Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
250
Identification and testability
One point regarding VECM restrictions that can be confusing at first is that identification (does
the restriction identify the system?) and testability (is the restriction testable?) are quite separate
matters. Restrictions can be identifying but not testable; less obviously, they can be testable but
not identifying.
This can be seen quite easily in relation to a rank-1 system. The restriction 
1
1 is identifying
(it pins down the scale of ) but, being a pure scaling, it is not testable. On the other hand, the
restriction 
1

2
0 is testable—the system with this requirement imposedwill almost certainly
have a lower maximized likelihood—but it is not identifying; it still leaves open the scale of .
We said above that the number of restrictions must equal at least r
2
,where r is the cointegrating
rank, for identification. This is a necessary andnot a sufficient condition. In fact, when r >1 it can
be quite tricky to assess whether a given set of restrictions is identifying. Gretl uses the method
suggested byDoornik(1995), where identification is assessed via the rank of the information ma-
trix.
It can be shown that for restrictions of the sort (27.7) and (27.8) the information matrix has the
same rank as the Jacobian matrix
J 
h
I
p
G :   I
p
1
H
i
Asufficient condition for identification is that the rank of J equals the number of free param-
eters. The rank of this matrix is evaluated by examination of its singular values at a randomly
selected point in the parameter space. For practical purposes we treat this condition as if it were
both necessary and sufficient; that is, we disregard the special cases where identification could be
achieved without this condition being met.7
27.7 Numerical solution methods
In general, the ML estimator for the restricted VECM problem has no closed-form solution, hence
the maximum must be found via numerical methods.
8
In some cases convergence may be difficult,
and gretl provides several choices to solve the problem.
Switching and LBFGS
Two maximization methods are available in gretl. The default is the switching algorithm set out
inBoswijkandDoornik (2004). The alternative is a limited-memory variant of the BFGS algorithm
(LBFGS), using analytical derivatives. This is invoked using the --lbfgs flag with the restrict
command.
The switching algorithm works by explicitly maximizing the likelihood at each iteration, with re-
spect to
ˆ
,
ˆ
and
ˆ
Ú(the covariance matrix of the residuals) in turn. This method shares a feature
with the basic Johansen eigenvalues procedure, namely, it can handle a set of restrictionsthat does
not fully identify the parameters.
LBFGS, on the other hand, requires that the model be fully identified. When using LBFGS, therefore,
you may have to supplement the restrictions of interest with normalizations that serve to identify
the parameters. For example, one might use all or part of the Phillips normalization (see section
27.5).
Neither the switching algorithm nor LBFGS is guaranteed to find the global ML solution.9 The
7
SeeBoswijkandDoornik (2004), pp. 447–8 for discussion ofthispoint.
8
The exception is restrictions thatare homogeneous, common to all  or all  (in case r > 1), and involve either 
only or  only. Such restrictions are handled viathe modified eigenvaluesmethod setoutbyJohansen (1995). We solve
directly for the ML estimator, withoutany needfor iterative methods.
9
Indeveloping gretl’sVECM-testing facilitieswe have considereda fairnumber of“trickycases”from varioussources.
We’d like to thankLuca Fanelli of the University of Bologna and Sven Schreiber of Goethe University Frankfurtfor their
help indevising torture-testsfor gretl’sVECM code.
Conversion of pdf to ppt online - control SDK system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Conversion of pdf to ppt online - control SDK system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
251
optimizer may end up at a local maximum (or, in the case of the switching algorithm, at a saddle
point).
The solution (or lack thereof) may be sensitive to the initial value selected for . By default, gretl
selects a starting point using a deterministic method based on Boswijk (1995), but two further
optionsare available: the initialization may be adjusted using simulated annealing, or the user may
supply an explicit initial value for .
The default initialization method is:
1. Calculate the unrestrictedML
ˆ
using the Johansen procedure.
2. If the restriction on  is non-homogeneous, use the method proposed by Boswijk:
0
 I
r
ˆ
?
0
H
I
r
ˆ
?
0
h
0
(27.9)
where
ˆ
0
?
ˆ
 0 and A denotes the Moore–Penrose inverse of A. Otherwise
0
H
0
H
1
H
0
vec
ˆ

(27.10)
3. vec
0
H
0
h
0
.
4. Calculate the unrestrictedML ˆ conditional on 
0
,as per Johansen:
ˆ
S
01
0

0
0
S
11
0
1
(27.11)
5. If  is restricted by vec
0
 G , then  
0
G
0
G
1
G
0
vecˆ
0
and vec
0
0
G 
0
.
Alternative initialization methods
As mentioned above, gretl offers the option of adjusting the initialization using simulated anneal-
ing. This is invoked by adding the --jitter option to the restrict command.
The basicidea is this: we start at a certain point in the parameter space, andforeach of n iterations
(currently n  4096) we randomly select a new point within a certain radius of the previous one,
and determine the likelihoodat the new point. If the likelihoodis higher, we jump tothe new point;
otherwise, we jump with probability P (and remain at the previous point with probability 1 P). As
theiterationsproceed, thesystem gradually “cools”—that is, the radiusofthe random perturbation
is reduced, as is the probability ofmaking a jump when the likelihood fails to increase.
In the course of thisprocedure many points in the parameter space are evaluated, startingwith the
point arrived at by the deterministic method, which we’ll call 
0
.One of these points will be “best”
in the sense of yielding the highest likelihood: call it 
.This point may or may not have a greater
likelihood than 
0
.And the procedure has an end point, 
n
,which may or may not be “best”.
The rule followedby gretl in selectingan initial value for basedon simulated annealingisthis: use
if 
>
0
,otherwise use 
n
.That is, if we get an improvement in the likelihood via annealing,
we make full use of this; on the other hand, if we fail to get an improvement we nonetheless allow
the annealing to randomize the starting point. Experiments indicate that the latter effect can be
helpful.
Besides annealing, a further alternative is manual initialization. This is done by passing a prede-
fined vector to the set command with parameter initvals, as in
set initvals myvec
The details depend on whether the switching algorithm or LBFGS is used. For the switching algo-
rithm, there are two options for specifying the initial values. The more user-friendly one (for most
people, we suppose) is to specify a matrix that contains vec followed by vec. For example:
control SDK system:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
252
open denmark.gdt
vecm 2 1 LRM LRY IBO IDE --rc --seasonals
matrix BA = {1, -1, 6, -6, -6, -0.2, 0.1, 0.02, 0.03}
set initvals BA
restrict
b[1] = 1
b[1] + b[2] = 0
b[3] + b[4] = 0
end restrict
In this example—from Johansen (1995)—the cointegration rank is 1 and there are 4 variables.
However, the model includes a restricted constant (the --rc flag) so that  has 5 elements. The 
matrix has 4 elements, one per equation. So the matrixBA may be read as

1
;
2
;
3
;
4
;
5
;
1
;
2
;
3
;
4
The other option, which is compulsory when using LBFGS, is to specify the initial values in terms
of the free parameters, and  . Getting this right is somewhat less obvious. As mentionedabove,
the implicit-form restriction Rvec  q has explicit form vec  Hh
0
,where H  R
?
,the
right nullspace of R. The vector  is shorter, by the number of restrictions, than vec. The
savvy user will then see what needs to be done. The other point to take into account is that if  is
unrestricted, the effective length of   is 0, since it is then optimal to compute  using Johansen’s
formula, conditional on  (equation27.11 above). The example above could be rewritten as:
open denmark.gdt
vecm 2 1 LRM LRY IBO IDE --rc --seasonals
matrix phi = {-8, -6}
set initvals phi
restrict --lbfgs
b[1] = 1
b[1] + b[2] = 0
b[3] + b[4] = 0
end restrict
In this more economical formulation the initializer specifies only the two free parameters in  (5
elements in  minus 3 restrictions). There is no call to give values for   since  is unrestricted.
Scale removal
Consider a simpler version of the restriction discussed in the previous section, namely,
restrict
b[1] = 1
b[1] + b[2] = 0
end restrict
This restriction comprises a substantive, testable requirement—that 
1
and 
2
sum to zero—and
anormalization or scaling, 
1
1. The question arises, might it be easier and more reliable to
maximize the likelihood without imposing 
1
 1?
10
If so, we could record this normalization,
remove it for the purpose of maximizing the likelihood, then reimpose it by scaling the result.
Unfortunately it is not possible to say in advance whether “scale removal” of this sort will give
better results for any particular estimation problem. However, this does seem to be the case more
often than not. Gretl therefore performs scale removal where feasible, unless you
10
As anumericalmatter, thatis. In principle this should makenodifference.
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert PDF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Jpeg
can perform rapid and high quality file conversion between PPT and PDF PDF to Tiff Conversion. transform and convert Tiff image file to Adobe PDF document, then
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 27. Cointegration and Vector Error Correction Models
253
 explicitly forbid this, by giving the --no-scaling option flag to the restrict command; or
 provide a specific vector of initial values; or
 select the LBFGS algorithm for maximization.
Scale removal is deemed infeasible if there are any cross-column restrictions on , or any non-
homogeneous restrictions involving more than one element of .
In addition, experimentation has suggested to us that scale removal is inadvisable if the system is
just identifiedwith thenormalization(s) included, so wedonot doit in that case. By “just identified”
we mean that the system would not be identified if any of the restrictions were removed. On that
criterion the above example is not just identified, since the removal of the secondrestriction would
not affect identification; and gretl would in fact perform scale removal in this case unless the user
specified otherwise.
control SDK system:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. MS Office to PDF Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
C# TIFF - Conversion from Word, Excel, PPT to TIFF. Learn How to Change MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to TIFF Image File in C#. Overview
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 28
Multivariate models
By a multivariate model we mean one that includes more than one dependent variable. Certain
specific types of multivariate model for time-series data are discussed elsewhere: chapter26 deals
with VARs and chapter27 with VECMs. Here we discuss two general sorts of multivariate model,
implemented in gretl via the system command: SUR systems (Seemingly Unrelated Regressions),
in which all the regressors are taken to be exogenous and interest centers on the covariance of the
error term across equations; and simultaneous systems, in which some regressors are assumed to
be endogenous.
In this chapter we give an account of the syntax and use of the system command and its compan-
ions, restrict and estimate; we also explain the options and accessors available in connection
with multivariate models.
28.1 The system command
The specification of a multivariate system takes the form of a block of statements, starting with
system and ending with end system. Once a system is specified it can estimated via various
methods, using the estimate command, with or without restrictions, which may be imposed via
the restrict command.
Starting a system block
The first line of a system block may be augmented in either (or both) of two ways:
 An estimation method is specified for the system. This is done by following system with
an expression of the form method=estimator, where estimator must be one of ols (Ordinary
Least Squares), tsls (Two-Stage Least Squares), sur (Seemingly Unrelated Regressions), 3sls
(Three-Stage Least Squares), liml (Limited Information Maximum Likelihood) or fiml (Full
Information Maximum Likelihood). Two examples:
system method=sur
system method=fiml
OLS, TSLS and LIML are, of course, single-equation methods rather than true system estima-
tors; they are included to facilitate comparisons.
 The system is assigned a name. This is done by giving the name first, followed by a back-
arrow, “<-”, followed by system. If the name contains spaces it must be enclosed in double-
quotes. Here are two examples:
sys1 <- system
"System 1" <- system
Note, however, that this naming method is not available within a user-defined function, only
in the main body of a gretl script.
If the initial system line is augmented in the first way, the effect is that the system is estimated as
soon as its definition is completed, using the specified method. The effect of the second option is
254
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
This VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion tutorial will illustrate our effective PPT to PDF converting control SDK from following aspects.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
to use our VB.NET PowerPoint Conversion Control to image or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF documents that can be converted from PPT document, please
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 28. Multivariate models
255
that the system can then be referencedby the assignedname for the purposesofthe restrictand
estimate commands; in the gretl GUI an additional effect is that an icon for the system is added
to the “Session view”.
These two possibilities can be combined, as in
mysys <- system method=3sls
In this example the system is estimated immediately via Three-Stage Least Squares, and is also
available for subsequent use under the name mysys.
If the system is not named via the back-arrow mechanism, it is still available for subsequent use
via restrict and estimate; in this case you should use the generic name $system to refer to the
last-defined multivariate system.
The body of a system block
The most basic element in the body of a system block is the equation statement, which is used
to specify each equation within the system. This takes the same form as the regression specifica-
tion for single-equation estimators, namely a list of series with the dependent variable given first,
followed by the regressors, with the series given either by name or by ID number (order in the
dataset). A system block must contain at least two equation statements, and for systems without
endogenous regressors these statements are all that is required. So, for example, a minimal SUR
specification might look like this:
system method=sur
equation y1 const x1
equation y2 const x2
end system
For simultaneous systemsit is necessary to determine which regressors are endogenous and which
exogenous. By default all regressors are treatedasexogenous, except that any variable that appears
as the dependent variable in one equation is automatically treated as endogeous if it appears as a
regressor elsewhere. However, an explicit list of endogenous regressors may be supplied follow-
ing the equations lines: this takes the form of the keyword endog followed by the names or ID
numbers of the relevant regressors.
When estimation is via TSLS or 3SLS it is possible to specify a particular set of instruments for each
equation. This is done by giving the equation lists in the format used with the tsls command:
first the dependent variable, then the regressors, then a semicolon, then the instruments, as in
system method=3sls
equation y1 const x11 x12 ; const x11 z1
equation y2 const x21 x22 ; const x21 z2
end system
An alternative way of specifying instruments is to insert an extra line starting with instr, followed
by the list ofvariables actingasinstruments. Thisis especially useful for specifying thesystem with
the equations keyword, see the following subsection. As in tsls, any regressors that are not also
listed as instruments are treated as endogenous, so in the example above x11 and x21 are treated
as exogenous while x21 and x22 are endogenous, and instrumented by z1 and z2 respectively.
One more sort ofstatementis allowedin a systemblock: that is, thekeywordidentity followedby
an equation that definesan accountingrelationship, ratherthen a stochastic one, between variables.
For example,
identity Y = C + I + G + X
There can be more than one identity in a system block. But note that these statementsare specific
to estimation via FIML; they are ignored for other estimators.
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: PPTX to SVG Conversion; Render PPT to Vector
add-on allows developers to perform high-quality PPT (.pptx) to svg conversion in both to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 28. Multivariate models
256
Equation systems within functions
It isalso possibleto define amultivariate system in a programmatic way. This isuseful ifthe precise
specification of the system depends on some input parameters that are not known in advance, but
are given when the script is actually run.
1
The relevant syntax is given by the equations keyword (note the plural), which replaces the block
of equation lines in the standard form. An equations line requires two list arguments. The first
list must contain all series on the left-hand side of the system; thus the number of elements in this
first list determines the number ofequations in the system. The secondlist isa “list oflists”, which
is a special variant of the list data type. That is, for each equation ofthe system you must provide a
list of right-hand side variables, andthe lists for all equations must be joined by assigning them to
another list object; in that assignment, they must be separated by a semicolon. Here is an example
for a two-equation system:
list syslist = xlist1 ; xlist2
Therefore, specifying a system generically in this way just involves building the necessary list
arguments, as shown in the following example:
open denmark
list LHS = LRM LRY
list RHS1 = const LRM(-1) IBO(-1) IDE(-1)
list RHS2 = const LRY(-1) IBO(-1)
list RHS = RHS1 ; RHS2
system method=ols
equations LHS RHS
end system
As mentioned above, the option of assigning a specific name to a system is not available within
functions, but the generic identifier $system can be used to similar effect. The following example
shows how one can define a system, estimate it via two methods, apply a restriction, then re-
estimate it subject to the restriction.
function void anonsys(series x, series y)
system
equation x const
equation y const
end system
estimate $system method=ols
estimate $system method=sur
restrict $system
b[1,1] - b[2,1] = 0
end restrict
estimate $system method=ols
end function
28.2 Restriction and estimation
The behavior of the restrict command is a little different for multivariate systems as compared
with single-equation models.
In the single-equation case, restrict refers to the last-estimated model, andonce the command is
completed the restriction is tested. In the multivariate case, you must give the name of the system
to which the restriction is to be applied (or $system to refer to the last-defined system), and the
1
Thisfeaturewasaddedinversion 1.9.7 ofgretl.
Chapter 28. Multivariate models
257
effect of the command is just to attach the restriction to the system; testing is not done until the
next estimate command is given. In addition, in the system case the default is to produce full
estimates of the restricted model; if you are not interested in the full estimates and just want the
test statistic you can append the --quiet option to estimate.
Agiven system restriction remains in force until it is replaced or removed. To return a system to
its unrestricted state you can give an empty restrict block, as in
restrict sysname
end restrict
Asillustratedabove, you can usethe methodtagto specify an estimation methodwith the estimate
command. If the system hasalready been estimated you can omit this tagand the previous method
is used again.
The estimate command is the main locus for options regarding the details of estimation. The
available options are as follows:
 If the estimation method is SUR or 3SLS and the --iterate flag is given, the estimator will be
iterated. In the case of SUR, if the procedure converges the results are maximum likelihood
estimates. Iteration ofthree-stage least squares,however, does not in general converge on the
full-information maximum likelihoodresults. This flag is ignored for other estimators.
 If the equation-by-equation estimators OLS or TSLS are chosen, the default is to apply a de-
grees of freedom correction when calculating standard errors. This can be suppressed using
the --no-df-corr flag. This flag has no effect with the other estimators; no degrees of free-
dom correction is applied in any case.
 By default, the formula used in calculating the elements of the cross-equation covariance
matrix is
ˆ
ij
ˆu
0
i
ˆu
j
T
where T is the sample size and ˆu
i
is the vector of residuals from equation i. But if the
--geomean flag is given, a degrees of freedom correction is applied: the formula is
ˆ
ij
ˆu
0
i
ˆu
j
q
T  k
i
T  k
j
where k
i
denotes the number of independent parameters in equation i.
 If an iterative method is specified, the --verbose option calls for printing of the details of
the iterations.
 When the system estimator is SUR or 3SLS the cross-equation covariance matrix is initially
estimated via OLS or TSLS, respectively. In the case of a system subject to restrictions the
question arises: should the initial single-equation estimator be restricted or unrestricted?
The default is the former, but the --unrestrict-init flag can be used to select unrestricted
initialization. (Note that this is unlikely to make much difference if the --iterate option is
given.)
28.3 System accessors
After system estimation various matrices may be retrieved for further analysis. Let g denote the
number of equations in the system and let K denote the total number of estimated parameters
(K 
P
i
k
i
). The accessors $uhat and $yhat get T  g matrices holding the residuals and fitted
values respectively. The accessor $coeff gets the stacked K-vector of parameter estimates; $vcv
Chapter 28. Multivariate models
258
gets the KK variance matrixofthe parameterestimates; and$sigma getsthe gg cross-equation
covariance matrix,
ˆ
Ö.
Atest statistic for the hypothesis that Ö is diagonal can be retrieved as $diagtest and its p-value
as $diagpval. This is the Breusch–Pagan test except when the estimator is (unrestricted) iterated
SUR, in which case it’s a Likelihood Ratio test. The Breusch–Pagan test is computed as
LM  T
g
X
i2
iX 1
j1
r
2
ij
where r
ij
ˆ
ij
=
q
ˆ
ii
ˆ
jj
;the LR test is
LR  T
0
@
g
X
i1
log ˆ
2
i
logj
ˆ
Öj
1
A
where ˆ
2
i
is ˆu
0
i
ˆu
i
=T from the individual OLS regressions. In both cases the test statistic is dis-
tributed asymptotically as 
2
with gg  1=2 degrees of freedom.
Structural and reduced forms
Systems of simultaneous systems can be represented in structural form as
—y
t
A
1
y
t 1
A
2
y
t 2
A
p
y
t p
Bx
t

t
where y
t
represents the vector of endogenous variables in period t, x
t
denotes the vector of ex-
ogenous variables, and p is the maximum lag of the endogenous regressors. The structural-form
matrices can be retrieved as $sysGamma, $sysA and $sysB respectively. If y
t
is m  1 and x
t
is
n1, then — is m m and B is m n. Ifthe system contains no lags of the endogenous variables
then the A matrix is not defined, otherwise A is the horizontal concatenation of A
1
;:::;A
p
,and is
therefore m mp.
From the structural form it is straightforward to obtain the reduced form, namely,
y
t
—
1
0
@
p
X
i1
A
i
y
t i
1
A
—
1
Bx
t
v
t
where v
t
—
1
t
.The reducedform is usedby gretl to generate forecasts in response to the fcast
command. This means that—in contrast to single-equation estimation—the values produced via
fcast for a static, within-sample forecast will in general differ from the fitted values retrieved via
$yhat. The fitted values for equation i represent the expectation of y
ti
conditional on the contem-
poraneous values of all the regressors, while the fcast values are conditional on the exogenous
and predetermined variables only.
The above account has to be qualified for the case where a system is set up for estimation via TSLS
or 3SLS using a specific list of instruments per equation, as described in section28.1. In that case
it is possible to include more endogenous regressors than explicit equations (although, of course,
there must be sufficient instruments to achieve identification). In such systems endogenous re-
gressors that have no associated explicit equation are treated “as if” exogenous when constructing
the structural-form matrices. This means that forecasts are conditional on the observed values of
the “extra” endogenous regressors rather than solely on the values of the exogenous and predeter-
mined variables.
Chapter 29
Forecasting
29.1 Introduction
In some econometric contexts forecasting is the prime objective: one wants estimates of the future
values ofcertain variables to reduce the uncertainty attaching to current decision making. In other
contexts where real-time forecasting is not the focus prediction may nonetheless be an important
moment in the analysis. For example, out-of-sample prediction can provide a useful check on
the validity of an econometric model. In other cases we are interested in questions of “what if”:
for example, howmight macroeconomic outcomes have differed over a certain period if a different
policy had been pursued? In the lattercases“prediction” need not be a matter of actually projecting
into the future but in any case it involves generating fitted values from a given model. The term
“postdiction” might be more accurate but it is not commonly used; we tend to talk of prediction
even when there is no true forecast in view.
This chapter offers an overview of the methods available within gretl for forecasting or prediction
(whether forwardin time or not) and explicatessome of the finer points of the relevant commands.
29.2 Saving and inspecting fitted values
In the simplest case, the “predictions” of interest are just the (within sample) fitted values from an
econometric model. For the single-equation linear model, y
t
X
t
u
t
,these are
ˆ
y
t
X
t
ˆ
.
In command-line mode, the yˆ series can be retrieved, after estimating a model, using the accessor
$yhat, as in
series yh = $yhat
If the model in question takes the form of a system of equations, $yhat returns a matrix, each
column ofwhich containsthe fitted values for a particular dependent variable. To extract the fitted
series for, e.g., the dependent variable in the second equation, do
matrix Yh = $yhat
series yh2 = Yh[,2]
Having obtained a series of fitted values, you can use the fcstats function to produce a vector of
statistics that characterize the accuracy of the predictions (see section29.4 below).
The gretl GUI offers several ways of accessing and examining within-sample predictions. In the
model display window the Save menu contains an item for saving fitted values, the Graphs menu
allows plotting of fitted versus actual values, andthe Analysismenu offers a display of actual,fitted
and residual values.
29.3 The fcast command
The fcast command generates predictions based on the last estimated model. Several questions
arise here: How to control the range over which predictions are generated? How to control the
forecasting method (where a choice is available)? How to control the printing and/or saving of the
results? Basic answers can be found in the Gretl Command Reference; we add some more details
here.
259
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested