Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files 
1
Publication 300.6     Rev. 07/04
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE I KEEPING AMERICA INFORMED
732 North Capitol Street NW  
Washington, DC  20401-0001  
www.gpo.gov
The Guidelines
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design & Prepress Files
Convert pdf file to powerpoint - Library SDK component:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to powerpoint - Library SDK component:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
To Our Customers,
The United States Government Printing Offi ce (GPO) 
is dedicated to providing you, our customers, the best 
possible publishing product at the lowest possible price, 
while meeting each customer’s important deadline. To do 
this effectively, the GPO will develop customized solutions 
for meeting your publishing needs and services. These 
solutions will offer a fully integrated approach, including 
creating, packaging, disseminating, storing, preserving, 
and authenticating information.
GPO’s new National Sales Program is committed to creating 
awareness of GPO’s product and service offerings, which 
will promote the full spectrum of GPO’s services to you, our 
agency customers and partners. In doing so, the program 
will showcase creative services, electronic publishing 
options, dissemination strategies and other valuable services.
We are committed to providing you with support and 
solutions to meet your publishing needs. As always, we will 
continue to keep you informed.
Jim Bradley
Managing Director
Customer Services
Library SDK component:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Platform 
3
Other Platforms 
3
File Submission 
3
Media 
3
Electronic File Transfer (ETF) 
3
Commonly Accepted Publishing Software 
3
Macintosh Platform 
3
Windows Platform 
3
Current Software Versions 
4
File Formats for Print 
4
Native Applications Files 
4
Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF) 
4
PostScript Files 
4
Digital Deliverables 
5
File Formats for Repurposed Deliverables 
5
HTML 
5
Acrobat PDF 
5
Press Optimized PDF 
5
Screen/Web Optimized PDF 
5
SGML & XML 
5
Fonts 
6
PostScript Type 1 
6
Open Type 
6
Fonts Used in Graphics Files
Converting Fonts to Outline Paths or Curves 
6
Color Issues 
6
RGB 
6
Four-Color Process (CMYK) 
6
Spot Colors 
7
Grayscale 
7
Duotone Images 
7
Color Expectation 
7
Images 
7
Scanning 
7
Scanning Resolution (color and grayscale photographs) 
7
Scanning Resolution (line art) 
8
Scanned Image File Formats 
8
Digital Cameras 
8
Resolution Capture 
8
Formats and Compression 
8
Image Manipulation 
8
Cropping, Rotating, & Scaling 
8
Layers 
8
Table of Contents
Support Through GPO
The goal of this publication, The Guidelines 
— Best Practices for Submitting Electronic 
Design and Prepress Files, is to provide best 
practice guidance to customers who are  
creating publishing products via desktop 
computers. As always, the ePUB Support 
Group is available to answer questions 
regarding electronics and publishing.
GPO’s Electronic Publishing Support Group 
is an in-house desktop and electronic 
publishing consulting group. We service 
all Federal Government agencies who use 
GPO’s Printing Procurement process, as well 
as our in-house and regional personnel.
Please note that the basics of proper file 
creation, unlike technology, stay fairly 
consistent. While no specific “recipe” 
exists for creating the perfect electronic 
file, the suggestions provided in this 
publication will simplify the process and 
minimize potential problems. 
Please direct questions, comments or 
suggestions for improving this document 
to ePUB:
phone      
202.512.1491
e-mail
epub@gpo.gov
website
www.gpo.gov/procurement/ditsg
NOTE
This edition of The Guidelines was revised July of 
2004 and replaces the previous version revised in 
August of 2001. This revision includes updated 
information regarding software, processes, and the 
latest trends in industry.
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files 
1
Library SDK component:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Merge PDF with byte array, fields. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
Graphics, Maps, Charts, and Appropriate File Formats 
9
Establishing Links 
9
Updating Graphics 
9
Nested Graphics 
9
Clip Art 
9
Copyright & Artwork 
9
Maps 
9
Graphs and Charts 
9
Appropriate File Formats 
9
Proofing 
10
Conventional Proofs 
10
Standard Digital Proofing (SDP) 
10
Two-Step Proofing 
10
Prior to Production Samples (One-Off Proofs) 
10
Miscellaneous 
11
Extraneous Images 
11
Designer Responsibility 
11
Printer-Ready Files 
11
Gradients 
11
Tint Screens 
11
Rules 
11
Bleeds 
11
Compressing Files 
11
Backup Copies 
11
Clipping Paths 
12
Documentation 
12
Form 952 
12
Marking Visuals 
12
Current Visuals 
12
Color-Separated Visuals 
12
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files
Education Through GPO
The art and science of producing printed 
publications using commercial offset 
lithography or the new digital means 
requires very structured files. As an 
example the “colors” produced by these 
reproduction means are very different and 
often limited compared to typical desktop 
printing. Understanding the requirements 
and limitations of commercial reproduc-
tion is often the difference between bring-
ing a project in on-time and being late, 
and will definitely effect it’s final cost.
The practices described in these guide-
lines, and many tips and tricks of publica-
tion design, are covered in detail in classes 
taught by GPO. For anyone involved with 
producing printed publications basic print 
production training is recommended. For 
those designing pages, “responsible page 
building” is also a must.
GPO Training Provides
Electronic Design and Prepress Courses: 
Adobe Acrobat –PDF for Press, Checking 
Desktop Publishing Files—Preflighting, 
Getting the Best From Desktop Publishing, 
Printing Processes and Terminology, and 
others including software specific classes, 
tutoring, selfpaced learning aids, and on-
line training.
Electronic Publishing Courses: courses 
in electronic publishing such as CD 
Publication, XML for the WWW and 
Dreamweaver are also provided.
For training classes, contact the  
Institute for Federal Printing and Electronic 
Publishing (IFPEP) at GPO:
phone      
202.512.1283
e-mail
ifpep-registrar@gpo.gov
website
www.gpo.gov/ifpep/ifpep.html
Library SDK component:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
PDFPage page = (PDFPage)doc.GetPage(0); // Convert the first PDF page to a JPEG file. page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg");
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF from PowerPoint; C#: Create PDF from Tiff; C#: Convert PDF to Word; C#: Convert PDF to Tiff; C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress
www.rasteredge.com
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files 
3
Platform
Electronic files should be created using either the 
Macintosh or Microsoft’s Windows operating system 
(OS). When using the Macintosh OS, use system 10.2 
or later. When using the Windows OS, use Windows 
2000 or XP.
Tip: GPO will accept files from either platform; however, 
the Macintosh is the primary platform used by the print 
publishing industry. GPO’s experience has shown that 
most service providers (and printers) are Macintosh 
based. Consequently, files created on the Macintosh 
process with fewer problems and typically with lower 
overall costs.
Other Platforms
Agencies using alternative platforms such as Unix 
should discuss the project in advance with GPO, so 
that suitable vendors can be invited to bid.
File Submission
Files can be submitted for procurement on any  
commercially established media, or by Electronic File 
Transfer (EFT).
Media
Physical media includes, but is not limited to, Iomega 
products (all sizes), single-session recordable CD or 
DVD. If submitting a DVD, address compatibility  
issues by making sure that the format of the DVD 
drive used by the end user is the same format as the 
DVD drive used for recording. 
Caution: DVD–RW drives only record on –R and –RW 
discs, and DVD+RW drives only record on +R and 
+RW discs. Make sure you get blank DVD disks that 
are compatible with your drive. 
Tip: The minus format is the most popular format for 
Windows users, and is almost universally accepted by 
Mac users as their standard DVD recordable format. 
Caution: Customers should be wary of data stored  
on certain types of removable media (e.g., SyQuest  
cartridges, 3.5” floppies, etc.) as it may become  
increasingly difficult to access the information.  
GPO suggests phasing out older legacy media.
Electronic File Transfer (EFT)
If desired by the ordering agency, GPO contracts can 
include the electronic submission of files. Electronic 
submissions include, but are not limited to e-mail 
and File Transfer Protocol (FTP). Proprietary solutions 
(e.g., Wam!Net) can be accommodated if requested 
by the ordering agency. 
Caution: Attachments to e-mail can be particularly 
troublesome due to common file size limitations  
associated with attached files and encoding issues.
Tip: It is important to clearly state the method and 
restrictions of any desired EFT on the Standard  
Form-1 so that suitable vendors may be invited to  
participate in the bidding process.
Commonly Accepted  
Publishing Software 
The programs listed on the following pages are used 
to create a majority of the print publishing work 
received by GPO. They are also the preferred  
programs of the commercial printing industry. Files 
created using the following software output with 
fewer problems than files created in programs not 
designed for print publishing. Other programs may 
be used, but unless they support prepress functions 
(e.g., CMYK and PANTONE color, trapping, bleeds, 
crop marks and color separation) problems will likely 
occur. Customers who use programs other than those 
listed below should consider supplying high-resolu-
tion press optimized PDF files instead of native files 
(see ePUB’s website at www.gpo.gov/procurement/
ditsg for more information on creating appropriate 
PDF files).
Macintosh Platform
Page Layout: Adobe InDesign, QuarkXPress,  
Adobe FrameMaker
Drawing/Illustration: Adobe Illustrator,  
Macromedia FreeHand
Image Manipulation: Adobe Photoshop
Windows Platform
Page Layout: Adobe InDesign, QuarkXPress,  
Adobe PageMaker, Adobe FrameMaker
Drawing/Illustration: Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw, 
Macromedia FreeHand
Image Manipulation: Adobe Photoshop
Library SDK component:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page using VB.NET code efficiently.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK component:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files
Current Software Versions
If possible, use current software. Avoid using any 
software that is more than one major revision old 
because most vendors only support recent or near 
recent applications. Customers with access to the 
World Wide Web (WWW) should check software 
vendors’ web sites for upgrade patches and other 
important technical information.
Tip: Getting updates, upgrades and other helpful  
software  
Adobe — www.adobe.com 
Apple — www.apple.com 
Corel — www.corel.com 
Quark — www.quark.com 
Macromedia — www.macromedia.com 
Markzware — www.markzware.com 
Extensis — www.extensis.com 
PANTONE — www.pantone.com
File Formats for Print
Native Application Files
At the time of publication, most print industry 
vendors request that files provided for publishing 
be in native format. For example, using a Windows 
version of InDesign the file will be saved as with an 
.indd extension, and a QuarkXPress file will be saved 
with a .qxd extension. Using the save feature of most 
publishing software creates a native application file. 
Tip: Three-letter extensions are used in the Windows 
environment to register files with programs. On the  
Macintosh OS, native files are designated by icons 
(graphical representations of the file) coupled with 
internal type and creator identifiers. Adding the 3 letter 
extension will not cause problems with the file. The 
icons below represent QuarkXPress (left), Adobe  
PageMaker (center) and Adobe InDesign (right) files 
created on a Macintosh.
Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF) 
Commonly called PDF files, this file format can take 
the place of native application files. PDF’s are de-
signed as self contained, platform independent files 
and if created properly may eliminate many common 
prepress problems. PDF files should contain  
embedded fonts, graphics, color data and layout 
structure. PDF files are somewhat editable and are 
more compact (e.g., smaller file size) than native  
application file formats. 
Caution: Not all PDF files are created to be output for 
print publishing. Design elements must contain  
appropriate information (e.g., color space, fonts, 
resolution) in order to be output properly. PDF files 
created specifically for web use may not out-put well 
for print publishing due to resolution, color and 
other issues.
Tip: PDF files for press output must be created using 
the appropriate settings in Acrobat Distiller, not through 
the PDFWriter. PDF files created using the PDFWriter 
are not acceptable for print publishing. See ePUB’s 
website (www.gpo.gov/procurement/ditsg) for  
specific information regarding PDF file creation, includ-
ing downloadable press optimized Distiller settings.
While this guide does not provide instructions for 
creating PDF files there are several sources for obtain-
ing this information. In addition to ePUB’s website, 
customers can find instructions for creating high 
quality PDF files at many web sites including Adobe 
(www.adobe.com), PDFZone (www.pdfzone.com) 
and PlanetPDF (www.planetpdf.com). In addition, 
GPO’s Institute for Federal Printing and Electronic 
Publishing (IFPEP: 202-512-1283) teaches both Adobe 
Acrobat courses and desktop publishing courses.
PostScript Files
Commonly referred too as Print-to-file or print-to-
disk, PostScript files are similar to PDF files in that 
they are designed as self contained, platform inde-
pendent, print driver files (e.g., contain fonts, graph-
ics and layout structure). 
Caution: The majority of GPO’s vendors prefer not to 
receive PostScript files. PostScript files often contain 
output limitations specific to the print driver used to 
create the file. In addition, if you submit a PostScript 
file, you will be responsible for any PostScript errors 
encountered during output.
Tip: When supplying PostScript files it is important  
to identify the print driver used when creating the  
document. Include this information on GPO form 952.
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files 
5
Caution: Common “office” printers use HP’s Printer 
Control Language (PCL) instead of PostScript  
language to print data. Unfortunately, PCL printers 
are incompatible with most print publishing environ-
ments (e.g., copy may reflow). When creating print-
to-disk files it is necessary to use a PostScript printer 
and/or PostScript driver. DO NOT USE PCL  
LANGUAGE DEPENDENT DEVICES IN A PRINT  
PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENT.
Digital Deliverables
The ordering agency may request upon completion 
of the order, that the contractor provide corrected 
native application files (digital deliverables) with the 
furnished material. The digital deliverables must  
represent the final production files and must be an  
exact representation of the final printed product. 
Digital deliverables must be returned on the same 
type of storage media that was furnished with the 
original submission. The Government will not accept 
digital deliverables or storage media that do not  
possess the same formatting, in regards to platform, as 
the original submission.
File Formats for  
Repurposed Deliverables
In order to conform to federal laws governing elec-
tronic dissemination, and to make products more 
accessible to the public, many Government agencies 
are looking to convert native application files into 
other formats for multiple uses.  This includes for-
mats for both online use and for future printing.
These other file formats consist of, but are not  
limited to, Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format 
(PDF) and Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML). 
Text files coded in Standard Generalized Markup  
Language (SGML), or Extensible Markup Language 
(XML) may be requested as well. Each format has 
advantages and disadvantages and it is up to the 
customer to determine the desired format. For help 
in deciding the appropriate electronic format, the 
specifics needed, and the possible cost implications, 
contact ePUB.
HTML
The most common file format for creating web pages. 
HTML can be exported from most programs used for 
layout. As a general rule, simple HTML export is  
relatively easy to accomplish and should not add  
significantly to production costs. HTML files are  
readily searchable and are best used for publica-
tions that do not require a high degree of document 
structure (e.g., formatting, graphic fidelity and page 
structure) and are not required to visually match the 
printed version.
Caution: The more functionality you desire for the 
HTML product the more costly the project becomes. 
Dynamic features (e.g., links, formatting and graph-
ics/animation) require additional labor (including 
hand coding) and can be time consuming and costly.
Acrobat PDF
The most common format for presenting documents 
online, PDF is also becoming a standard for profes-
sional printing. In addition, PDF files are relatively 
easy to create and when printed to an office printer 
maintain product design integrity (e.g., page format-
ting). The type of PDF you should request back from 
the contractor is determined by the desired output 
for press or online use.
Press Optimized PDF
PDF files created for output to a press can be gener-
ated from native application files. These PDFs contain 
embedded fonts, graphics, color data, and layout 
structure.
Screen/Web Optimized PDF
PDF files for online use should be created using the 
“Screen” setting in Acrobat Distiller 5.0 or the  
“Standard” setting in Acrobat Distiller 6.0. The  
“Standard” setting in 6.0 may also be used for print-
ing, but only to desktop printers–NOT FOR PRESS.
Caution: Simple PDF files that are generated from 
electronic files (not scanned from legacy documents) 
can be easy to create and should not add significantly 
to production costs. However, the more functionality 
you desire for your PDF product the more costly the 
project becomes. Dynamic features (e.g., links, video, 
bookmarking, etc.) require extra system time. In 
addition, PDF files created from scanned images will 
not be readily searchable without third party software 
and may not conform to all federal requirements.
SGML & XML
Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML)  
and Extensible Markup Language (XML) are meta 
languages that are more robust and more compli-
cated than standard HTML. XML specifies neither 
semantics nor a tag set. XML is defined as an applica-
tion profile of SGML. These formats may be request-
ed, but are very labor intensive. Customers should 
contact ePUB before requesting SGML or XML files.
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files
Fonts
PostScript Type 1
PostScript Type 1 fonts have been the industry stan-
dard. It is best to provide the entire font set (Macin-
tosh—printer and screen fonts; Windows—.pfm and 
.pfb files) with each job. However, send in only the 
font sets used in the job not your entire font collec-
tion. Font files that contain customized features such 
as kerning and tracking MUST be provided. 
Caution: True Type fonts may be used, but most 
commercial print vendors prefer files using PostScript 
fonts. If your document uses TrueType fonts avoid us-
ing PostScript fonts in the same document as mixing 
font types can cause output problems. 
Tip: If it is not possible to supply the font, GPO can 
require that the vendor substitute a matching font.  
For this font substitution to work properly custom-
ers are still required to indicate the font name(s), 
manufacturer(s), and the version(s) of all fonts used.  
If fonts are not supplied GPO strongly recommends  
that the customer obtain a contract proof and read  
the proofs very carefully, both for character integrity  
and text reflow.
OpenType
OpenType fonts are accepted on both Windows and 
Macintosh computer systems. These fonts include 
PostScript data (both printer and screen) within a 
single font and are acceptable to use in electronic 
design files.
Fonts Used in Graphics Files
If drawing/illustration graphic files contain text mat-
ter, fonts for these files should also be provided.
Converting Fonts to Outline Paths or Curves
One way to avoid font problems with graphic files 
is to convert all type matter in the graphic to either 
outlines, paths or curves depending on the software.
Caution: Once converted to outline/path/curve, text 
is very difficult to edit. Always make a backup of any 
file prior to converting to outline. This backup file is 
not sent to the vendor, but remains with the cus-
tomer to allow for quick editing or touch-up of text if 
warranted.
Color Issues
Any file requiring four-color process separations 
should be in CMYK color mode only. Do not submit 
color files in RGB, Index, LAB, or other color modes. 
Any file requiring spot-color separations should be 
defined by the proper spot-color model (PANTONE, 
Toyo, etc.) and identified as spot colors for output. 
Tip: Photoshop 5.x and newer versions support spot 
colors in multi channel mode and/or duotone mode  
only. Attempting to achieve spot colors from  
Photoshop in any color mode other than multichannel  
or duotone can result in extra costs and lost time.
Caution: When confronted with a color mode other 
than CMYK (for full color), vendors will convert to 
CMYK and output as per contract. Unless a reason-
able color match standard (e.g., contract proof or 
CMYK value) is identified in the GPO specification, 
any color shift or image fidelity issue will be the 
responsibility of the customer, not the vendor.
RGB
Red, green, and blue pixels are illuminated on your 
display and have a different range of colors compared 
to a printed image. RGB are “additive colors.” Com-
bined they will make white light. RGB color spaces 
are device dependent and are altered by the gamma 
of the system displaying them. 
Caution: RGB color mode should only be used when 
images are being electronically displayed (computer 
monitor, TV, projector screen, etc.), NOT FOR  
COMMERCIAL PRINTING.
Tip: RGB images must be converted to CMYK for  
process color printing. However, be aware that  
converting from RGB to CMYK will cause a color shift. 
The CMYK color can be adjusted using professional 
image software (e.g., Adobe Photoshop).
Four-Color Process (CMYK)
Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black (K) inks are used 
when printing. CMYK are “subtractive colors” because 
they absorb light. Designers and printers should take 
into account the different properties of inks and pa-
pers used for printing. 
Caution: Non graphics software such as MS Word, 
PowerPoint, Excel, and Corel WordPerfect use an RGB 
color space and are not designed for CMYK output. Pre 
2000 versions of MS Publisher do not support process 
color (CMYK) printing to conventional high resolu-
tion, color separation based print publishing work-
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files 
7
flows. Customers who desire process color printing 
should use one of the software packages listed under 
“Commonly Accepted Publishing Software.”
Spot Colors
To ensure color continuity when working with multi-
ple software programs, make sure that all spot colors 
are assigned the exact same name in each program. 
To the computer system, PANTONE 200 CVU is not 
the same color as PANTONE 200 CV. Color names 
should be consistent throughout all elements of the 
layout file and in all imported graphic elements. In 
addition, avoid using the default spot colors such as 
red, green, and blue that appear in the color menu of 
most page layout software. 
Caution: Be aware that some spot colors cannot be 
adequately represented using four-color process inks. 
Consult a color guide book (e.g., PANTONE Process 
Color Imaging Guide) to see a comparison of spot 
colors and their closest build. 
Caution: Some programs (e.g., MS Word, PowerPoint, 
Excel, Corel WordPerfect) do not support spot colors 
and should not be used when creating printed pieces 
that require spot color(s). Pre 2000 versions of MS 
Publisher support spot colors, but only if the Pub-
lisher file was created for spot color output. When us-
ing pre 2000 Publisher for spot colors it is important 
to read the instructions provided by Microsoft and 
included with MS Publisher.
Grayscale
Images that will print using only black ink should be 
converted to grayscale using professional image edit-
ing software (e.g., Adobe Photoshop). 
Caution: When you convert to grayscale, you remove 
all color information.
Duotone Images
Duotone images provide more depth to a typical gray-
scale image by introducing a second color of ink. 
Tip: GPO recommends contacting Creative Services 
Tech Review for help in setting up duotone images. 
Software such as CreoScitex Powertone, or swatch 
books such as PANTONE’s duotone indicator can also 
provide direction for creating good duotones.
Color Expectation
Never expect the overall color of a final printed piece 
to match a furnished color visual. A color visual is 
not a good representation of the final piece due to 
the physical differences between ink in traditional 
printing; inks, toners, and dyes in digital printing; 
and the colorants used in desktop color printers.
Caution: Color management (the ability to match 
monitor display, proof output and press output) has 
made some strides recently, but is still not a viable 
option for most customers. Unless you’ve invested 
in the proper equipment, training and calibration 
software your monitor will fail to display colors  
that match offset or digital printing output and will 
display colors that can not be printed. 
Tip:
The most accurate and least expensive method 
of color match is to consult an appropriate color guide 
book (e.g., PANTONE Process Color Imaging Guide) 
for all color issues. These books, if current, represent 
ink characteristics using different production methods 
(e.g., process builds, solid colors and tint screens).
Images 
(Scans & Digital Cameras)
Scanning
When scanning images, it is important to capture 
enough information (resolution) to accurately  
reproduce the image. However, excessive informa-
tion capture does not necessarily guarantee a better 
printed image. In fact, large file sizes may increase 
processing time and costs.
Tip: To achieve optimal results especially with color  
images, scanning should be accomplished by a  
prepress professional using properly calibrated  
equipment and suitable image manipulation software. 
Caution: Because image fidelity is a highly subjective 
issue, acceptable quality may vary from customer  
to customer and job to job. Customers who choose  
to do their own scanning should follow the  
guidelines below, which should provide generally 
acceptable results.
Scanning Resolution (color and grayscale photo-
graphs): Scan all images at a resolution of 300 pixels 
per inch. This requirement is based on an input-to-
output (I/O) size ratio of 1 to 1. For example, a 3 x 
5 inch original photograph that is to be printed at 
3 x 5 inches (I/O ratio of 1 to 1) should be scanned 
at 300 pixels per inch. The same 3 x 5 inch original 
photograph to be printed at 6 x 10 inches (I/O ratio 
of 1 to 2) should be scanned at 600 pixels per inch. 
All other enlargements and reductions are similarly 
proportional. 
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files
Best Practices for Submitting Electronic Design and Prepress Files
Tip: Using the “Sharpen” or “Unsharp Masking”  
filters of most image-editing software may improve im-
age quality. In addition, certain software programs auto-
matically process images to achieve high quality results.
Scanning Resolution (line art): Scan all line art as 
bitmap images with a resolution between 800 and 
1200 pixels per inch, based on an I/O ratio of 1 to 1. 
Enlargements and reductions are similarly propor-
tional. 
Scanned Image File Formats: Scanned images should 
be saved as uncompressed TIFF or EPS files. 
Caution: If saving EPS files from Photoshop deselect 
the “include halftone screen” and “include transfer 
function” options. These options can override vendor 
output settings. Only select them if you are confident 
that you are making the correct decision.
Tip: If you plan to convert an image into a Duotone 
and/or apply a clipping path, save the scanned image 
as an EPS file. Otherwise, save bitmapped graphics as 
TIFF images.
Caution: Continuous tone images (except duotones) 
are not generally designed for multiple spot color 
output. Color images that have been scanned into, or 
created in an image editing program (e.g., Photoshop) 
are typically composed of shades of color and do not 
convert to spot colors easily. Other than duotones, 
the current version of Photoshop (CS 8.x) supports 
spot colors only in multi-channel mode; however, this 
effect is difficult to achieve in a typical print produc-
tion environment. Consult your Photoshop manual 
for more information on multi-channel mode. ePUB 
is available to answer questions as to the best way to 
achieve spot color effects with scanned images.
Digital Cameras
Customers who use digital cameras to capture images 
for print publishing should test the images prior to 
submission for print (ePUB provides this service). 
For customers who must use images obtained from 
a digital camera we recommend the guidelines that 
follow:
Resolution Capture: To be used for print production, 
digital cameras should capture a minimum resolution 
of 1524 x 1024 ppi. Images should be captured at the 
maximum allowable resolution and with the lowest 
compression settings.
Tip: The higher the mega-pixel number, the larger image 
size you can produce at an acceptable resolution (e.g., 
300 ppi). A 3.1 mega-pixel digital camera yields a 300 
ppi image at 5" x 7", while a 4.0 mega-pixel digital cam-
era yields a 300 ppi image at 5.33" x 8". 
Caution: Capturing at the highest available resolu-
tion should be acceptable for same size (1 to 1 ratio) 
images; however, images captured at this resolution 
level may not be sufficient for enlargements. Always 
use the formula identified under scanning for resolu-
tion issues. Enlargements beyond the sizes identified 
above are not recommended.
Formats and Compression: If possible, avoid using 
the compression schemes built into digital cameras. If 
compression is necessary use the lowest possible (high-
est quality) compression option available. Always save 
images from digital cameras as TIFF files before editing 
and sending to GPO.
Caution: Be wary of color shifts with images from 
digital cameras. The RGB captured color data and 
some compression algorithms (e.g., JPEG) may cause 
the on-screen view and color printer appearance to 
differ from printed output.
Tip: Always request contract color proofs for any job 
which uses images obtained from a digital camera.
Image Manipulation
Special effects such as blurring and distorting should 
be applied to the images prior to submission for 
printing. 
Cropping, Rotating & Scaling: Images should be 
cropped, rotated, and scaled prior to placement into 
the page layout file. These three functions are best ac-
complished in the image manipulation program, not 
in the page layout program.
Layers: GPO recommends working in layers whenev-
er possible with raster images. By separating elements 
onto different layers, corrections (especially type cor-
rections) are much easier to achieve. 
Tip: If possible, save an unflattened version of your file 
for future editing. Flattening an image reduces future 
editing capabilities.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested