Contents
ix
C.4
Build and install. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360
D
Numerical accuracy
362
E
Related free software
363
F
Listing of URLs
364
Bibliography
365
How to convert pdf to powerpoint - SDK application service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf to powerpoint - SDK application service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 1
Introduction
1.1 Features at a glance
Gretl is an econometrics package, including a shared library, a command-line client program and a
graphical user interface.
User-friendly Gretl offers an intuitive user interface; it is very easy to get up and running with
econometric analysis. Thanks to its association with the econometrics textbooks by Ramu
Ramanathan, Jeffrey Wooldridge, andJames Stock and Mark Watson, the package offers many
practice data files and command scripts. These are well annotated and accessible. Two other
useful resources for gretl users are the available documentation and thegretl-users mailing
list.
Flexible You can choose your preferred point on the spectrum from interactive point-and-click to
complexscripting, and can easily combine these approaches.
Cross-platform Gretl’s “home” platform is Linux but it is also available for MS Windows and Mac
OS X, and should work on any unix-like system that has the appropriate basic libraries (see
AppendixC).
Open source The full source code for gretl is available to anyone who wants to critique it, patch it,
or extend it. See AppendixC.
Sophisticated Gretl offersa full range ofleast-squaresbasedestimators, either for singleequations
and for systems, including vector autoregressions and vector error correction models. Sev-
eral specific maximum likelihood estimators (e.g. probit, ARIMA, GARCH) are also provided
natively; more advanced estimation methods can be implemented by the user via generic
maximum likelihood or nonlinear GMM.
Extensible Users can enhance gretl by writingtheir own functions andprocedures in gretl’s script-
ing language, which includes a wide range of matrix functions.
Accurate Gretl has been thoroughly tested on several benchmarks, among which the NIST refer-
ence datasets. See AppendixD.
Internet ready Gretl can fetch materials such databases, collections oftextbook datafiles andadd-
on packages over the internet.
International Gretl will produce its output in English, French, Italian, Spanish, Polish, Portuguese,
German, Basque, Turkish, Russian, Albanian or Greek depending on your computer’s native
language setting.
1.2 Acknowledgements
The gretl code base originally derived from the program ESL (“Econometrics Software Library”),
written by Professor Ramu Ramanathan of the University of California, San Diego. We are much in
debt to Professor Ramanathan for making this code available under the GNUGeneral Public Licence
and for helping to steer gretl’s early development.
1
SDK application service:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 1. Introduction
2
We are also grateful to the authors of several econometricstextbooks for permission to package for
gretl various datasets associated with their texts. This list currently includes William Greene, au-
thor of Econometric Analysis; Jeffrey Wooldridge (Introductory Econometrics: A Modern Approach);
James Stock and Mark Watson (Introduction to Econometrics); Damodar Gujarati (Basic Economet-
rics); Russell Davidson and James MacKinnon (Econometric Theory and Methods); and Marno Ver-
beek (A Guide to Modern Econometrics).
GARCH estimation in gretl is based on code deposited in the archive of the Journal of Applied
Econometrics by Professors Fiorentini, Calzolari and Panattoni, and the code to generate p-values
for Dickey–Fuller tests is due to James MacKinnon. In each case we are grateful to the authors for
permission to use their work.
With regard to the internationalization of gretl, thanks go to Ignacio Díaz-Emparanza (Spanish),
Michel RobitailleandFlorent Bresson (French),Cristian Rigamonti (Italian),TadeuszKufel andPawel
Kufel (Polish), Markus Hahn and Sven Schreiber (German), Hélio Guilherme and Henrique Andrade
(Portuguese), Susan Orbe (Basque), Talha Yalta (Turkish) and Alexander Gedranovich (Russian).
Gretl has benefitted greatly from the work of numerous developers of free, open-source software:
for specifics please see AppendixC. Our thanks are due to Richard Stallman of the Free Software
Foundation, for his support of free software in general and for agreeing to “adopt” gretl as a GNU
program in particular.
Many users of gretl have submitted useful suggestions and bug reports. In this connection par-
ticular thanks are due to Ignacio Díaz-Emparanza, Tadeusz Kufel, Pawel Kufel, Alan Isaac, Cri
Rigamonti, Sven Schreiber, Talha Yalta, Andreas Rosenblad, and Dirk Eddelbuettel, who maintains
the gretl package for Debian GNU/Linux.
1.3 Installing the programs
Linux
On the Linux
1
platform you have the choice ofcompiling the gretl code yourself or making use of a
pre-built package. Buildinggretl from the source isnecessary ifyou want to accessthe development
version or customize gretl to your needs, but this takes quite a few skills; most users will want to
go for a pre-built package.
Some Linux distributions feature gretl as part of their standard offering: Debian, Ubuntu and Fe-
dora, for example. If this is the case, all you need to do is install gretl through your package
manager of choice. In addition the gretl webpage athttp://gretl.sourceforge.net offers a
“generic” package in rpm format for modern Linux systems.
If you prefer to compile your own (or are using a unix system for which pre-built packages are not
available), instructions on building gretl can be found in AppendixC.
MS Windows
The MS Windows version comes as a self-extracting executable. Installation is just a matter of
downloading gretl_install.exe and running this program. You will be prompted for a location
to install the package.
Mac OS X
The Mac version comes as a gzipped disk image. Installation is a matter of downloading the image
file, opening it in the Finder, and dragging Gretl.app to the Applications folder. However, when
installing for the first time two prerequisite packages must be put in place first; details are given
on the gretl website.
1
In thismanual we use “Linux” asshorthand torefer to the GNU/Linux operating system. What is said herein about
Linuxmostly applies toother unix-typesystemstoo, though some localmodificationsmay be needed.
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to Image; Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF;
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
Part I
Running the program
3
SDK application service:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. C# Demo: Convert PowerPoint to PDF Document. Add references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 2
Getting started
2.1 Let’s run a regression
This introduction is mostly angled towards the graphical client program; please see Chapter 43
belowand the Gretl Command Reference for details on the command-line program, gretlcli.
You can supply the name of a data file to open as an argument to gretl, but for the moment let’s
not do that: just fire up the program.
1
You should see a main window(which will hold information
on the data set but which is at first blank) and various menus, some of them disabled at first.
What can you do at this point? You can browse the supplied data files (or databases), open a data
file, create a new data file, read the help items, or open a command script. For nowlet’s browse the
supplied data files. Under the File menu choose “Open data, Sample file”. A second notebook-type
window will open, presenting the setsofdata files suppliedwith the package (see Figure2.1). Select
the first tab, “Ramanathan”. The numbering of the files in this section corresponds to the chapter
organization ofRamanathan (2002), which contains discussion of the analysis of these data. The
data will be useful for practice purposes even without the text.
Figure 2.1: Practicedata files window
If you select a row in this window and click on “Info” this opens a window showing information on
the data set in question (for example, on the sources and definitions of the variables). If you find
afile that is of interest, you may open it by clicking on “Open”, or just double-clicking on the file
name. For the moment let’s open data3-6.
+
In gretl windows containing lists, double-clicking on a line launches a default action for the associated list
entry: e.g. displaying the values of a data series, openinga file.
1For convenience we refer tothegraphicalclientprogramsimplyasgretlin thismanual. . Note,however,thatthe
specific name of the program differs according to the computer platform. On Linux it is called gretl_x11 while on
MS Windows it is gretl.exe. On Linux systems a wrapper script named gretl is also installed — see also the Gretl
CommandReference.
4
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 2. Getting started
5
This file contains data pertaining to a classic econometric “chestnut”, the consumption function.
The data window should now display the name of the current data file, the overall data range and
sample range, and the names of the variables along with brief descriptive tags—see Figure2.2.
Figure 2.2: Main window, with apracticedata file open
OK, what can we do now? Hopefully the variousmenu options shouldbe fairly selfexplanatory. For
now we’ll dipinto the Model menu; a brieftourofall the main windowmenusis given in Section2.3
below.
Gretl’s Model menu offers numerous various econometric estimation routines. The simplest and
most standard is Ordinary Least Squares (OLS). Selecting OLS pops up a dialog box calling for a
model specification—see Figure2.3.
Figure 2.3: Model specification dialog
To select the dependent variable, highlight the variable you want in the list on the left and click
the arrow that points to the Dependent variable slot. If you check the “Set as default” box this
variable will be pre-selected as dependent when you next open the model dialog box. Shortcut:
double-clicking on a variable on the left selects it as dependent and also sets it as the default. To
select independent variables,highlight them on the left and click the green arrow (or right-click the
Chapter 2. Getting started
6
highlighted variable); to remove variablesfrom the selected list,use the radarrow. To select several
variable in the list box, drag the mouse over them; to select several non-contiguous variables, hold
down the Ctrl key and click on the variables you want. To run a regression with consumption as
the dependent variable and income as independent, click Ct into the Dependent slot and add Yt to
the Independent variables list.
2.2 Estimation output
Once you’ve specified a model, a window displaying the regression output will appear. The output
is reasonably comprehensive and in a standard format (Figure2.4).
Figure 2.4: Model output window
The output window contains menus that allow you to inspect or graph the residuals and fitted
values, and to run various diagnostic tests on the model.
For most models there is also an option to print the regression output in LAT
E
Xformat. See Chap-
ter35 for details.
To import gretl output into a word processor, you may copy and paste from an output window,
using its Edit menu (or Copy button, in some contexts) to the target program. Many (not all) gretl
windows offer the option of copying in RTF (Microsoft’s “Rich Text Format”) or as L
A
T
E
X. If you are
pasting into a word processor, RTF may be a good option because the tabular formatting of the
output is preserved.2 Alternatively, you can save the output to a (plain text) file then import the
file into the target program. When you finish a gretl session you are given the option of saving all
the output from the session to a single file.
Note that on the gnome desktop and under MS Windows, the File menu includes a command to
send the output directly to a printer.
+
Whenpastingor importingplaintextgretloutputintoawordprocessor,selectamonospacedortypewriter-
style font (e.g. Courier) to preserve the output’s tabular formatting. Select a small font (10-point Courier
should do) toprevent the output lines from being broken in the wrong place.
2Note that when youcopyas RTFunder MS Windows, , Windowswill onlyallowyou u topaste the material into ap-
plications that “understand” RTF. Thus you will be able to paste into MS Word, but not into notepad. Note also that
there appears to be a bug in some versions of Windows, whereby the paste will not work properly unless the “target”
application (e.g. MS Word) isalready running prior to copying thematerial in question.
Chapter 2. Getting started
7
2.3 The main window menus
Reading left to right along the main window’s menu bar, we find the File, Tools, Data, View, Add,
Sample, Variable, Model and Help menus.
 File menu
– Open data: Open a native gretl data file or import from other formats. See Chapter4.
– Append data: Add data to the current working data set, from a gretl data file, a comma-
separated values file or a spreadsheet file.
– Save data: Save the currently open native gretl data file.
– Save data as: Write out the current data set in native format, with the option of using
gzip data compression. See Chapter4.
– Export data: Write out the current data set in Comma Separated Values (CSV) format, or
the formats of GNU R or GNU Octave. See Chapter4 and also AppendixE.
– Send to: Send the current data set as an e-mail attachment.
– New data set: Allows you to create a blank data set, ready for typing in values or for
importing series from a database. See below for more on databases.
– Clear data set: Clear the current data set out of memory. Generally you don’t have to do
this (since opening a new data file automatically clears the old one) but sometimes it’s
useful.
– Script files: A “script” is a file containing a sequence of gretl commands. This item
contains entries that let you open a script you have created previously (“User file”), open
asample script, or open an editor window in which you can create a new script.
– Session files: A “session” file contains a snapshot of a previous gretl session, including
the data set used and any models or graphs that you saved. Under this item you can
open a saved session or save the current session.
– Databases: Allows you to browse various large databases, either on your own computer
or, if you are connected to the internet, on the gretl database server. See Section4.2 for
details.
– Exit: Quit the program. You’ll be prompted to save any unsavedwork.
 Tools menu
– Statistical tables: Look up critical values for commonly used distributions (normal or
Gaussian, t, chi-square, F and Durbin–Watson).
– P-value finder: Look up p-values from the Gaussian, t, chi-square, F, gamma, binomial or
Poisson distributions. See also the pvalue command in the Gretl Command Reference.
– Distribution graphs: Produce graphs of various probability distributions. In the resulting
graph window, the pop-up menu includes an item “Add another curve”, which enables
you to superimpose a further plot (for example, you can draw the t distribution with
various different degrees of freedom).
– Test statistic calculator: Calculate test statistics and p-values for a range of common hy-
pothesistests (population mean, variance and proportion;difference ofmeans, variances
and proportions).
– Nonparametric tests: Calculate test statistics for various nonparametric tests (Sign test,
Wilcoxon rank sum test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, Runs test).
– Seed for random numbers: Set the seed for the random number generator (by default
this is set basedon the system time when the program is started).
Chapter 2. Getting started
8
– Command log: Open a window containing a record of the commands executed so far.
– Gretl console: Open a “console” windowinto which you can typecommands asyou would
using the command-line program, gretlcli (as opposed to using point-and-click).
– Start Gnu R: Start R (if it is installed on your system), and load a copy of the data set
currently open in gretl. See AppendixE.
– Sort variables: Rearrange the listing of variables in the main window,eitherby ID number
or alphabetically by name.
– Function packages: Handles “function packages” (see Section13.5), which allow you to
access functions written by other users and share the ones written by you.
– NIST test suite: Check the numerical accuracy of gretl against the reference results for
linear regression made available by the (US) National Institute ofStandards and Technol-
ogy.
– Preferences: Set the paths to variousfiles gretl needs to access. Choose the font in which
gretl displays text output. Activate or suppress gretl’s messaging about the availability
of program updates, and so on. See the Gretl Command Reference for further details.
 Data menu
– Select all: Several menu items act upon those variables that are currently selected in the
main window. This item lets you select all the variables.
– Display values: Pops up a window with a simple (not editable) printout of the values of
the selected variable or variables.
– Edit values: Opens a spreadsheet window where you can edit the values of the selected
variables.
– Add observations: Gives a dialog box in which you can choose a number of observations
to add at the end of the current dataset; for use with forecasting.
– Remove extra observations: Active only if extra observations have been added automati-
cally in the process of forecasting; deletes these extra observations.
– Read info, Edit info: “Read info” just displays the summary information for the current
data file; “Edit info” allows you to make changes to it (if you have permission to do so).
– Print description: Opens a window containing a full account of the current dataset, in-
cluding the summary information and any specific information on each of the variables.
– Add case markers: Prompts for the name of a text file containing “case markers” (short
strings identifying the individual observations) and adds this information to the data set.
See Chapter4.
– Remove case markers: Active only if the dataset has case markers identifying the obser-
vations; removes these case markers.
– Dataset structure: invokes a series of dialog boxes which allow you to change the struc-
tural interpretation of the current dataset. For example, if data were read in as a cross
section you can get the program to interpret them as time series or as a panel. See also
section4.4.
– Compact data: For time-series data ofhigher than annual frequency, givesyou the option
of compacting the data to a lower frequency, using one of four compaction methods
(average, sum, start of period or end of period).
– Expand data: For time-series data, gives you the option of expanding the data to a higher
frequency.
– Transpose data: Turn each observation into a variable and vice versa (or in other words,
each row of the data matrixbecomesa column in themodifieddata matrix); can be useful
with imported data that have been read in “sideways”.
 View menu
Chapter 2. Getting started
9
– Icon view: Opens a window showing the content of the current session as a set of icons;
see section3.4.
– Graph specified vars: Gives a choice between a time series plot, a regular X–Y scatter
plot, an X–Y plot using impulses (vertical bars), an X–Y plot “with factor separation” (i.e.
with the points colored differently depending to the value of a given dummy variable),
boxplots, and a 3-D graph. Serves up a dialog box where you specify the variables to
graph. See Chapter6 for details.
– Multiple graphs: Allows you to compose a set of up to six small graphs, either pairwise
scatter-plots or time-series graphs. These are displayed together in a single window.
– Summary statistics: Shows a full set of descriptive statistics for the variables selected in
the main window.
– Correlation matrix: Shows the pairwise correlation coefficients for the selectedvariables.
– Cross Tabulation: Shows a cross-tabulation of the selected variables. This works only if
at least two variables in the data set have been marked as discrete (see Chapter11).
– Principal components: Produces a Principal Components Analysis for the selected vari-
ables.
– Mahalanobis distances: Computes the Mahalanobis distance of each observation from
the centroid of the selected set of variables.
– Cross-correlogram: Computes and graphs the cross-correlogram for two selected vari-
ables.
 Add menu Offers various standard transformations ofvariables (logs, lags, squares, etc.) that
you may wish to add to the data set. Also gives the option of adding random variables, and
(for time-series data) adding seasonal dummy variables (e.g. quarterly dummy variables for
quarterly data).
 Sample menu
– Set range: Select a different starting and/or ending point for the current sample, within
the range of data available.
– Restore full range: self-explanatory.
– Define, based on dummy: Given a dummy (indicator) variable with values 0 or 1, this
drops from the current sample all observations for which the dummy variable has value
0.
– Restrict, based on criterion: Similar to the item above, except that you don’t need a pre-
defined variable: you supply a Boolean expression (e.g. sqft > 1400) and the sample is
restricted to observations satisfying that condition. See the entry for genr in the Gretl
Command Reference for details on the Boolean operators that can be used.
– Random sub-sample: Drawa random sample from the full dataset.
– Drop all obs with missing values: Drop from the current sample all observations for
which at least one variable has a missing value (see Section4.6).
– Count missing values: Give a report on observations where data values are missing. May
be useful in examining a panel data set, where it’s quite common to encounter missing
values.
– Set missing valuecode: Set a numerical value that will be interpreted as“missing” or “not
available”. This is intended for use with imported data, when gretl has not recognized
the missing-value code used.
 Variable menu Most items under here operate on a single variable at a time. The “active”
variable is set by highlighting it (clicking on its row) in the main data window. Most options
will be self-explanatory. Note that you can rename a variable and can edit its descriptive label
under “Edit attributes”. You can also “Define a new variable” via a formula (e.g. involving
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested