Section 9.12  Experiment 11: Shift Registers    463
does not change. The carry‐out output is equal to 1 when all four data outputs are 
equal to 1. Perform an experiment to verify the operation of the 74161 IC according 
to the function table. 
Show how the 74161 IC, together with a two‐input NAND gate, can be made to oper-
ate as a synchronous BCD counter that counts from 0000 to 1001. Do not use the clear 
input. Use the NAND gate to detect the count of 1001, which then causes all 0’s to be 
loaded into the counter.    
9.12    EXPERIMENT 11: SHIFT REGISTERS 
In this experiment, you will investigate the operation of shift registers. The IC to be 
used is the 74195 shift register with parallel load. Shift registers are explained in 
Section 6.2. 
IC Shift Register 
IC type 74195 is a four‐bit shift register with parallel load and asynchronous clear. The 
pin assignments to the inputs and outputs are shown in  Fig.   9.16   . The single control line 
labeled    SH>LD    (shift/load) determines the synchronous operation of the register. When 
SH>LD =0,    the control input is in the load mode and the four data inputs are trans-
ferred into the four internal flip‐flops,  QA  through  QD . When    SH>LD = 1,    the control 
input is in the shift mode and the information in the register is shifted right from  QA  
toward  QD . The serial input into  QA  during the shift is determined from the  J  and    K
inputs. The two inputs behave like the  J  and the complement of  K  of a  JK  flip‐flop. When 
both  J  and    K
are equal to 0, flip‐flop  QA  is cleared to 0 after the shift. If both inputs are 
equal to 1,  QA  is set to 1 after the shift. The other two conditions for the  J  and    K
inputs 
provide a complement or no change in the output of flip‐flop  QA  after the shift. 
The function table for the 74195 shows the mode of operation of the register. When 
the clear input goes to 0, the four flip‐flops clear to 0 asynchronously—that is, without 
the need of a clock. Synchronous operations are affected by a positive transition of the 
clock. To load the input data,  SH/LD  must be equal to 0 and a positive clock‐pulse 
transition must occur. To shift right,  SH/LD  must be equal to 1. The  J  and    K
inputs must 
be connected together to form the serial input. 
Perform an experiment that will verify the operation of the 74195 IC. Show that it 
performs all the operations listed in the function table. Include in your function table 
the two conditions for    JK
=01    and 10.  
Ring Counter 
A ring counter is a circular shift register with the signal from the serial output  QD  going 
into the serial input. Connect the  J  and    K
input together to form the serial input. Use 
the load condition to preset the ring counter to an initial value of 1000. Rotate the single 
bit with the shift condition and check the state of the register after each clock pulse. 
How to convert pdf into powerpoint - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
conversion of pdf into ppt; changing pdf to powerpoint
How to convert pdf into powerpoint - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
how to convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation; how to convert pdf to ppt online
464    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
A switch‐tail ring counter uses the complement output of  QD  for the serial input. 
Preset the switch‐tail ring counter to 0000 and predict the sequence of states that 
will result from shifting. Verify your prediction by observing the state sequence after 
each shift.  
Feedback Shift Register 
A feedback shift register is a shift register whose serial input is connected to some func-
tion of selected register outputs. Connect a feedback shift register whose serial input is 
Data
outputs
1
10
16
15
14
13
8
12
11
6
7
9
2
3
4
5
CLR
QA
QB
QC
QD
QD
CK
SH/LD
J
K
A
B
C
D
74195
GND
V
CC
Clock
Shift/load
Clear
Complement of QD
Shift from QA toward QD,QA= 1
Shift from QA toward QD,QA= 0
Load input data
No change in output
Asynchronous clear
Function table
Clear
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Shift/
load
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Clock
J
K
Serial
input
Function
Serial
inputs
Data
inputs
FIGURE 9.16  
IC type 74195 shift register with parallel load       
Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
change pdf to powerpoint; change pdf to powerpoint on
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
convert pdf to editable powerpoint online; convert pdf into powerpoint
Section 9.12  Experiment 11: Shift Registers    465
the exclusive‐OR of outputs  QC  and  QD . Predict the sequence of states of the register, 
starting from state 1000. Verify your prediction by observing the state sequence after 
each clock pulse.  
Bidirectional Shift Register 
The 74195 IC can shift only right from  QA  toward  QD . It is possible to convert the 
register to a bidirectional shift register by using the load mode to obtain a shift‐left 
operation (from  QD  toward  QA ). This is accomplished by connecting the output of 
each flip‐flop to the input of the flip‐flop on its left and using the load mode of the 
SH/LD  input as a shift‐left control. Input  D  becomes the serial input for the shift‐
left operation. 
Connect the 74195 as a bidirectional shift register (without parallel load). Con-
nect the serial input for shift right to a toggle switch. Construct the shift left as a 
ring counter by connecting the serial output  QA  to the serial input  D . Clear the 
register and then check its operation by shifting a single 1 from the serial input 
switch. Shift right three more times and insert 0’s from the serial input switch. Then 
rotate left with the shift‐left (load) control. The single 1 should remain visible while 
shifting.  
Bidirectional Shift Register with Parallel Load 
The 74195 IC can be converted to a bidirectional shift register with parallel load in con-
junction with a multiplexer circuit. We will use IC type 74157 for this purpose. The 74157 
is a quadruple two‐to‐one‐line multiplexer whose internal logic is shown in Fig.4.26. The 
pin assignments to the inputs and outputs of the 74157 are shown in  Fig.  9.17   . Note that 
the enable input is called a strobe in the 74157. 
Construct a bidirectional shift register with parallel load using the 74195 register 
and the 74157 multiplexer. The circuit should be able to perform the following opera-
tions: 
 
1.   Asynchronous clear  
 
2.   Shift right  
 
3.   Shift left  
 
4.   Parallel load  
 
5.   Synchronous clear    
Derive a table for the five operations as a function of the clear, clock, and  SH/LD  inputs 
of the 74195 and the strobe and select inputs of the 74157. Connect the circuit and verify 
your function table. Use the parallel‐load condition to provide an initial value to the 
register, and connect the serial outputs to the serial inputs of both shifts in order not to 
lose the binary information while shifting.   
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
how to convert pdf to ppt; and paste pdf into powerpoint
RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to ODP/ ODP to PowerPoint. Document & Page Process. PowerPoint Page Edit. Insert Pages into PowerPoint File
conversion of pdf into ppt; conversion of pdf to ppt online
466    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
9.13    EXPERIMENT 12: SERIAL ADDITION 
In this experiment, you will construct and test a serial adder–subtractor circuit. Serial 
addition of two binary numbers can be done by means of shift registers and a full adder, 
as explained in Section 6.2. 
Serial Adder 
Starting from the diagram of Fig. 6.6, design and construct a four‐bit serial adder using 
the following ICs: 74195 (two), 7408, 7486, and 7476. Provide a facility for register  B  to 
accept parallel data from four toggle switches, and connect its serial input to ground so 
that 0’s are  shifted into register  B  during the addition. Provide a toggle switch to clear 
Data
outputs
2
5
16
4
7
9
8
12
10
13
11
14
3
6
1
15
Y1
A1
A2
A3
A4
B1
B2
B3
B4
Y2
Y3
Y4
74157
GND
SEL
STB
V
CC
Data
inputs
B
Data
inputs
A
Select
Strobe
Select data inputs B
Select data inputs A
All 0’s
Function table
Strobe
1
1
0
0
0
Select
X
Data outputs Y
FIGURE 9.17  
IC type 74157 quadruple    2 2 * * 1    multiplexers       
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
convert pdf to powerpoint slide; chart from pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
convert pdf slides to powerpoint online; convert pdf slides to powerpoint
Section 9.14  Experiment 13: Memory Unit    467
the registers and the flip‐flop. Another switch will be needed to specify whether register 
B  is to accept parallel data or is to be shifted during the addition.  
Testing the Adder 
To test your serial adder, perform the binary addition    5 5 + 6+ 15 =26.    This is done by 
first clearing the registers and the carry flip‐flop. Parallel load the binary value 0101 into 
register  B . Apply four pulses to add  B  to  A  serially, and check that the result in  A  is 0101. 
(Note that clock pulses for the 7476 must be as shown in  Fig.   9.12   .) Parallel load 0110 
into  B  and add it to  A  serially. Check that  A  has the proper sum. Parallel load 1111 into 
B  and add to  A . Check that the value in  A  is 1010 and that the carry flip‐flop is set. 
Clear the registers and flip‐flop and try a few other numbers to verify that your serial 
adder is functioning properly.  
Serial Adder–Subtractor 
If we follow the procedure used in Section 6.2 for the design of a serial subtractor (that 
subtracts    AB   ), we will find that the output difference is the same as the output sum, but 
that the input to the J and K of the borrow flip‐flop needs the complement of  QD  (available 
in the 74195). Using the other two XOR gates from the 7486, convert the serial adder to a 
serial adder–subtractor with a mode control  M . When    = 0,    the circuit adds    AB.    When 
=1,    the circuit subtracts    AB    and the flip‐flop holds the borrow instead of the carry. 
Test the adder part of the circuit by repeating the operations recommended to ensure 
that the modification did not change the operation. Test the serial subtractor part by 
performing the subtraction    15 - 4 - 5 - 13 = -7.    Binary 15 can be transferred to reg-
ister A by first clearing it to 0 and adding 15 from B. Check the intermediate results 
during the subtraction. Note that    -7    will appear as the 2’s complement of 7 with a bor-
row of 1 in the flip‐flop.   
9.14    EXPERIMENT 13: MEMORY UNIT 
In this experiment, you will investigate the behavior of a random‐access memory (RAM) 
unit and its storage capability. The RAM will be used to simulate a read‐only memory 
(ROM). The ROM simulator will then be used to implement combinational circuits, as 
explained in Section 7.5. The memory unit is discussed in Sections 7.2 and 7.3. 
IC RAM 
IC type 74189 is a    16 6 * 4    RAM. The internal logic is similar to the circuit shown in Fig. 7.6 
for a    4 4 * 4    RAM. The pin assignments to the inputs and outputs are shown in  Fig.   9.18   . 
The four address inputs select 1 of 16 words in the memory. The least significant bit of the 
address is  A  and the most significant is    A
3
.    The chip select ( CS ) input must be equal to 0 
to enable the memory. If  CS  is equal to 1, the memory is disabled and all four outputs are 
in a high‐impedance state. The write enable ( WE ) input determines the type of operation, 
as indicated in the function table. The write operation is performed when    WE= 0.    This 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
changing pdf to powerpoint file; convert pdf to editable powerpoint online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Bmp, Jpeg
how to change pdf to powerpoint slides; convert pdf file to powerpoint online
468    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
operation is a transfer of the binary number from the data inputs into the selected word 
in memory. The read operation is performed when    WE= 1.    This operation transfers the 
complemented value stored in the selected word into the output data lines. The memory 
has three‐state outputs to facilitate memory expansion.   
Testing the RAM 
Since the outputs of the 74189 produce the complemented values, we need to insert four 
inverters to change the outputs to their normal value. The RAM can be tested after 
making the following connections: Connect the address inputs to a binary counter using 
the 7493 IC (shown in  Fig.   9.3   ). Connect the four data inputs to toggle switches and the 
Data
outputs
16
8
5
7
9
11
4
6
10
12
14
13
1
15
2
3
S1
D1
D2
D3
D4
A
0
A
1
A
2
A
3
S2
S3
S4
74189
GND
CS
WE
V
CC
Address
inputs
Data
inputs
Chip select
Write enable
Function table
Data outputs
High impedance
Complement of selected word
High impedance
Operation
Write
Read
Disable
WE
0
1
X
CS
0
0
1
FIGURE 9.18  
IC type 74189    16 6 *4    RAM       
Section 9.15  Experiment 14: Lamp Handball    469
data outputs to four 7404 inverters. Provide four indicator lamps for the address and 
four more for the outputs of the inverters. Connect input  CS  to ground and  WE  to a 
toggle switch (or a pulser that provides a negative pulse). Store a few words into the 
memory, and then read them to verify that the write and read operations are functioning 
properly. You must be careful when using the  WE  switch. Always leave the  WE  input in 
the read mode, unless you want to write into memory. The proper way to write is first to 
set the address in the counter and the inputs in the four toggle switches. Then, store the 
word in memory, flip the  WE  switch to the write position and return it to the read posi-
tion. Be careful not to change the address or the inputs when  WE  is in the write mode.  
ROM Simulator 
A ROM simulator is obtained from a RAM operated in the read mode only. The pattern 
of 1’s and 0’s is first entered into the simulating RAM by placing the unit momentarily 
in the write mode. Simulation is achieved by placing the unit in the read mode and tak-
ing the address lines as inputs to the ROM. The ROM can then be used to implement 
any combinational circuit. 
Implement a combinational circuit using the ROM simulator that converts a four‐bit 
bi nary number to its equivalent Gray code as defined in Table 1.6. This is done as follows: 
Obtain the truth table of the code converter. Store the truth table into the 74189 mem-
ory by setting the  address inputs to the binary value and the data inputs to the corre-
sponding Gray code value. After all 16 entries of the table are written into memory, the 
ROM simulator is set by permanently connecting the  WE  line to logic 1. Check the code 
converter by applying the inputs to the  address lines and verifying the correct outputs 
in the data output lines.  
Memory Expansion 
Expand the memory unit to a    32 2 * 4    RAM using two 74189 ICs. Use the  CS  inputs to 
select between the two ICs. Note that since the data outputs are three‐stated, you can 
tie pairs of terminals together to obtain a logic OR operation between the two ICs. Test 
your circuit by using it as a ROM simulator that adds a three‐bit number to a two‐bit 
number to produce a four‐bit sum. For example, if the input of the ROM is 10110, then 
the output is calculated to be    101+ + 10 =0111.    (The first three bits of the input repre-
sent 5, the last two bits represent 2, and the output sum is binary 7.) Use the counter to 
provide four bits of the address and a switch for the fifth bit of the address.   
9.15    EXPERIMENT 14: LAMP HANDBALL 
In this experiment, you will construct an electronic game of handball, using a single light 
to simulate the moving ball. The experiment demonstrates the application of a bidirec-
tional shift register with parallel load. It also shows the operation of the asynchronous 
inputs of flip‐flops. We will first introduce an IC that is needed for the experiment and 
then present the logic diagram of the simulated lamp handball game. 
470    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
IC Type 74194 
This is a four‐bit bidirectional shift register with parallel load. The internal logic is sim-
ilar to that shown in Fig. 6.7. The pin assignments to the inputs and outputs are shown 
in  Fig.   9.19   . The two mode‐control inputs determine the type of operation, as specified 
in the function table.  
Logic Diagram 
The logic diagram of the electronic lamp handball game is shown in  Fig.   9.20   . It consists 
of two 74194 ICs, a dual  D  flip‐flop 7474 IC, and three gate ICs: the 7400, 7404, and 
7408. The ball is simulated by a moving light that is shifted left or right through the 
Mode control
inputs
74194
GND
SIL
SIR V
CC
15
12
13
14
4
3
5
6
10
16
2
9
11
1
B
A
QA
QB
QC
QD
C
D
S1
S0
CK
CLR
7
8
Data
outputs
Serial input
for shift right
Serial input
for shift left
Parallel data
inputs
Clock
Clear
Clear outputs to 0
No change in output
Shift right in the direction from
QA to QD.SIR to QA
Parallel-load input data
Shift left in the direction from
QD to QA.SIL to QD
Function
Function table
Mode
Clear
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Clock
X
X
X
S1
S0
FIGURE 9.19  
IC type 74194 bidirectional shift register with parallel load       
471
74194
QA
CK
CK
S1
S1
S0
S0
QB
QC
QD
SIR
SIL
CLR
CLR
A
B
C
D
A
B
C
D
D
Q
Q
CK
CLR
PR
74194
QA
QB
QC
QD
SIR
SIL
D
Q
Q
CK
CLR
PR
CLK
Pulser
Reset
Start
Indicator lamps
FIGURE 9.20  
Lamp handball logic diagram       
472    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
bidirectional shift  register. The rate at which the light moves is determined by the fre-
quency of the clock. The  circuit is first initialized with the  reset  switch. The  start  switch 
starts the game by placing the ball (an indicator lamp) at the extreme right. The player 
must press the pulser push button to start the ball moving to the left. The single light 
shifts to the left until it reaches the leftmost position (the wall), at which time the ball 
returns to the player by reversing the direction of shift of the moving light. When the 
light is again at the rightmost position, the player must press the pulser again to reverse 
the direction of shift. If the player presses the pulser too soon or too late, the ball dis-
appears and the light goes off. The game can be restarted by turning the start switch 
on and then off. The start switch must be open (logic 1) during the game.    
Circuit Analysis 
Prior to connecting the circuit, analyze the logic diagram to ensure that you understand 
how the circuit operates. In particular, try to answer the following questions: 
 
1.   What is the function of the reset switch?  
 
2.   How does the light in the rightmost position come on when the start switch is 
grounded? Why is it necessary to place the start switch in the logic‐1 position 
before the game starts?  
 
3.   What happens to the two mode‐control inputs,  S1  and  S0 once the ball is set in 
motion?  
 
4.   What happens to the mode‐control inputs and to the ball if the pulser is pressed 
while the ball is moving to the left? What happens if the ball is moving to the right, 
but has not yet reached the rightmost position?  
 
5.   If the ball has returned to the rightmost position, but the pulser has not yet been 
pressed, what is the state of the mode‐control inputs if the pulser is pressed? What 
happens if it is not pressed?    
Playing the Game 
Wire the circuit of  Fig.   9.20   . Test the circuit for proper operation by playing the game. Note 
that the pulser must provide a positive‐edge transition and that both the reset and start 
switches must be open (i.e., must be in the logic‐1 state) during the game. Start with a low 
clock rate, and increase the clock frequency to make the handball game more challenging.  
Counting the Number of Losses 
Design a circuit that keeps score of the number of times the player loses while playing 
the game. Use a BCD‐to‐seven‐segment decoder and a seven‐segment display, as in 
Fig.  9.8   , to display the count from 0 through 9. Counting is done with either the 7493 as 
a ripple  decimal counter or the 74161 and a NAND gate as a synchronous decimal 
counter. The display should show 0 when the circuit is reset. Every time the ball disap-
pears and the light goes off, the display should increase by 1. If the light stays on during 
the play, the number in the display should not change. The final design should be an 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested