Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
290
Example 32.4: Multinomial logit
Input:
open keane.gdt
smpl (year=87) --restrict
logit status 0 educ exper expersq black --multinomial
Output (selected portions):
Model 1: Multinomial Logit, using observations 1-1738 (n = 1717)
Missing or incomplete observations dropped: 21
Dependent variable: status
Standard errors based on Hessian
coefficient
std. error
z
p-value
--------------------------------------------------------
status = 2
const
10.2779
1.13334
9.069
1.20e-19 ***
educ
-0.673631
0.0698999
-9.637
5.57e-22 ***
exper
-0.106215
0.173282
-0.6130
0.5399
expersq
-0.0125152
0.0252291
-0.4961
0.6199
black
0.813017
0.302723
2.686
0.0072
***
status = 3
const
5.54380
1.08641
5.103
3.35e-07 ***
educ
-0.314657
0.0651096
-4.833
1.35e-06 ***
exper
0.848737
0.156986
5.406
6.43e-08 ***
expersq
-0.0773003
0.0229217
-3.372
0.0007
***
black
0.311361
0.281534
1.106
0.2687
Mean dependent var
2.691322
S.D. dependent var
0.573502
Log-likelihood
-907.8572
Akaike criterion
1835.714
Schwarz criterion
1890.198
Hannan-Quinn
1855.874
Number of cases ’correctly predicted’ = 1366 (79.6%)
Likelihood ratio test: Chi-square(8) = 583.722 [0.0000]
Change pdf to powerpoint - Library SDK class:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Change pdf to powerpoint - Library SDK class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
291
y
2;i
k
2
X
j1
z
ij
j
"
2;i
y
2;i
1 () y
2;i
>0
(32.10)
"
"
2;i
"
2;i
#
N
"
0;
1 
1
!#
(32.11)
 The explanatory variables for the first equation x and for the second equation z may overlap
 example contained in the biprobit.inp sample script.
 $uhat and $yhat are matrices
FIXME: expand.
32.5 Panel estimators
When your dataset is a panel, the traditional choice for binary dependent variable models was,
for many years, to use logit with fixed effects and probit with random effects (see18.1 for a brief
discussion of this dichotomy in the context of linear models). Nowadays, the choice is somewhat
wider, but the two traditional models are by and large what practitioners use as routine tools.
Gretl provides FE logit as a function package
1
and RE probit natively. Provided your dataset has
apanel structure, the latter option can be obtained by adding the --random option to the probit
command:
probit depvar const indvar1 indvar2 --random
as exemplifiedin thereprobit.inp samplescript. Thenumerical technique usedforthisparticular
estimator is Gauss-Hermite quadrature, which we’ll now briefly describe. Generalizing equation
(32.5) to a panel context, we get
y
i;t
Xk
j1
x
ijt
j

i
"
i;t
z
i;t
!
i;t
(32.12)
in which we assume that the individual effect, 
i
, and the disturbance term, "
i;t
, are mutually
independent zero-mean Gaussian random variables. The composite error term, !
i;t

i
"
i;t
,is
therefore a normal r. v. with mean zero and variance 1 
2
. Because of the individual effect, 
i
,
observations for the same unit are not independent; the likelihood therefore has to be evaluated
on a per-unit basis, as
i
logP
y
i;1
;y
i;2
;:::;y
i;T
:
and there’s no way to write the above as a product of individual terms.
However, the above probability could be written as a product if we were to treat 
i
as a constant;
in that case we would have
i
j
i
XT
t1
Ø
2
4
2y
i;t
1
x
ijt
j

i
q
1
2
3
5
so that we can compute ‘
i
by integrating 
i
out as
i
E
i
j
i
Z
1
1
‘
i
j
i
’
i
q
1
2
d
i
1
Althoughthismaychange in the near future.
Library SDK class:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Able to view and edit PowerPoint rapidly. Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PowerPoint to Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
292
The technique known as Gauss–Hermite quadrature is simply a way of approximating the above
integral via a sum of carefully chosen terms:
2
i
Xm
k1
‘
i
j
i
n
k
w
k
where the numbers n
k
and w
k
are known as quadrature points and weights,respectively. Ofcourse,
accuracy improves with higher values of m, but so does CPU usage. Note that this technique can
also be used in more general cases by using the quadtable() function and the mle command via
the apparatus described in chapter 21. Here, however, the calculations were hard-coded in C for
maximal speed and efficiency.
Experience shows that a reasonable compromise can be achieved in most cases by choosing m in
theorder of20or so;gretl uses 32 asa default value,but thiscan be changed via the --quadpoints
option, as in
probit y const x1 x2 x3 --random --quadpoints=48
32.6 The Tobit model
The Tobit model is used when the dependent variable of a model is censored. Assume a latent
variable y
i
can be described as
y
i
Xk
j1
x
ij
j
"
i
;
where "
i
N0;
2
. Ify
i
were observable,the model’sparameterscould be estimatedvia ordinary
least squares. On the contrary, suppose that we observe y
i
,defined as
y
i
8
>
>
<
>
>
:
a
for y
i
a
y
i
for a < y
i
<b
b
for y
i
b
(32.13)
In most cases foundin the appliedliterature, a 0 andb  1, so in practice negative values of y
i
are not observed and are replaced by zeros.
In this case, regressing y
i
on the x
i
s does not yield consistent estimates of the parameters ,
because the conditional mean Ey
i
jx
i
is not equal to
P
k
j1
x
ij
j
. It can be shown that restricting
the sample to non-zero observations would not yield consistent estimates either. The solution is to
estimate the parameters via maximum likelihood. The syntax is simply
tobit depvar indvars
As usual, progress of the maximization algorithm can be tracked via the --verbose switch, while
$uhat returns the generalized residuals. Note that in this case the generalized residual is defined
as ˆu
i
E"
i
jy
i
0 for censored observations, so the familiar equality ˆu
i
y
i
ˆy
i
only holds for
uncensored observations, that is, when y
i
>0.
An important difference between the Tobit estimator and OLS is that the consequences of non-
normality of the disturbance term are much more severe: non-normality implies inconsistency for
the Tobit estimator. For this reason, the output for the Tobit model includes theChesherandIrish
(1987) normality test by default.
The general case in which a is nonzero and/or b is finite can be handled by using the options
--llimit and --rlimit. So, for example,
2
Some have suggested using a more refined method called adaptive Gauss-Hermite quadrature; this is not imple-
mented ingretl.
Library SDK class:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint in C# .NET Programming Project. PowerPoint Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
293
tobit depvar indvars --llimit=10
would tell gretl that the left bounda is set to 10.
32.7 Interval regression
The interval regression model arises when the dependent variable is unobserved for some (possibly
all) observations; what we observe instead is an interval in which the dependent variable lies. In
other words, the data generating process is assumed to be
y
i
x
i

i
but we only know that m
i
y
i
M
i
, where the interval may be left- or right-unbounded (but
not both). If m
i
M
i
,we effectively observe y
i
and no information loss occurs. In practice, each
observation belongs to one of four categories:
1. left-unbounded, when m
i
 1,
2. right-unbounded, when M
i
1,
3. bounded, when  1 < m
i
<M
i
<1 and
4. point observations when m
i
M
i
.
It is interesting to note that this model bears similarities to other models in several special cases:
 When all observations are point observations the model trivially reducesto the ordinary linear
regression model.
 The interval model could be thought of an ordered probit model (see32.2) in which the cut
points (the 
j
coefficients in eq.32.8) are observedand don’t need to be estimated.
 The Tobit model (see32.6) is a special case of the interval model in which m
i
and M
i
do not
depend on i, that is, the censoring limits are the same for all observations. As a matter of
fact, gretl’s tobit commands is handled internally as a special case of the interval model.
The gretl commandintreg estimates interval models by maximum likelihood, assuming normality
of the disturbance term 
i
.Its syntax is
intreg minvar maxvar X
where minvar contains the m
i
series, with NAs for left-unbounded observations, and maxvar con-
tains M
i
, with NAs for right-unbounded observations. By default, standard errors are computed
using the negative inverse of the Hessian. If the --robust flag is given, then QML or Huber–White
standard errors are calculated instead. In this case the estimated covariance matrixis a “sandwich”
of the inverse of the estimated Hessian and the outer product of the gradient.
If the model specification contains regressors other than just a constant, the output includes a
chi-square statistic for testing the joint null hypothesis that none of these regressors has any
effect on the outcome. This is a Wald statistic based on the estimated covariance matrix. If you
wish to construct a likelihood ratio test, this is easily done by estimating both the full model
and the null model (containing only the constant), saving the log-likelihood in both cases via the
$lnl accessor, and then referring twice the difference between the two log-likelihoods to the chi-
square distribution with k degrees of freedom, where k is the number of additional regressors (see
the pvalue command in the Gretl Command Reference). Also included is a conditional moment
normality test, similar to those provided for the probit, ordered probit and Tobit models (see
above). An example iscontainedin the sample script wtp.inp, providedwith the gretl distribution.
Library SDK class:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
Such as load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, convert PowerPoint to PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file, as well as add
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
create image on desired PowerPoint slide, merge/split PowerPoint file, change the order of How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to SVG
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
294
Example 32.5: Interval model onartificial data
Input:
nulldata 100
# generate artificial data
set seed 201449
x = normal()
epsilon = 0.2*normal()
ystar = 1 + x + epsilon
lo_bound = floor(ystar)
hi_bound = ceil(ystar)
# run the interval model
intreg lo_bound hi_bound const x
# estimate ystar
gen_resid = $uhat
yhat = $yhat + gen_resid
corr ystar yhat
Output (selected portions):
Model 1: Interval estimates using the 100 observations 1-100
Lower limit: lo_bound, Upper limit: hi_bound
coefficient
std. error
t-ratio
p-value
---------------------------------------------------------
const
0.993762
0.0338325
29.37
1.22e-189 ***
x
0.986662
0.0319959
30.84
8.34e-209 ***
Chi-square(1)
950.9270
p-value
8.3e-209
Log-likelihood
-44.21258
Akaike criterion
94.42517
Schwarz criterion
102.2407
Hannan-Quinn
97.58824
sigma = 0.223273
Left-unbounded observations: 0
Right-unbounded observations: 0
Bounded observations: 100
Point observations: 0
...
corr(ystar, yhat) = 0.98960092
Under the null hypothesis of no correlation:
t(98) = 68.1071, with two-tailed p-value 0.0000
As with the probit and Tobit models, after a model has been estimated the $uhat accessor returns
the generalized residual, which is an estimate of 
i
: more precisely, it equals y
i
x
i
ˆ
 for point
observations and E
i
jm
i
;M
i
;x
i
otherwise. Note that it is possible to compute an unbiased pre-
dictorofy
i
by summingthis estimate to x
i
ˆ
. Script32.5 showsan example. Asa further similarity
with Tobit, the interval regression model may deliver inconsistent estimates if the disturbances are
non-normal; hence, theChesherandIrish (1987) test for normality is included by default here too.
Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) Document. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
295
32.8 Sample selection model
In the sample selection model (also known as “Tobit II” model), there are two latent variables:
y
i
Xk
j1
x
ij
j
"
i
(32.14)
s
i
Xp
j1
z
ij
j

i
(32.15)
and the observation rule is given by
y
i
(
y
i
for s
i
>0
}
for s
i
0
(32.16)
In this context, the } symbol indicates that for some observations we simply do not have data on
y: y
i
may be 0, or missing, or anything else. Adummy variable d
i
isnormally usedto set censored
observations apart.
One of the most popular applications of this model in econometrics is a wage equation coupled
with a labor force participation equation: we only observe the wage for the employed. If y
i
and s
i
were (conditionally) independent, there wouldbe no reason not to use OLS for estimating equation
(32.14); otherwise, OLS does not yield consistent estimates of the parameters 
j
.
Since conditional independence between y
i
and s
i
is equivalent to conditional independence be-
tween "
i
and 
i
,one may model the co-dependence between "
i
and 
i
as
"
i

i
v
i
;
substituting the above expression in (32.14), you obtain the model that is actually estimated:
y
i
Xk
j1
x
ij
j
ˆ
i
v
i
;
so the hypothesis that censoring does not matter is equivalent to the hypothesis H
0
:  0, which
can be easily tested.
The parameters can be estimatedvia maximum likelihoodunder the assumption ofjoint normality
of"
i
and 
i
;however,a widely usedalternative methodyields the so-calledHeckit estimator, named
afterHeckman(1979). The procedure can be briefly outlined as follows: first, a probit model is fit
on equation (32.15); next, the generalized residuals are inserted in equation (32.14) to correct for
the effect of sample selection.
Gretl provides the heckit command to carry out estimation; its syntaxis
heckit y X ; d Z
where y is the dependent variable, X is a list of regressors, d is a dummy variable holding 1 for
uncensored observations and Z is a list of explanatory variables for the censoring equation.
Since in most cases maximum likelihood is the method of choice, by default gretl computes ML
estimates. The 2-step Heckit estimates can be obtained by using the --two-step option. After
estimation, the $uhat accessor contains the generalized residuals. As in the ordinary Tobit model,
the residuals equal the difference between actual and fitted y
i
only for uncensored observations
(those for which d
i
1).
Example32.6 shows two estimates from the dataset used inMroz (1987): the first one replicates
Table 22.7 inGreene(2003),3 while the second one replicates table 17.1 inWooldridge(2002a).
3
Note that the estimates given by gretl do notcoincide with those found in the printed volume. They do, however,
matchthose foundonthe erratawebpagefor Greene’sbook:http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~wgreene/Text/Errata/
ERRATA5.htm.
Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
296
Example 32.6: Heckit model
open mroz87.gdt
genr EXP2 = AX^2
genr WA2 = WA^2
genr KIDS = (KL6+K618)>0
# Greene’s specification
list X = const AX EXP2 WE CIT
list Z = const WA WA2 FAMINC KIDS WE
heckit WW X ; LFP Z --two-step
heckit WW X ; LFP Z
# Wooldridge’s specification
series NWINC = FAMINC - WW*WHRS
series lww = log(WW)
list X = const WE AX EXP2
list Z = X NWINC WA KL6 K618
heckit lww X ; LFP Z --two-step
32.9 Count data
Here the dependent variable is assumedto be a non-negative integer, so a probabilistic description
of y
i
jx
i
must hinge on some discrete distribution. The most common model is the Poisson model,
in which
Py
i
Yjx
i
 
e
i
Y
i
Y!
i
exp
0
@
X
j
x
ij
j
1
A
In some cases, an “offset” variable is needed. The number of occurrences of y
i
in a given time is
assumed to be strictly proportional to the offset variable n
i
. In the epidemiology literature, the
offset is known as “population at risk”. In this case, the model becomes
i
n
i
exp
0
@
X
j
x
ij
j
1
A
Another way to look at the offset variable is to consider its natural log as just another explanatory
variable whose coefficient is constrained to be one.
Estimation is carried out by maximum likelihood and follows the syntax
poisson depvar indep
Ifan offset variable is needed, it has to be specifiedat the endofthe command, separated from the
list of explanatory variables by a semicolon, as in
poisson depvar indep ; offset
Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
297
It should be noted that the poisson command does not use, internally, the same optimization
engines as most other gretl command, such as arma or tobit. As a consequence, some details may
differ: the --verbose option will yield different output and settings such as bfgs_toler will not
work.
Overdispersion
In the Poisson model, Ey
i
jx
i
Vy
i
jx
i
 
i
,that is, the conditional mean equalsthe conditional
variance by construction. In many cases, this feature is at odds with the data, as the conditional
variance is often larger than the mean; this phenomenon is called “overdispersion”. The output
from the poisson command includes a conditional moment test for overdispersion (as perDavid-
son and MacKinnon(2004),section11.5),whichisprintedautomaticallyafterestimation.
Overdispersion can be attributed tounmodeledheterogeneity between individuals. Two data points
with the same observable characteristics x
i
 x
j
may differ because of some unobserved scale
factor s
i
6s
j
so that
Ey
i
jx
i
;s
i

i
s
i
6 
j
s
j
Ey
j
jx
j
;s
j
even though 
i

j
.In other words, y
i
is a Poisson random variable conditional on both x
i
and s
i
,
but since s
i
is unobservable, the only thingwe can we can use, Py
i
jx
i
, will not followthe Poisson
distribution.
It is often assumed that s
i
can be represented as a gamma random variable with mean 1 and
variance : the parameter  is estimated together with the vector , and measures the degree of
heterogeneity between individuals.
In this case, the conditional probability for y
i
given x
i
can be shown to be
Py
i
jx
i

—y
i

1
— 1—y
i
1
"
i
i
 1
#
y
i
"
1
i
 1
#
 1
(32.17)
which is known as the “Negative Binomial Model”. The conditional mean is still Ey
i
jx
i
 
i
,but
the variance equals Vy
i
jx
i
 
i
1
i
. The gretl command for this model is negbin depvar
indep.
 There is also a less usedvariant of the negative binomial model, in which the conditional vari-
ance is a scalar multiple of the conditional mean, that is Vy
i
jx
i

i
1  . To distinguish
between the two, the model (32.17) is termed “Type 2”. Gretl implements model 1 via the
option --model1.
 A script which exemplifies the above models is included among gretl’s sample scripts, under
the name camtriv.inp.
FIXME: expand.
32.10 Duration models
In somecontextswe wish to apply econometricmethods tomeasurementsofthe duration ofcertain
states. Classic examples include the following:
 From engineering, the “time to failure” of electronic or mechanical components: how longdo,
say, computer hard drives last until they malfunction?
 From the medical realm: howdoes a new treatment affect the time from diagnosis of a certain
condition to exit from that condition (where “exit” might mean death or full recovery)?
 From economics: the duration of strikes, or of spells of unemployment.
Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
298
In each case we may be interested in how the durations are distributed, and how they are affected
by relevant covariates. There are several approaches to this problem; the one we discuss here—
which is currently the only one supported by gretl—is estimation of a parametric model by means
of Maximum Likelihood. In this approach we hypothesize that the durations follow some definite
probability law and we seek to estimate the parameters of that law, factoring in the influence of
covariates.
We may express the density (PDF) of the durations as ft;X;, where t is the length oftime in the
state in question, X is a matrix of covariates, and  is a vector of parameters. The likelihood for a
sample of n observations indexed by i is then
L
Yn
i1
ft
i
;x
i
;
Rather than working with the density directly, however, it is standard practice to factor f into
two components, namely a hazard function, , and a survivor function, S. The survivor function
gives the probability that a state lasts at least as long as t; it is therefore 1   Ft;X; where F
is the CDF corresponding to the density f. The hazard function addresses this question: given
that a state has persisted as long as t, what is the likelihood that it ends within a short increment
of time beyond t—that is, it ends between t and t Ñ? Taking the limit as Ñ goes to zero, we end
up with the ratio of the density to the survivor function:
4
t;X; 
ft;X;
St;X;
(32.18)
so the log-likelihood can be written as
‘
Xn
i1
logft
i
;x
i
; 
Xn
i1
logt
i
;x
i
; logSt
i
;x
i
;
(32.19)
One point of interest is the shape of the hazard function, in particular its dependence (or not) on
time since the state began. If  does not depend on t we say the process in question exhibits du-
ration independence: the probability ofexiting the state at any given moment neither increases nor
decreases based simply on how long the state has persisted to date. The alternatives are positive
duration dependence (the likelihood of exiting the state rises, the longer the state has persisted)
or negative duration dependence (exit becomes less likely, the longer it has persisted). Finally, the
behavior of the hazard with respect to time need not be monotonic; some parameterizations allow
for this possibility and some do not.
Since durations are inherently positive the probability distribution used in modeling must respect
this requirement, giving a density of zero for t  0. Four common candidates are the exponential,
Weibull, log-logistic and log-normal, the Weibull being the most common choice. The table below
displays the density and the hazard function for each of these distributions as they are commonly
parameterized, written as functions of t alone. ( and Ø denote, respectively, the Gaussian PDF
and CDF.)
density, ft
hazard, t
Exponential
exp  t
Weibull
t
 1
exp  t
t
 1
Log-logistic
 t
 1
1 t
2
 t
 1
1 t
Log-normal
1
t
logt  =
1
t
logt  =
Ø
logt  =
4
For a fuller discussionsee, forexample,DavidsonandMacKinnon(2004).
Chapter 32. Discrete and censored dependent variables
299
The hazard is constant for the exponential distribution. For the Weibull, it is monotone increasing
in t if  > 1, or monotone decreasing for  <1. (If   1 the Weibull collapses to the exponential.)
The log-logistic and log-normal distributions allow the hazard to vary with t in a non-monotonic
fashion.
Covariates are brought into the picture by allowing them to govern one of the parameters of the
density, so that the durations are not identically distributedacross cases. For example, when using
the log-normal distribution it is natural to make , the expected value of logt, depend on the
covariates, X. This is typically done via a linear index function:   X.
Note that the expressions for the log-normal density and hazard contain the term logt  =.
Replacing  with X this becomes logt X=. It turns out that this constitutes a useful simpli-
fying change of variables for all of the distributions discussed here. As inKalbfleischandPrentice
(2002), we define
w
i
logt
i
x
i
=
The interpretation of the scale factor, , in this expression depends on the distribution. For the
log-normal,  represents the standard deviation of logt; for the Weibull and the log-logistic it
corresponds to 1=; and for the exponential it is fixed at unity. For distributions other than the
log-normal, X corresponds to  log , or in other words    exp X.
With this change of variables, the density and survivor functions may be written compactly as
follows (the exponential is the same as the Weibull).
density, fw
i
survivor, Sw
i
Weibull
expw
i
ew
i
exp ew
i
Log-logistic
e
w
i
1e
w
i
2
1e
w
i
1
Log-normal
w
i
Ø w
i
In light of the above we may think of the generic parameter vector , as in ft;X;, as composed
of the coefficients on the covariates, , plus (in all cases apart from the exponential) the additional
parameter .
Acomplication in estimation of  is posed by “incomplete spells”. That is, in some cases the state
in question may not have ended at the time the observation is made (e.g. some workers remain
unemployed, some components have not yet failed). If we use t
i
to denote the time from entering
the state to either (a) exiting the state or (b) the observation windowclosing, whichever comes first,
then all we know of the “right-censored” cases (b) is that the duration was at least as long as t
i
.
This can be handled by rewriting the the log-likelihood (compare32.19) as
i
Xn
i1
i
logSw
i
1  
i
log logf w
i
(32.20)
where 
i
equals 1 for censored cases (incomplete spells), and 0 for complete observations. The
rationale for this is that the log-density equals the sum of the log hazard and the log survivor
function, but for the incomplete spells only the survivor function contributes to the likelihood. So
in (32.20) we are adding up the log survivor function alone for the incomplete cases, plus the full
log density for the completed cases.
Implementation in gretl and illustration
The duration command accepts a list of series on the usual pattern: dependent variable followed
by covariates. If right-censoring is present in the data this should be represented by a dummy
variable corresponding to 
i
above, separated from the covariates by a semicolon. For example,
duration durat 0 X ; cens
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested