Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
170
main()
{
decl dpd = new DPD();
dpd.Load("abdata.in7");
dpd.SetYear("YEAR");
// model-specific code here
delete dpd;
}
In the examples below we take this template for granted and showjust the model-specific code.
Example 1
The following Ox/DPD code—drawn from abest1.ox—replicatescolumn (b) ofTable 4 inArellano
and Bond(1991),aninstanceofthedifferences-onlyorGMM-DIFestimator.Thedependentvariable
is the log of employment, n; the regressors include two lags of the dependent variable, current and
lagged values of the log real-product wage, w, the current value of the log of gross capital, k, and
current and lagged values of the log of industry output, ys. In addition the specification includes
aconstant and five year dummies; unlike the stochastic regressors, these deterministic terms are
not differenced. In this specification the regressors w, k and ys are treatedas exogenous and serve
as their own instruments. In DPD syntax this requires entering these variables twice, on the X_VAR
and I_VAR lines. The GMM-type (block-diagonal) instruments in this example are the second and
subsequent lags of the level of n. Both 1-step and 2-step estimates are computed.
dpd.SetOptions(FALSE); // don’t use robust standard errors
dpd.Select(Y_VAR, {"n", 0, 2});
dpd.Select(X_VAR, {"w", 0, 1, "k", 0, 0, "ys", 0, 1});
dpd.Select(I_VAR, {"w", 0, 1, "k", 0, 0, "ys", 0, 1});
dpd.Gmm("n", 2, 99);
dpd.SetDummies(D_CONSTANT + D_TIME);
print("\n\n***** Arellano & Bond (1991), Table 4 (b)");
dpd.SetMethod(M_1STEP);
dpd.Estimate();
dpd.SetMethod(M_2STEP);
dpd.Estimate();
Here is gretl code to do the same job:
open abdata.gdt
list X = w w(-1) k ys ys(-1)
dpanel 2 ; n X const --time-dummies --asy --dpdstyle
dpanel 2 ; n X const --time-dummies --asy --two-step --dpdstyle
Note that in gretl the switch to suppress robust standard errors is --asymptotic, here abbreviated
to--asy.
4
The--dpdstyleflag specifiesthat the constant anddummies shouldnot be differenced,
in the context of a GMM-DIF model. With gretl’s dpanel command it is not necessary to specify the
exogenous regressors as their own instruments since this is the default; similarly, the use of the
second and all longer lags of the dependent variable as GMM-type instruments is the default and
need not be stated explicitly.
4
Optionflagsin gretlcanalwaysbe truncated,down tothe minimalunique abbreviation.
Image from pdf to ppt - control Library platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Image from pdf to ppt - control Library platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
171
Example 2
The DPD file abest3.ox contains a variant of the above that differs with regard to the choice of
instruments: the variables w and k are now treated as predetermined, and are instrumented GMM-
style using the second and third lags of their levels. This approximates column (c) of Table 4 in
Arellano and Bond(1991). Wehavemodifiedthecodeinabest3.ox x slightlyto allowtheuseof
robust (Windmeijer-corrected) standard errors, which are the default in both DPD and gretl with
2-step estimation:
dpd.Select(Y_VAR, {"n", 0, 2});
dpd.Select(X_VAR, {"w", 0, 1, "k", 0, 0, "ys", 0, 1});
dpd.Select(I_VAR, {"ys", 0, 1});
dpd.SetDummies(D_CONSTANT + D_TIME);
dpd.Gmm("n", 2, 99);
dpd.Gmm("w", 2, 3);
dpd.Gmm("k", 2, 3);
print("\n***** Arellano & Bond (1991), Table 4 (c)\n");
print("
(but using different instruments!!)\n");
dpd.SetMethod(M_2STEP);
dpd.Estimate();
The gretl code is as follows:
open abdata.gdt
list X = w w(-1) k ys ys(-1)
list Ivars = ys ys(-1)
dpanel 2 ; n X const ; GMM(w,2,3) GMM(k,2,3) Ivars --time --two-step --dpd
Notethat sincewe arenowcallingforan instrument set otherthen the default (following thesecond
semicolon), it is necessary to include the Ivars specification for the variable ys. However, it is
not necessary to specify GMM(n,2,99) since this remains the default treatment of the dependent
variable.
Example 3
Our third example replicates the DPD output from bbest1.ox: this uses the same dataset as the
previous examples but the model specifications are based onBlundellandBond (1998), and involve
comparison of the GMM-DIF and GMM-SYS (“system”) estimators. The basic specification is slightly
simplifiedin that the variable ys is not used andonly one lag of the dependent variable appears as
aregressor. The Ox/DPD code is:
dpd.Select(Y_VAR, {"n", 0, 1});
dpd.Select(X_VAR, {"w", 0, 1, "k", 0, 1});
dpd.SetDummies(D_CONSTANT + D_TIME);
print("\n\n***** Blundell & Bond (1998), Table 4: 1976-86 GMM-DIF");
dpd.Gmm("n", 2, 99);
dpd.Gmm("w", 2, 99);
dpd.Gmm("k", 2, 99);
dpd.SetMethod(M_2STEP);
dpd.Estimate();
print("\n\n***** Blundell & Bond (1998), Table 4: 1976-86 GMM-SYS");
dpd.GmmLevel("n", 1, 1);
dpd.GmmLevel("w", 1, 1);
control Library platform:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
PowerPoint to Image. Adobe PDF to Image. Tiff to Image. Dicom to Image. Microsoft PowerPoint to PDF. C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET convert image to PDF How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
172
dpd.GmmLevel("k", 1, 1);
dpd.SetMethod(M_2STEP);
dpd.Estimate();
Here is the corresponding gretl code:
open abdata.gdt
list X = w w(-1) k k(-1)
list Z = w k
# Blundell & Bond (1998), Table 4: 1976-86 GMM-DIF
dpanel 1 ; n X const ; GMM(Z,2,99) --time --two-step --dpd
# Blundell & Bond (1998), Table 4: 1976-86 GMM-SYS
dpanel 1 ; n X const ; GMM(Z,2,99) GMMlevel(Z,1,1) \
--time --two-step --dpd --system
Note the use of the --system option flag to specify GMM-SYS, including the default treatment of
the dependent variable, which corresponds to GMMlevel(n,1,1). In this case we also want to
use lagged differences of the regressors w and k as instruments for the levels equations so we
need explicit GMMlevel entries for those variables. If you want something other than the default
treatment for the dependent variable as an instrument for the levels equations, you should give an
explicit GMMlevel specification for that variable—and in that case the --system flag is redundant
(but harmless).
For the sake ofcompleteness, note that if you specify at least one GMMlevel term, dpanel will then
include equations in levels, but it will not automatically add a default GMMlevel specification for
the dependent variable unless the --system option is given.
19.4 Cross-country growth example
The previous examples all used the Arellano–Bond dataset; for this example we use the dataset
CEL.gdt, which is also included in the gretl distribution. As with the Arellano–Bond data, there
are numerous missing values. Details of the provenance of the data can be found by opening the
dataset information window in the gretl GUI (Data menu, Dataset info item). This is a subset of the
Barro–Lee 138-country panel dataset, an approximation to which is used inCaselli, Esquiveland
Lefort(1996)and Bond, Hoeffler and Temple(2001).Bothofthesepapersexplorethedynamic
panel-data approachin relation tothe issues ofgrowth and convergence ofper capita incomeacross
countries.
The dependent variable is growth in real GDP per capita over successive five-year periods; the
regressors are the log of the initial (five years prior) value of GDP per capita, the log-ratio of in-
vestment to GDP, s, in the prior five years, and the log of annual average population growth, n,
over the prior five years plus 0.05 as stand-in for the rate of technical progress, g, plus the rate of
depreciation,  (with the last two terms assumed to be constant across both countries and periods).
The original model is
Ñ
5
y
it
y
i;t 5
s
it
 n
it
g  
t

i

it
(19.7)
which allows for a time-specific disturbance 
t
. The Solow model with Cobb–Douglas production
function implies that     , but this assumption is not imposed in estimation. The time-specific
disturbance is eliminated by subtracting the period mean from each of the series.
5
Wesay an “approximation” because wehavenotbeen abletoreplicateexactlytheOLSresultsreported inthepapers
cited, though it seems from the description of the data inCasellietal.(1996) thatwe ought tobe able todo so. We note
thatBondetal.(2001) used data provided by ProfessorCaselliyetdid notmanage toreproduce the latter’sresults.
control Library platform:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. Convert PDF to Word. |. Home ›› XDoc.Word ›› C# Word: Convert How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. Learn How to Change MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to TIFF Image File in C#. Overview
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
173
Equation (19.7) can be transformed to an AR(1) dynamic panel-data model by adding y
i;t 5
to both
sides, which gives
y
it
1y
i;t 5
s
it
 n
it
g 
i

it
(19.8)
where all variables are now assumed to be time-demeaned.
In (rough) replication ofBondetal.(2001) we now proceed to estimate the following two models:
(a) equation (19.8) via GMM-DIF, using as instruments the second and all longer lags of y
it
,s
it
and
n
it
g  ; and (b) equation (19.8) via GMM-SYS, using Ñy
i;t 1
,Ñs
i;t 1
and Ñn
i;t 1
g   as
additional instruments in the levels equations. We report robust standarderrors throughout. (As a
purely notational matter, we nowuse “t 1” to refer to values five years prior to t, as inBondetal.
(2001)).
The gretl script to do this job is shown below. Note that the final transformed versions of the
variables (logs, with time-means subtracted) are named ly (y
it
), linv (s
it
)and lngd (n
it
g ).
open CEL.gdt
ngd = n + 0.05
ly = log(y)
linv = log(s)
lngd = log(ngd)
# take out time means
loop i=1..8 --quiet
smpl (time == i) --restrict --replace
ly -= mean(ly)
linv -= mean(linv)
lngd -= mean(lngd)
endloop
smpl --full
list X = linv lngd
# 1-step GMM-DIF
dpanel 1 ; ly X ; GMM(X,2,99)
# 2-step GMM-DIF
dpanel 1 ; ly X ; GMM(X,2,99) --two-step
# GMM-SYS
dpanel 1 ; ly X ; GMM(X,2,99) GMMlevel(X,1,1) --two-step --sys
For comparison weestimatedthesame two modelsusing Ox/DPDandthe Stata commandxtabond2.
(In each case we constructed a comma-separatedvalues dataset containing the data as transformed
in the gretl script shown above, using a missing-value code appropriate to the target program.) For
reference, the commands used with Stata are reproduced below:
insheet using CEL.csv
tsset unit time
xtabond2 ly L.ly linv lngd, gmm(L.ly, lag(1 99)) gmm(linv, lag(2 99))
gmm(lngd, lag(2 99)) rob nolev
xtabond2 ly L.ly linv lngd, gmm(L.ly, lag(1 99)) gmm(linv, lag(2 99))
gmm(lngd, lag(2 99)) rob nolev twostep
xtabond2 ly L.ly linv lngd, gmm(L.ly, lag(1 99)) gmm(linv, lag(2 99))
gmm(lngd, lag(2 99)) rob nocons twostep
For the GMM-DIF model all three programs find 382 usable observations and 30 instruments, and
yield identical parameter estimates androbust standarderrors (up to the number of digits printed,
or more); see Table19.1.
6
6
The coefficient shown for ly(-1) in the Tablesis that reported directly by the software; for comparability with the
original model(eq.19.7) it is necesary to subtract 1, which produces the expected negative value indicating conditional
convergence in percapita income.
control Library platform:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
VB.NET PowerPoint processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
174
1-step
2-step
coeff
std. error
coeff
std. error
ly(-1)
0.577564
0.1292
0.610056
0.1562
linv
0.0565469
0.07082
0.100952
0.07772
lngd
0.143950
0.2753
0.310041
0.2980
Table 19.1: GMM-DIF:Barro–Leedata
Results for GMM-SYS estimation are shown in Table19.2. In this case we show two sets of gretl
results: those labeled “gretl(1)” were obtained usinggretl’s --dpdstyle option,while those labeled
“gretl(2)” did not use that option—the intent being to reproduce the H matrices used by Ox/DPD
and xtabond2 respectively.
gretl(1)
Ox/DPD
gretl(2)
xtabond2
ly(-1)
0.9237 (0.0385)
0.9167 (0.0373)
0.9073 (0.0370)
0.9073 (0.0370)
linv
0.1592 (0.0449)
0.1636 (0.0441)
0.1856 (0.0411)
0.1856 (0.0411)
lngd
0.2370 (0.1485)  0.2178 (0.1433)  0.2355 (0.1501)  0.2355 (0.1501)
Table 19.2: 2-step GMM-SYS:Barro–Leedata (standard errors in parentheses)
In this case all three programs use 479 observations; gretl and xtabond2 use 41 instruments and
produce the same estimates (when using the same H matrix) while Ox/DPD nominally uses 66.7
It is noteworthy that with GMM-SYS plus “messy” missing observations, the results depend on the
precise array of instruments used, which in turn depends on the details of the implementation of
the estimator.
19.5 Auxiliary test statistics
We have concentrated above on the parameter estimates and standard errors. It may be worth
adding a few words on the additional test statistics that typically accompany both GMM-DIF and
GMM-SYS estimation. These include the Sargan test for overidentification, one or more Wald tests
for the joint significance of the regressors(and time dummies, ifapplicable) and tests for first-and
second-order autocorrelation of the residuals from the equations in differences.
As in Ox/DPD, the Sargan test statistic reported by gretl is
S
0
@
XN
i1
ˆ
vvv
0
i
ZZZ
i
1
A
AAA
N
0
@
XN
i1
ZZZ
0
i
ˆ
vvv
i
1
A
where the
ˆ
v
v
v
i
are the transformed (e.g. differenced) residuals for unit i. Under the null hypothesis
that the instruments are valid, S isasymptotically distributedaschi-square with degreesoffreedom
equal to the number of overidentifying restrictions.
In general we see a good level of agreement between gretl, DPD and xtabond2 with regardto these
statistics, with a few relatively minor exceptions. Specifically, xtabond2 computes both a “Sargan
test”anda “Hansen test” for overidentification,but what it callsthe Hansen test is,apparently, what
DPD calls the Sargan test. (We have had difficulty determining from the xtabond2 documentation
(Roodman,2006) exactly how its Sargan test is computed.) In addition there are cases where the
degrees of freedom for the Sargan test differ between DPD and gretl; this occurs when the A
A
A
N
matrix is singular (section19.1). In concept the df equals the number of instruments minus the
7
Thisisa caseoftheissue describedin section19.1: thefullA
A
A
N
matrixturnsouttobesingular andspecialmeasures
mustbetaken toproduce estimates.
control Library platform:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
slide(s) into image source. If you want to create a featured PPTX to PDF converting application, you may need other VB.NET APIs to customize PPT (.pptx) to
www.rasteredge.com
control Library platform:VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
The created Interleaved 2 of 5 barcode image on PPT PowerPoint PDF 417 barcode library is a mature and This PPT ISBN barcode creator offers users the flexible
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 19. Dynamic panel models
175
number of parameters estimated; for the first of these terms gretl uses the rank of AAA
N
,while DPD
appears to use the full dimension of this matrix.
19.6 Memo: dpanel options
flag
effect
--asymptotic
Suppresses the use of robust standard errors
--two-step
Calls for 2-step estimation (the default being 1-step)
--system
Calls for GMM-SYS, with default treatment of the dependent variable,
as in GMMlevel(y,1,1)
--time-dummies
Includes period-specific dummy variables
--dpdstyle
Compute the H matrix as in DPD; also suppresses differencing of
automatic time dummies and omission of intercept in the GMM-DIF
case
--verbose
When --two-step is selected, prints the 1-step estimates first
--vcv
Calls for printing of the covariance matrix
--quiet
Suppresses the printing of results
The time dummies option supports the qualifier noprint, as in
--time-dummies=noprint
This means that although the dummiesare included in the specification their coefficients, standard
errors and so on are not printed.
Chapter 20
Nonlinear least squares
20.1 Introduction and examples
Gretl supports nonlinear least squares (NLS) using a variant ofthe Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm.
The usermust supply a specification ofthe regression function; priorto givingthisspecification the
parameters to be estimated must be “declared” and given initial values. Optionally, the user may
supply analytical derivatives of the regression function with respect to each of the parameters.
If derivatives are not given, the user must instead give a list of the parameters to be estimated
(separated by spaces or commas), preceded by the keyword params. The tolerance (criterion for
terminating the iterative estimation procedure) can be adjusted using the set command.
The syntaxfor specifying the function to be estimated is the same as for the genr command. Here
are two examples, with accompanying derivatives.
# Consumption function from Greene
nls C = alpha + beta * Y^gamma
deriv alpha = 1
deriv beta = Y^gamma
deriv gamma = beta * Y^gamma * log(Y)
end nls
# Nonlinear function from Russell Davidson
nls y = alpha + beta * x1 + (1/beta) * x2
deriv alpha = 1
deriv beta = x1 - x2/(beta*beta)
end nls --vcv
Note the commandwords nls (which introduces the regression function),deriv (which introduces
the specification of a derivative), and end nls, which terminates the specification and calls for
estimation. If the --vcv flag is appended to the last line the covariance matrix of the parameter
estimates is printed.
20.2 Initializing the parameters
The parameters of the regression function must be given initial values prior to the nls command.
This can be done using the genr command (or, in the GUI program, via the menu item “Variable,
Define new variable”).
In some cases, where the nonlinear function is a generalization of (or a restricted form of) a linear
model, it may be convenient to run an ols and initialize the parameters from the OLS coefficient
estimates. In relation to the first example above, one might do:
ols C 0 Y
genr alpha = $coeff(0)
genr beta = $coeff(Y)
genr gamma = 1
And in relation to the second example one might do:
176
Chapter 20. Nonlinear least squares
177
ols y 0 x1 x2
genr alpha = $coeff(0)
genr beta = $coeff(x1)
20.3 NLS dialog window
It is probably most convenient to compose the commands for NLS estimation in the form of a
gretl script but you can also do so interactively, by selecting the item “Nonlinear Least Squares”
under the “Model, Nonlinear models” menu. This opens a dialog box where you can type the
function specification (possibly prefaced by genr lines to set the initial parameter values) and the
derivatives, if available. An example of this is shown in Figure20.1. Note that in this context you
do not have to supply the nls and end nls tags.
Figure 20.1: NLSdialog box
20.4 Analytical and numerical derivatives
If you are able to figure out the derivatives of the regression function with respect to the param-
eters, it is advisable to supply those derivatives as shown in the examples above. If that is not
possible, gretl will compute approximate numerical derivatives. However, the properties of the NLS
algorithm may not be so good in this case (see section20.7).
This is done by using the params statement, which should be followed by a list of identifiers
containing the parameters to be estimated. In this case, the examples above would read as follows:
# Greene
nls C = alpha + beta * Y^gamma
params alpha beta gamma
end nls
# Davidson
nls y = alpha + beta * x1 + (1/beta) * x2
params alpha beta
end nls
If analytical derivatives are supplied, they are checked for consistency with the given nonlinear
function. If the derivatives are clearly incorrect estimation is aborted with an error message. If the
Chapter 20. Nonlinear least squares
178
derivatives are “suspicious” a warning message is issued but estimation proceeds. This warning
may sometimes be triggered by incorrect derivatives, but it may also be triggered by a high degree
of collinearity among the derivatives.
Note that you cannot mix analytical and numerical derivatives: you should supply expressions for
all of the derivatives or none.
20.5 Controlling termination
The NLS estimation procedure is an iterative process. Iteration is terminated when the criterion for
convergence is met or when the maximum number of iterations is reached, whichever comes first.
Let k denote the number of parameters being estimated. The maximum number of iterations is
100 k 1 when analytical derivatives are given, and 200 k 1 when numerical derivatives
are used.
Let  denote a small number. The iteration is deemed to have converged if at least one of the
following conditions is satisfied:
 Both the actual and predicted relative reductions in the error sum ofsquares are at most .
 The relative error between two consecutive iterates is at most .
This default value of  is the machine precision to the power 3/4,1 but it can be adjusted using the
set command with the parameter nls_toler. For example
set nls_toler .0001
will relax the value of  to 0.0001.
20.6 Details on the code
The underlying engine for NLS estimation is based on the minpack suite of functions, available
fromnetlib.org. Specifically, the following minpack functions are called:
lmder
Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm with analytical derivatives
chkder
Check the supplied analytical derivatives
lmdif
Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm with numerical derivatives
fdjac2
Compute final approximate Jacobian when using numerical derivatives
dpmpar
Determine the machine precision
On successful completion oftheLevenberg–Marquardt iteration,a Gauss–Newton regression isused
to calculate the covariance matrix for the parameter estimates. If the --robust flag is given a
robust variant is computed. The documentation for the set command explainsthe specific options
available in this regard.
Since NLS results are asymptotic, there is room for debate over whether or not a correction for
degrees of freedom should be applied when calculating the standard error of the regression (and
the standard errors of the parameter estimates). For comparability with OLS, and in light of the
reasoning given inDavidsonandMacKinnon(1993), the estimates shown in gretl do use a degrees
of freedom correction.
1
Ona 32-bitIntelPentium machine a likely valueforthis parameteris 1:8210
12
.
Chapter 20. Nonlinear least squares
179
20.7 Numerical accuracy
Table20.1 shows the results of running the gretl NLS procedure on the 27 Statistical Reference
Datasets made available by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for test-
ing nonlinear regression software.
2
For each dataset, two sets ofstarting values for the parameters
are given in the test files, so the full test comprises 54 runs. Two full tests were performed, one
usingall analytical derivativesandone using all numerical approximations. In each case the default
tolerance was used.
3
Out of the 54 runs, gretl failed to produce a solution in 4 cases when using analytical derivatives,
and in 5 cases when using numeric approximation. Of the four failures in analytical derivatives
mode, two were due to non-convergence ofthe Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm after the maximum
number of iterations (on MGH09 andBennett5, both describedby NIST as of “Higher difficulty”) and
two were due to generation of range errors (out-of-bounds floating point values) when computing
the Jacobian (on BoxBOD and MGH17, described as of “Higher difficulty” and “Average difficulty”
respectively). The additional failure in numerical approximation mode was on MGH10 (“Higher diffi-
culty”, maximum number ofiterations reached).
The table gives information on several aspects of the tests: the number of outright failures, the
average number of iterations taken to produce a solution and two sorts of measure of the accuracy
of the estimates for both the parameters and the standard errors of the parameters.
For each of the 54 runs in each mode, if the run produced a solution the parameter estimates
obtained by gretl were compared with the NIST certified values. We define the “minimum correct
figures” for a given run as the number of significant figures to which the least accurate gretl esti-
mate agreed with the certified value, for that run. The table shows both the average and the worst
case value of this variable across all the runs that produced a solution. The same information is
shown for the estimated standard errors.
4
The second measure of accuracy shown is the percentage of cases, taking into account all parame-
ters from all successful runs, in which the gretl estimate agreed with the certified value to at least
the 6 significant figures which are printed by default in the gretl regression output.
Using analytical derivatives, the worst case values for both parameters and standard errors were
improved to 6 correct figures on the test machine when the tolerance was tightened to 1.0e 14.
Using numerical derivatives, the same tightening of the tolerance raised the worst values to 5
correct figures for the parameters and 3 figures for standard errors, at a cost of one additional
failure of convergence.
Note the overall superiority of analytical derivatives: on average solutions to the test problems
were obtainedwith substantially fewer iterations andthe results were more accurate (most notably
for the estimated standard errors). Note also that the six-digit results printed by gretl are not 100
percent reliable for difficult nonlinear problems (in particular when using numerical derivatives).
Having registered this caveat, the percentage of cases where the results were good to six digits or
better seems high enough to justify their printing in this form.
2
For a discussion ofgretl’s accuracyintheestimation oflinear models, seeAppendixD.
3
The data shown in the table were gathered from a pre-release build of gretl version 1.0.9, compiled with gcc 3.3,
linked againstglibc2.3.2,andrun under Linux on an i686PC(IBM ThinkPadA21m).
4Forthestandarderrors,Iexcludedoneoutlierfromthestatisticsshowninthetable,namelyLanczos1. Thisisan
odd case, using generated data with an almost-exact fit: the standard errors are 9 or 10 orders of magnitude smaller
than the coefficients. In this instance gretl could reproduce the certified standard errors to only 3 figures (analytical
derivatives)and2 figures(numerical derivatives).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested