Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
240
Consider now another process y
t
,defined by
y
t
kx
t
u
t
where,again, k is a real numberand u
t
is a white noise process. Since u
t
isstationary by definition,
x
t
and y
t
cointegrate: that is, their difference
z
t
y
t
x
t
k u
t
is a stationary process. For k = 0, z
t
is simple zero-mean white noise, whereas for k 60 the process
z
t
is white noise with a non-zero mean.
After some simple substitutions, the two equations above can be represented jointly as a VAR(1)
system
"
y
t
x
t
#
"
km
m
#
"
0 1
0 1
#"
y
t 1
x
t 1
#
"
u
t
"
t
"
t
#
or in VECM form
"
Ñy
t
Ñx
t
#
"
km
m
#
"
1 1
0 0
#"
y
t 1
x
t 1
#
"
u
t
"
t
"
t
#
"
km
m
#
"
1
0
#
h
 1
i
"
y
t 1
x
t 1
#
"
u
t
"
t
"
t
#
0

0
"
y
t 1
x
t 1
#

t

0
z
t 1

t
;
where  is the cointegration vector and  is the “loadings” or “adjustments” vector.
We are now ready to consider three possible cases:
1. m 60: In this case x
t
is trended, as we just saw; it follows that y
t
also follows a linear trend
because on average it keeps at a fixeddistance k from x
t
.The vector 
0
is unrestricted.
2. m = 0 and k 6 0: In this case, x
t
is not trendedand as a consequence neither is y
t
.However,
the mean distance between y
t
and x
t
is non-zero. The vector 
0
is given by
0
"
k
0
#
which is not null and therefore the VECM shown above does have a constant term. The
constant, however, is subject to the restriction that its second element must be 0. More
generally, 
0
is a multiple of the vector . Note that the VECM could also be written as
"
Ñy
t
Ñx
t
#
"
1
0
#
h
 1  k
i
2
6
6
4
y
t 1
x
t 1
1
3
7
7
5
"
u
t
"
t
"
t
#
which incorporates theintercept into thecointegration vector. Thisis known asthe“restricted
constant” case.
3. m = 0 and k = 0: This case is the most restrictive: clearly, neither x
t
nor y
t
are trended, and
the mean distance between them is zero. The vector 
0
is also 0, which explains why this case
is referred to as “no constant.”
In most cases, the choice between these three possibilities is based on a mix of empirical obser-
vation and economic reasoning. If the variables under consideration seem to follow a linear trend
Pdf to ppt converter online for large - application control tool:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to ppt converter online for large - application control tool:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
241
then we should not place any restriction on the intercept. Otherwise,the question arises of whether
it makes sense to specify a cointegration relationship which includes a non-zero intercept. One ex-
ample where this is appropriate is the relationship between two interest rates: generally these are
not trended, but the VAR might still have an intercept because the difference between the two (the
“interest rate spread”) might be stationary around a non-zero mean (for example, because ofa risk
or liquidity premium).
The previous example can be generalized in three directions:
1. If a VAR of order greater than 1 is considered, the algebra gets more convoluted but the
conclusions are identical.
2. If the VAR includes more than two endogenous variables the cointegration rank r can be
greaterthan 1. In this case, is a matrixwith r columns, and the case with restrictedconstant
entails the restriction that 
0
should be some linear combination of the columns of .
3. If a linear trend is includedin the model, the deterministic part ofthe VAR becomes 
0

1
t.
The reasoning is practically the same as above except that the focus nowcenters on 
1
rather
than 
0
. The counterpart to the “restricted constant” case discussed above is a “restricted
trend” case, such that the cointegration relationships include a trend but the first differences
of the variables in question do not. In the case of an unrestricted trend, the trend appears
in both the cointegration relationships and the first differences, which corresponds to the
presence of a quadratic trend in the variables themselves (in levels).
In order to accommodate the five cases, gretl provides the following options to the coint2 and
vecm commands:
t
option flag
description
0
--nc
no constant
0
;
0
?
0
0
--rc
restricted constant
0
--uc
unrestricted constant
0

1
t;
0
?
1
0
--crt
constant + restricted trend
0

1
t
--ct
constant + unrestricted trend
Note that for this command the above options are mutually exclusive. In addition, you have the
option of using the --seasonal options, for augmenting 
t
with centered seasonal dummies. In
each case, p-values are computed via the approximations devised byDoornik(1998).
27.4 The Johansen cointegration tests
The two Johansen tests for cointegration are used to establish the rank of , or in other words
the number of cointegrating vectors. These are the “-max” test, for hypotheses on individual
eigenvalues, and the “trace” test, for joint hypotheses. Suppose that the eigenvalues 
i
are sorted
from largest tosmallest. Thenull hypothesis for the -maxtest on the i-th eigenvalue is that 
i
0.
The corresponding trace test, instead, considers the hypothesis 
j
0 for all j  i.
The gretl command coint2 performs these two tests. The corresponding menu entry in the GUI is
“Model, Time Series, Cointegration Test, Johansen”.
As in the ADF test, the asymptotic distribution ofthe tests varieswith the deterministic component
t
one includes in the VAR (see section27.3 above). The following code uses the denmark data file,
supplied with gretl, to replicate Johansen’s example found in his 1995 book.
open denmark
coint2 2 LRM LRY IBO IDE --rc --seasonal
application control tool:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Thus, we still offer the precise online guide for a large amount of robust PPT slides/pages provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Handle large size of Tiff in partition, reducing the resource 2. Word/Excel/PPT/PDF/ Jpeg to Tiff conversion. Refer to this online tutorial page, you will see:
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
242
In this case, the vector y
t
in equation (27.2) comprises the four variables LRM, LRY, IBO, IDE. The
number of lags equals p in (27.2) (that is, the number of lags of the model written in VAR form).
Part of the output is reported below:
Johansen test:
Number of equations = 4
Lag order = 2
Estimation period: 1974:3 - 1987:3 (T = 53)
Case 2: Restricted constant
Rank Eigenvalue Trace test p-value
Lmax test
p-value
0
0.43317
49.144 [0.1284]
30.087 [0.0286]
1
0.17758
19.057 [0.7833]
10.362 [0.8017]
2
0.11279
8.6950 [0.7645]
6.3427 [0.7483]
3
0.043411
2.3522 [0.7088]
2.3522 [0.7076]
Both the trace and -max tests accept the null hypothesis that the smallest eigenvalue is 0 (see the
last row ofthe table), so we may conclude that the series are in fact non-stationary. However, some
linear combination may be I(0), since the -max test rejects the hypothesis that the rank of Õ is 0
(though the trace test gives less clear-cut evidence for this, with a p-value of 0:1284).
27.5 Identification of the cointegration vectors
The core problem in the estimation of equation (27.2) is to find an estimate of Õ that has by con-
struction rank r,so it can be written as Õ  
0
,where  is the matrix containing the cointegration
vectors and  contains the “adjustment” or “loading” coefficients whereby the endogenous vari-
ables respond to deviation from equilibrium in the previous period.
Without further specification, the problem has multiple solutions (in fact, infinitely many). The
parameters  and  are under-identified: if all columns of  are cointegration vectors, then any
arbitrary linear combinations of those columns is a cointegration vector too. To put it differently,
if Õ 
0
0
0
for specific matrices 
0
and 
0
,then Õ also equals 
0
QQ
1
0
0
for any conformable
non-singular matrix Q. In order to find a unique solution, it is therefore necessary to impose
some restrictions on  and/or . It can be shown that the minimum number of restrictions that
is necessary to guarantee identification is r
2
. Normalizing one coefficient per column to 1 (or  1,
according to taste) is a trivial first step, which also helps in that the remaining coefficients can be
interpreted as the parameters in the equilibrium relations, but this only suffices when r  1.
The method that gretl uses by default is known as the “Phillips normalization”, or “triangular
representation”.1 The starting point is writing  in partitioned form as in

"
1
2
#
where 
1
is an r  r matrix and 
2
is n   r  r. Assuming that 
1
has full rank,  can be
post-multiplied by 
1
1
,giving
ˆ

"
I
2
1
1
#
"
I
B
#
:
The coefficients that gretl produces are
ˆ
, with B known as the matrix of unrestricted coefficients.
In termsoftheunderlyingequilibrium relationship,the Phillipsnormalization expresses the system
1
For comparison with other studies, you may wish to normalize  differently. Using the set command you
can do set vecm_norm diag to select a normalization that simply scales the columns of the original  such that
ij
 1 for i  j and i  r, as used in the empirical section ofBoswijk and Doornik (2004). Another alternative is
set vecm_norm first, which scales  such that the elements on the first row equal 1. To suppress normalization
altogether,use set vecm_norm none. (Toreturnto the default: set vecm_norm phillips.)
application control tool:VB.NET Excel: Render and Convert Excel File to TIFF Image by Using
If you need the most comprehensive overview on VB.NET Excel converter add-on, please go If you want to view or edit PDF, Word, Excel or PPT document, you
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# Imaging - Decode Identcode in C#.NET
Own advanced Identcode barcode reading functionality for C# PDF,Word, Excel & PPT editing projects. decode is located at one corner of a large-size image
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
243
of r equilibrium relations as
y
1;t
b
1;r1
y
r1;t
:::b
1;n
y
n;t
y
2;t
b
2;r1
y
r1;t
:::b
2;n
y
n;t
.
.
.
y
r;t
b
r;r1
y
r1;t
::: b
r;n
y
r;t
where the first r variables are expressed as functions of the remaining n r.
Although the triangular representation ensures that the statistical problem of estimating  is
solved, the resulting equilibrium relationships may be difficult to interpret. In this case, the user
may want to achieve identification by specifying manually the system of r
2
constraints that gretl
will use to produce an estimate of .
As an example, consider the money demand system presented in section 9.6 ofVerbeek(2004). The
variables used are m (the log of real money stock M1), infl (inflation), cpr (the commercial paper
rate), y (log of real GDP) and tbr (the Treasury bill rate).
2
Estimation of can be performed via the commands
open money.gdt
smpl 1954:1 1994:4
vecm 6 2 m infl cpr y tbr --rc
and the relevant portion of the output reads
Maximum likelihood estimates, observations 1954:1-1994:4 (T = 164)
Cointegration rank = 2
Case 2: Restricted constant
beta (cointegrating vectors, standard errors in parentheses)
m
1.0000
0.0000
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
infl
0.0000
1.0000
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
cpr
0.56108
-24.367
(0.10638)
(4.2113)
y
-0.40446
-0.91166
(0.10277)
(4.0683)
tbr
-0.54293
24.786
(0.10962)
(4.3394)
const
-3.7483
16.751
(0.78082)
(30.909)
Interpretation of the coefficients of the cointegration matrix  would be easier if a meaning could
be attached to each of its columns. This is possible by hypothesizing the existence of two long-run
relationships: a money demand equation
m c
1

1
infl
2
y
3
tbr
and a risk premium equation
cpr c
2

4
infl
5
y
6
tbr
2
Thisdatasetis available inthe verbeekdata package; seehttp://gretl.sourceforge.net/gretl_data.html.
application control tool:C# Imaging - Scan 1D POSTNET in C#.NET
C#.NET PDF document SDK. Seamlessly integrated with C#.NET MS Word, Excel and PPT documents SDK. Quickly scan POSTENT barcode from images in high-quality. Large
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
244
which imply that the cointegration matrix can be normalized as

2
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
1
0
1
4
 1
2
5
3
6
c
1
c
2
3
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
5
This renormalization can be accomplished by means of the restrict command, to be given after
the vecm command or, in the graphical interface, by selecting the “Test, Linear Restrictions” menu
entry. The syntax for entering the restrictions should be fairly obvious:3
restrict
b[1,1] = -1
b[1,3] = 0
b[2,1] = 0
b[2,3] = -1
end restrict
which produces
Cointegrating vectors (standard errors in parentheses)
m
-1.0000
0.0000
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
infl
-0.023026
0.041039
(0.0054666)
(0.027790)
cpr
0.0000
-1.0000
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
y
0.42545
-0.037414
(0.033718)
(0.17140)
tbr
-0.027790
1.0172
(0.0045445)
(0.023102)
const
3.3625
0.68744
(0.25318)
(1.2870)
27.6 Over-identifying restrictions
One purpose of imposing restrictionson a VECM system is simply to achieve identification. If these
restrictions are simply normalizations, they are not testable and should have no effect on the max-
imized likelihood. In addition, however, one may wish to formulate constraints on  and/or  that
derive from the economic theory underlying the equilibrium relationships; substantive restrictions
of this sort are then testable via a likelihood-ratio statistic.
Gretl is capable of testing general linear restrictions of the form
R
b
vec q
(27.5)
and/or
R
a
vec 0
(27.6)
Note that the  restriction may be non-homogeneous(q  0) but the  restriction must be homoge-
neous. Nonlinear restrictions are not supported, and neither are restrictions that cross between 
3
Note that in this contextwearebending theusual matrix indexation convention, using the leading index to refer to
the columnof (theparticular cointegrating vector). This isstandard practicein theliterature, anddefensibleinsofar as
itisthe columnsof (thecointegrating relationsor equilibrium errors)thatare of primary interest.
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
245
and . When r > 1, such restrictions may be in common across all the columns of  (or ) or may
be specific to certain columns of these matrices. For useful discussions of this point seeBoswijk
(1995) andBoswijkandDoornik (2004), section 4.4.
The restrictions (27.5) and (27.6) may be written in explicit form as
vec  Hh
0
(27.7)
and
vec
0
 G 
(27.8)
respectively, where  and   are the free parameter vectors associated with  and  respectively.
We may refer to the free parameters collectively as  (the column vector formed by concatenating
and  ). Gretl uses this representation internally when testing the restrictions.
If the list of restrictions that is passed to the restrict command contains more constraints than
necessary to achieve identification, then an LR test is performed. In addition, the restrict com-
mand can be given the --full switch, in which case full estimates for the restricted system are
printed (including the —
i
terms) and the system thus restricted becomes the “current model” for
the purposes of further tests. Thus you are able to carry out cumulative tests, as in Chapter 7 of
Johansen(1995).
Syntax
The full syntax for specifying the restriction is an extension of that exemplified in the previous
section. Inside a restrict...end restrict block, valid statements are of the form
parameter linear combination = scalar
where a parameter linear combination involves a weighted sum of individual elements of  or 
(but not both in the same combination); the scalar on the right-hand side must be 0 for combina-
tions involving , but can be any real number for combinations involving . Below, we give a few
examples of valid restrictions:
b[1,1] = 1.618
b[1,4] + 2*b[2,5] = 0
a[1,3] = 0
a[1,1] - a[1,2] = 0
Special syntax is used when a certain constraint shouldbe applied to all columns of : in this case,
one index is given for each b term, and the square brackets are dropped. Hence, the following
syntax
restrict
b1 + b2 = 0
end restrict
corresponds to

2
6
6
6
6
4
11
21
11
21
13
23
14
24
3
7
7
7
7
5
The same convention is used for : when only one index is given for an “a” term the restriction is
presumed to apply to all r columns of , or in other words the variable associated with the given
row of  is weakly exogenous. For instance, the formulation
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
246
restrict
a3 = 0
a4 = 0
end restrict
specifies that variables 3 and 4 do not respond to the deviation from equilibrium in the previous
period.
4
A variant on the single-index syntax for common restrictions on  and  is available: you can
replace the index number with the name of the corresponding variable, in square brackets. For
example, instead of a3 = 0 one could write a[cpr] = 0, if the third variable in the system is
named cpr.
Finally, a shortcut (or anyway an alternative) is available for setting up complex restrictions (but
currently only in relation to ): you can specify R
b
and q, as in R
b
vec  q, by giving the names
of previously defined matrices. For example,
matrix I4 = I(4)
matrix vR = I4**(I4~zeros(4,1))
matrix vq = mshape(I4,16,1)
restrict
R = vR
q = vq
end restrict
which manually imposes Phillips normalization on the  estimates for a system with cointegrating
rank 4.
There are two points to note in relation to this option. First, vec is taken to include the coeffi-
cientson all terms within the cointegration space, including the restricted constant or trend, ifany,
as well as any restricted exogenous variables. Second, it is acceptable to give an R matrix with a
number of columns equal to the number of rows of ; this variant is taken to specify a restriction
that is in common across all the columns of .
An example
Brand and Cassola(2004)proposeamoneydemandsystemfortheEuroarea,inwhichtheypostu-
late three long-run equilibrium relationships:
money demand
m 
l
l
y
y
Fisher equation
 l
Expectation theory of l  s
interest rates
where m is real money demand, l and s are long- and short-term interest rates, y is output and
 is inflation.
5
(The names for these variables in the gretl data file are m_p, rl, rs, y and infl,
respectively.)
The cointegration rank assumed by the authors is 3 and there are 5 variables, giving 15 elements
in the  matrix. 3 3  9 restrictions are required for identification, and a just-identified system
would have 15  9  6 free parameters. However, the postulated long-run relationships feature
only three free parameters, so the over-identification rank is 3.
4
Note thatwhen two indices are given in a restriction on  the indexation isconsistent with that for  restrictions:
the leading index denotes the cointegrating vectorandthe trailing indexthe equation number.
5
Atraditional formulation of the Fisher equation would reverse the roles of the variables in the second equation,
but this detail is immaterial in the present context; moreover, the expectation theory of interest rates implies that the
third equilibrium relationship should include a constant for the liquidity premium. However, since in this example the
system isestimated with the constant term unrestricted, the liquidity premium gets absorbed into the system intercept
anddisappearsfrom z
t
.
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
247
Example 27.1: Estimationof a money demand system with constraints on
Input:
open brand_cassola.gdt
# perform a few transformations
m_p = m_p*100
y = y*100
infl = infl/4
rs = rs/4
rl = rl/4
# replicate table 4, page 824
vecm 2 3 m_p infl rl rs y -q
ll0 = $lnl
restrict --full
b[1,1] = 1
b[1,2] = 0
b[1,4] = 0
b[2,1] = 0
b[2,2] = 1
b[2,4] = 0
b[2,5] = 0
b[3,1] = 0
b[3,2] = 0
b[3,3] = 1
b[3,4] = -1
b[3,5] = 0
end restrict
ll1 = $rlnl
Partial output:
Unrestricted loglikelihood (lu) = 116.60268
Restricted loglikelihood (lr) = 115.86451
2 * (lu - lr) = 1.47635
P(Chi-Square(3) > 1.47635) = 0.68774
beta (cointegrating vectors, standard errors in parentheses)
m_p
1.0000
0.0000
0.0000
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
infl
0.0000
1.0000
0.0000
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
rl
1.6108
-0.67100
1.0000
(0.62752)
(0.049482)
(0.0000)
rs
0.0000
0.0000
-1.0000
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
y
-1.3304
0.0000
0.0000
(0.030533)
(0.0000)
(0.0000)
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
248
Example27.1 replicates Table 4 on page 824 of the Brand and Cassola article.
6
Note that we use
the $lnl accessor after the vecm command to store the unrestricted log-likelihood and the $rlnl
accessor after restrict for its restricted counterpart.
The example continues in script27.2, where we perform further testing to check whether (a) the
income elasticity in the money demand equation is 1 (
y
1) and (b) the Fisher relation is homo-
geneous (  1). Since the --full switch was given to the initial restrict command, additional
restrictions can be applied without having to repeat the previous ones. (The secondscript contains
afewprintf commands, which are not strictly necessary, to format the output nicely.) It turns out
that both of the additional hypotheses are rejected by the data, with p-values of 0:002 and 0:004.
Example 27.2: Further testing of money demand system
Input:
restrict
b[1,5] = -1
end restrict
ll_uie = $rlnl
restrict
b[2,3] = -1
end restrict
ll_hfh = $rlnl
# replicate table 5, page 824
printf "Testing zero restrictions in cointegration space:\n"
printf "
LR-test, rank = 3: chi^2(3) = %6.4f [%6.4f]\n", 2*(ll0-ll1), \
pvalue(X, 3, 2*(ll0-ll1))
printf "Unit income elasticity: LR-test, rank = 3:\n"
printf "
chi^2(4) = %g [%6.4f]\n", 2*(ll0-ll_uie), \
pvalue(X, 4, 2*(ll0-ll_uie))
printf "Homogeneity in the Fisher hypothesis:\n"
printf "
LR-test, rank = 3: chi^2(4) = %6.3f [%6.4f]\n", 2*(ll0-ll_hfh), \
pvalue(X, 4, 2*(ll0-ll_hfh))
Output:
Testing zero restrictions in cointegration space:
LR-test, rank = 3: chi^2(3) = 1.4763 [0.6877]
Unit income elasticity: LR-test, rank = 3:
chi^2(4) = 17.2071 [0.0018]
Homogeneity in the Fisher hypothesis:
LR-test, rank = 3: chi^2(4) = 15.547 [0.0037]
Another type of test that is commonly performed is the “weak exogeneity” test. In this context, a
variable is said to be weakly exogenous if all coefficients on the corresponding row in the  matrix
are zero. If this is the case, that variable does not adjust to deviations from any of the long-run
equilibria and can be considered an autonomous driving force of the whole system.
The code in Example27.3 performs this test for each variable in turn, thus replicating the first
column of Table 6 on page 825 ofBrandandCassola (2004). The results showthat weak exogeneity
might perhaps be accepted for the long-term interest rate and real GDP (p-values 0:07 and 0:08
respectively).
6
Modulowhatappearto be afewtyposin thearticle.
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
249
Example 27.3: Testing for weak exogeneity
Input:
restrict
a1 = 0
end restrict
ts_m = 2*(ll0 - $rlnl)
restrict
a2 = 0
end restrict
ts_p = 2*(ll0 - $rlnl)
restrict
a3 = 0
end restrict
ts_l = 2*(ll0 - $rlnl)
restrict
a4 = 0
end restrict
ts_s = 2*(ll0 - $rlnl)
restrict
a5 = 0
end restrict
ts_y = 2*(ll0 - $rlnl)
loop foreach i m p l s y --quiet
printf "Delta $i\t%6.3f [%6.4f]\n", ts_$i, pvalue(X, 6, ts_$i)
endloop
Output (variable, LR test, p-value):
Delta m
18.111 [0.0060]
Delta p
21.067 [0.0018]
Delta l
11.819 [0.0661]
Delta s
16.000 [0.0138]
Delta y
11.335 [0.0786]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested