Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
220
by the model for the observations t
0
;:::;T. The starting point t
0
depends on the orders of the AR
polynomials in the model. The numerical maximization method used is BHHH, and the covariance
matrix is computed using a Gauss–Newton regression.
The CML method is nearly equivalent to maximum likelihood under the hypothesis of normality;
the difference is that the first t
0
1 observations are considered fixed and only enter the like-
lihood function as conditioning variables. As a consequence, the two methods are asymptotically
equivalent under standard conditions—except for the fact, discussed above, that our CML imple-
mentation treats the constant and exogenous variables as per equation (25.3).
The two methods can be compared as in the following example
open data10-1
arma 1 1 ; r
arma 1 1 ; r --conditional
which produces the estimates shown in Table25.1. As you can see, the estimates of  and 
are quite similar. The reported constants differ widely, as expected—see the discussion following
equations (25.4) and (25.5). However, dividing the CML constant by 1  we get 7.38, which is not
far from the ML estimate of 6.93.
Table 25.1: ML and CML estimates
Parameter
ML
CML
6.93042
(0.923882)
1.07322
(0.488661)
0.855360
(0.0511842) 0.852772
(0.0450252)
0.588056
(0.0986096) 0.591838
(0.0456662)
Convergence and initialization
The numerical methods used to maximize the likelihood for ARMA models are not guaranteed
to converge. Whether or not convergence is achieved, and whether or not the true maximum of
the likelihood function is attained, may depend on the starting values for the parameters. Gretl
employs one of the following two initialization mechanisms, depending on the specification of the
model andthe estimation method chosen.
1. Estimate a pure AR model by Least Squares (nonlinear least squares if the model requires
it, otherwise OLS). Set the AR parameter values based on this regression and set the MA
parameters to a small positive value (0.0001).
2. The Hannan–Rissanen method: First estimate an autoregressive model by OLS and save the
residuals. Then in a second OLS pass add appropriate lags of the first-round residuals to the
model, to obtain estimates ofthe MA parameters.
To see the details of the ARMA estimation procedure, add the --verbose option to the command.
This prints a notice of the initialization method used, as well as the parameter values and log-
likelihood at each iteration.
Besides the built-in initialization mechanisms, the user has the option ofspecifyinga set of starting
values manually. This is done via the set command: the first argument should be the keyword
initvals and the second should be the name of a pre-specified matrix containing starting values.
For example
matrix start = { 0, 0.85, 0.34 }
set initvals start
arma 1 1 ; y
How to convert pdf to ppt online - application control utility:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf to ppt online - application control utility:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
221
The specified matrix should have just as many parameters as the model: in the example above
there are three parameters, since the model implicitly includes a constant. The constant,if present,
is always given first; otherwise the order in which the parameters are expected is the same as the
order of specification in the arma or arima command. In the example the constant is set to zero,
1
to 0.85, and
1
to 0.34.
You can get gretl to revert to automatic initialization via the command set initvals auto.
Two variantsofthe BFGS algorithm are availablein gretl. In general we recommendthe default vari-
ant, which is based on an implementation byNash(1990), but for some problems the alternative,
limited-memory version (L-BFGS-B, seeByrdetal.,1995) may increase the chances of convergence
on the ML solution. This can be selected via the --lbfgs option to the arma command.
Estimation via X-12-ARIMA
As an alternative to estimating ARMA models using “native” code, gretl offers the option of using
the external program X-12-ARIMA. This is the seasonal adjustment software produced and main-
tained by the U.S. Census Bureau; it is used for all official seasonal adjustments at the Bureau.
Gretl includes a module which interfaces with X-12-ARIMA: it translates arma commands using the
syntax outlined above into a form recognized by X-12-ARIMA, executes the program, and retrieves
the results for viewing and further analysis within gretl. To use this facility you have to install
X-12-ARIMA separately. Packages for both MS Windows and GNU/Linux are available from the gretl
website,http://gretl.sourceforge.net/.
To invoke X-12-ARIMA as the estimation engine, append the flag --x-12-arima, as in
arma p q ; y --x-12-arima
As with native estimation, the default isto use exact ML but there is the option ofusingconditional
MLwith the --conditional flag. However, pleasenote that when X-12-ARIMA isusedin conditional
ML mode, the comments above regarding the variant treatments of the mean of the process y
t
do
not apply. That is, when you use X-12-ARIMA the model that is estimated is (25.2), regardless
of whether estimation is by exact ML or conditional ML. In addition, the treatment of exogenous
regressors in the context ofARIMA differencing is always that shown in equation (25.8).
Forecasting
ARMA models are often used for forecasting purposes. The autoregressive component, in particu-
lar, offers the possibility of forecasting a process “out of sample” over a substantial time horizon.
Gretl supports forecasting on the basis of ARMA models using the method set out by Boxand
Jenkins(1976).
2
The Box and Jenkins algorithm produces a set of integrated AR coefficients which
take into account any differencing of the dependent variable (seasonal and/or non-seasonal) in the
ARIMA context, thus making it possible to generate a forecast for the level of the original variable.
By contrast, if you first difference a series manually andthen apply ARMAto the differenced series,
forecasts will be for the differenced series, not the level. This point is illustrated in Example25.1.
The parameter estimates are identical for the two models. The forecasts differ but are mutually
consistent: the variable fcdiff emulates the ARMA forecast (static, one step ahead within the
sample range, and dynamic out ofsample).
2
Seein particulartheir “Program 4”onp. 505ff.
application control utility:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
222
Example 25.1: ARIMA forecasting
open greene18_2.gdt
# log of quarterly U.S. nominal GNP, 1950:1 to 1983:4
genr y = log(Y)
# and its first difference
genr dy = diff(y)
# reserve 2 years for out-of-sample forecast
smpl ; 1981:4
# Estimate using ARIMA
arima 1 1 1 ; y
# forecast over full period
smpl --full
fcast fc1
# Return to sub-sample and run ARMA on the first difference of y
smpl ; 1981:4
arma 1 1 ; dy
smpl --full
fcast fc2
genr fcdiff = (t<=1982:1)? (fc1 - y(-1)) : (fc1 - fc1(-1))
# compare the forecasts over the later period
smpl 1981:1 1983:4
print y fc1 fc2 fcdiff --byobs
The output from the last command is:
y
fc1
fc2
fcdiff
1981:1
7.964086
7.940930
0.02668
0.02668
1981:2
7.978654
7.997576
0.03349
0.03349
1981:3
8.009463
7.997503
0.01885
0.01885
1981:4
8.015625
8.033695
0.02423
0.02423
1982:1
8.014997
8.029698
0.01407
0.01407
1982:2
8.026562
8.046037
0.01634
0.01634
1982:3
8.032717
8.063636
0.01760
0.01760
1982:4
8.042249
8.081935
0.01830
0.01830
1983:1
8.062685
8.100623
0.01869
0.01869
1983:2
8.091627
8.119528
0.01891
0.01891
1983:3
8.115700
8.138554
0.01903
0.01903
1983:4
8.140811
8.157646
0.01909
0.01909
application control utility:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. MS Office
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document. Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint in C# Program.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
223
25.3 Unit root tests
The ADF test
The Augmented Dickey–Fuller (ADF) test is, as implemented in gretl, the t-statistic on ’ in the
following regression:
Ñy
t

t
’y
t 1
p
X
i1
i
Ñy
t i

t
:
(25.10)
This test statistic is probably the best-known and most widely used unit root test. It is a one-sided
test whose null hypothesis is ’  0 versus the alternative ’ < 0 (and hence large negative values
of the test statistic leadto the rejection of the null). Under the null, y
t
must be differenced at least
once to achieve stationarity; under the alternative, y
t
is already stationary and no differencing is
required.
One peculiar aspect of this test is that its limit distribution is non-standard under the null hy-
pothesis: moreover, the shape of the distribution, and consequently the critical values for the test,
depends on the form of the 
t
term. A full analysis of the various cases is inappropriate here:
Hamilton(1994)containsanexcellentdiscussion,butanyrecenttimeseriestextbookcoversthis
topic. Suffice it to say that gretl allows the user to choose the specification for 
t
among four
different alternatives:
t
command option
0
--nc
0
--c
0

1
t
--ct
0

1
t
1
t
2
--ctt
These option flags are not mutually exclusive; when they are used together the statistic will be
reported separately for each selected case. By default, gretl uses the combination --c --ct. For
each case, approximate p-values are calculated by means of the algorithm developedinMacKinnon
(1996).
The gretl command used to perform the test is adf; for example
adf 4 x1
would compute the test statistic as the t-statistic for ’ in equation25.10 with p  4 in the two
cases 
t

0
and 
t

0

1
t.
The numberoflags(p inequation25.10) shouldbechosen asto ensure that (25.10) isa parametriza-
tion flexible enough to represent adequately the short-run persistence of Ñy
t
. Setting p too low
results in size distortions in the test, whereas setting p too high leads to low power. As a conve-
nience to the user, the parameter p can be automatically determined. Setting p to a negative num-
ber triggers a sequential procedure that startswith p lagsand decrements p until the t-statistic for
the parameter 
p
exceeds 1.645 in absolute value.
The ADF-GLS test
Elliott, Rothenberg and Stock(1996)proposedavariantoftheADFtestwhichinvolvesanalterna-
tive methodofhandlingthe parameters pertainingto thedeterministic term 
t
:these are estimated
first via Generalized Least Squares, and in a second stage an ADF regression is performed using the
GLS residuals. This variant offers greater power than the regular ADF test for the cases 
t

0
and
t

0

1
t.
The ADF-GLS test is available in gretl via the --gls option to the adf command. When this option
is selected the --nc and --ctt options become unavailable, and only one case can be selected at
application control utility:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
PPTXDocument doc = new PPTXDocument(@"demo.pptx"); if (null == doc) throw new Exception("Fail to load PowerPoint Document"); // Convert PPT to Tiff.
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
This VB.NET online tutorial page can help you processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
224
atime; by default the constant-only model is used but a trend can be added using the --ct flag.
When a trend is present in this test MacKinnon-type p-values are not available; instead we show
critical values from Table 1 inElliottetal.(1996).
The KPSS test
The KPSS test (Kwiatkowski,Phillips,SchmidtandShin,1992) is a unit root test in which the null
hypothesis is opposite to that in the ADF test: under the null, the series in question is stationary;
the alternative is that the series is I1.
The basic intuition behind this test statistic is very simple: if y
t
can be written as y
t
  u
t
,
where u
t
is some zero-mean stationary process, then not only does the sample average of the y
t
s
provide a consistent estimator of , but the long-run variance ofu
t
is a well-defined, finite number.
Neither of these properties holdunder the alternative.
The test itself is based on the following statistic:

P
T
i1
S
2
t
T2
¯
2
(25.11)
where S
t
P
t
s1
e
s
and ¯2 is an estimate of the long-run variance of e
t
y
t
¯y. Under the null,
this statistic has a well-defined (nonstandard) asymptotic distribution, which is free of nuisance
parameters and has been tabulated by simulation. Under the alternative, the statistic diverges.
As a consequence, it is possible to construct a one-sided test based on , where H
0
is rejected if
is bigger than the appropriate critical value; gretl provides the 90, 95 and 99 percent quantiles.
The critical values are computed via the method presentedbySephton (1995), which offers greater
accuracy than the values tabulated inKwiatkowskietal.(1992).
Usage example:
kpss m y
where m is an integerrepresentingthe bandwidth or windowsize usedin the formula for estimating
the long run variance:
¯
2
Xm
i m
jij
m1
ˆ
i
The ˆ
i
terms denote the empirical autocovariances of e
t
from order  m through m. For this
estimator to be consistent, m must be large enough to accommodate the short-run persistence of
e
t
,but not too large compared to the sample size T. If the suppliedm is non-positive a default value
is computed, namely the integer part of 4
T
100
1=4
.
The above concept can be generalized to the case where y
t
is thought to be stationary around a
deterministic trend. In this case, formula (25.11) remains unchanged, but the series e
t
is definedas
the residuals from an OLS regression of y
t
on a constant and a linear trend. This second form of
the test is obtained by appending the --trend option to the kpss command:
kpss n y --trend
Note that in this case the asymptotic distribution of the test is different and the critical values
reported by gretl differ accordingly.
Panel unit root tests
The most commonly used unit root tests for panel data involve a generalization of the ADF pro-
cedure, in which the joint null hypothesis is that a given times series is non-stationary for all
individuals in the panel.
application control utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET PowerPoint - Render PPT to PDF in VB.NET. How to Convert PowerPoint Slide to PDF Using VB.NET Code in .NET. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging SDK >
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
225
In this context the ADF regression (25.10) can be rewritten as
Ñy
it

it
’
i
y
i;t 1
p
i
X
j1
ij
Ñy
i;t j

it
(25.12)
The model (25.12) allows for maximal heterogeneity acrossthe individuals in the panel: the param-
eters of the deterministic term, the autoregressive coefficient ’, andthe lag order p are all specific
to the individual, indexed by i.
One possible modification of this model is to impose the assumption that ’
i
’ for all i; that is,
the individual time series share a common autoregressive root (although they may differ in respect
of other statistical properties). The choice of whether or not to impose this assumption has an
important bearing on the hypotheses under test. Under model (25.12) the joint null is ’
i
0 for
all i, meaning that all the individual time series are non-stationary, and the alternative (simply the
negation of the null) is that at least one individual time series is stationary. When a common ’ is
assumed, the null is that ’  0 and the alternative is that ’ < 0. The null still says that all the
individual series are non-stationary, but the alternative now says that they are all stationary. The
choice of model should take this point into account, as well as the gain in power from forming a
pooledestimate of ’ and, of course, the plausibility of assuming a common AR(1) coefficient.
3
In gretl, the formulation (25.12) is used automatically when the adf command is used on panel
data. The joint test statistic is formed using the method ofIm, PesaranandShin (2003). In this
context the behavior ofadf differsfrom regular time-seriesdata: only one case ofthe deterministic
term is handled per invocation of the command; the default is that 
it
includes just a constant but
the --nc and --ct flags can be used to suppress the constant or to include a trend, respectively;
and the quadratic trend option --ctt is not available.
The alternative that imposes a common value of ’ is implemented via the levinlin command.
The test statistic is computedas perLevin,LinandChu (2002). As with the adf command, the first
argument is the lag order and the second is the name of the series to test; and the default case for
the deterministic component is a constant only. The options --nc and --ct have the same effect
as with adf. One refinement is that the lag order may be given in either of two forms: if a scalar
is given, this is taken to represent a common value of p for all individuals, but you may instead
provide a vector holding a set ofp
i
values, hence allowing the order of autocorrelation of the series
to differ by individual. So, for example, given
levinlin 2 y
levinlin {2,2,3,3,4,4} y
the first command runs a joint ADF test with a common lag order of 2, while the second (which
assumes a panel with six individuals) allows for differing short-run dynamics. The first argument
tolevinlin can be given asa set of comma-separatedintegers enclosedin braces, as shown above,
or as the name of an appropriately dimensioned pre-defined matrix (see chapter15).
Besides variants of the ADF test, the KPSS test also can be used with panel data via the kpss
command. In this case the test (of the null hypothesis that the given time series is stationary for
all individuals) is implemented using the method ofChoi(2001). This is an application of meta-
analysis, the statistical technique whereby an overall or composite p-value for the test of a given
null hypothesis can be computed from the p-values of a set of separate tests. Unfortunately, in
the case of the KPSS test we are limited by the unavailability of precise p-values, although if an
individual test statistic falls between the 10 percent and 1 percent critical values we are able to
interpolate with a fair degree ofconfidence. This gives rise to four cases.
1. All the individual KPSS test statistics fall between the 10 percent and 1 percent critical values:
the Choi method gives us a plausible composite p-value.
3
If the assumption of a common ’ seems excessively restrictive, bear in mind that we routinely assume common
slopecoefficientswhenestimating panel models, evenif this isunlikelyto be literally true.
Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
226
2. Some of the KPSS test statistics exceed the 1 percent value and none fall short of the 10
percent value: we can give an upper bound for the composite p-value by setting the unknown
p-values to 0.01.
3. Some of the KPSS test statistics fall short of the 10 percent critical value but none exceed the
1percent value: we can give a lower bound to the composite p-value by setting the unknown
p-values to 0.10.
4. None of the above conditions are satisfied: the Choi method fails to produce any result for
the composite KPSS test.
25.4 Cointegration tests
The generally recommended test for cointegration is the Johansen test, which is discussed in detail
in chapter27. In this context we offer a fewremarkson the cointegration test ofEngleandGranger
(1987), which builds on the ADF test discussed above (section25.3).
For the Engle–Granger test, the procedure is:
1. Test each series for a unit root using an ADF test.
2. Run a “cointegratingregression” via OLS.For thiswe select one ofthe potentially cointegrated
variables asdependent,and include the other potentially cointegrated variables as regressors.
3. Perform an ADF test on the residuals from the cointegrating regression.
The idea is that cointegration is supported if (a) the null of non-stationarity is not rejected for each
of the series individually, in step 1, while (b) the null is rejected for the residuals at step 3. That is,
each of the individual series is I1 but some linear combination of the series is I0.
This test is implemented in gretl by the coint command, which requires an integer lag order
(for the ADF tests) followed by a list of variables to be tested, the first of which will be taken
as dependent in the cointegrating regression. Please see the online help for coint, or the Gretl
Command Reference, for further details.
25.5 ARCH and GARCH
Heteroskedasticity means a non-constant variance of the error term in a regression model. Autore-
gressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (ARCH) is a phenomenon specific to time series models,
whereby the variance of the error displays autoregressive behavior; for instance, the time series ex-
hibits successive periods where the error variance is relatively large, and successive periods where
it is relatively small. Thissort ofbehavior isreckonedtobe common in asset markets: an unsettling
piece of news can lead to a period of increased volatility in the market.
An ARCH error process of order q can be represented as
u
t

t
"
t
;
2
t
Eu
2
t
t 1
 
0
q
X
i1
i
u
2
t i
where the "
t
s are independently and identically distributed (iid) with mean zero and variance 1,
and where 
t
is taken to be the positive square root of 
2
t
. Ú
t 1
denotes the information set as of
time t 1 and
2
t
is the conditional variance: that is, the variance conditional on information dated
t 1 and earlier.
It isimportant to notice thedifference between ARCH and an ordinary autoregressive error process.
The simplest (first-order) case of the latter can be written as
u
t
u
t 1
"
t
;
1 < < 1
Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
227
where the "
t
sare independently and identically distributed with mean zero and variance 
2
. With
an AR(1) error, if  is positive then a positive value of u
t
will tend to be followed by a positive
u
t1
.With an ARCH error process, a disturbance u
t
of large absolute value will tendto be followed
by further large absolute values, but with no presumption that the successive values will be of the
same sign. ARCH in asset prices is a “stylized fact” and is consistent with market efficiency; on the
other hand autoregressive behavior of asset prices would violate market efficiency.
One can test for ARCH of order q in the following way:
1. Estimate the model ofinterest via OLS and save the squared residuals,
ˆ
u
2
t
.
2. Perform an auxiliary regression in which the current squared residual is regressed on a con-
stant and q lags of itself.
3. Find the TR
2
value (sample size times unadjusted R
2
)for the auxiliary regression.
4. Refer the TR2 value to the 2 distribution with q degrees of freedom, and if the p-value is
“small enough” reject the null hypothesis of homoskedasticity in favor of the alternative of
ARCH(q).
This test is implemented in gretl via the modtest command with the --arch option, which must
follow estimation of a time-series model by OLS (either a single-equation model or a VAR). For
example,
ols y 0 x
modtest 4 --arch
This example specifies an ARCH order of q  4; if the order argument is omitted, q is set equal to
the periodicity of the data. In the graphical interface, the ARCH test is accessible from the “Tests”
menu in the model window (again, for single-equation OLS or VARs).
GARCH
The simple ARCH(q) process is useful for introducing the general concept of conditional het-
eroskedasticity in time series, but it has been found to be insufficient in empirical work. The
dynamics of the error variance permittedby ARCH(q) are not rich enough to represent the patterns
found in financial data. The generalized ARCH or GARCH model is now more widely used.
The representation of the variance of a process in the GARCH model is somewhat (but not exactly)
analogousto the ARMArepresentation ofthe level ofa time series. Thevariance at timet isallowed
to depend on both past values ofthe variance and past values of the realized squared disturbance,
as shown in the following system of equations:
y
t
X
t
u
t
(25.13)
u
t
t
"
t
(25.14)
2
t
0
q
X
i1
i
u
2
t i
p
X
j1
j
2
t j
(25.15)
As above, "
t
is an iid sequence with unit variance. X
t
is a matrix of regressors (or in the simplest
case, just a vector of 1s allowing for a non-zero mean of y
t
). Note that if p  0, GARCH collapses
to ARCH(q): the generalization is embodied in the 
j
terms that multiply previous values of the
error variance.
In principle the underlying innovation, "
t
,could follow any suitable probability distribution, and
besides the obvious candidate of the normal or Gaussian distribution the Student’s t distribution
has been used in this context. Currently gretl only handles the case where "
t
is assumed to be
Gaussian. However, when the --robust option to the garch command is given, the estimator gretl
Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
228
usesfor the covariance matrixcan be consideredQuasi-Maximum Likelihood even with non-normal
disturbances. See belowfor more on the options regarding the GARCH covariance matrix.
Example:
garch p q ; y const x
where p 0 and q > 0 denote the respective lag orders as shown in equation (25.15). These values
can be supplied in numerical form or as the names ofpre-defined scalar variables.
GARCH estimation
Estimation of the parameters of a GARCH model is by no means a straightforward task. (Consider
equation 25.15: the conditional variance at any point in time, 
2
t
, depends on the conditional
variance in earlier periods, but 
2
t
is not observed, and must be inferred by some sort of Maximum
Likelihood procedure.) By default gretl uses native code that employs the BFGS maximizer; you
also have the option (activated by the --fcp command-line switch) of using the method proposed
by Fiorentini et t al. (1996),
4
which was adopted as a benchmark in the study of GARCH results
by McCullough and Renfro (1998). It employs analytical first and second derivatives of the log-
likelihood, and uses a mixed-gradient algorithm, exploiting the information matrix in the early
iterations andthen switching to the Hessian in the neighborhoodofthe maximum likelihood. (This
progress can be observed if you appendthe --verbose option to gretl’s garch command.)
Several options are available for computing the covariance matrix of the parameter estimates in
connection with the garch command. At a first level, one can choose between a “standard” and a
“robust” estimator. By default, the Hessian is used unless the --robust option is given, in which
case the QML estimator is used. A finer choice is available via the set command, as shown in
Table25.2.
Table 25.2: Options for theGARCH covariance matrix
command
effect
set garch_vcv hessian
Use the Hessian
set garch_vcv im
Use the Information Matrix
set garch_vcv op
Use the Outer Product of the Gradient
set garch_vcv qml
QMLestimator
set garch_vcv bw
Bollerslev–Wooldridge “sandwich” estimator
It is not uncommon, when one estimates a GARCH model for an arbitrary time series, to find that
the iterative calculation of the estimates fails to converge. For the GARCH model to make sense,
there are strong restrictions on the admissible parameter values, and it is not always the case
that there exists a set of values inside the admissible parameter space for which the likelihood is
maximized.
The restrictions in question can be explained by reference to the simplest (and much the most
common) instanceofthe GARCH model, where p q  1. In the GARCH(1,1) model the conditional
variance is
2
t

0

1
u
2
t 1

1
2
t 1
(25.16)
Taking the unconditional expectation of (25.16) we get
2

0

1
2

1
2
4
The algorithm is based on Fortran code deposited in the archive of the Journal of Applied Econometrics by the
authors, and isusedby kind permission of Professor Fiorentini.
Chapter 25. Univariate time series models
229
so that
2
0
1 
1
1
For this unconditional variance to exist, we require that 
1

1
<1, and for it to be positive we
require that 
0
>0.
Acommon reason for non-convergence ofGARCH estimates (that is, a common reason for the non-
existence of 
i
and 
i
values that satisfy the above requirements and at the same time maximize
thelikelihoodofthe data) ismisspecification ofthe model. It is important to realize that GARCH, in
itself, allows only for time-varying volatility in the data. If the mean of the series in question is not
constant, or if the error process is not only heteroskedastic but also autoregressive, it is necessary
to take this into account when formulating an appropriate model. For example, it may be necessary
to take the first difference of the variable in question and/or to add suitable regressors, X
t
,as in
(25.13).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested