Chapter 18. Panel data
160
 Collect the fixed-effects estimates in a vector
˜
 and the corresponding random-effects esti-
mates in
ˆ
, then form the difference vector 
˜
 
ˆ
.
 Form the covariance matrix of the difference vector as Var
˜
 
ˆ
  Var
˜
   Var
ˆ
  Ù,
where Var
˜
 and Var
ˆ
 are estimated by the sample variance matrices of the fixed- and
random-effects models respectively.3
 Compute H 
˜
 
ˆ
0
Ù
1
˜
 
ˆ
.
Given the relative efficiencies of
˜
and
ˆ
, the matrix Ù “should be” positive definite, in which case
His positive, but in finite samples this is not guaranteed and of course a negative 
2
value is not
admissible. The regression method avoids this potential problem. The procedure is:
 Treat the random-effects model as the restricted model, and record its sum of squared resid-
uals as SSR
r
.
 Estimate via OLS an unrestricted model in which the dependent variable is quasi-demeaned y
and the regressors include both quasi-demeaned X (as in the RE model) and the de-meaned
variants of all the time-varying variables (i.e. the fixed-effects regressors); record the sum of
squared residuals from this model as SSR
u
.
 Compute H  nSSR
r
SSR
u
=SSR
u
,where n is the total number of observations used. On
this variant H cannot be negative, since adding additional regressors to the RE model cannot
raise the SSR.
By default gretl computes the Hausman test via the regression method, but it uses the matrix-
difference method if you pass the option --matrix-diff to the panel command.
Robust standard errors
For most estimators, gretl offers the option of computingan estimate of the covariance matrix that
is robust with respect to heteroskedasticity and/or autocorrelation (andhence also robust standard
errors). In the case of panel data, robust covariance matrix estimators are available for the pooled
and fixed effects model but not currently for random effects. Please see section17.4 for details.
The constant in the fixed effects model
Users are sometimes puzzled by the constant or intercept reported by gretl on estimation of the
fixed effects model: how can a constant remain when the group means have been subtracted from
the data? The method of calculation of this term is a matter of convention, but the gretl authors
decided to follow the convention employedby Stata; this involves addingthe global mean back into
the variables from which the group means have been removed.4
The method that gretl uses internally is exemplified in Example18.1. The coefficients in the final
OLS estimation, including the intercept, agree with those in the initial fixed effects model, though
the standard errors differ due to a degrees of freedom correction in the fixed-effects covariance
matrix. (Note that the pmean function returns the group mean ofa series.)
R-squared in the fixed effects model
There is no uniquely “correct” way of calculating R
2
in the context of the fixed-effects model. It
may be argued that a measure of the squared correlation between the dependent variable and the
3
Hausman(1978)showedthatthecovarianceofthedifferencetakesthissimpleformwhen
ˆ
isanefficientestimator
and
˜
isinefficient.
4
SeeGould(2013)for anextendedexplanation.
Convert pdf file into ppt - SDK Library service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file into ppt - SDK Library service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 18. Panel data
161
Example 18.1: Calculating theintercept inthe fixedeffects model
open abdata.gdt
panel n const w k ys --fixed-effects
depvar = n - pmean(n) + mean(n)
list indepvars = const
loop foreach i w k ys --quiet
x_$i = $i - pmean($i) + mean($i)
indepvars += x_$i
endloop
ols depvar indepvars
prediction yielded by the model is a desirable descriptive statistic to have, but which model and
which (variant of the) dependent variable are we talking about?
Fixed-effects models can be thought of in two equally defensible ways. From one perspective they
provide a nice, clean way of sweeping out individual effects by using the fact that in the linear
model a sufficient statistic is easy to compute. Alternatively, they provide a clever way to estimate
the “important” parameters of a model in which you want to include (for whatever reason) a full
set ofindividual dummies. If you take the second of these perspectives, your dependent variable is
unmodified y and your model includes the unit dummies; the appropriate R
2
measure is then the
squaredcorrelation between y and the ˆy computed usingboth the measuredindividual effectsand
the effects of the explicitly named regressors. This is reported by gretl as the “LSDV R-squared”. If
you take the first point of view, on the other hand, your dependent variable is really y
it
¯y
i
and
your model just includes the  terms, the coefficients of deviations of the x variables from their
per-unit means. In this case, the relevant measure of R
2
is the so-called “within” R
2
; this variant
is printed by gretl for fixed-effects model in place of the adjusted R
2
(it being unclear in this case
what exactly the “adjustment” should amount to anyway).
Residuals in the fixed and random effect models
After estimation of most kindsof models in gretl, you can retrieve a series containing the residuals
using the $uhat accessor. This is true of the fixed and random effects models, but the exact
meaning of gretl’s $uhat in these cases requires a little explanation.
Consider first the fixed effects model:
y
it
X
it

i
"
it
In this model gretl takes the “fitted value” ($yhat) to be ˆ
i
X
it
ˆ
, and the residual ($uhat) to be
y
it
minus this fitted value. This makes sense because the fixed effects (the 
i
terms) are taken as
parameters to be estimated. However, it can be argued that the fixed effectsare not really “explana-
tory” and if one defines the residual as the observed y
it
value minus its “explained” component
one might prefer to see just y
it
X
it
ˆ
. You can get this after fixed-effects estimation as follows:
series ue_fe = $uhat + $ahat - $coeff[1]
where $ahat gives the unit-specific intercept (as it would be calculated if one included all N unit
dummies and omitted a common y-intercept), and $coeff[1] gives the “global” y-intercept.
5
5
For anyone used to Stata, gretl’s fixed-effects $uhat corresponds to what you getfrom Stata’s “predict, e” after
xtreg,whilethesecond variantcorrespondsto Stata’s “predict, ue”.
SDK Library service:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.docx"; // Load a PDF document How to C#: Convert Excel to Word. RootPath + "\\" Output.docx"; // Load an Excel (.xlsx) file.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 18. Panel data
162
Now consider the random-effects model:
y
it
X
it
v
i
"
it
In this case gretl considers the error term to be v
i
"
it
(since v
i
is conceived as a random drawing)
and the $uhat series is an estimate of this, namely
y
it
X
it
ˆ
What if you want an estimate of just v
i
(or just "
it
) in this case? This poses a signal-extraction
problem: given the composite residual,howto recover an estimate ofits components? The solution
is to ascribe to the individual effect, ˆv
i
, a suitable fraction of the mean residual per individual,
¯
ˆu
i
P
T
i
t1
ˆu
it
.The “suitable fraction” is the proportion of the variance of the variance of ¯u
i
that is
due to v
i
,namely
2
v
2
v

2
"
=T
i
1  1  
i
2
After random effects estimation in gretl you can construct a series containing the
ˆ
v
i
sas follows:
# case 1: balanced panel
scalar theta = $["theta"]
series vhat = (1 - (1 - theta)^2) * pmean($uhat)
# case 2: unbalanced, Ti varies by individual
scalar s2v = $["s2v"]
scalar s2e = $["s2e"]
series frac = s2v / (s2v + s2e/pnobs($uhat))
series vhat = frac * pmean($uhat)
Having found vhat, an estimate of"
it
can then be obtained by subtraction from $uhat.
18.2 Autoregressive panel models
Special problems arise when a lag of the dependent variable is included among the regressors in a
panel model. Consider a dynamic variant of the pooledmodel (eq.18.1):
y
it
X
it
y
it 1
u
it
(18.7)
First, if the error u
it
includes a groupeffect, v
i
,then y
it 1
is bound to be correlated with the error,
since the value of v
i
affects y
i
at all t. That means that OLS applied to (18.7) will be inconsistent
as well as inefficient. The fixed-effects model sweeps out the group effects and so overcomes this
particular problem, but a subtler issue remains, which applies to both fixed and random effects
estimation. Consider the de-meaned representation of fixed effects, as applied to the dynamic
model,
it
˜
X
it
˜y
i;t 1
"
it
where ˜y
it
y
it
¯y
i
and"
it
u
it
¯u
i
(or u
it
i
,using the notation ofequation18.2). The trouble
is that ˜y
i;t 1
will be correlated with "
it
via the group mean, ¯y
i
. The disturbance "
it
influences y
it
directly, which influences ¯y
i
, which, by construction, affects the value of ˜y
it
for all t. The same
issue arises in relation to the quasi-demeaning used for random effects. Estimators which ignore
this correlation will be consistent only as T ! 1 (in which case the marginal effect of "
it
on the
group mean of y tends to vanish).
One strategy for handling this problem, and producing consistent estimates of  and , was pro-
posed byAndersonandHsiao(1981). Instead of de-meaning the data, they suggest taking the first
difference of (18.7), an alternative tactic for sweeping out the group effects:
Ñy
it
ÑX
it
Ñy
i;t 1

it
(18.8)
SDK Library service:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Load an Excel (.xlsx) file. XLSXDocument doc = new XLSXDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert Excel to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
In order to convert Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to Tiff image file Visual C#.NET It is quiet easy to integrate this SDK into your C# program, by
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 18. Panel data
163
where 
it
Ñu
it
Ñv
i
"
it
 "
it
"
i;t 1
. We’re not in the clear yet, given the structure of the
error 
it
:the disturbance "
i;t 1
is an influence on both 
it
and Ñy
i;t 1
y
it
y
i;t 1
.The next step
is then to find an instrument for the “contaminated” Ñy
i;t 1
. Anderson and Hsiao suggest using
either y
i;t 2
or Ñy
i;t 2
, both of which will be uncorrelated with 
it
provided that the underlying
errors, "
it
,are not themselves serially correlated.
The Anderson–Hsiao estimator is not provided as a built-in function in gretl, since gretl’s sensible
handling of lags and differences for panel data makes it a simple application of regression with
instrumental variables—see Example18.2, which is based on a study of country growth rates by
Nerlove(1999).6
Example 18.2: The Anderson–Hsiao estimator for adynamic panel model
# Penn World Table data as used by Nerlove
open penngrow.gdt
# Fixed effects (for comparison)
panel Y 0 Y(-1) X
# Random effects (for comparison)
panel Y 0 Y(-1) X --random-effects
# take differences of all variables
diff Y X
# Anderson-Hsiao, using Y(-2) as instrument
tsls d_Y d_Y(-1) d_X ; 0 d_X Y(-2)
# Anderson-Hsiao, using d_Y(-2) as instrument
tsls d_Y d_Y(-1) d_X ; 0 d_X d_Y(-2)
Although the Anderson–Hsiao estimator is consistent, it is not most efficient: it does not make the
fullest use of the available instruments for Ñy
i;t 1
,nor does it take into account the differenced
structure of the error 
it
. It is improved upon by the methods ofArellano andBond (1991) and
Blundell and Bond(1998).Thesemethodsaretakenupinthenextchapter.
6
AlsoseeClintCummins’benchmarkspage,http://www.stanford.edu/~clint/bench/.
SDK Library service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
image source into PDF document file which may be to save converted image source to PDF format, RasterEdge offers other encoding APIs to convert rendered image
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
how to split one PPT (.pptx) document file into smaller sub slides and merge/split PPT file without depending & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 19
Dynamic panel models
Since gretl version 1.9.2, the primary command for estimating dynamic panel models has been
dpanel. The closely related arbond command predated dpanel, and is still present, but whereas
arbond only supports the so-called “difference” estimator (Arellano andBond,1991), dpanel is
addition offers the “system” estimator (BlundellandBond,1998), which has become the method of
choice in the applied literature.
19.1 Introduction
Notation
Adynamic linear panel data model can be represented as follows (in notation based onArellano
(2003)):
y
it
y
i;t 1

0
x
it

i
v
it
(19.1)
The main idea on which the difference estimator is based is to get rid of the individual effect via
differencing. First-differencing eq. (19.1) yields
Ñy
it
Ñy
i;t 1

0
Ñx
it
Ñv
it
0
W
it
Ñv
it
;
(19.2)
in obvious notation. The error term of(19.2) is, by construction, autocorrelatedand also correlated
with the lagged dependent variable, so an estimator that takes both issues into account is needed.
The endogeneity issue is solved by noting that all values of y
i;t k
, with k > 1 can be used as
instrumentsfor Ñy
i;t 1
:unobservedvaluesofy
i;t k
(because they couldbemissing, or pre-sample)
can safely be substituted with 0. In the language of GMM, this amounts to using the relation
EÑv
it
y
i;t k
 0; k > 1
(19.3)
as an orthogonality condition.
Autocorrelation is dealt with by notingthat ifv
it
is white noise, the covariance matrix ofthe vector
whose typical element is Ñv
it
is proportional to a matrix H that has 2 on the main diagonal,  1
on the first subdiagonals and 0 elsewhere. One-step GMM estimation ofequation (19.2) amounts to
computing
ˆ  
2
4
0
@
XN
i1
W
W
W
0
i
Z
Z
Z
i
1
A
A
A
A
N
0
@
XN
i1
Z
Z
Z
0
i
W
W
W
i
1
A
3
5
1
0
@
XN
i1
W
W
W
0
i
Z
Z
Z
i
1
A
A
A
A
N
0
@
XN
i1
Z
Z
Z
0
i
Ñy
y
y
i
1
A
(19.4)
where
Ñyyy
i
h
Ñy
i;3
 Ñy
i;T
i
0
W
W
W
i
"
Ñy
i;2
 Ñy
i;T 1
Ñx
i;3

Ñx
i;T
#
0
Z
Z
Z
i
2
6
6
6
6
6
4
y
i1
0
0

0
Ñx
i3
0
y
i1
y
i2

0
Ñx
i4
.
.
.
0
0
0
 y
i;T 2
Ñx
iT
3
7
7
7
7
7
5
0
164
SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
VB.NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode advanced Codabar barcode scanning function into PPT processing projects that is contained in .pptx document file.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
165
and
A
A
A
N
0
@
XN
i1
Z
Z
Z
0
i
HZ
Z
Z
i
1
A
1
Once the 1-step estimator is computed, the sample covariance matrix of the estimated residuals
can be used instead of H to obtain 2-step estimates, which are not only consistent but asymp-
totically efficient. (In principle the process may be iterated, but nobody seems to be interested.)
StandardGMM theory applies, except for one thing:Windmeijer(2005) has computed finite-sample
corrections to the asymptotic covariance matrix of the parameters, which are nowadays almost
universally used.
The difference estimator isconsistent,but hasbeen shown tohave poor propertiesin finite samples
when  is near one. People these days prefer the so-called “system” estimator, which complements
the differenced data (with lagged levels used as instruments) with data in levels (using lagged dif-
ferences as instruments). The system estimator relies on an extra orthogonality condition which
has to do with the earliest value of the dependent variable y
i;1
. The interested reader is referred
toBlundellandBond (1998, pp. 124–125) for details, but here it suffices to say that this condi-
tion is satisfied in mean-stationary models and brings an improvement in efficiency that may be
substantial in many cases.
The set of orthogonality conditions exploited in the system approach is not very much larger than
with the difference estimator, the reason being that most of the possible orthogonality conditions
associated with the equations in levels are redundant, given those already used for the equations
in differences.
The key equations of the system estimator can be written as
˜
2
4
0
@
XN
i1
˜
W
W
W
0
˜
Z
Z
Z
1
A
A
A
A
N
0
@
XN
i1
˜
Z
Z
Z
0
˜
W
W
W
1
A
3
5
1
0
@
XN
i1
˜
W
W
W
0
˜
Z
Z
Z
1
A
A
A
A
N
0
@
XN
i1
˜
Z
Z
Z
0
Ñ
˜
y
y
y
i
1
A
(19.5)
where
Ñ
˜
yyy
i
h
Ñy
i3
 Ñy
iT
y
i3
 y
iT
i
0
˜
W
W
W
i
"
Ñy
i2
 Ñy
i;T 1
y
i2
 y
i;T 1
Ñx
i3

Ñx
iT
x
i3

x
iT
#
0
˜
ZZZ
i
2
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
y
i1
0
0

0
0

0
Ñx
i;3
0
y
i1
y
i2

0
0

0
Ñx
i;4
.
.
.
0
0
0
 y
i;T 2
0

0
Ñx
iT
.
.
.
0
0
0

0
Ñy
i2

0
x
i3
.
.
.
0
0
0

0
0
 Ñy
i;T 1
x
iT
3
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
5
0
and
AAA
N
0
@
XN
i1
˜
ZZZ
0
H
˜
ZZZ
1
A
1
In this case choosing a precise form for the matrix H for the first step is no trivial matter. Its
north-west block should be as similar as possible to the covariance matrix of the vector Ñv
it
,so
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
166
the same choice as the “difference” estimator is appropriate. Ideally, the south-east block should
be proportional to the covariance matrix of the vector 
i
vvv, that is 
2
v
I
2

0
;but since 
2
is
unknown and any positive definite matrix renders the estimator consistent, people just use I. The
off-diagonal blocksshould, in principle,contain the covariancesbetween Ñv
is
and v
it
,which would
be an identity matrix if v
it
is white noise. However, since the south-east block is typically given a
conventional value anyway, the benefit in making this choice is not obvious. Some packages use I;
others use a zero matrix. Asymptotically, it should not matter, but on real datasets the difference
between the resulting estimates can be noticeable.
Rank deficiency
Both the difference estimator (19.4) and the system estimator (19.5) depend, for their existence,
on the invertibility of AAA
N
. This matrix may turn out to be singular for several reasons. However,
this does not mean that the estimator is not computable: in some cases, adjustments are possible
such that the estimator does exist, but the user should be aware that in these cases not all software
packages use the same strategy and replication of results may prove difficult or even impossible.
Afirst reason why A
A
A
N
may be singular could be the unavailability of instruments, chiefly because
of missing observations. This case is easy to handle. If a particular row of
˜
Z
Z
Z
i
is zero for all
units, the correspondingorthogonality condition (or the correspondinginstrument if you prefer) is
automatically dropped; of course, the overidentification rank is adjusted for testing purposes.
Even if no instruments are zero, however, AAA
N
could be rank deficient. A trivial case occurs if there
are collinear instruments, but a less trivial case may arise when T (the total number oftime periods
available) isnot much smaller than N (thenumberofunits), as,for example,in some macrodatasets
where the units are countries. The total number of potentially usable orthogonality conditions is
OT
2
, which may well exceedN in some cases. Ofcourse A
A
A
N
is the sum of N matrices which have,
at most, rank 2T  3 and therefore it could well happen that the sum is singular.
In all these cases, what we consider the “proper” way to go is to substitute the pseudo-inverse of
AAA
N
(Moore–Penrose) for its regular inverse. Again,our choice is sharedby some software packages,
but not all, so replication may be hard.
Treatment of missing values
Textbooks seldom bother with missing values, but in some cases their treatment may be far from
obvious. This is especially true if missing values are interspersed between valid observations. For
example, consider the plain difference estimator with one lag, so
y
t
y
t 1
 
t
where the i index is omitted for clarity. Suppose you have an individual with t  1:::5, for which
y
3
is missing. It may seem that the data for this individual are unusable, because differencing y
t
would produce something like
t
1
2 3 4
5
y
t
 
Ñy
t
 
  
where  = nonmissing and  = missing. Estimation seems to be unfeasible, since there are no
periods in which Ñy
t
and Ñy
t 1
are both observable.
However, we can use a k-difference operator and get
Ñ
k
y
t
Ñ
k
y
t 1
Ñ
k
t
where Ñ
k
1  L
k
and past levels of y
t
are perfectly valid instruments. In this example, we can
choose k 3 and use y
1
as an instrument, so this unit is in fact perfectly usable.
Not all software packages seem to be aware of this possibility, so replicating publishedresults may
prove tricky if your dataset contains individuals with “gaps” between valid observations.
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
167
19.2 Usage
One of the concepts underlying the syntax of dpanel is that you get default values for several
choices you may want to make, so that in a “standard” situation the command itself is very short
to write (and read). The simplest case of the model (19.1) is a plain AR(1) process:
y
i;t
y
i;t 1

i
v
it
:
(19.6)
If you give the command
dpanel 1 ; y
gretl assumes that you want to estimate (19.6) via the difference estimator (19.4), using as many
orthogonality conditions aspossible. The scalar 1between dpanel andthe semicolon indicates that
only one lag of y is included as an explanatory variable; using 2 would give an AR(2) model. The
syntaxthat gretl uses for the non-seasonal AR and MA lags in an ARMA model is also supported in
this context.1 For example, if you want the first and third lags of y (but not the second) includedas
explanatory variables you can say
dpanel {1 3} ; y
or you can use a pre-defined matrix for this purpose:
matrix ylags = {1, 3}
dpanel ylags ; y
To use a single lag of y other than the first you need to employ this mechanism:
dpanel {3} ; y # only lag 3 is included
dpanel 3 ; y
# compare: lags 1, 2 and 3 are used
To use the system estimator instead, you add the --system option, as in
dpanel 1 ; y --system
The level orthogonality conditions and the corresponding instrument are appended automatically
(see eq.19.5).
Regressors
Ifwe want to introduce additional regressors,we list them after the dependent variable in the same
way as other gretl commands, such as ols.
For the difference orthogonality relations, dpanel takes care oftransforming the regressors in par-
allel with the dependent variable. Note that this differs from gretl’s arbond command, where only
the dependent variable is differenced automatically; it brings us more in line with other software.
One case of potential ambiguity is when an intercept is specified but the difference-only estimator
is selected, as in
dpanel 1 ; y const
In this case the default dpanel behavior, which agrees with Stata’s xtabond2, is to drop the con-
stant (since differencing reduces it to nothing but zeros). However, for compatibility with the
DPD package for Ox, you can give the option --dpdstyle, in which case the constant is retained
1
Thisrepresents an enhancementover thearbond command.
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
168
(equivalent to including a linear trend in equation 19.1). A similar point applies to the period-
specific dummy variables which can be added in dpanel via the --time-dummies option: in the
differences-only case these dummies are entered in differenced form by default, but when the
--dpdstyle switch is appliedthey are entered in levels.
The standard gretl syntax applies if you want to use lagged explanatory variables, so for example
the command
dpanel 1 ; y const x(0 to -1) --system
would result in estimation of the model
y
it
y
i;t 1

0

1
x
it

2
x
i;t 1

i
v
it
:
Instruments
The default rules for instruments are:
 lags of the dependent variable are instrumented using all available orthogonality conditions;
and
 additional regressors are considered exogenous, so they are used as their own instruments.
If a different policy is wanted, the instruments should be specified in an additional list, separated
from the regressors list by a semicolon. The syntax closely mirrors that for the tsls command,
but in this context it is necessary to distinguish between “regular” instruments and what are often
called “GMM-style” instruments (that is, instruments that are handled in the same block-diagonal
manner as lags of the dependent variable, as described above).
“Regular” instruments are transformed in the same way as regressors, and the contemporaneous
value of the transformed variable is used to form an orthogonality condition. Since regressors are
treated as exogenous by default, it follows that these two commands estimate the same model:
dpanel 1 ; y z
dpanel 1 ; y z ; z
The instrument specification in the second case simply confirms what is implicit in the first: that
zis exogenous. Note, though, that if you have some additional variable z2 which you want to add
as a regular instrument, it then becomes necessary to include z in the instrument list if it is to be
treated as exogenous:
dpanel 1 ; y z ; z2
# z is now implicitly endogenous
dpanel 1 ; y z ; z z2 # z is treated as exogenous
The specification of “GMM-style” instruments is handled by the special constructs GMM() and
GMMlevel(). The first of these relates to instruments for the equations in differences, and the
second to the equations in levels. The syntaxfor GMM() is
GMM(name, minlag, maxlag)
where name is replaced by the name of a series (or the name of a list of series), and minlag and
maxlag are replacedby the minimum and maximum lagsto be used asinstruments. The same goes
for GMMlevel().
One common use of GMM() is to limit the number of lagged levels of the dependent variable used
as instruments for the equations in differences. It’s well known that although exploiting all pos-
sible orthogonality conditions yields maximal asymptotic efficiency, in finite samples it may be
preferable to use a smaller subset (but see alsoOkui(2009)). For example, the specification
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
169
dpanel 1 ; y ; GMM(y, 2, 4)
ensures that no lags of y
t
earlier than t  4 will be used as instruments.
Aseconduse ofGMM()is to exploit more fully the potential block-diagonal orthogonality conditions
offered by an exogenous regressor, or a related variable that does not appear as a regressor. For
example, in
dpanel 1 ; y x ; GMM(z, 2, 6)
thevariable x isconsideredan endogenousregressor, andupto 5 lags ofz are usedasinstruments.
Note that in the following script fragment
dpanel 1 ; y z
dpanel 1 ; y z ; GMM(z,0,0)
the twoestimation commandsshould not be expectedto give the same result,as the setsoforthog-
onality relationships are subtly different. In the latter case, you have T  2 separate orthogonality
relationships pertaining to z
it
,none of which has any implication for the other ones; in the former
case, you only have one. In terms of the Z
Z
Z
i
matrix, the first form adds a single row to the bottom
of the instruments matrix, while the second form adds a diagonal block with T  2 columns; that
is,
h
z
i3
z
i4
 z
it
i
versus
2
6
6
6
6
6
4
z
i3
0

0
0
z
i4

0
.
.
.
.
.
.
0
0
 z
it
3
7
7
7
7
7
5
19.3 Replication of DPD results
In this section we show how to replicate the results of some of the pioneering work with dynamic
panel-data estimators by Arellano, Bond and Blundell. As the DPD manual (Doornik,Arellanoand
Bond, 2006)explains,itisdifficulttoreplicatetheoriginalpublishedresultsexactly,fortwomain
reasons: not all of the data used in those studies are publicly available; and some of the choices
made in the original software implementation of the estimators have been superseded. Here,there-
fore, our focus is on replicating the results obtained using the current DPD package and reported
in the DPD manual.
The examples are based on the program files abest1.ox, abest3.ox and bbest1.ox. These
are included in the DPD package, along with the Arellano–Bond database files abdata.bn7 and
abdata.in7.2 The Arellano–Bond data are also provided with gretl, in the file abdata.gdt. In the
following we do not show the output from DPD or gretl; it is somewhat voluminous, and is easily
generated by the user. As of this writing the results from Ox/DPD and gretl are identical in all
relevant respects for all of the examples shown.3
Acomplete Ox/DPD program to generate the results of interest takes this general form:
#include <oxstd.h>
#import <packages/dpd/dpd>
2
Seehttp://www.doornik.com/download.html.
3
To bespecific, this isusing Ox Consoleversion 5.10, version 1.24of the DPD package, andgretlbuiltfromCVSasof
2010-10-23, allonLinux.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested