Chapter 34. Nonparametric methods
310
The local regression can be made robust via an adjustment based on the residuals, e
i
y
i
ˆy
i
.
Robustness weights, 
k
,are defined by
k
Be
k
=6s
where s is the median of the je
i
jand B is the bisquare function,
Bx 
(
1 x
2
2
for jxj <1
0
for jxj 1
The polynomial regression is then re-run using weight 
k
w
k
x
i
at x
k
;y
k
.
The loess() function in gretl takes up to five arguments as follows: the y series, the x series, the
order d, the bandwidth q, and a boolean switch to turn on the robust adjustment. The last three
arguments are optional: if they are omitted the default values are d  1, q  0:5 and no robust
adjustment. An example of a full call to loess() is shown below; in this case a quadratic in x is
specified, three quarters of the data points will be used in each local regression, and robustness is
turned on:
series yh = loess(y, x, 2, 0.75, 1)
An illustration of loess is provided in Example34.1: we generate a series that has a deterministic
sine wave component overlaid with noise uniformly distributed on  1;1. Loess is then used to
retrieve a good approximation to the sine function. The resulting graph is shown in Figure34.1.
Example 34.1: Loess script
nulldata 120
series x = index
scalar n = $nobs
series y = sin(2*pi*x/n) + uniform(-1, 1)
series yh = loess(y, x, 2, 0.75, 0)
gnuplot y yh x --output=display --with-lines=yh
-2
-1.5
-1
-0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
x
loess fit
Figure 34.1: Loess: retrieving a sine wave
Image from pdf to powerpoint - application Library cloud:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Image from pdf to powerpoint - application Library cloud:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 34. Nonparametric methods
311
34.2 The Nadaraya–Watson estimator
The Nadaraya–Watson nonparametric estimator (Nadaraya1964Watson1964) is an estimator
for the conditional mean of a variable Y, available in a sample of size n, for a given value of a
conditioning variable X, and is defined as
mX 
P
n
j1
y
j
K
h
X  x
j
P
n
j1
K
h
X  x
j
where K
h
 is the so-called kernel function, which is usually some simple transform of a density
function that depends on a scalar called the bandwidth. The one gretl uses is given by
K
h
x exp
x
2
2h
!
for jxj <  and zero otherwise. The scalar  is used to prevent numerical problems when the
kernel function is evaluatedtoo far away from zero and is called the trim parameter.
Example 34.2: Nadaraya–Watsonexample
# Nonparametric regression example: husband’s age on wife’s age
open mroz87.gdt
# initial value for the bandwidth
scalar h = $nobs^(-0.2)
# three increasingly smooth estimates
series m0 = nadarwat(HA, WA, h)
series m1 = nadarwat(HA, WA, h * 5)
series m2 = nadarwat(HA, WA, h * 10)
# produce the graph
dataset sortby WA
gnuplot HA m0 m1 m2 WA --output=display --with-lines=m0,m1,m2
Example34.2 produces the graph shown in Figure34.2 (after some slight editing).
The choice ofthe bandwidth is upto the user: larger values ofh leadto a smoother m function;
smaller values make the m function follow the y
i
values more closely, so that the function
appears more “jagged”. In fact, as h ! 1, mx
i
!
¯
Y; on the contrary, if h ! 0, observations for
which x
i
6X are not taken into account at all when computing mX.
Also, the statistical properties of m vary with h: its variance can be shown to be decreasing in
h, while its squared bias is increasing in h. It can be shown that choosing h n 1=5 minimizes the
RMSE, so that value is customarily taken as a reference point.
Note that the kernel function has its tails “trimmed”. The scalar , which controls the level at
which trimming occurs is set by default at 4 h; this setting, however, may be changed via the set
command. For example,
set nadarwat_trim 10
sets   10  h. This may at times produce more sensible results in regions of X with sparse
support; however, you should be aware that in those same cases machine precision (division by
numerical zero) may render your results spurious. The default is relatively safe, but experimenting
with larger values may be a sensible strategy in some cases.
application Library cloud:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library cloud:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 34. Nonparametric methods
312
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
HA
WA
m0
m1
m2
Figure 34.2: Nadaraya–Watson exampleforseveral choices of the bandwidth parameter
Acommon variant of the Nadaraya–Watson estimator is the so-called “leave-one-out” estimator:
this is a variant of the estimator that does not use the i-th observation for evaluating mx
i
. This
makesthe estimator more robust numerically anditsusage is often advised for inference purposes.
In formulae, the leave-one-out estimator is
mx
i

P
j6i
y
j
K
h
x
i
x
j
P
j6i
K
h
x
i
x
j
In order to have gretl compute the leave-one-out estimator, just reverse the sign ofh: ifwe changed
example34.2 by substituting
scalar h = $nobs^(-0.2)
with
scalar h = -($nobs^(-0.2))
the rest of the example would have stayed unchanged, the only difference being the usage of the
leave-one-out estimator.
Although X could be, in principle, any value, in the typical usage of this estimator you want to
compute mX for X equal to one or more values actually observed in your sample, that is mx
i
.
If you need a point estimate of mX for some value of X which is not present among the valid
observations of your dependent variable, you may want to add some “fake” observations to your
dataset in which y is missing and x contains the values you want mx evaluated at. For example,
the following script evaluates mx at regular intervals between -2.0 and 2.0:
nulldata 120
set seed 120496
# first part of the sample: actual data
smpl 1 100
application Library cloud:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library cloud:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 34. Nonparametric methods
313
x = normal()
y = x^2 + sin(x) + normal()
# second part of the sample: fake x data
smpl 101 120
x = (obs-110) / 5
# compute the Nadaraya-Watson estimate
# with bandwidth equal to 0.4 (note that
# 100^(-0.2) = 0.398)
smpl full
m = nadarwat(y, x, 0.4)
# show m(x) for the fake x values only
smpl 101 120
print x m -o
and running it produces
x
m
101
-1.8
1.165934
102
-1.6
0.730221
103
-1.4
0.314705
104
-1.2
0.026057
105
-1.0
-0.131999
106
-0.8
-0.215445
107
-0.6
-0.269257
108
-0.4
-0.304451
109
-0.2
-0.306448
110
0.0
-0.238766
111
0.2
-0.038837
112
0.4
0.354660
113
0.6
0.908178
114
0.8
1.485178
115
1.0
2.000003
116
1.2
2.460100
117
1.4
2.905176
118
1.6
3.380874
119
1.8
3.927682
120
2.0
4.538364
application Library cloud:C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library cloud:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Annotation & Thumbnail. Add and burn annotation to PowerPoint. Text & Image. Search and obtain PowerPoint text Content.
www.rasteredge.com
Part III
Technical details
314
application Library cloud:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Insert Image To PowerPoint Document. You may easily generate thumbnail image from PowerPoint. Copyright © <2000-2015> by <RasterEdge.com>. All Rights Reserved.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library cloud:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
Convert PDF to Image; Convert Word to PDF; Convert Excel to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF;
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 35
Gretl and T
E
X
35.1 Introduction
T
E
X — initially developed by Donald Knuth of Stanford University andsince enhancedby hundreds
of contributors around the world — is the gold standard of scientific typesetting. Gretl provides
various hooks that enable you to preview and print econometric results using the T
E
Xengine, and
to save output in a form suitable for further processing with T
E
X.
Thischapter explainsthe finer points of gretl’s T
E
X-relatedfunctionality. The next section describes
the relevant menu items; section35.3 discusses ways of fine-tuning T
E
Xoutput; and section35.4
gives some pointers on installing (and learning) T
E
Xif you do not already have it on your computer.
(Just to be clear: T
E
Xis not included with the gretl distribution; it is a separate package, including
several programs and a large number of supporting files.)
Before proceeding, however, it may be useful to set out briefly the stages of production of a final
document using T
E
X. For the most part you don’t have to worry about these details, since, in regard
to previewing at any rate, gretl handles them for you. But having some grasp of what is going on
behind the scences will enable you to understand your options better.
The first step is the creation of a plain text “source” file, containing the text or mathematics to
be typset, interspersed with mark-up that defines how it should be formatted. The second step
is to run the source through a processing engine that does the actual formatting. Typically this a
program calledpdflatex that generatesPDF output.
1
(In times gone by it was a program calledlatex
that generated so-called DVI (device-independent) output.)
So gretl calls pdflatex to process the source file. On MS Windows and Mac OS X, gretl expects the
operating system to find the default viewer for PDF output. On GNU/Linux you can specify your
preferredPDF viewer via the menu item “Tools, Preferences, General,” under the “Programs” tab.
35.2 T
E
X-related menu items
The model window
The fullest T
E
Xsupport in gretl is found in the GUI model window. This has a menu item titled
“LaTeX” with sub-items “View”, “Copy”, “Save” and“Equation options” (see Figure35.1).
The first three sub-itemshave branches titled“Tabular” and “Equation”. By “Tabular” we mean that
the model is represented in the form of a table; this is the fullest and most explicit presentation of
the results. See Table35.1 for an example; this was pasted into the manual after using the “Copy,
Tabular” item in gretl (a few lines were edited out for brevity).
The “Equation” option is fairly self-explanatory—the results are written across the page in equation
format, as below:
˘
ENROLL 0:241105
0:066022
0:223530
0:04597
CATHOL 0:00338200
0:0027196
PUPIL 0:152643
0:040706
WHITE
T 51
¯
R
2
0:4462 F3;47 14:431 ˆ  0:038856
1
Expertswillbe aware ofsomething called “plain T
E
X”, whichisprocessed using theprogram tex. Thegreatmajority
ofT
E
Xusers,however, use the L
A
T
E
Xmacros, initially developed by LeslieLamport. gretl doesnotsupportplainT
E
X.
315
Chapter 35. Gretl and T
E
X
316
Figure 35.1: LAT
E
Xmenu in model window
Table 35.1: Example of LAT
E
Xtabular output
Model 1: OLS estimates using the 51 observations 1–51
Dependent variable: ENROLL
Variable
Coefficient
Std. Error
t-statistic
p-value
const
0:241105
0:0660225
3:6519
0:0007
CATHOL
0:223530
0:0459701
4:8625
0:0000
PUPIL
0:00338200
0:00271962
1:2436
0:2198
WHITE
0:152643
0:0407064
3:7499
0:0005
Mean of dependent variable
0:0955686
S.D. of dependent variable
0:0522150
Sum of squared residuals
0:0709594
Standard error of residuals (ˆ)
0:0388558
Unadjusted R2
0:479466
Adjusted
¯
R2
0:446241
F3;47
14:4306
Chapter 35. Gretl and T
E
X
317
(standard errors in parentheses)
The distinction between the “Copy” and “Save” options (for both tabular and equation) is twofold.
First, “Copy” puts the T
E
Xsource on the clipboardwhile with “Save” you are promptedfor the name
of a file into which the source should be saved. Second, with “Copy” the material is copied as a
“fragment” while with “Save” it is written as a complete file. The point is that a well-formed T
E
X
source file must have a header that defines the documentclass (article, report, book or whatever)
and tags that say \begin{document} and \end{document}. This material is included when you do
“Save” but not when you do “Copy”, since in the latter case the expectation is that you will paste
the data into an existing T
E
Xsource file that already has the relevant apparatus in place.
The items under “Equation options” should be self-explanatory: when printing the model in equa-
tion form, do you want standard errors or t-ratios displayed in parentheses under the parameter
estimates? The default is to show standard errors; if you want t-ratios, select that item.
Other windows
Several other sorts of output windows also have T
E
Xpreview, copy and save enabled. In the case of
windows having a graphical toolbar, look for the T
E
Xbutton. Figure35.2 shows this icon (second
from the right on the toolbar) along with the dialog that appears when you press the button.
Figure 35.2: T
E
Xicon anddialog
One aspect of gretl’s T
E
Xsupport that is likely to be particularly useful for publication purposes is
the ability to produce a typeset version of the “model table” (see section3.4). An example ofthis is
shown in Table35.2.
35.3 Fine-tuning typeset output
There are three aspects to this: adjusting the appearance of the output produced by gretl in
L
A
T
E
Xpreview mode; adjusting the formatting of gretl’s tabular output for models when using the
tabprint command; and incorporating gretl’s output into your own T
E
Xfiles.
Previewing in the GUI
As regards preview mode, you can control the appearance of gretl’s output using a file named
gretlpre.tex, which should be placed in your gretl user directory (see the Gretl Command Ref-
erence). If such a file is found, its contents will be used as the “preamble” to the T
E
Xsource. The
default value of the preamble is as follows:
\documentclass[11pt]{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
Chapter 35. Gretl and T
E
X
318
Table 35.2: Example of model tableoutput
OLS estimates
Dependent variable: ENROLL
Model 1
Model 2
Model 3
const
0.2907
0.2411
0.08557
(0.07853)
(0.06602)
(0.05794)
CATHOL
0.2216

0.2235

0.2065

(0.04584)
(0.04597)
(0.05160)
PUPIL
0.003035
0.003382
0.001697
(0.002727)
(0.002720)
(0.003025)
WHITE
0.1482

0.1526

(0.04074)
(0.04071)
ADMEXP
0.1551
(0.1342)
n
51
51
51
¯
R2
0.4502
0.4462
0.2956
96.09
95.36
88.69
Standard errors in parentheses
*indicates significance at the 10 percent level
** indicates significance at the 5 percent level
Chapter 35. Gretl and T
E
X
319
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{dcolumn,longtable}
\begin{document}
\thispagestyle{empty}
Notethat theamsmath anddcolumn packagesare required. (For some sorts ofoutput thelongtable
package is also needed.) Beyond that you can, for instance, change the type size or the font by al-
tering the documentclass declaration or including an alternative font package.
In addition, if you wish to typeset gretl output in more than one language, you can set up per-
languagepreamble files. A“localized”preamble file isidentifiedby a nameoftheformgretlpre_xx.tex,
where xx is replaced by the first two letters of the current setting of the LANG environment vari-
able. For example, if you are running the program in Polish, using LANG=pl_PL, then gretl will do
the following when writing the preamble for a T
E
Xsource file.
1. Look for a file named gretlpre_pl.tex in the gretl user directory. If this is not found, then
2. look for a file named gretlpre.tex in the gretl user directory. If this is not found, then
3. use the default preamble.
Conversely, suppose you usually run gretl in a language other than English, and have a suitable
gretlpre.tex file in place for your native language. If on some occasions you want to produce T
E
X
output in English, then you could create an additional file gretlpre_en.tex: this file will be used
for the preamble when gretl is run with a language setting of, say, en_US.
Command-line options
After estimatinga model via a script—or interactively via the gretl console or using the command-
line program gretlcli—you can use the commands tabprint or eqnprint to print the model to
file in tabular format or equation format respectively. These options are explained in the Gretl
Command Reference.
Ifyou wish alter the appearance of gretl’stabular output for models in the context of the tabprint
command, you can specify a custom row format using the --format flag. The format string must
be enclosed in double quotes and must be tied to the flag with an equals sign. The pattern for the
format string is as follows. There are four fields, representing the coefficient, standard error, t-
ratio and p-value respectively. These fields should be separated by vertical bars; they may contain
aprintf-type specification for the formatting of the numeric value in question, or may be left
blank to suppress the printing ofthat column (subject to the constraint that you can’t leave all the
columns blank). Here are a few examples:
--format="%.4f|%.4f|%.4f|%.4f"
--format="%.4f|%.4f|%.3f|"
--format="%.5f|%.4f||%.4f"
--format="%.8g|%.8g||%.4f"
The first of these specifications prints the values in all columns using 4 decimal places. The second
suppresses the p-value and prints the t-ratio to 3 places. The third omits the t-ratio. The last one
again omits the t, and prints both coefficient and standarderror to 8 significant figures.
Once you set a custom format in this way, it is remembered and used for the duration of the gretl
session. To revert to the default formatting you can use the special variant --format=default.
Further editing
Once you have pasted gretl’s T
E
Xoutput into your own document, or saved it to file and opened it
in an editor, you can of course modify the material in any wish you wish. In some cases, machine-
generated T
E
X is hard to understand, but gretl’s output is intended to be human-readable and
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested