Section 9.2  Experiment 1: Binary and Decimal Numbers    443
circuit will be explained with reference to logic diagrams from previous chapters. The 
operation of the circuit will be specified by means of a truth table or a function table. 
Other possible graphic symbols for the ICs are presented in  Chapter   10   . These are 
standard graphic symbols approved by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics 
Engineers and are given in IEEE Standard 91‐1984. The standard graphic symbols for 
SSI gates have rectangular shapes, as shown in Fig. 10.1. The standard graphic symbol 
for the 7493 IC is shown in Fig. 10.13. This symbol can be substituted in place of the one 
shown in  Fig.   9.2   (c). The standard graphic symbols of the other ICs that are needed to 
run the experiments are presented in  Chapter   10   . They can be used to draw schematic 
diagrams of the logic circuits if the standard symbols are preferred. 
Table   9.1    lists the ICs that are needed for the experiments, together with the numbers of 
the figures in which they are presented in this chapter. In addition, the table lists the numbers 
of the figures in  Chapter   10    in which the equivalent standard graphic symbols are drawn. 
The next 18 sections present 18 hardware experiments requiring the use of digital 
inte grated circuits. Section 9.20 outlines HDL simulation experiments requiring a Verilog 
HDL compiler and simulator.  
9.2     EXPERIMENT 1: BINARY AND DECIMAL 
NUMBERS 
This experiment demonstrates the count sequence of binary numbers and the binary‐
coded decimal (BCD) representation. It serves as an introduction to the breadboard used 
in the laboratory and acquaints the student with the cathode‐ray oscilloscope. Reference 
material from the text that may be useful to know while performing the experiment can 
be found in Section 1.2, on binary numbers, and Section 1.7, on BCD numbers. 
Binary Count 
IC type 7493 consists of four flip‐flops, as shown in  Fig.   9.2   . They can be connected to 
count in binary or in BCD. Connect the IC to operate as a four‐bit binary counter by 
wiring the external terminals, as shown in  Fig.   9.3   . This is done by connecting a wire from 
pin 12 (output  QA ) to pin 1 (input  B ). Input  A  at pin 14 is connected to a pulser that 
provides single pulses. The two reset inputs,  R1  and  R2 are connected to ground. The 
four outputs go to four indicator lamps, with the low‐order bit of the counter from  QA  
connected to the rightmost indicator lamp. Do not forget to supply 5 V and ground to 
the IC. All connections should be made with the power supply in the off position. 
Turn the power on and observe the four indicator lamps. The four‐bit number in the 
output is incremented by 1 for every pulse generated in the push‐button pulser. The 
count goes to  binary 15 and then back to 0. Disconnect the input of the counter at pin 
14 from the pulser, and connect it to a clock generator that produces a train of pulses at 
a low frequency of about 1 pulse per second. This will provide an automatic binary count. 
Note that the binary counter will be used in subsequent experiments to provide the 
input binary signals for testing combinational circuits. 
Converting pdf to ppt online - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
change pdf to powerpoint online; pdf to ppt converter
Converting pdf to ppt online - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
convert pdf to powerpoint using; pdf page to powerpoint
444    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
Oscilloscope Display 
Increase the frequency of the clock to 10 kHz or higher and connect its output to an oscil-
loscope. Observe the clock output on the oscilloscope and sketch its waveform. Using a 
dual‐trace oscilloscope, connect the output of  QA  to one channel and the output of the 
clock to the second channel. Note that the output of  QA  is complemented every time the 
clock pulse goes through a negative transition from 1 to 0. Note also that the clock fre-
quency at the output of the first flip‐flop is one‐half that of the input clock frequency. Each 
flip‐flop in turn divides its incoming frequency by 2. The four‐bit counter divides the 
incoming frequency by 16 at output  QD . Obtain a timing diagram showing the relationship 
of the clock to the four outputs of the counter. Make sure that you  include at least 16 clock 
cycles. The way to proceed with a dual‐trace oscilloscope is as follows: First,  observe the 
clock pulses and  QA and record their timing waveforms. Then repeat by  observing and 
recording the waveforms of  QA  together with  QB followed by the waveforms of  QB  with 
QC  and then  QC  with  QD . Your final result should be a diagram showing the relationship 
of the clock to the four outputs in one composite diagram having at least 16 clock cycles.  
BCD Count 
The BCD representation uses the binary numbers from 0000 to 1001 to represent the 
coded decimal digits from 0 to 9. IC type 7493 can be operated as a BCD counter by 
making the external connections shown in  Fig.   9.4   . Outputs  QB  and  QD  are connected 
to the two reset inputs,  R1  and  R2 . When both  R1  and  R2  are equal to 1, all four cells in 
the counter clear to 0 irrespective of the input pulse. The counter starts from 0, and every 
input pulse increments it by 1 until it reaches the count of 1001. The next pulse changes 
the ouput to 1010, making  QB  and  QD  equal to 1. This momentary output cannot be 
Push-button
pulser or
clock
Indicator
lamps
V
CC
A
B
R1
R2
QD
QC
QB
QA
GND
7493
14
1
2
5
10
3
12
9
8
11
FIGURE 9.3  
Binary counter       
Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Your PDF file is converted to look just the same as it does in your office software. Creating a PDF from PPTX/PPT has never been so easy! Easy converting!
and paste pdf into powerpoint; convert pdf to editable ppt online
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
how to change pdf to powerpoint format; how to change pdf to powerpoint slides
Section 9.2  Experiment 1: Binary and Decimal Numbers    445
sustained, because the four cells immedi ately clear to 0, with the result that the output 
goes to 0000. Thus, the pulse after the count of 1001 changes the output to 0000, produc-
ing a BCD count.  
Connect the IC to operate as a BCD counter. Connect the input to a pulser and the 
four outputs to indicator lamps. Verify that the count goes from 0000 to 1001. 
Disconnect the input from the pulser and connect it to a clock generator. Observe the 
clock waveform and the four outputs on the oscilloscope. Obtain an accurate timing dia-
gram showing the relationship between the clock and the four outputs. Make sure to include 
at least 10 clock cycles in the oscilloscope display and in the composite timing diagram.  
Output Pattern 
When the count pulses into the BCD counter are continuous, the counter keeps repeat-
ing the sequence from 0000 to 1001 and back to 0000. This means that each bit in the 
four outputs produces a fixed pattern of 1’s and 0’s that is repeated every 10 pulses. These 
patterns can be predicted from a list of the binary numbers from 0000 to 1001. The list 
will show that output  QA being the least significant bit, produces a pattern of alternate 
1’s and 0’s. Output  QD being the most significant bit, produces a pattern of eight 0’s 
followed by two 1’s. Obtain the pattern for the other two outputs and then check all four 
patterns on the oscilloscope. This is done with a dual‐trace oscilloscope by displaying the 
clock pulses in one channel and one of the output waveforms in the other channel. The 
pattern of 1’s and 0’s for the corresponding output is obtained by observing the output 
levels at the vertical positions where the pulses change from 1 to 0.  
V
CC
A
B
R1
R2
QD
QC
QB
QA
GND
7493
5
10
14
1
2
3
12
9
8
11
Input
pulses
FIGURE 9.4  
BCD counter       
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
This VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion tutorial will illustrate our effective PPT to PDF converting control SDK from following aspects.
convert pdf to powerpoint slide; chart from pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
image or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF that can be converted from PPT document, please corresponding VB.NET guide for converting PowerPoint document
convert pdf document to powerpoint; convert pdf file to powerpoint
446    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
Other Counts 
IC type 7493 can be connected to count from 0 to a variety of final counts. This is done 
by connecting one or two outputs to the reset inputs,  R1  and  R2 . Thus, if R1 is connected 
to  QA  instead of to  QB  in  Fig.   9.4   , the resulting count will be from 0000 to 1000, which 
is 1 less than 1001 (   QD = 1    and    QA =1   ). 
Utilizing your knowledge of how  R1  and  R2  affect the final count, connect the 7493 
IC to count from 0000 to the following final counts: 
 
(a)   0101  
 
(b)   0111  
(c)   1011   
Connect each circuit and verify its count sequence by applying pulses from the pulser 
and observing the output count in the indicator lamps. If the initial count starts with a 
value greater than the final count, keep applying input pulses until the output clears to 0.   
9.3    EXPERIMENT 2: DIGITAL LOGIC GATES 
In this experiment, you will investigate the logic behavior of various IC gates: 
7400 quadruple two‐input NAND gates  
7402 quadruple two‐input NOR gates  
7404 hex inverters  
7408 quadruple two‐input AND gates  
7432 quadruple two‐input OR gates  
7486 quadruple two‐input XOR gates   
The pin assignments to the various gates are shown in  Fig.   9.1   . “Quadruple” means 
that there are four gates within the package. The digital logic gates and their character-
istics are discussed in Section 2.8. A NAND implementation is discussed in Section 3.7. 
Truth Tables 
Use one gate from each IC listed and obtain the truth table of the gate. The truth table 
is obtained by connecting the inputs of the gate to switches and the output to an indica-
tor lamp. Compare your results with the truth tables listed in Fig. 2.5.  
Waveforms 
For each gate listed, obtain the input–output waveform of the gate. The waveforms are 
to be observed in the oscilloscope. Use the two low‐order outputs of a binary counter 
( Fig.   9.3   ) to provide the inputs to the gate. As an example, the circuit and waveforms 
for the NAND gate are illustrated in  Fig.   9.5   . The oscilloscope display will repeat this 
waveform, but you should record only the nonrepetitive portion.  
VB.NET PowerPoint: Customize PPT Document Rendering Options in VB.
to render and convert PPT slide to various formats, including PDF, BMP, TIFF, SVG, PNG, JPEG, GIF and JBIG2. In the process of converting PPT slide to any of
table from pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf file into ppt
VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
control add-on can do PPT creating, loading controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
convert pdf file to powerpoint online; pdf picture to powerpoint
Section 9.3  Experiment 2: Digital Logic Gates    447
Propagation Delay 
Connect the six inverters inside the 7404 IC in cascade. The output will be the same as 
the input, except that it will be delayed by the time it takes the signal to propagate 
through all six inverters. Apply clock pulses to the input of the first inverter. Using the 
oscilloscope, determine the delay from the input to the output of the sixth inverter dur-
ing the upswing of the pulse and again during the downswing. This is done with a dual‐
trace oscilloscope by applying the input clock pulses to one of the channels and the 
output of the sixth inverter to the second channel. Set the time‐base knob to the lowest 
time‐per‐division setting. The rise or fall time of the two pulses should appear on the 
screen. Divide the total delay by 6 to obtain an average propagation delay per inverter.   
Universal NAND Gate 
Using a single 7400 IC, connect a circuit that produces 
 
(a)   an inverter,  
(b)   a two‐input AND,  
(c)   a two‐input OR,  
(d)   a two‐input NOR,  
(e)   a two‐input XOR. (See Fig. 3.32.)   
In each case, verify your circuit by checking its truth table.  
NAND Circuit 
Using a single 7400 IC, construct a circuit with NAND gates that implements the Boolean 
function 
AB CD   
 
1.   Draw the circuit diagram.  
 
2.   Obtain the truth table for  F  as a function of the four inputs.  
 
3.   Connect the circuit and verify the truth table.  
Input
pulses
F
QA
A
QB
Fig. 9.3
(counter)
QA
QB
F
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
FIGURE 9.5  
Waveforms for NAND gate       
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert PowerPoint to BMP Image with VB PPT
in VB class for rendering and converting PowerPoint presentations converters, such as VB.NET PDF Converter, Excel to the corresponding guide on C# PPT to BMP
add pdf to powerpoint slide; how to convert pdf to ppt using
C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
doc.ConvertToDocument(DocumentType.TIFF, @"output.tif"); C# Demo for Converting PowerPoint to TIFF. Add references (Extra); Load your PPT (.pptx) document.
how to convert pdf to powerpoint in; how to convert pdf to powerpoint
448    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
4.   Record the patterns of 1’s and 0’s for  F  as inputs  A,   B,   C and  D  go from binary 0 
to  binary 15.  
 
5.   Connect the four outputs of the binary counter shown in  Fig.   9.3    to the four inputs 
of the NAND circuit. Connect the input clock pulses from the counter to one 
channel of a dual‐trace oscilloscope and output F to the other channel. Observe 
and record the 1’s and 0’s pattern of F after each clock pulse, and compare it with 
the pattern recorded in step 4.     
9.4     EXPERIMENT 3: SIMPLIFICATION 
OF BOOLEAN FUNCTIONS 
This experiment demonstrates the relationship between a Boolean function and the 
corresponding logic diagram. The Boolean functions are simplified by using the map 
method, as discussed in  Chapter   3   . The logic diagrams are to be drawn with NAND gates, 
as explained in Section 3.7. 
The gate ICs to be used for the logic diagrams must be those from  Fig.   9.1    which 
contain the following NAND gates: 
7400 two‐input NAND  
7404 inverter (one‐input NAND)  
7410 three‐input NAND  
7420 four‐input NAND   
If an input to a NAND gate is not used, it should not be left open, but instead should be 
connected to another input that is used. For example, if the circuit needs an inverter and 
there is an extra two‐input gate available in a 7400 IC, then both inputs of the gate are 
to be con nected together to form a single input for an inverter. 
Logic Diagram 
This part of the experiment starts with a given logic diagram from which we proceed to 
apply simplification procedures to reduce the number of gates and, possibly, the number 
of ICs. The logic diagram shown in  Fig.   9.6    requires two ICs—a 7400 and a 7410. Note 
that the inverters for inputs  x,   y and  z  are obtained from the remaining three gates in 
the 7400 IC. If the inverters were taken from a 7404 IC, the circuit would have required 
three ICs. Note also that, in drawing SSI circuits, the gates are not enclosed in blocks as 
is done with MSI circuits.  
Assign pin numbers to all inputs and outputs of the gates, and connect the circuit with 
the  x,   y and  z  inputs going to three switches and the output  F  to an indicator lamp. Test 
the circuit by obtaining its truth table. 
Obtain the Boolean function of the circuit and simplify it, using the map method. Con-
struct the simplified circuit without disconnecting the original circuit. Test both circuits by 
applying identical inputs to each and observing the separate outputs. Show that, for each 
of the eight  possible input combinations, the two circuits have identical outputs. This will 
prove that the simplified circuit behaves exactly like the original circuit.  
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. MS Office
add pdf to powerpoint; how to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation
Section 9.4  Experiment 3: Simplification of Boolean Functions     449
F
x
y
z
FIGURE 9.6  
Logic diagram for Experiment 3       
Boolean Functions 
Consider two Boolean functions in sum‐of‐minterms form: 
F
1
(ABC, D) = (0, 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13)
F
2
(AB, C, D) = = (3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15)
Simplify these functions by means of maps. Obtain a composite logic diagram with four 
inputs,  A,   B,   C and  D and two outputs,    F
1
and    F
2
.    Implement the two functions 
together, using a minimum number of NAND ICs. Do not duplicate the same gate if 
the corresponding term is  needed for both functions. Use any extra gates in existing 
ICs for inverters when possible. Connect the circuit and check its operation. The truth 
table for    F
1
and    F
2
obtained from the circuit should conform with the minterms listed.  
Complement 
Plot the following Boolean function in a map: 
A+BD BABD   
Combine the 1’s in the map to obtain the simplified function for  F  in sum‐of‐products 
form. Then combine the 0’s in the map to obtain the simplified function for    F′,    also in 
sum‐of‐products form. Implement both  F  and    F    with NAND gates, and connect the two 
circuits to the same input switches, but to separate output indicator lamps. Obtain the 
truth table of each circuit in the laboratory and show that they are the complements of 
each other.   
450    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
9.5    EXPERIMENT 4: COMBINATIONAL CIRCUITS 
In this experiment, you will design, construct, and test four combinational logic circuits. 
The first two circuits are to be constructed with NAND gates, the third with XOR gates, 
and the fourth with a decoder and NAND gates. Reference to a parity generator can be 
found in Section 3.9. Implementation with a decoder is discussed in Section 4.9. 
Design Example 
Design a combinational circuit with four inputs— A,   B,   C and  D —and one output,  F .  F  
is to be equal to 1 when    = 1,    provided that    = 0,    or when    = 1,    provided that 
either  C  or  D  is also equal to 1. Otherwise, the output is to be equal to 0. 
 
1.   Obtain the truth table of the circuit.  
 
2.   Simplify the output function.  
 
3.   Draw the logic diagram of the circuit, using NAND gates with a minimum number 
of ICs.  
 
4.   Construct the circuit and test it for proper operation by verifying the given 
conditions.    
Majority Logic 
A majority logic is a digital circuit whose output is equal to 1 if the majority of the inputs 
are 1’s. The output is 0 otherwise. Design and test a three‐input majority circuit using 
NAND gates with a minimum number of ICs.  
Parity Generator 
Design, construct, and test a circuit that generates an even parity bit from four message 
bits. Use XOR gates. Adding one more XOR gate, expand the circuit so that it generates 
an odd parity bit also.  
Decoder Implementation 
A combinational circuit has three inputs— x,   y and  z —and three outputs—   F
1
,F
2
,    and 
F
3
.    The simplified Boolean functions for the circuit are 
F
1
xz xyz
F
2
xxyz
F
3
xy xyz   
Implement and test the combinational circuit, using a 74155 decoder IC and external 
NAND gates. 
Section 9.5  Experiment 4: Combinational Circuits    451
The block diagram of the decoder and its truth table are shown in  Fig.   9.7   . The 
74155 can be connected as a dual    2 2 * 4    decoder or as a single    3 3 * 8    decoder. When 
   3 3 *8    decoder is desired, inputs  C1  and  C2 as well as inputs  G1  and  G2 must be 
connected together, as shown in the block diagram. The function of the circuit is 
similar to that illustrated in Fig. 4.18.  G  is the enable input and must be equal to 0 for 
proper operation. The eight outputs are labeled with symbols given in the data book. 
The 74155 uses NAND gates, with the result that the selected output goes to 0 while 
all other outputs remain at 1. The implementation with the decoder is as shown in 
Fig. 4.21, except that the OR gates must be replaced with external NAND gates when 
the 74155 is used.    
C
B
A
G
C1
C2
B
A
G1
G2
GND
9
10
11
12
7
6
5
4
1
15
3
13
2
14
74155
16
8
V
CC
G
C
B
A
2Y0
2Y1
2Y2
2Y3
1Y0
1Y1
1Y2
1Y3
Inputs
Outputs
Truth table
2Y0
2Y1
2Y2
2Y3
1Y0
1Y1
1Y2
1Y3
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
X
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
X
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
X
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
FIGURE 9.7  
IC type 74155 connected as a    3 3 * * 8    decoder       
452    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
9.6    EXPERIMENT 5: CODE CONVERTERS 
The conversion from one binary code to another is common in digital systems. In this 
experiment, you will design and construct three combinational‐circuit converters. Code 
conversion is discussed in Section 4.4. 
Gray Code to Binary 
Design a combinational circuit with four inputs and four outputs that converts a four‐
bit Gray code number (Table 1.6) into the equivalent four‐bit binary number. Imple-
ment the circuit with exclusive‐OR gates. (This can be done with one 7486 IC.) 
Connect the circuit to four switches and four indicator lamps, and check for proper 
operation.  
9’s Complementer 
Design a combinational circuit with four input lines that represent a decimal digit in 
BCD and four output lines that generate the 9’s complement of the input digit. Pro-
vide a fifth output that detects an error in the input BCD number. This output should 
be equal to logic 1 when the four inputs have one of the unused combinations of the 
BCD code. Use any of the gates listed in  Fig.   9.1   , but minimize the total number of 
ICs used.  
Seven‐Segment Display 
A seven‐segment indicator is used to display any one of the decimal digits 0 through 9. 
Usually, the decimal digit is available in BCD. A BCD‐to‐seven‐segment decoder accepts 
a decimal digit in BCD and generates the corresponding seven‐segment code, as is 
shown pictorially in Problem 4.9. 
Figure   9.8    shows the connections necessary between the decoder and the display. The 
7447 IC is a BCD‐to‐seven‐segment decoder/driver that has four inputs for the BCD 
digit. Input  D  is the most significant and input A the least significant. The four‐bit BCD 
digit is converted to a seven‐segment code with outputs  a  through  g . The outputs of the 
7447 are applied to the inputs of the 7730 (or equivalent) seven‐segment display. This 
IC contains the seven light‐emitting diode (LED) segments on top of the package. The 
input at pin 14 is the common anode ( CA ) for all the LEDs. A    47@    resistor to    V
CC
is 
needed in order to supply the proper current to the selected LED segments. Other 
equivalent seven‐segment display ICs may have additional anode terminals and may 
require different resistor values. 
Construct the circuit shown in  Fig.   9.8   . Apply the four‐bit BCD digits through four 
switches, and observe the decimal display from 0 to 9. Inputs 1010 through 1111 have 
no meaning in BCD. Depending on the decoder, these values may cause either a blank 
or a meaningless pattern to be displayed. Observe and record the output patterns of the 
six  unused input combinations.    
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested