0011100001
0001000010
0001000010
0100100011
Digital logic
circuits for
binary addition
FIGURE 1.2  
Example of binary information processing       
30    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
into R1 and R2. The digital logic circuits produce the sum, which is transferred to register 
R3. The contents of R3 can now be transferred back to one of the memory registers. 
The last two examples demonstrated the information‐flow capabilities of a digital 
system in a simple manner. The registers of the system are the basic elements for storing 
and holding the binary information. Digital logic circuits process the binary information 
stored in the registers. Digital logic circuits and registers are covered in Chapters 2 
through 6. The memory unit is explained in  Chapter   7   . The description of register oper-
ations at the register transfer level and the design of digital systems are covered in 
Chapter   8   .   
1.9    BINARY LOGIC 
Binary logic deals with variables that take on two discrete values and with operations 
that assume logical meaning. The two values the variables assume may be called by dif-
ferent names (true and false, yes and no, etc.), but for our purpose, it is convenient to 
think in terms of bits and assign the values 1 and 0. The binary logic introduced in this 
section is equivalent to an algebra called Boolean algebra. The formal presentation of 
Boolean algebra is covered in more detail in  Chapter   2   . The purpose of this section is 
to introduce Boolean algebra in a heuristic manner and relate it to digital logic circuits 
and binary signals. 
Definition of Binary Logic 
Binary logic consists of binary variables and a set of logical operations. The variables are 
designated by letters of the alphabet, such as A, B, C, x, y, z, etc., with each variable hav-
ing two and only two distinct possible values: 1 and 0. There are three basic logical oper-
ations: AND, OR, and NOT. Each operation produces a binary result, denoted by z. 
 
1.   AND: This operation is represented by a dot or by the absence of an operator. For 
example,    x
#
=z    or    xy z    is read “x AND y is equal to z.” The logical operation 
AND is interpreted to mean that    z= 1    if and only if    x= 1    and    = 1;    otherwise 
= 0.    (Remember that xy, and z are binary variables and can be equal either to 
1 or 0, and nothing else.) The result of the operation x
#
y is z 
 
2.   OR: This operation is represented by a plus sign. For example,    xz    is read 
x OR y is equal to z,” meaning that    =1    if    = 1    or if    y= 1    or if both    x= 1    
and    = 1.    If both    x= 0    and    = 0,    then    z= 0.     
 
3.   NOT: This operation is represented by a prime (sometimes by an overbar). For 
example,    x′ ′ =z    (or    x
z   ) is read “not x is equal to z,” meaning that z is what x 
is not. In other words, if    x= 1,    then    = 0,    but if    = 0,    then    = 1.    The NOT 
operation is also referred to as the complement operation, since it changes a 1 to 
0 and a 0 to 1, i.e., the result of complementing 1 is 0, and vice versa.   
Binary logic resembles binary arithmetic, and the operations AND and OR have 
similarities to multiplication and addition, respectively. In fact, the symbols used for 
Section 1.9  Binary Logic    31
AND and OR are the same as those used for multiplication and addition. However, 
binary logic should not be confused with binary arithmetic. One should realize that an 
arithmetic variable designates a number that may consist of many digits. A logic vari-
able is always either 1 or 0. For example, in binary arithmetic, we have    1 1 + 1= 10    (read 
“one plus one is equal to 2”), whereas in binary logic, we have    1+ + 1 = 1    (read “one 
OR one is equal to one”). 
For each combination of the values of x and y, there is a value of z specified by the 
definition of the logical operation. Definitions of logical operations may be listed in a 
compact form called truth tables. A truth table is a table of all possible combinations of 
the variables, showing the relation between the values that the variables may take and 
the result of the operation. The truth tables for the operations AND and OR with vari-
ables x and y are obtained by listing all possible values that the variables may have when 
combined in pairs. For each combination, the result of the operation is then listed in a 
separate row. The truth tables for AND, OR, and NOT are given in  Table   1.8   . These 
tables clearly demonstrate the definition of the operations. 
   Logic Gates 
Logic gates are electronic circuits that operate on one or more input signals to pro-
duce an output signal. Electrical signals such as voltages or currents exist as analog 
signals having values over a given continuous range, say, 0 to 3 V, but in a digital 
system these voltages are interpreted to be either of two recognizable values, 0 or 1. 
Voltage‐operated logic circuits respond to two separate voltage levels that represent a 
binary variable equal to logic 1 or logic 0. For example, a particular digital system may 
define logic 0 as a signal equal to 0 V and logic 1 as a signal equal to 3 V. In practice, 
each voltage level has an acceptable range, as shown in  Fig.   1.3   . The input terminals of 
digital circuits accept binary signals within the allowable range and respond at the 
output terminals with binary signals that fall within the specified range. The intermedi-
ate region between the allowed regions is crossed only during a state transition. Any 
desired information for computing or control can be operated on by passing binary 
signals through various combinations of logic gates, with each signal representing a 
particular binary variable. When the physical signal is in a particular range it is inter-
preted to be either a 0 or a 1. 
Table 1.8 
Truth Tables of Logical Operations 
AND 
OR 
NOT 
   y      x
#
y    
   y    x + y  
   x  
 0  0 
 0 
 1 
 1  0 
 1 
 0 
 0  0 
 0 
 1  1 
 1 
32    Chapter 1  Digital Systems and Binary Numbers
The graphic symbols used to designate the three types of gates are shown in  Fig.   1.4   . 
The gates are blocks of hardware that produce the equivalent of logic‐1 or logic‐0 output 
signals if input logic requirements are satisfied. The input signals x and y in the AND and 
OR gates may exist in one of four possible states: 00, 10, 11, or 01. These input signals 
are shown in  Fig.   1.5    together with the corresponding output signal for each gate. The 
timing diagrams illustrate the idealized response of each gate to the four input signal 
combinations. The horizontal axis of the timing diagram represents the time, and the 
vertical axis shows the signal as it changes between the two possible voltage levels. In 
reality, the transitions between logic values occur quickly, but not instantaneously. The 
low level represents logic 0, the high level logic 1. The AND gate responds with a logic 
1 output signal when both input signals are logic 1. The OR gate responds with a logic 
1 output signal if any input signal is logic 1. The NOT gate is commonly referred to as 
an inverter. The reason for this name is apparent from the signal response in the timing 
diagram, which shows that the output signal inverts the logic sense of the input signal. 
Volts
Signal
range for
logic 1
Signal
range for
logic 0
0
1
2
3
Transition occurs
between these limits
FIGURE 1.3  
Signal levels for binary logic values       
x
x
(c) NOT gate or inverter
(a) Two-input AND gate
x
z= x ̇ y
y
(b) Two-input OR gate
z x +y
x
y
FIGURE 1.4  
Symbols for digital logic circuits       
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested