Section A.1  Complementary MOS    513
CMOS Characteristics 
When a CMOS logic circuit is in a static state, its power dissipation is very low. This is 
because at least one transistor is always off in the path between the power supply and 
ground when the state of the circuit is not changing. As a result, a typical CMOS gate 
has static power dissipation on the order of 0.01 mW. However, when the circuit is 
changing state at the rate of 1 MHz, the power dissipation increases to about 1 mW, and 
at 10 MHz it is about 5 mW.  
CMOS logic is usually specified for a single power‐supply operation over a voltage 
range from 3 to 18 V with a typical    V
DD
value of 5 V. Operating CMOS at a larger power‐
supply voltage reduces the propagation delay time and improves the noise margin, but 
the power dissipation is increased. The propagation delay time with    V
DD
= 5 V    ranges 
from 5 to 20 ns, depending on the type of CMOS used. The noise margin is usually about 
40% of the power supply voltage. The fan‐out of CMOS gates is about 30 when they are 
operated at a frequency of 1 MHz. The fan‐out decreases with an increase in the 
frequency of operation of the gates. 
There are several series of the CMOS digital logic family. The 74C series are pin and 
function compatible with TTL devices having the same number. For example, CMOS 
IC type 74C04 has six inverters with the same pin configuration as TTL type 7404. The 
high‐speed CMOS 74HC series is an improvement over the 74C series, with a tenfold 
increase in switching speed. The 74HCT series is electrically compatible with TTL ICs. 
This means that circuits in this series can be connected to inputs and outputs of TTL ICs 
without the need of addi tional interfacing circuits. Newer versions of CMOS are the 
high‐speed series 74VHC and its TTL‐compatible version 74VHCT. 
The CMOS fabrication process is simpler than that of TTL and provides a greater 
packing density. Thus, more circuits can be placed on a given area of silicon at a reduced 
cost per function. This property, together with the low power dissipation of CMOS cir-
cuits, good noise immunity, and reasonable propagation delay, makes CMOS the most 
popular standard as a digital logic family.   
FIGURE A.5  
CMOS inverter       
V
in
V
out
V
DD
= 5 V
A
Y
V
DD
(a) Switch model
(b) Logical model
Convert pdf into ppt - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
convert pdf to editable ppt online; convert pdf to powerpoint using
Convert pdf into ppt - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
embed pdf into powerpoint; convert pdf to powerpoint
514    Appendix  Semiconductors and CMOS Integrated Circuits
A.2  CMOS TRANSMISSION GATE CIRCUITS 
A special CMOS circuit that is not available in the other digital logic families is the 
transmission gate . The transmission gate is essentially an electronic switch that is con-
trolled by an input logic level. It is used to simplify the construction of various digital 
components when fabricated with CMOS technology. 
Figure A.6(a) shows the basic circuit of the transmission gate. Whereas a CMOS 
in verter consists of a  p ‐channel transistor connected in series with an  n ‐channel transis-
tor, a transmission gate is formed by one  n ‐channel and one  p ‐channel MOS transistor 
connected in parallel. 
The  n ‐channel substrate is connected to ground and the  p ‐channel substrate is con-
nected to    V
DD
.    When the  N  gate is at    V
DD
and the  P  gate is at ground, both transistors 
conduct and there is a closed path between input  X  and output  Y . When the  N  gate is 
at ground and the  P  gate is at    V
DD
,    both transistors are off and there is an open circuit 
between  X  and  Y . Figure A.4(b) shows the block diagram of the transmission gate. Note 
that the terminal of the  p ‐channel gate is marked with the negation symbol. FigureA.4(c) 
demonstrates the behavior of the switch in terms of positive‐logic assignment with    V
DD
equivalent to logic 1 and ground equivalent to logic 0. 
The transmission gate is usually connected to an inverter, as shown in  Fig.   A.7   . This 
type of arrangement is referred to as a  bilateral switch . The control input  C  is connected 
directly to the  n ‐channel gate and its inverse to the  p ‐channel gate. When    C= 1,    the 
FIGURE A.6  
Transmission gate (TG)       
TG
X
P
N
Y
P
X
X
Y
Y
V
DD
(a)
(b)
(c)
Closed switch
N= 1
P= 0
X
Y
Open switch
N= 0
P= 1
N
Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
pdf to powerpoint; change pdf to powerpoint
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.Word SDK into your C#.NET project, PDF, MS
add pdf to powerpoint slide; change pdf to ppt
Section A.2  CMOS Transmission Gate Circuits    515
switch is closed, producing a path between  X  and  Y . When    C= 0,    the switch is open, 
disconnecting the path between  X  and  Y .   
Various circuits can be constructed that use the transmission gate. To demonstrate its 
usefulness as a component in the CMOS family, we will show three examples. 
The exclusive‐OR gate can be constructed with two transmission gates and two 
inverters, as shown in  Fig.   A.8   . Input A controls the paths in the transmission gates and 
input  B  is connected to output  Y  through the gates. When input  A  is equal to 0, transmis-
sion gate  TG1  is closed and output  Y  is equal to input  B . When input A is equal to 1, 
TG2  is closed and output  Y  is equal to the complement of input  B . This results in the 
exclusive‐OR truth table, as indicated in  Fig.   A.8   .  
Another circuit that can be constructed with transmission gates is the multiplexer. 
Afour‐to‐one‐line multiplexer implemented with transmission gates is shown in 
Fig.  A.9   . The  TG  circuit provides a transmission path between its horizontal input and 
FIGURE A.7  
Bilateral switch       
TG
X
Y
C
FIGURE A.8  
Exclusive‐OR constructed with transmission gates       
TG1
A
B
TG2
Y
A
B
TG1
TG2
Y
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
close
close
open
open
open
open
close
close
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. MS Office to PDF Conversion Overview. By integrating XDoc.PDF SDK into your C#.NET project, Microsoft Office
pdf to powerpoint conversion; convert pdf file into ppt
C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. In order to convert Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to quiet easy to integrate this SDK into your C#
convert pdf to editable ppt; image from pdf to ppt
516    Appendix  Semiconductors and CMOS Integrated Circuits
output lines when the two vertical control inputs have the value of 1 in the uncircled ter-
minal and 0 in the circled terminal. With an opposite polarity in the control inputs, the path 
disconnects and the circuit behaves like an open switch. The two selection inputs,    S
1
and    S
0
,    
control the transmission path in the  TG  circuits. Inside each box is marked the condition 
for the transmission gate switch to be closed. Thus, if    S
0
= 0    and    S
1
= 0,    there is a closed 
path from input    I
0
to output  Y  through the two  TG s marked with    S
0
= 0    and    S
1
= 0.    The 
other three inputs are disconnected from the output by one of the other  TG  circuits. 
FIGURE A.9  
Multiplexer with transmission gates       
Y
S
0
S
1
I
0
I
1
I
2
I
3
TG
(S
1
= 1)
TG
(S
0
= 1)
TG
(S
1
= 0)
TG
(S
0
= 0)
TG
(S
0
= 1)
TG
(S
0
= 0)
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
directly encode converted image source into PDF document file converted image source to PDF format, RasterEdge VB other encoding APIs to convert rendered image
how to change pdf file to powerpoint; create powerpoint from pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
to split one PPT (.pptx) document file into smaller sub control add-on can do PPT creating, loading powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add pdf to powerpoint presentation; picture from pdf to powerpoint
Section A.3  Switch‐Level Modeling With HDL    517
The level‐sensitive  D  flip‐flop commonly referred to as the gated  D  latch can be 
constructed with transmission gates, as shown in  Fig.   A.10   . The  C  input controls two 
transmission gates  TG . When    =1,    the  TG  connected to input  D  has a closed path 
and the one connected to output  Q  has an open path. This configuration produces an 
equivalent circuit from input  D  through two inverters to output  Q . Thus, the output fol-
lows the data input as long as  C  remains active. When  C  switches to 0, the first  TG  dis-
connects input  D  from the circuit and the second  TG  produces a closed path between 
the two inverters at the output. Thus, the value that was present at input  D  at the time 
that  C  went from 1 to 0 is retained at the  Q  output.  
A master–slave  D  flip‐flop can be constructed with two circuits of the type shown in 
Fig.   A.10   . The first circuit is the master and the second is the slave. Thus, a master–slave 
D  flip‐flop can be constructed with four transmission gates and six inverters.  
A.3  SWITCH‐LEVEL MODELING WITH HDL 
CMOS is the dominant digital logic family used with integrated circuits. By definition, 
CMOS is a complementary connection of an NMOS and a PMOS transistor. MOS 
transistors can be considered to be electronic switches that either conduct or are open. 
By specifying the connections among MOS switches, the designer can describe a digital 
circuit constructed with CMOS. This type of description is called  switch‐level modeling  
in Verilog HDL.  
The two types of MOS switches are specified in Verilog HDL with the keywords  nmos  
and  pmos . They are instantiated by specifying the three terminals of the transistor, as 
shown in  Fig.   A.2   : 
nmos  (drain, source, gate); 
pmos  (drain, source, gate);  
Switches are considered to be primitives, so the use of an instance name is optional. 
FIGURE A.10  
Gated  D  latch with transmission gates       
TG
TG
C
D
Q
Q
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; ConvertResult. FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type
how to convert pdf slides to powerpoint presentation; pdf conversion to powerpoint
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode Allow VB.NET developers to output PPT ISSN barcode scanning result into data string.
converting pdf to ppt online; convert pdf file to powerpoint online
518    Appendix  Semiconductors and CMOS Integrated Circuits
The second module, set forth in HDL Example A.2, describes the two‐input CMOS 
NAND circuit of  Fig.   A.4   (b). There are two PMOS transistors connected in parallel, 
with their source terminals connected to PWR. There are also two NMOS transistors 
connected in series and with a common terminal  W1 . The drain of the first NMOS is 
connected to the output, and the source of the second NMOS is connected to GRD.  
The connections to a power source    (V
DD
)    and to ground must be specified when MOS 
circuits are designed. Power and ground are defined with the keywords  supply1  and 
supply0 . They are specified, for example, with the following statements: 
supply1  PWR; 
supply0  GRD;  
Sources of type  supply1  are equivalent to    V
DD
and have a value of logic 1. Sources of 
type  supply0  are equivalent to ground connection and have a value of logic 0. 
The description of the CMOS inverter of  Fig.   A.4   (a) is shown in HDL Example A.1. 
The input, the output, and the two supply sources are declared first. The module instan-
tiates a PMOS and an NMOS transistor. The output  Y  is common to both transistors 
at their drain terminals. The input is also common to both transistors at their gate 
terminals. The source terminal of the PMOS transistor is connected to PWR and the 
source terminal of the NMOS transistor is connected to GRD.  
HDL Example A.1  
// CMOS inverter of Fig. A.4(a)
module  inverter (Y, A);
input  A;
output  Y;
supply1   PWR;
supply0   GRD;
pmos  (Y, PWR, A); 
// (Drain, source, gate)
nmos  (Y, GRD, A); 
// (Drain, source, gate)
endmodule    
HDL Example A.2  
// CMOS two-input NAND of Fig. A.4(b)
module  NAND2 (Y, A, B);
input  A, B;
output  Y;
supply1   PWR;
supply0   GRD;
wire  W1; 
// terminal between two nmos
pmos  (Y, PWR, A); 
// source connected to Vdd
pmos  (Y, PWR, B); 
// parallel connection
Section A.3  Switch‐Level Modeling With HDL    519
Transmission Gate 
The transmission gate is instantiated in Verilog HDL with the keyword  cmos . It has an 
output, an input, and two control signals, as shown in Fig. A.6. It is referred to as a  cmos  
switch. The relevant code is as follows: 
cmos  (output, input, ncontrol, pcontrol); // general description 
cmos  (Y, X, N, P);  // transmission gate of  Fig.   A.6   (b)  
Normally, ncontrol and pcontrol are the complement of each other. The  cmos  switch 
does not need power sources, since    V
DD
and ground are connected to the substrates of 
the MOS transistors. Transmission gates are useful for building multiplexers and flip‐
flops with CMOS circuits. 
HDL Example A.3 describes a circuit with  cmos  switches. The exclusive‐OR circuit 
of  Fig.   A.8    has two transmission gates and two inverters. The two inverters are instan-
tiated within the module describing a CMOS inverter. The two  cmos  switches are 
instantiated without an instance name, since they are primitives in the language. A test 
module is included to test the circuit’s operation. Applying all possible combinations 
of the two inputs, the result of the simulator verifies the operation of the exclusive‐OR 
circuit. The output of the simulation is as follows: 
A= 0 =0 = 0
A= 0 =1 = 1
A= 1 =0 = 1
A= 1 =1 = 0   
nmos  (Y, W1, A); 
// serial connection
nmos  (W1, GRD, B); 
// source connected to ground
endmodule    
HDL Example A.3  
//CMOS_XOR with CMOS switches, Fig. A.8
module  CMOS_XOR (A, B, Y);
input  A, B;
output  Y;
wire  A_b, B_b;
// instantiate inverter
inverter v1 (A_b, A);
inverter v2 (B_b, B);
// instantiate cmos switch
cmos  (Y, B, A_b, A); 
//(output, input, ncontrol, pcontrol)
cmos  (Y, B_b, A, A_b);
endmodule 
520    Appendix  Semiconductors and CMOS Integrated Circuits
WEB SEARCH TOPICS  
Conductor 
Semiconductor 
Insulator 
Electrical properties of materials 
Valence electron 
Diode 
Transistor 
CMOS process 
CMOS logic gate 
CMOS inverter    
// CMOS inverter Fig. A.4(a)
module  inverter (Y, A);
input  A;
output  Y;
supply1   PWR;
supply0   GND;
pmos  (Y, PWR, A); 
//(Drain, source, gate)
nmos  (Y, GND, A); 
//(Drain, source, gate)
endmodule 
// Stimulus to test CMOS_XOR
module  test_CMOS_XOR;
reg  A,B;
wire  Y;
//Instantiate CMOS_XOR
CMOS_XOR X1 (A, B, Y);
// Apply truth table
initial 
begin 
A = 1'b0; B = 1'b0;
#5 A = 1'b0; B = 1'b1;
#5 A = 1'b1; B = 1'b0;
#5 A = 1'b1; B = 1'b1;
end 
// Display results
initial 
$monitor  ("A =%b  B= %b  Y =%b", A, B, Y);
endmodule 
521
Answers to Selected Problems 
CHAPTER 1 
1.2 
(a) 32,768  (b) 67,108,864  (c) 6,871,947,674  
1.3 
(a)    (4310)
5
= 580     (b)    (198)
12
= 260     
1.5 
(a) 6  (b) 8  (c) 11  
1.6 
8  
1.7 
(62315)
8
1.9 
22.3125 (all three)  
1.12   (a) 10000 and 110111  (b) 62 and 958  
1.19   (a) 010087  (b) 008485  (c) 991515  (d) 989913  
1.24   (a) 6   3   1   1   Decimal     
0 
4 (or 0101) 
7 (or 1001) 
522    Answers to Selected Problems
1.29   Steve Jobs  
1.31      62 + 32= 94    printing characters  
1.32   bit 6 from the right  
1.33   (a) 897 (b) 564 (c) 871 (d) 2,199   
CHAPTER 2 
2.2 
(a) x  (b) x  (c) y  (d) 0  
2.3 
(a) B  (b)    z(y)     (c)    xy′     (d)    x(y)     (e) 0  
2.4 
(a)    AB +C′     (b)    +z     (c) B  (d)    A′(BCA)     
2.9 
(a)    xy xy′     
2.11      F(xyz) = = ∑(1, 4, 5, 6, 7)     
2.12   (a) 10100000  (c) 00011101  (d) 01001110  
2.14   (b)    (x′+ y′)′+ (y)′ +(yz′)′     
2.15      T
1
A′(B′ +C′)    
T
2
ABC =T
1
=
2.17   (a)    ∑(3, 5, 6, 7) ) = (0, 1, 2, 4)     
2.18   (c)    yzy(x)     
2.19      ∑(1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) ) = (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14)     
2.22   (a)    AB +BC =(AC)B     (b)    x′+ z′      
CHAPTER 3 
3.1 
(a)    xy′ + xz′     (b)    xy′+ z′     (c)    x′+ yz     (d)    xxzyz     
3.2 
(a)    xy′+ xz     (b)    yxz     
3.3 
(a)    xy xz′     (b)    x′+ yz     (c)    z′ + xy     
3.4 
(a) y  (b)    BCD ABD′     (c)    ABD ABC +CD     
(d)    wxwxy     
3.5 
(a)    xz′+wyz+wxy     (d)    BDBD′+AB     or     BDBD′+AD′     
3.6 
(a)    BD′+ ABD ABC′     (b)    xy′+ xwxy     
3.7 
(a)    xz     (c)    ACBD′+ ABD BC    (or CD)  
3.8 
(a)    F(xyz) = = ∑(3, 5, 6, 7)     (b)    F (ABCD) = ∑(1, 3, 5, 9, 12, 13, 14)     
3.9 
(a) Essential: xz and    xz′;    Nonessential:    wx    and    wz′    
(b)    BD′+ AC ABD + (CD or BC)     
3.10   (c)    BC′+ ACABD    
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested