Section 9.16  Experiment 15: Clock‐Pulse Generator    473
automatic scoring circuit, with the decimal display incremented automatically each time 
the player loses when the light  disappears.  
Lamp Ping‐Pong™ 
Modify the circuit of  Fig.   9.20    so as to obtain a lamp Ping‐Pong game. Two players can 
participate in this game, with each player having his or her own pulser. The player with 
the right pulser returns the ball when it is in the extreme right position, and the player 
with the left pulser returns the ball when it is in the extreme left position. The only mod-
ification required for the Ping‐Pong game is a second pulser and a change of a few wires. 
With a second start circuit, the game can be made to start by either one of the two 
players (i.e., either one serves). This addition is optional.   
9.16    EXPERIMENT 15: CLOCK‐PULSE GENERATOR 
In this experiment, you will use an IC timer unit and connect it to produce clock pulses 
at a given frequency. The circuit requires the connection of two external resistors and 
two external capacitors. The cathode‐ray oscilloscope is used to observe the waveforms 
and measure the frequency of the pulses. 
IC Timer 
IC type 72555 (or 555) is a precision timer circuit whose internal logic is shown in  Fig.   9.21   . 
(The resistors,    R
A
and    R
B
,    and the two capacitors are not part of the IC.) The circuit con-
sists of two voltage comparators, a flip‐flop, and an internal transistor. The voltage division 
from    V
CC
= 5 V    through the three internal resistors to ground produces    
2
3
and    
1
3
of    V
CC
(3.3 V and 1.7 V, respectively) into the fixed inputs of the comparators. When the threshold 
input at pin 6 goes above 3.3 V, the upper comparator resets the flip‐flop and the output 
goes low to about 0 V. When the trigger input at pin 2 goes below 1.7 V, the lower com-
parator sets the flip‐flop and the output goes high to about 5 V. When the output is low, 
Q′    is high and the base–emitter junction of the transistor is forward biased. When the 
output is high,    Q′    is low and the transistor is cut off. (See Section 10.3.) The timer circuit 
is capable of producing accurate time delays controlled by an external  RC  circuit. In this 
experiment, the IC timer will be operated in the astable mode to produce clock pulses.  
Circuit Operation 
Figure   9.21    shows the external connections for astable operation of the circuit. Capacitor 
C  charges through resistors    R
A
and    R
B
when the transistor is cut off and discharges through 
R
B
when the transistor is forward biased and conducting. When the charging voltage across 
capacitor  C  reaches 3.3 V, the threshold input at pin 6 causes the flip‐flop to reset and the 
transistor turns on. When the discharging voltage reaches 1.7 V, the trigger input at pin 2 
causes the flip‐flop to set and the transistor turns off. Thus, the output continually alternates 
Create powerpoint from pdf - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
converting pdf to ppt online; convert pdf pages into powerpoint slides
Create powerpoint from pdf - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
how to add pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation
474    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
between two voltage levels at the output of the flip‐flop. The output remains high for a 
duration equal to the charge time. This duration is determined from the equation 
t
H
=0.693(R
A
R
B
)C   
The output remains low for a duration equal to the discharge time. This duration is 
determined from the equation 
t
L
=0.693R
B
C     
Clock‐Pulse Generator 
Starting with a capacitor  C  of 0.001 μF calculate values for    R
A
and    R
B
to produce clock 
pulses, as shown in  Fig.   9.22   . The pulse width is 1 μs in the low level and repeats at a 
Threshold
Trigger
72555 Timer
Compare
Compare
GND
2
1
6
C
5 V
V
CC
8
5
Reset
Output
Discharge
3
7
R
A
R
S
Q
Q
R
B
0.01μf
4
FIGURE 9.21  
IC type 72555 timer connected as a clock‐pulse generator       
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Images.
converting pdf to powerpoint online; convert pdf file to powerpoint
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Images.
changing pdf to powerpoint; converting pdf to powerpoint
Section 9.17  Experiment 16: Parallel Adder and Accumulator    475
frequency rate of 100 kHz (every 10 μs). Connect the circuit and check the output in the 
oscilloscope. 
Observe the output across the capacitor  C,  and record its two levels to verify that 
they are between the trigger and threshold values. 
Observe the waveform in the collector of the transistor at pin 7 and record all perti-
nent information. Explain the waveform by analyzing the circuit’s action. 
Connect a variable resistor (potentiometer) in series with    R
A
to produce a variable‐ 
frequency pulse generator. The low‐level duration remains at 1 μs The frequency should 
range from 20 to 100 kHz. 
Change the low‐level pulses to high‐level pulses with a 7404 inverter. This will pro-
duce positive pulses of 1 μs with a variable‐frequency range.   
9.17     EXPERIMENT 16: PARALLEL ADDER 
AND ACCUMULATOR 
In this experiment, you will construct a four‐bit parallel adder whose sum can be loaded 
into a register. The numbers to be added will be stored in a RAM. Aset of bi nary 
numbers will be selected from memory and their sum will be accumulated in the  register. 
Block Diagram 
Use the RAM circuit from the memory experiment of Section 9.14, a four‐bit parallel 
adder, a four‐bit shift register with parallel load, a carry flip‐flop, and a multiplexer to 
construct the circuit. The block diagram and the ICs to be used are shown in  Fig.   9.23   . 
Information can be written into RAM from data in four switches or from the four‐bit 
data available in the outputs of the register. The selection is done by means of a multi-
plexer. The data in RAM can be added to the contents of the register and the sum 
transferred back to the register.  
Control of Register 
Provide toggle switches to control the 74194 register and the 7476 carry flip‐flop as follows: 
 
(a)   A LOAD condition transfers the sum to the register and the output carry to the 
flip‐flop upon the application of a clock pulse.  
10μS
S
FIGURE 9.22  
Output waveform for clock generator       
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET. Create multipage Tiff image files from PDF in VB.NET project. Support
table from pdf to powerpoint; how to add pdf to powerpoint slide
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Create PDF from Tiff. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Tiff in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET application.
convert pdf pages to powerpoint slides; convert pdf to powerpoint online no email
476    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
 
(b)   A SHIFT condition shifts the register right with the carry from the carry flip‐
flop transferred into the leftmost position of the register upon the application 
of a clock pulse. The value in the carry flip‐flop should not change during the 
shift.  
 
(c)   A NO‐CHANGE condition leaves the contents of the register and flip‐flop 
unchanged even when clock pulses are applied.     
Carry Circuit 
To conform with the preceding specifications, it is necessary to provide a circuit between 
the output carry from the adder and the  J  and  K  inputs of the 7476 flip‐flop so that the 
output carry is transferred into the flip‐flop (whether it is equal to 0 or 1) only when the 
LOAD condition is activated and a pulse is applied to the clock input of the flip‐flop. 
The carry flip‐flop should not change if the LOAD condition is disabled or the SHIFT 
condition is enabled.  
Count
(pulser)
Address
counter
(7493)
RAM
(74189)
MUX
(74157)
Inverters
(7404)
Select
(switch)
4 switches
Output carry
4-bit adder
(7483)
Sum
Register
(74194)
Carry
(7476)
FIGURE 9.23  
Block diagram of a parallel adder for Experiment 16       
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual C#. Online C#.NET Tutorial for Create PDF from Microsoft Office Excel Spreadsheet Using .NET XDoc.PDF Library.
convert pdf to powerpoint with; adding pdf to powerpoint
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Create PDF from Word. |. Home ›› XDoc in C#. C# Demo Code to Create PDF Document from Word in C# Program with .NET XDoc.PDF Component.
convert pdf to powerpoint online for; convert pdf to powerpoint slides
Section 9.17  Experiment 16: Parallel Adder and Accumulator    477
Detailed Circuit 
Draw a detailed diagram showing all the wiring between the ICs. Connect the circuit, 
and provide indicator lamps for the outputs of the register and carry flip‐flop and for 
the address and output data of the RAM.  
Checking the Circuit 
Store the numbers 0110, 1110, 1101, 0101, and 0011 in RAM and then add them to the 
register one at a time. Start with a cleared register and flip‐flop. Predict the values in 
the output of the register and carry after each addition in the following sum, and verify 
your results: 
0110+ 1110 + 1101+ 0101 + 0011    
Circuit Operation 
Clear the register and the carry flip‐flop to zero, and store the following four‐bit num-
bers in RAM in the indicated addresses:   
Address  
Content  
0110 
1110 
1101 
0101 
12 
0011 
Now perform the following four operations: 
 
1.   Add the contents of address 0 to the contents of the register, using the LOAD 
condition.  
 
2.   Store the sum from the register into RAM at address 1.  
 
3.   Shift right the contents of the register and carry with the SHIFT condition.  
 
4.   Store the shifted contents of the register at address 2 of RAM.   
Check that the contents of the first three locations in RAM are as follows:   
Address  
Contents  
0110 
0110 
0011 
Repeat the foregoing four operations for each of the other four binary numbers 
stored in RAM. Use addresses 4, 7, 10, and 13 to store the sum from the register in step2. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Best C#.NET component to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create PDF from Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint.
pdf to powerpoint slide; convert pdf back to powerpoint
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Images.
how to convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation; how to convert pdf into powerpoint slides
478    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
Use addresses 5, 8, 11, and 14 to store the shifted value from the register in step 4. Predict 
what the contents of RAM at addresses 0 through 14 would be, and check to verify your 
results.   
9.18    EXPERIMENT 17: BINARY MULTIPLIER 
In this experiment, you will design and construct a circuit that multiplies 2 four‐bit 
unsigned numbers to produce an eight‐bit product. An algorithm for multiplying two 
binary numbers is  presented in Section 8.7. The algorithm implemented in this experi-
ment differs from the one described in Figs. 8.14 and 8.15, by treating only a four‐bit 
datapath and by incrementing, instead of decrementing, a bit  counter. 
Block Diagram 
The ASMD chart and block diagram of the binary multiplier with those ICs recom-
mended to be used are shown in  Fig.   9.24   (a) and (b). The multiplicand,  B is available 
from four  switches instead of a register. The multiplier,  Q is obtained from another set 
of four switches. The product is displayed with eight indicator lamps. Counter  P  is 
initialized to 0 and then incremented after each partial product is formed. When the 
counter reaches the count of four, output Done becomes 1 and the multiplication 
operation terminates.   
Control of Registers 
The ASMD chart for the binary multiplier in  Fig.   9.24   (a) shows that the three registers 
and the carry flip‐flop of the datapath unit are controlled with signals  Load_regs, 
Incr_P, Add_regs and  Shift_regs . The external input signals of the control unit are 
clock,   reset_b  (active‐low), and  Start ; another input to the control unit is the internal 
status signal,  Done which is formed by the datapath unit to indicate that the counter 
has reached a count of four, corresponding to the number of bits in the multiplier. 
Load_regs  clears the product register ( A ) and the carry flip‐flop ( C ), loads the mul-
tiplicand into register  B loads the multiplier into register  Q and clears the bit coun-
ter.  Incr_P  increments the bit counter concurrently with the accumulation of a partial 
product.  Add_regs  adds the multiplicand to  A if the least significant bit of the shifted 
multiplier (Q [0] ) is 1. Flip‐flop  C  accommodates a carry that results from the addition. 
The  concatenated register  CAQ  is updated by storing the result of shifting its contents 
one bit to the right.  Shift_regs  shifts  CAQ  one bit to the right, which also clears flip‐
flop  C . 
The state diagram for the control unit is shown in  Fig.   9.24   (c). Note that it does not 
show the register operations of the datapath unit or the output signals that control 
them. That information is apparent in  Fig.   9.24   (d). Note that  Incr_P  and  Shift_regs  are 
generated unconditionally in states  S_add  and  S_shift respectively.  Load_regs  is 
Section 9.18  Experiment 17: Binary Multiplier    479
generated under the condition that  Start  is asserted conditionally while the state is in 
S_idle ;  Add_regs  is asserted conditionally in  S_add  if  Q[0]  = 1.  
Multiplication Example 
Before connecting the circuit, make sure that you understand the operation of the 
multiplier. To do this, construct a table similar to Table 8.5, but with    = 1111    for the 
multiplicand and    = 1011    for the multiplier. Along with each comment listed on 
the left side of the table, specify the state.  
Datapath Design 
Draw a detailed diagram of the datapath part of the multiplier, showing all IC pin con-
nections. Generate the four control signals with switches, and use them to provide the 
required control operations for the various registers. Connect the circuit and check that 
each component is functioning properly. With the control signals at 0, set the multipli-
cand switches to 1111 and the multiplier switches to 1011. Assert the control signals 
manually by means of the control switches, as specified by the state diagram of 
Fig.  9.24   (c). Apply a single pulse while in each control state, and observe the outputs of 
registers  A  and  Q  and the values in  C  and    P.    Compare these outputs with the numbers 
in your numerical example to verify that the circuit is functioning properly. Note that IC 
type 74161 has master–slave flip‐flops. To operate it manually, it is necessary that the 
single clock pulse be a negative pulse.  
Design of Control 
Design the control circuit specified by the state diagram. You can use any method of 
control implementation discussed in Section 8.8. 
Choose the method that minimizes the number of ICs. Verify the operation of the 
control circuit prior to its connection to the datapath unit.  
Checking the Multiplier 
Connect the outputs of the control circuit to the datapath unit, and verify the total circuit 
operation by repeating the steps of multiplying 1111 by 1011. The single clock pulses 
should now sequence the control states as well. (Remove the manual switches.) The start 
signal ( Start ) can be generated with a switch that is on while the control is in state    S_idle.    
Generate the start signal ( Start ) with a pulser or any other short pulse, and operate the 
multiplier with continuous clock pulses from a clock generator. Pressing the pulser for 
Start  should initiate the multiplication operation, and upon its completion, the product 
should be displayed in the  A  and  Q  registers. Note that the multiplication will be repeated 
as long as signal  Start  is enabled. Make sure that  Start  goes back to 0. Then set the switches 
to two other four‐bit  numbers and press  Start  again. The new product should appear at the 
outputs. Repeat the multiplication of a few numbers to verify the operation of the circuit.   
480    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
FIGURE 9.24  
ASMD chart, block diagram of the datapath, control state diagram, and register 
operations of the binary multiplier circuit        
(a) ASMD chart
S_idle
Ready
S_add
Incr_P
Done
reset
Start
1
Q[0]
S_shift
Shift_regs
1
1
Add_regs
Load_regs
{C, A, Q} <= {C, A, Q} >>1
{C, A} <= A + B
P<= P+1
A<= 0
C<= 0
B<=Multiplicand
Q<=Multiplier
P<= 0
9.19     VERILOG HDL SIMULATION EXPERIMENTS 
AND RAPID PROTOTYPING WITH FPGAS 
Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are used by industry to implement logic when 
the system is complex, the time‐to‐market is short, the performance (e.g., speed) of an 
FPGA is acceptable, and the volume of potential sales does not warrant the investment 
in a standard cell‐based ASIC. Circuits can be rapidly prototyped into an FPGA using an 
Section 9.19  Verilog HDL Simulation Experiments    481
Parallel adder
(7483)
RegisterA
(74194)
C
(7474)
RegisterQ
(74194)
MultiplierQ
(4 switches)
MultiplicandB
(4 switches)
CounterP
(74161)
Done= 1 on count of 4
Q
0
C
out
(b) Datapath block program
S_idle
Start= 1
Start= 0
S_add
S_shift
Done= 0
Done= 1
(c) Control state diagram
State Transition
Register Operations
Control signal
Load_regs
Incr_P
Add_regs
Shift_regs
From
To
S_idle
Initial state reached by reset action
S_idle
S_add
A<= 0, C<= 0, P<= 0
S_add
S_shift
P<=P+ 1
if (Q[0]) then (A<=A+B,C<=C
out
)
S_shift
shift right {CAQ}, C <= 0
(d) Register operations
FIGURE 9.24 
(Continued)    
482    Chapter 9  Laboratory Experiments
HDL. Once the HDL model is verified, the description is synthesized and mapped into 
the FPGA. FPGA vendors provide software tools for synthesizing the HDL description 
of a circuit into an optimized gate‐level description and mapping (fitting) the resulting 
netlist into the resources of their FPGA. This process avoids the detailed assembly of ICs 
that is required by composing a circuit on a breadboard, and the process involves sig-
nificantly less risk of failure, because it is easier and faster to edit an HDL description 
than to re‐wire a breadboard. 
Most of the hardware experiments outlined in this chapter can be supplemented by 
a corresponding software procedure using the Verilog hardware description language 
(HDL). A Verilog compiler and simulator are necessary for these supplements. The 
supplemental experiments have two levels of engagement. In the first, the circuits that 
are specified in the hands‐on  laboratory experiments can be described, simulated, and 
verified using Verilog and a simulator. In the second, if a suitable FPGA prototyping 
board is available (e.g., see www.digilentinc.com), the hardware experiments can be 
done by synthesizing the Verilog descriptions and implementing the circuits in an FPGA. 
Where appropriate, the identity of the individual (structural) hardware units (e.g., a 4‐bit 
counter) can be preserved by encapsulating them in separate Verilog modules whose 
internal detail is described behaviorally or by a mixture of behavioral and structural 
models. 
Prototyping a circuit with an FPGA requires synthesizing a Verilog description to 
produce a bit stream that can be downloaded to configure the internal resources 
(e.g.,CLBS of a  Xilinx FPGA) and connectivity of the FPGA. Three details require 
attention: (1) The pins of the prototyping board are connected to the pins of the FPGA, 
and the hardware implementation of the synthesized circuit requires that its input and 
output signals be associated with the pins of the prototyping board (this association is 
made using the synthesis tool  provided by the vendor of the FPGA (such tools are avail-
able free)), (2) FPGA prototyping boards have a clock generator, but it will be necessary, 
in some cases, to implement a clock divider (in Verilog) to obtain an internal clock 
whose frequency is suitable for the experiment, and (3) inputs to an FPGA‐based circuit 
can be made using switches and pushbuttons located on the prototyping board, but it 
might be necessary to implement a pulser circuit in software to control and observe the 
activity of a counter or a state machine (see the supplement to  Experiment 1). 
Supplement to Experiment 1 (Section 9.2) 
The functionality of the counters specified in Experiment 1 can be described in Verilog 
and synthesized for implementation in an FPGA. Note that the circuit shown in  Fig.   9.3    
uses a push‐button pulser or a clock to cause the count to increment in a circuit built 
with standard ICs. A software pulser circuit can be developed to work with a switch on 
the prototyping board of an FPGA so that the operation of the counters can be verified 
by visual inspection. 
The software pulser has the ASM chart shown in  Fig.   9.25   , where the external input 
Pushed ) is obtained from a mechanical switch or pushbutton. This circuit asserts  Start  
for one cycle of the clock and then waits for the switch to be opened (or the pushbutton 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested