An ESRC Research Group 
Exporting from manufacturing firms in Sub-Saharan Africa 
GPRG-WPS-036 
Neil Rankin, Måns Söderbom and Francis Teal 
Global Poverty Research Group 
Website: http://www.gprg.org/ 
The support of the Economic and Social Research Council  
(ESRC) is gratefully acknowledged. The work was part of the  
programme of the ESRC Global Poverty Research Group. 
How to convert pdf into powerpoint on - Library application component:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf into powerpoint on - Library application component:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
2
Exporting from manufacturing firms in Sub-Saharan Africa 
Neil Rankin 
School of Economic & Business Sciences 
University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa 
Måns Söderbom and Francis Teal 
Centre for the Study of African Economies 
Department of Economics 
University of Oxford, UK 
December 2005 
Abstract 
The poor performance of many African economies has been associated with low growth of 
exports in general and of manufacturing exports in particular. In this paper we draw on micro 
evidence of manufacturing firms in five African countries - Kenya, Ghana, Tanzania, South 
Africa and Nigeria - to investigate the causes of poor exporting performance. We exploit a data 
set which has a much longer panel dimension than has been used before to assess the relative 
importance  of  self-selection  based  on  efficiency  and  firm  size  as  determinants  of  export 
participation. We show that firm size is a robust determinant of the decision to export. It is not a 
proxy for efficiency,  for capital intensity, for sector or for time-invariant unobservables. In 
contrast the evidence for self-selection into exporting is very weak. Finally our use of a longer 
run panel than has been available before has allowed us to separate out the roles of ownership and 
skills as possible determinants of participation in exporting. We find that both foreign ownership 
and skills are significant determinants of exporting. 
This paper draws on data collected as part of the Regional Program on Enterprise Development (RPED), 
organised by the World Bank and funded by the Belgian, British, Canadian, Dutch, French and Swedish 
governments. Extensions to this data for Ghana were collected by a team from the Centre for the Study of 
African Economies, Oxford and the Ghana Statistical Office (GSO), Accra over a period from 1992 to 
2003. The surveys have been funded by  the Department for International Development of  the UK 
government. The Kenyan, Nigerian and Tanzanian data collection was funded by both DFID and UNIDO. 
Work on this project was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council of the UK as part of the 
Global Poverty Research Group. We are greatly indebted to numerous collaborators for enabling this 
comparative data to be assembled.  
Library application component:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
3
Introduction 
There is a finding across virtually all micro firm-level data sets that exporting and efficiency are 
positively correlated. Much work has focused on how this correlation is to be interpreted. Work 
on countries outside of Africa, reviewed in Bigsten et al (2004), has found more evidence that 
causation runs from efficiency to exporting - there is self-selectivity into exporting - rather than 
from exporting to efficiency - implying firms learn from exporting.
1
For sub-Saharan Africa 
Bigsten et al (2004) present evidence for sub-Saharan Africa firms of learning by exporting. In 
their study  there  is  little  evidence for  an efficiency  effect by  which  firms  self-select  into 
exporting. However they note that “this may be due to the co-linearity between some of the 
regressors in the export probit.” (page 133) The time dimension is short, three years, and with 
such data it is difficult to assess convincingly the importance of efficiency as a determinant of 
exporting while allowing for firm heterogeneity and the presence of sunk costs with a dynamic 
specification. 
While the focus of much of the literature to date has been on distinguishing learning from 
exporting and self-selection into exporting a common finding across all the work on African firms 
has been a strong correlation between firm size and exporting, Söderbom and Teal (2000, 2003), 
Bigsten et al (2004), and van Biesebroeck (2005). The finding in Bigsten et al (2004, page 128) is 
that firm size is a robust determinant of export participation across specifications which allow for 
certain forms of firm heterogeneity and dynamics. In this paper we exploit a data set which has a 
much longer panel dimension than has been used before to assess the relative importance of self-
selection based on efficiency and firm size as determinants of export participation.  
One interpretation of the size effect is that it is really a disguised element of efficiency in 
that larger firms benefit from increasing returns to scale. The evidence to date is strongly against 
this interpretation. Söderbom and Teal (2004) use a longer run of the Ghana data, from 1991 to 
1997, to show that constant returns to scale is readily accepted by the data. Rankin (2004) has a 
similar finding for comparative data across the same countries used in this study. A second 
interpretation of the size effect is that it can be explained by the presence of fixed costs. However 
this interpretation is difficult to reconcile with the robust significance of the size variable when 
there are controls for sunk costs in the form of a lagged dependent variable (see Bigsten et al 
1
Tybout and Westbrook (1995) on Mexico; Clerides, Lach and Tybout (1998) on Mexico, Colombia and 
Morocco; Kraay (1999) on China; Aw et al. (2000) on the Republic of Korea and Taiwan; Isgut (2001) on 
Colombia; and Fafchamps et al. (2002) on Morocco. 
Library application component:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to ODP/ ODP to PowerPoint. Document & Page Process. PowerPoint Page Edit. Insert Pages into PowerPoint File
www.rasteredge.com
4
(2004, p. 128)). It also seems to be the case that size is not capturing sectoral differences in 
technology  as size  remains highly significant  with  sectoral controls  in the equation. There 
remains the possibility, which none of the regressions in either Söderbom and Teal (2003) or 
Bigsten et al (2004) can rule out, that size is simply a proxy for some time-invariant aspect of the 
firm correlated with the other regressors. If larger firms simply have more skilled labour and that 
is the key to exporting then size has no causal role in affecting the ability to export. If this is the 
case then the association between exporting and size implies that it is not the size of the firm that 
matters for policy but some unobserved aspect of large firms - the most obvious being their skills 
broadly interpreted - which matters for understanding the ability of firms to participate in the 
export market. To distinguish convincingly between these alternatives the longer time series 
dimension to our data is vital.  
The relative importance of these factors is of importance for understanding the factors 
that determine the export behaviour of African firms. African firms are in general very small and 
the focus of small firms on the domestic market ensures that, in aggregate, their growth is limited 
by the growth of domestic incomes. If size is related to a firm’s participation in the export market 
this may reflect a strategy of successful growth - limited domestic demand ensures that the only 
way for firms to expand is for them to grow into the export market. As a first step to investigating 
this hypothesis we ask if changes in firm size, measured as the log of employment, change the 
probability of a firm participating in the export market in the future.  
In the next section we set out our general modelling framework which allows a clear 
identification  of  the  relative  importance  of  these  efficiency  and  size  effects  on  export 
participation. In section 3 we present a comparative data set, which includes firms across a wide 
range of sizes, of five African countries - Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria and South Africa - 
that allows us to investigate these issues over the period from 1993 to 2003. As we have panel 
data we can address the issues of time-invariant heterogeneity in a way that has not been possible 
before for firms in sub-Saharan Africa. In section 4 we present the results of this modelling 
exercise focusing on allowing for the importance of unobservables in affecting our view as to the 
determinants of exports. The possible roles of ownership and skills are discussed in section 5. A 
final section concludes. 
The modelling framework: the determinants of export participation  
The modelling framework is designed to allow us to address the respective roles of size and 
technical efficiency in exporting from manufacturing firms in Africa in as general framework as 
Library application component:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
www.rasteredge.com
5
possible. Technical efficiency is represented as the residuals, or unexplained part, of a production 
function. However, instead of using a two step process, the first step of which is to estimate the 
production function to obtain the residuals and the second to insert these residuals into the export 
participation function, we chose instead to manipulate the production function and to substitute 
the components of the production function into the export function. Equation (1) below shows 
this substitution and the resulting export participation function: 
1
1
1
1
1
1
' '
1
1
1
1
'
'
'
1
1
1
(
,
, , ,
)
(
)
(
)
(
)
(
)
it
it
it
i
i
it
it
z it
B
i
a i
X
it
it
i
i
z it
z it
B i
a i
X
it
it
a
i
B
i
z
z
it
X
it
X
f
z
B a X
z
B
a
X
y
a
B
z
z
B
a
X
y
a
B
z
X
η
η
η
η
η
η
η
ξη
ξ
ξ
ξ
ξ
ξ
φ
θ
ξ
ξ
ξ
ξ
ξ
ξ
ξ
ξ
ξφ
ξ
ξθ
ξ
=
′ ′
=
+
+
+
+
′ ′
=
− −
+
+
+
+
=
+
+
+
+
[1] 
We assume that current export participation, (X
it
),  is a function of lagged efficiency (η
it-1
), lagged 
factor inputs (z
it-1
), past export participation (X
it-1
) and unchanging firm-specific effects divided 
into observed (B
i
) and unobserved characteristics (a
i
). We use lagged values of factor inputs and 
efficiency because we are interested in investigating whether there is Granger-causality from 
factor inputs and/or efficiency to export participation.  
As can be seen from equation (1) the impact of efficiency on export participation is 
measured by (ξ
η
), the coefficient on lagged output per unit of labour (y
it-1
). Equation (1) also 
shows  that  the  coefficients  on  the  observed  firm  specific  effects  and  factor  inputs  are  a 
combination of two effects. The first of these effects is the efficiency effect (ξ
η
). This efficiency 
effect has the opposite sign to the coefficient on y
it-1
. (i.e. if there is a positive efficiency effect 
and no second effect, this will show up as a negative coefficient on the factor inputs and firm 
specific  effects).  This efficiency  effect  is  scaled  by  the  coefficient on the  variable  in  the 
production function (i.e. θ
z
in the case of the factor inputs and 
φ
in the case of the observed firm 
characteristics).  
The second effect present in the coefficients is the direct effect of that variable on export 
participation (ξ
z
). By using this one-step technique we cannot isolate the direct effect unless the 
coefficient on the variable in the production function is equal to zero. The interaction between the 
productivity (efficiency) effect and the direct effect, and the impact on the coefficient in the 
export participation function can be better understood with an example. Suppose that there is a 
positive efficiency effect (ξ
η
) and that there is also a positive direct effect of capital intensity (ξ
k
on export participation. If a  firm increases its capital stock,  whilst everything else remains 
Library application component:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Bmp, Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
6
constant, this reduces productivity which in turn reduces the probability of exporting. However, at 
the same time it increases the probability of exporting through the direct effect because the firm is 
now more capital intensive. Thus the estimated coefficient on capital intensity in the export 
participation equation is measuring these two, and in this case opposite, effects. 
In the case of constant returns to scale in the production function the coefficient on labour 
l
in the θ
z
vector of factor inputs) will be equal to zero. This implies that there will be no 
efficiency effect present in the coefficient on labour and the coefficient on labour can then be 
interpreted as a pure size effect. As already noted there is considerable evidence for these firms 
that they are characterised by constant returns to scale, see Söderbom and Teal (2003, 2004) and 
Rankin (2004). In this paper we use the assumption of constant returns to scale to enable us to 
identify separately the two dimensions of the determinants of exports on which we wish to focus, 
efficiency and size. In the next section we introduce the data that will enable us to isolate the 
efficiency and size effects from the time-invariant unobservables determining exports.    
3. 
Export participation and the characteristics of firms 
Table 1 introduces our data. The data set extends that used in Söderbom and Teal (2003) in 
respect of both Nigeria and Ghana. For both a further three years of data have become available 
since the earlier study. We have a sample of 1,012 firms spanning the period from 1992 to 2003.  
Table 1 Span of Data and Sample Size 
Span of Data 
Number of Observations 
Number of 
Firms 
Non-Exporting
Exporting 
All 
Ghana 
1992 to 2002 
218 
981 
206 
1187 
Kenya 
1993 to 1999 
268 
310 
170 
480 
Nigeria 
1999 to 2003 
147 
428 
40 
468 
South Africa 
1997 
145 
43 
102 
145 
Tanzania 
1993 to 2000 
234 
413 
77 
490 
Total 
1012 
2175 
595 
2770 
For all countries except South Africa we have a panel component although it is clear from Table 
1 that Ghana is by far the most important of the countries in terms of the sample size and length 
of the panel. While the firms are observed over a ten year period 1992 to 2003 the observations 
are not annual. By far the most common outcome is not to export. This constitutes 78 per cent of 
the sample. 
7
Table 2 Employment, Productivity, Capital Intensity, Age and Ownership 
Non Exporting  
Exporting  
All 
Mean 
Std 
Mean 
Std 
Mean 
Std 
Ghana 
Employment 
45 
107 
220 
287 
76 
167 
Ln (Output/Employee) 
7.99 
1.25 
8.68 
0.99 
8.11 
1.23 
Ln(Capital/Employee) 
6.73 
1.94 
8.56 
1.44 
7.05 
1.98 
Firm Age 
18.95 
11.89 
22.03 
12.76 
19.49 
12.10 
Any foreign Ownership 
0.13 
0.34 
0.48 
0.50 
0.19 
0.39 
Kenya 
Employment 
46 
103 
241 
390 
115 
263 
Ln (Output/Employee) 
8.51 
1.17 
9.58 
1.10 
8.89 
1.25 
Ln(Capital/Employee) 
8.02 
1.66 
9.54 
1.19 
8.56 
1.68 
Firm Age 
20.96 
14.40 
21.54 
11.34 
21.17 
13.38 
Any foreign Ownership 
0.11 
0.31 
0.35 
0.48 
0.19 
0.39 
Nigeria 
Employment 
132 
355 
755 
1525 
185 
583 
Ln Output/Employee) 
9.17 
1.45 
9.53 
0.91 
9.20 
1.42 
Ln(Capital/Employee) 
8.17 
2.07 
8.94 
1.82 
8.23 
2.06 
Firm Age 
22.43 
10.75 
27.90 
10.65 
22.90 
10.84 
Any foreign ownership 
0.19 
0.39 
0.30 
0.46 
0.20 
0.40 
South Africa 
Employment 
149 
272 
268 
352 
233 
334 
Ln Output/Employee) 
10.38 
0.57 
10.78 
0.67 
10.66 
0.67 
Ln(Capital/Employee) 
9.53 
1.24 
9.57 
1.24 
9.56 
1.23 
Firm Age 
17.35 
16.13 
22.56 
17.53 
21.01 
17.24 
Any foreign ownership 
0.14 
0.35 
0.28 
0.45 
0.24 
0.43 
Tanzania 
Employment 
58 
215 
241 
432 
87 
269 
Ln Output/Employee) 
7.94 
1.29 
9.01 
1.32 
8.11 
1.35 
Ln(Capital/Employee) 
7.12 
1.86 
8.98 
1.68 
7.41 
1.96 
Firm Age 
16.19 
11.47 
19.51 
14.17 
16.71 
11.98 
Any foreign ownership 
0.15 
0.36 
0.35 
0.48 
0.18 
0.39 
All 
Employment 
67 
207 
273 
535 
111 
320 
Ln Output/Employee) 
8.34 
1.39 
9.40 
1.25 
8.57 
1.43 
Ln(Capital/Employee) 
7.33 
2.02 
9.09 
1.47 
7.71 
2.05 
Firm Age 
19.37 
12.25 
22.05 
13.47 
19.94 
12.57 
Any foreign ownership 
0.14 
0.35 
0.38 
0.49 
0.19 
0.40 
See next page for definitions. 
8
Notes: Employment is the total number of employees in the firm. Output, capital, raw material 
and indirect costs are all in 1991 US$. The deflation procedure used for Ghana, Kenya and 
Tanzania was to deflate the nominal values into constant price domestic and then convert into 
1991/92 US$ using the exchange rate in 1991/92. The deflation for both Ghana and Tanzania 
used firm based price indices while for Kenya sector level deflators were used. In the case of 
Nigeria and South Africa the nominal values were deflated by consumer prices, producer prices 
being unavailable, then converted in US$ using the exchange rate for the base period. These US$ 
numbers were then deflated by the US GDP deflator to 1991 values. Firm age is in years and any 
foreign ownership is a dummy which takes the value 1 if the firm has any element of foreign 
ownership and zero otherwise. 
In Table 2 we present the data for key variables for all five countries broken down by 
whether or not the firm exports. Larger firms are far more  likely to export. Across all five 
countries the average size of firm which is not exporting at all is 67 employees, this increases to 
273 for exporting firms. Across all countries there are other clear similarities – exporters have 
higher levels of labour productivity, are more capital intensive, tend to be older and more likely to 
be foreign owned. While these differences between exporters and non-exporters are not unique to 
African firms (see for example Bernard and Jensen, 1995, 1999 (a,b) Clerides, Lach and Tybout, 
1998, Aw, Chen and Roberts, 2001 for results from other countries) they point to the potential 
importance of size as a factor in explaining African manufacturing poor performance. There are 
relatively few large firms in Africa and this characteristic of the industrial structure is a clear 
difference between Africa and non-African developing countries. A further potential problem 
highlighted by the data is that while labour productivity is uniformly higher in exporting than 
non-exporting firms so is capital intensity. In the next section we first investigate the relative 
importance of size and underlying efficiency in determining exporting using the panel dimension 
of the  data  to  assess  in  particular  the potential  importance  of  firm  level heterogeneity  in 
explaining export outcomes. We then ask which factors are of importance in understanding how 
time-invariant factors, such as ownership and sector, may impact on export performance.  
4. 
Exporting: Firm efficiency, size and heterogeneity  
The top part of Table 3 below presents the results from four separate specifications of export 
participation. Column [1] is the linear probability model, column [2] a probit, column [3] a 
random effects probit and column [4] a dynamic version of the probit. All the regressions use data 
pooled across the five countries and time periods and all contain controls for sectors and time 
dummies. The later are not reported to conserve space. The bottom part of Table 3 reports the 
marginal effects of the explanatory variables on the probability of export participation, evaluated    
9
Table 3 The Determinants of Export Participation (the LPM and Probit Specifications) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
Linear 
Probability 
Model (LPM) 
Probit 
Random 
Effects 
Probit 
Dynamic Probit 
Ln (Output/ 
0.066 
0.303 
0.425 
0.185 
Employee)
(t-1) 
(3.17)** 
(2.99)** 
(2.75)** 
(1.58) 
Ln (Capital/ 
0.017 
0.129 
0.211 
0.088 
Employee)
(t-1)
(2.40)* 
(3.06)** 
(3.63)** 
(2.57)* 
Ln (Raw materials/ 
-0.033 
-0.154 
-0.129 
-0.046 
Employee)
(t-1)
(2.08)* 
(2.06)* 
(1.11) 
(0.56) 
Ln (Indirect Costs/ 
-0.011 
-0.035 
-0.083 
-0.083 
Employee)
(t-1)
(1.17) 
(0.69) 
(1.17) 
(1.63) 
Ln(Employment)
(t-1)
0.076 
0.336 
0.652 
0.170 
(8.41)** 
(7.66)** 
(9.47)** 
(3.67)** 
Export
(t-1)
2.729 
(26.14)** 
Any Foreign 
0.032 
0.079 
0.307 
0.171 
Ownership 
(0.91) 
(0.61) 
(1.47) 
(1.44) 
Firm Age 
-0.001 
-0.003 
-0.003 
-0.002 
(0.76) 
(0.77) 
(0.50) 
(0.68) 
Constant 
-0.410 
-4.843 
-8.729 
-4.825 
(5.01)** 
(9.32)** 
(8.44)** 
(8.28)** 
Observations 
2770 
2770 
2770 
2770 
R-squared 
0.36 
Number of firms 
1012 
Robust t statistics in parentheses 
* significant at 5%; ** significant at 1% 
Marginal Effects Evaluated at the Means 
Ln (Output/ 
0.064 
0.029 
Employee)
(t-1) 
Ln (Capital/ 
0.027 
0.014 
Employee)
(t-1)
Ln (Raw materials/ 
-0.032 
-0.007 
Employee)
(t-1)
Ln (Indirect Costs/ 
-0.007 
-0.013 
Employee)
(t-1)
Ln(Employment)
(t-1)
0.071 
0.027 
Export
(t-1)
0.756 
Any Foreign 
0.017 
0.029 
Ownership 
Firm Age 
-0.001 
-0.000 
10
at their means, for both the static and dynamic probits. These marginal effects can be directly 
compared with the coefficients on the linear probability model to assess whether the functional 
form  is  affecting  our  view  as  to  the  relative  importance  of  firm  size  and  efficiency  as 
determinants of exporting. 
The results for the probit regressions are very similar to those reported in Bigsten et al 
(2004). Once we allow for the presence of sunk costs by means of a dynamic specification there 
is no evidence of a significant effect of efficiency onto exporting, column [4].
2
In the context of 
the gross output production function Bigsten et al (2004) find this result to be robust to a translog 
specification of the production function and to a more general specification of how the firm 
effects were distributed. As already noted this result must be treated with caution due to the 
problems of interpreting coefficients on efficiency when regressors which are highly collinear 
with output per employee are included in the equation. In terms of the point estimates in Table 3 
both the static and dynamic probits suggest that the quantitative importance of firm size as 
measured by the log of employment and efficiency are of very similar magnitude as determinants 
of the probability of export participation. Further the size of the marginal effects from the static 
probit is very similar to the estimates from the linear probability model in column [1].  
As the descriptive statistics in Table 2 show exporting firms have an average employment 
of 535 while non-exporting firms have 67 employees, a nearly ten fold difference in size. The 
point estimates from Table 3 imply that if a firm grows from 67 to 535 employees the probability 
of being in the export market increases by 15 percentage points. As the average propensity to 
export in our sample is 21 per cent (Table 1) this is clearly a very large rise indeed. How much of 
this rise is actually due to the size of the firm and how much due to factors associated with size 
like foreign ownership and skills? 
To date that question has been addressed by allowing for unobservables by means of 
random effects models. In Table 3 column [3] we report the random effects probit which suggests 
that if the assumptions on which this is based are correct, then the unobservables are biasing 
2
The model shown in column [4] assumes that there is no unobserved time invariant heterogeneity across 
firms. We have considered adding to the dynamic probit controls for unobserved firm specific random 
effects. It is well known (Heckman, 1981a,b) that in such a model the presence of a lagged dependent 
variable  among the explanatory variables may create an initial conditions problem  (the problem  is 
essentially that the first observation on exports is treated as exogenous, and thus uncorrelated with the firm 
specific random effect, which may be restrictive). Following Heckman, and more recently Roberts and 
Tybout (1997), we attempted to address this problem by explicitly modelling the initial condition as a 
function of observed firm variables and the unobserved firm specific effect. In doing so, we consistently 
found that the estimated variance of the random effect tended towards zero, indicating that our dynamic 
probit without controls for random effects in column [4] is not a mis-specification. We therefore do not 
report these results from the dynamic random effects probit, but they are available on request from the 
authors.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested