Chapter 17. Robust covariance matrix estimation
150
Despite the points made above, some residual degree of heteroskedasticity may be present in time
series data: the key point is that in most cases it is likely to be combined with serial correlation
(autocorrelation), hence demanding a special treatment. In White’s approach,
ˆ
Ú, the estimated
covariance matrix of the u
t
, remains conveniently diagonal: the variances, Eu
2
t
, may differ by
t but the covariances, Eu
t
u
s
, are all zero. Autocorrelation in time series data means that at
least some of the the off-diagonal elements of
ˆ
Úshould be non-zero. This introduces a substantial
complication and requires another piece of terminology; estimates of the covariance matrix that
are asymptotically valid in face of both heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation of the error process
are termed HAC (heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation consistent).
The issue of HAC estimation is treated in more technical terms in chapter 22. Here we try to
convey some of the intuition at a more basic level. We begin with a general comment: residual
autocorrelation is not so much a property ofthe data, as a symptom of an inadequate model. Data
may be persistent though time, and if we fit a model that does not take this aspect into account
properly, we endup with a model with autocorrelated disturbances. Conversely, it is often possible
to mitigate or even eliminate the problem of autocorrelation by including relevant lagged variables
in a time series model, or in other words, by specifying the dynamics of the model more fully. HAC
estimation should not be seen as the first resort in dealing with an autocorrelated error process.
That said, the “obvious” extension of White’s HCCME to the case of autocorrelated errors would
seem to be this: estimate the off-diagonal elements of
ˆ
Ú (that is, the autocovariances, Eu
t
u
s
)
using, once again, the appropriate OLS residuals: !ˆ
ts
ˆu
t
ˆu
s
. This is basically right, but demands
an important amendment. We seek a consistent estimator, one that converges towards the true Ú
as the sample size tends towards infinity. This can’t work if we allow unbounded serial depen-
dence. Bigger samples will enable us to estimate more of the true !
ts
elements (that is, for t and
smore widely separated in time) but will not contribute ever-increasing information regarding the
maximally separated !
ts
pairs, since the maximal separation itself grows with the sample size.
To ensure consistency, we have to confine our attention to processes exhibiting temporally limited
dependence, or in other words cut off the computation of the !ˆ
ts
values at some maximum value
of p  t  s (where p is treated as an increasing function of the sample size, T, although it cannot
increase in proportion to T).
The simplest variant of this idea is to truncate the computation at some finite lag order p, where
pgrows as, say, T1=4. The trouble with this is that the resulting
ˆ
Úmay not be a positive definite
matrix. In practical terms, we may end up with negative estimated variances. One solution to this
problem is offered by The Newey–West estimator (NeweyandWest,1987), which assigns declining
weights to the sample autocovariances as the temporal separation increases.
To understand this point it is helpful to look more closely at the covariance matrix given in (17.5),
namely,
X
0
X
1
X
0ˆ
ÚXX
0
X
1
This is known as a “sandwich” estimator. The bread, which appears on both sides, is X0X  1.
This is a k k matrix, and is also the key ingredient in the computation of the classical covariance
matrix. The filling in the sandwich is
ˆ
Ö
X
0
ˆ
Ú
X
kk
kT
TT
Tk
Since Ú  Euu
0
, the matrix being estimated here can also be written as
Ö EX
0
uu
0
X
which expresses Ö as the long-run covariance of the random k-vector X
0
u.
From a computational point of view, it is not necessary or desirable to store the (potentially very
large) T T matrix
ˆ
Úas such. Rather, one computes the sandwich filling by summation as
ˆ
Ö
ˆ
—0
p
X
j1
w
j
ˆ
—j
ˆ
0
j
Convert pdf file to powerpoint online - control software system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to powerpoint online - control software system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 17. Robust covariance matrix estimation
151
where the k k sample autocovariance matrix
ˆ
—j, for j 0, is given by
ˆ
—j 
1
T
XT
tj1
ˆu
t
ˆu
t j
X
0
t
X
t j
and w
j
is the weight given to the autocovariance at lag j > 0.
This leaves two questions. How exactly do we determine the maximum lag length or “bandwidth”,
p, of the HAC estimator? And how exactly are the weights w
j
to be determined? We will return to
the (difficult) question ofthe bandwidth shortly. As regards the weights, gretl offers three variants.
The default is the Bartlett kernel, as used by Newey andWest. This sets
w
j
8
<
:
j
p1
jp
0
j>p
so the weights decline linearly as j increases. The other two options are the Parzen kernel and the
Quadratic Spectral (QS) kernel. For the Parzen kernel,
w
j
8
>
>
<
>
>
:
1 6a
2
j
6a
3
j
0a
j
0:5
21  a
j
3
0:5 <a
j
1
0
a
j
>1
where a
j
j=p1, and for the QS kernel,
w
j
25
122d
2
j
sinm
j
m
j
cosm
j
!
where d
j
j=p and m
j
6d
i
=5.
Figure17.1 shows the weights generated by these kernels, for p  4 and j = 1 to 9.
Figure 17.1: Three HAC kernels
Bartlett
Parzen
QS
In gretl you select the kernel using the set command with the hac_kernel parameter:
set hac_kernel parzen
set hac_kernel qs
set hac_kernel bartlett
Selecting the HAC bandwidth
The asymptotic theory developed by Newey, West and others tells us in general terms how the
HAC bandwidth, p, should grow with the sample size, T —that is, p should grow in proportion
to some fractional power of T. Unfortunately this is of little help to the applied econometrician,
working with a given dataset of fixed size. Various rules of thumb have been suggested, and gretl
implements two such. The default is p  0:75T1=3, as recommended byStockandWatson (2003).
An alternative is p  4T=1002=9, as inWooldridge(2002b). In each case one takes the integer
part of the result. These variants are labeled nw1 and nw2 respectively, in the context of the set
command with the hac_lag parameter. That is, you can switch to the version given by Wooldridge
with
control software system:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 17. Robust covariance matrix estimation
152
set hac_lag nw2
As shown in Table17.1 the choice between nw1 and nw2 does not make a great deal of difference.
T
p(nw1) p (nw2)
50
2
3
100
3
4
150
3
4
200
4
4
300
5
5
400
5
5
Table 17.1: HAC bandwidth: two rules of thumb
You also have the option of specifying a fixed numerical value for p, as in
set hac_lag 6
In addition you can set a distinct bandwidth for use with the Quadratic Spectral kernel (since this
need not be an integer). For example,
set qs_bandwidth 3.5
Prewhitening and data-based bandwidth selection
An alternative approach is to deal with residual autocorrelation by attacking the problem from two
sides. The intuition behind the technique known as VAR prewhitening (Andrews and Monahan,
1992)canbeillustratedbyasimpleexample. Letx
t
be a sequence of first-order autocorrelated
random variables
x
t
x
t 1
u
t
The long-run variance of x
t
can be shown to be
V
LR
x
t

V
LR
u
t
1  2
In most cases, u
t
is likely to be less autocorrelated than x
t
,so a smaller bandwidth should suffice.
Estimation ofV
LR
x
t
can therefore proceedin three steps: (1) estimate ; (2) obtain a HAC estimate
of ˆu
t
x
t
ˆx
t 1
;and (3) divide the result by 1 
2
.
The application of the above concept to our problem implies estimating a finite-order Vector Au-
toregression (VAR) on the vector variables 
t
X
t
ˆ
u
t
. In general, the VAR can be of any order, but
in most cases 1 is sufficient; the aim is not to build a watertight model for 
t
,but just to “mop up”
asubstantial part of the autocorrelation. Hence, the following VAR is estimated
t
A
t 1
"
t
Then an estimate of the matrix X
0
ÚX can be recovered via
I  
ˆ
A
1ˆ
Ö
"
I 
ˆ
A
0
1
where
ˆ
Ö
"
is any HAC estimator, applied to the VAR residuals.
You can ask for prewhitening in gretl using
set hac_prewhiten on
control software system:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 17. Robust covariance matrix estimation
153
There is at present no mechanism for specifying an order other than 1 for the initial VAR.
Afurther refinement is available in this context, namely data-based bandwidth selection. It makes
intuitive sense that the HAC bandwidth should not simply be based on the size of the sample,
but should somehow take into account the time-series properties of the data (and also the kernel
chosen). A nonparametric method for doing this was proposed byNeweyandWest(1994); a good
concise account of the method is given inHall(2005). This option can be invokedin gretl via
set hac_lag nw3
This option is the default when prewhitening is selected, but you can override it by giving a specific
numerical value for hac_lag.
Even the Newey–West data-based method does not fully pin down the bandwidth for any particular
sample. The first stepinvolves calculating a series ofresidual covariances. The length ofthis series
is given as a function of the sample size, but only up to a scalar multiple—for example, it is given
as OT
2=9
for the Bartlett kernel. Gretl uses an implied multiple of 1.
VARs: a special case
Awell-specified vector autoregression (VAR) will generally include enough lags of the dependent
variables to obviate the problem of residual autocorrelation, in which case HAC estimation is
redundant—although there may still be a need to correct for heteroskedasticity. For that rea-
son plain HCCME, and not HAC, is the default when the --robust flag is given in the context of the
var command. However, if for some reason you need HAC you can force the issue by giving the
option --robust-hac.
17.4 Special issues with panel data
Since panel data have both a time-series and a cross-sectional dimension one might expect that, in
general,robust estimation ofthe covariance matrixwould require handlingboth heteroskedasticity
and autocorrelation (the HAC approach). In addition, some special features of panel data require
attention.
 The variance of the error term may differ across the cross-sectional units.
 The covariance of the errors across the units may be non-zero in each time period.
 If the “between” variation is not removed, the errors may exhibit autocorrelation, not in the
usual time-series sense but in the sense that the mean error for unit i may differ from that of
unit j. (This is particularly relevant when estimation is by pooled OLS.)
Gretl currently offers two robust covariance matrixestimatorsspecifically for panel data. These are
available for models estimated via fixed effects, pooled OLS, and pooled two-stage least squares.
The default robust estimator is that suggested byArellano(2003), which is HAC provided the panel
is of the “large n, small T” variety (that is, many units are observed in relatively few periods). The
Arellano estimator is
ˆ
Ö
A
X
0
X
1
0
@
Xn
i1
X
0
i
ˆu
i
ˆu
0
i
X
i
1
A
X
0
X
1
where X isthe matrixofregressors(with the groupmeanssubtracted,in the caseoffixedeffects) ˆu
i
denotes the vector of residuals for unit i, and n is the number of cross-sectional units.
2
Cameron
and Trivedi(2005)makeastrongcaseforusingthisestimator;theynotethattheordinaryWhite
HCCMEcan produce misleadingly small standard errors in the panel context because it failsto take
2
Thisvarianceestimatorisalsoknown asthe “clustered (overentities)” estimator.
control software system:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
SharePoint. C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB library download and VB.NET online source code
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 17. Robust covariance matrix estimation
154
autocorrelation into account. In additionStockandWatson (2008) show that the White HCCME is
inconsistent in the fixed-effects panel context for fixed T > 2.
In cases where autocorrelation is not an issue the estimator proposed by Beck and Katz (1995)
and discussed by Greene (2003, chapter 13) may be appropriate. This estimator, which takes into
account contemporaneous correlation across the units and heteroskedasticity by unit, is
ˆ
Ö
BK
X
0
X
1
0
@
Xn
i1
Xn
j1
ˆ
ij
X
0
i
X
j
1
A
X
0
X
1
The covariances ˆ
ij
are estimated via
ˆ
ij
ˆ
u
0
i
ˆ
u
j
T
where T is the length of the time series for each unit. Beck and Katz call the associated standard
errors “Panel-Corrected Standard Errors” (PCSE). This estimator can be invoked in gretl via the
command
set pcse on
The Arellano default can be re-established via
set pcse off
(Note that regardless of the pcse setting, the robust estimator is not used unless the --robust flag
is given, or the “Robust” box is checkedin the GUI program.)
17.5 The cluster-robust estimator
One furthervariance estimator is available in gretl, namely the “cluster-robust” estimator. This may
be appropriate (forcross-sectional data,mostly) when the observations naturally fall into groupsor
clusters, and one suspects that the error term may exhibit dependency within the clusters and/or
have a variance that differs across clusters. Such clusters may be binary (e.g. employed versus
unemployed workers), categorical with several values (e.g. products grouped by manufacturer) or
ordinal (e.g. individuals with low, middle or high education levels).
For linear regression models estimated via least squares the cluster estimator is defined as
ˆ
Ö
C
X
0
X
1
0
@
mX
j1
X
0
j
ˆu
j
ˆu
0
j
X
j
1
A
X
0
X
1
where m denotes the number of clusters, and X
j
and ˆu
j
denote, respectively, the matrix of regres-
sors and the vector of residuals that fall within cluster j. As noted above, the Arellano variance
estimator for panel data models is a special case of this, where the clustering is by panel unit.
For models estimated by the method of Maximum Likelihood (in which case the standard variance
estimator is the inverse of the negative Hessian, H), the cluster estimator is
ˆ
Ö
C
H
1
0
@
mX
j1
G
0
j
G
j
1
A
H
1
where G
j
is the sum of the “score” (that is, the derivative of the loglikelihood with respect to the
parameter estimates) across the observations falling within cluster j.
It is common to apply a degrees offreedom adjustment to these estimators (otherwise the variance
may appear misleadingly small in comparison with other estimators, if the number of clusters is
small). In the least squares case the factor is m=m  1 n 1=n  k, where n is the total
number ofobservations and k is the number ofparametersestimated; in the case of MLestimation
the factor is just m=m  1.
control software system:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to High quality jpeg file can be exported from PDF in Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Choose file display mode. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 17. Robust covariance matrix estimation
155
Availability and syntax
The cluster-robust estimator is currently available for models estimatedvia OLS andTSLS, and also
for most ML estimators other than those specialized for time-series data: binary logit and probit,
ordered logit and probit, multinomial logit, Tobit, interval regression, biprobit, count models and
duration models. In all cases the syntax is the same: you give the option flag --cluster= followed
by the name of the series to be used to define the clusters, as in
ols y 0 x1 x2 --cluster=cvar
The specified clustering variable must (a) be defined (not missing) at all observations used in esti-
mating the model and(b) take on at least twodistinct values over the estimation range. The clusters
are definedassets of observationshavinga common valuefor the clustering variable. It is generally
expected that the number of clusters is substantially less than the total number of observations.
Chapter 18
Panel data
18.1 Estimation of panel models
Pooled Ordinary Least Squares
The simplest estimator for panel data is pooled OLS. In most cases this is unlikely to be adequate,
but it provides a baseline for comparison with more complexestimators.
If you estimate a model on panel data using OLS an additional test item becomes available. In the
GUImodel windowthis isthe item “panel diagnostics” under the Testsmenu; thescript counterpart
is the hausman command.
To take advantage ofthis test, you shouldspecify a model without any dummy variables represent-
ing cross-sectional units. The test compares pooled OLS against the principal alternatives, the fixed
effects and random effects models. These alternatives are explained in the following section.
The fixed and random effects models
In the graphical interface these options are found under the menu item “Model/Panel/Fixed and
random effects”. In the command-line interface one uses the panel command, with or without the
--random-effects option.
This section explains the nature of these models and comments on their estimation via gretl.
The pooled OLS specification may be written as
y
it
X
it
u
it
(18.1)
where y
it
is the observation on the dependent variable for cross-sectional unit i in period t, X
it
is a 1  k vector of independent variables observed for unit i in period t,  is a k  1 vector of
parameters, and u
it
is an error or disturbance term specific to unit i in period t.
The fixed and random effects models have in common that they decompose the unitary pooled
error term, u
it
.For the fixed effects model we write u
it

i
"
it
,yielding
y
it
X
it

i
"
it
(18.2)
That is,we decomposeu
it
into aunit-specificandtime-invariant component,
i
,andan observation-
specific error,"
it
.
1
The 
i
sarethen treatedas fixedparameters(in effect, unit-specific y-intercepts),
which are to be estimated. This can be done by includinga dummy variable for each cross-sectional
unit (and suppressingthe global constant). This issometimes calledtheLeast Squares Dummy Vari-
ables (LSDV) method. Alternatively, one can subtract the group mean from each of variables and
estimate a model without a constant. In the latter case the dependent variable may be written as
˜y
it
y
it
¯y
i
The “group mean”,
¯
y
i
,is defined as
¯y
i
1
T
i
T
i
X
t1
y
it
1
Itis possible tobreak a third component out ofu
it
,namely w
t
,ashockthat istime-specificbutcommonto allthe
unitsin a given period. In the interestofsimplicitywedonotpursue thatoptionhere.
156
Chapter 18. Panel data
157
where T
i
is the number of observations for unit i. An exactly analogous formulation applies to the
independent variables. Given parameter estimates,
ˆ
, obtained using such de-meaned data we can
recover estimates of the 
i
susing
ˆ
i
1
T
i
T
i
X
t1
y
it
X
it
ˆ
These two methods (LSDV, and using de-meaned data) are numerically equivalent. gretl takes the
approach of de-meaning the data. If you have a small number ofcross-sectional units, a large num-
ber of time-series observations per unit, and a large number of regressors, it is more economical
in terms of computer memory to use LSDV. If need be you can easily implement this manually. For
example,
genr unitdum
ols y x du_*
(See Chapter9 for details on unitdum).
The ˆ
i
estimates are not printedas part of the standard model output in gretl (there may be a large
number of these, and typically they are not of much inherent interest). However you can retrieve
them after estimation of the fixed effects model if you wish. In the graphical interface, go to the
“Save” menu in the model window andselect “per-unit constants”. In command-line mode, you can
do series newname = $ahat, where newname is the name you want to give the series.
For the random effects model we write u
it
v
i
"
it
,so the model becomes
y
it
X
it
v
i
"
it
(18.3)
In contrast to the fixed effects model, the v
i
sare not treated as fixed parameters, but as random
drawings from a given probability distribution.
The celebrated Gauss–Markov theorem, according to which OLS is the best linear unbiased esti-
mator (BLUE), depends on the assumption that the error term is independently and identically
distributed (IID). In the panel context, the IID assumption means that Eu
2
it
, in relation to equa-
tion18.1, equals a constant, 
2
u
,for all i and t, while the covariance Eu
is
u
it
equals zero for all
st and the covariance Eu
jt
u
it
equals zero for all j i.
If these assumptions are not met—and they are unlikely to be met in the context of panel data—
OLS is not the most efficient estimator. Greater efficiency may be gained using generalized least
squares (GLS), taking into account the covariance structure of the error term.
Consider observations on a given unit i at two different times s and t. From the hypotheses above
it can be worked out that Varu
is
 Varu
it
 
2
v

2
"
,while the covariance between u
is
andu
it
is given by Eu
is
u
it

2
v
.
In matrixnotation, we may group all the T
i
observations for unit i into the vector y
i
and write it as
y
i
X
i
u
i
(18.4)
The vectoru
i
,which includes all the disturbances forindividual i, has a variance–covariance matrix
given by
Varu
i
 Ö
i

2
"
I
2
v
J
(18.5)
where J is a square matrix with all elements equal to 1. It can be shown that the matrix
K
i
I  
i
T
i
J;
where 
i
1  
r
2
"
2
"
T
i
2
v
,has the property
K
i
ÖK
0
i

2
"
I
Chapter 18. Panel data
158
It follows that the transformedsystem
K
i
y
i
K
i
X
i
K
i
u
i
(18.6)
satisfies the Gauss–Markov conditions, and OLS estimation of (18.6) provides efficient inference.
But since
K
i
y
i
y
i
i
¯y
i
GLS estimation is equivalent to OLS using “quasi-demeaned” variables; that is,variables from which
we subtract a fraction  of their average.2 Notice that for 2
"
!0,  ! 1, while for 2
v
!0,  ! 0.
This means that if all the variance is attributable to the individual effects, then the fixed effects
estimator is optimal; if, on the other hand, individual effects are negligible, then pooled OLS turns
out, unsurprisingly, to be the optimal estimator.
To implement the GLS approach we need to calculate , which in turn requires estimates of the
variances 
2
"
and 
2
v
. (These are often referred to as the “within” and “between” variances re-
spectively, since the former refers to variation within each cross-sectional unit and the latter to
variation between the units). Several means of estimating these magnitudes have been suggested
in the literature (seeBaltagi,1995); by default gretl uses the method ofSwamyandArora (1972):
2
"
is estimated by the residual variance from the fixed effects model, and the sum 2
"
T
i
2
v
is
estimated as T
i
times the residual variance from the “between” estimator,
¯y
i
¯
X
i
e
i
The latter regression is implemented by constructing a data set consisting of the group means
of all the relevant variables. Alternatively, if the --nerlove option is given, gretl uses the method
suggestedbyNerlove(1971). In this case 
2
v
is estimated asthe sample varianceofthe fixed effects,
ˆ
2
v
1
n 1
Xn
i1

i
¯
2
where n is the number of individuals and ¯ is the mean of the fixed effects.
Choice of estimator
Which panel method should one use, fixed effects or random effects?
One way ofansweringthisquestion isin relation tothe nature ofthe dataset. Ifthe panel comprises
observations on a fixed and relatively small set of units of interest (say, the member states of the
European Union), there is a presumption in favor of fixed effects. If it comprises observations on a
large number of randomly selected individuals (as in many epidemiological and other longitudinal
studies), there is a presumption in favor of random effects.
Besides this general heuristic, however, various statistical issues must be taken into account.
1. Some panel data sets contain variables whose values are specific to the cross-sectional unit
but which do not vary over time. If you want to include such variables in the model, the fixed
effects option is simply not available. When the fixed effects approach is implemented using
dummy variables, the problem is that the time-invariant variables are perfectly collinear with
the per-unit dummies. When using the approach of subtracting the group means, the issue is
that after de-meaning these variables are nothing but zeros.
2. A somewhat analogous prohibition applies to the random effects estimator. This estimator is
in effect a matrix-weighted average of pooled OLS and the “between” estimator. Suppose we
have observations on n units or individuals and there are k independent variables of interest.
Ifk >n, the “between” estimator isundefined—since we haveonly n effective observations—
and hence so is the random effects estimator.
2
In abalanced panel, thevalue of iscommon toall individuals, otherwise itdiffersdepending on the valueofT
i
.
Chapter 18. Panel data
159
If one does not fall foul of one or other of the prohibitions mentioned above, the choice between
fixed effects and random effects may be expressed in terms of the two econometric desiderata,
efficiency and consistency.
From a purely statistical viewpoint, we could say that there is a tradeoff between robustness and
efficiency. In the fixedeffects approach, we donot make any hypotheses on the “groupeffects” (that
is, the time-invariant differences in mean between the groups) beyond the fact that they exist—
and that can be tested; see below. As a consequence, once these effects are swept out by taking
deviations from the group means, the remaining parameters can be estimated.
On the other hand, the random effects approach attempts to model the group effects as drawings
from a probability distribution instead of removing them. This requires that individual effects are
representable as a legitimate part of the disturbance term, that is, zero-mean random variables,
uncorrelated with the regressors.
As a consequence, the fixed-effects estimator “always works”, but at the cost of not being able to
estimate the effect of time-invariant regressors. The richer hypothesis set of the random-effects
estimator ensures that parameters for time-invariant regressors can be estimated, and that esti-
mation of the parameters for time-varying regressors is carried out more efficiently. These advan-
tages, though, are tied to the validity of the additional hypotheses. If, for example, there is reason
to think that individual effects may be correlated with some of the explanatory variables, then the
random-effects estimator would be inconsistent, while fixed-effects estimates would still be valid.
It is precisely on this principle that the Hausman test is built (see below): if the fixed- and random-
effects estimates agree, to within the usual statistical margin of error, there is no reason to think
the additional hypotheses invalid, and as a consequence, no reason not to use the more efficient RE
estimator.
Testing panel models
If you estimate a fixed effects or random effects model in the graphical interface, you may notice
that the number ofitemsavailable under the“Tests” menu in themodel windowisrelatively limited.
Panel models carry certain complications that make it difficult to implement all of the tests one
expects to see for models estimated on straight time-series or cross-sectional data.
Nonetheless, variouspanel-specifictests are printedalongwith the parameterestimatesasa matter
of course, as follows.
When you estimate a model using fixed effects, you automatically get an F-test for the null hy-
pothesis that the cross-sectional units all have a common intercept. That is to say that all the 
i
s
are equal, in which case the pooled model (18.1), with a column of 1s included in the X matrix, is
adequate.
When you estimate using random effects, the Breusch–Pagan and Hausman tests are presented
automatically.
The Breusch–Pagan test is the counterpart to the F-test mentioned above. The null hypothesis is
that the variance of v
i
in equation (18.3) equals zero; if this hypothesis is not rejected, then again
we conclude that the simple pooled model is adequate.
The Hausman test probes the consistency of the GLS estimates. The null hypothesis is that these
estimates are consistent—that is, that the requirement of orthogonality of the v
i
and the X
i
is
satisfied. The test isbasedon ameasure, H,ofthe“distance” between the fixed-effectsandrandom-
effects estimates, constructed such that under the null it follows the 
2
distribution with degrees
of freedom equal to the number of time-varying regressors in the matrix X. If the value of H is
“large” this suggeststhat the random effectsestimatoris not consistent andthe fixed-effectsmodel
is preferable.
There are two ways ofcalculating H, the matrix-difference method andthe regression method. The
procedure for the matrix-difference method is this:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested