Chapter FOUR
Using Probability and
Probability Distributions
4.1
The Basics of Probability
4.2
The Rules of Probability
CHAPTER OUTCOMES
After studying the material in Chapter 4, you should:
1. Understand the three approaches to assessing probabilities.
2. Be able to apply the Addition Rule.
3. Know how to use the Multiplication Rule.
4. Know how to use Bayes’ Theorem for applications involving conditional probabilities.
PREPARING FOR CHAPTER FOUR
• Review the discussion of statistical sampling in Section 1.3.
• Examine recent business periodicals and newspapers looking for examples where
probability concepts are discussed.
• Think about how you determine what decision to make in situations where you
are uncertain about your choices.
Chart from pdf to powerpoint - application control tool:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Chart from pdf to powerpoint - application control tool:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
158
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
Probability
The chance that a particular event
will occur.
The probability value will be 
in the range 0 to 1. A value of 0
means the event will not occur. 
A probability of 1 means the event
will occur. Anything between 
0 and 1 reflects the uncertainty of
the event occurring. The definition
given is for a countable number 
of events.
processor recognizes that there is a chance that one or
more of its products will be substandard and dissatisfy the
customer. Airlines overbook flights to make sure that the
seats on the plane are as full as possible because they know
there is a certain probability that customers will not show
for their flight. Accountants perform audits on the finan-
cial statements of a client and sign off on the statements
as accurate while realizing that there is a chance that
problems exist that were not uncovered by the audit.
Professional poker players base their decisions to fold or
play a hand based on their assessment of the chances that
their hand beats those of their opponents.
If we always knew what the result of our decisions
would be, our life as decision makers would be a lot less
stressful. However, in most instances uncertainty exists.
To deal with this uncertainty, we need to know how to
incorporate probability concepts into the decision process.
Chapter 4takes the first step in teaching you how to do this
by introducing the basic concepts and rules of probability.
You need to have a solid understanding of these basics
before moving on to the more practical probability applica-
tions that you will encounter in business.
A few years ago when states were determining whether to
sanction statewide and multistate lotteries, a commercial
opposing the lotteries aired on television. The commercial
showed three teenagers walking home from school dis-
cussing what they were going to do when they left high
school. One boy said that he was going to college to study
engineering and that he planned to design airplanes. A girl
said that she wanted to be a surgeon and was going to go to
medical school. When the third boy was asked about his
plans, he responded that he was going to win the Powerball
Lottery and be a multimillionaire. The point was that if the
state approved lotteries, some people would pin their
future on outcomes that had only the slightest possibility
of happening to them. Most people recognize when buying
a ticket there is a small probabilityof winning the lottery
and whether they win or lose is based on chance alone.
In business decision making, there are many instances
where chance is involved in determining the outcome of a
decision. For instance, when a tire manufacturer estab-
lishes a warranty on its tires, there is a certain probability
that any given tire will last less than the warranty mileage
and customers will have to be compensated. A food
W
HY
Y
OU
N
EED
T
O
K
NOW
4.1 The Basics of Probability
Before we can apply probabilityto the decision-making process, we must understand what
it means. The mathematical study of probability originated more than 300 years ago. The
Chevalier de Méré, a French nobleman (who today would probably own a gaming house in
Monte Carlo), began asking questions about games of chance. He was mostly interested in
the probability of observing various outcomes when dice were repeatedly rolled. The
French mathematician Blaise Pascal (you may remember studying Pascal’s triangle in a
mathematics class) with the help of his friend Pierre de Fermat was able to answer de
Méré’s questions. Of course, Pascal began asking more and more complicated questions of
himself and his colleagues, and the formal study of probability began.
Important Probability Terms
Several explanations of what probability is have come out of this mathematical study.
However, the definition of probabilityis quite basic.
For instance, if we look out the window and see rain, we can say the probability of
rain today is 1 since we know for sure that it will rain. If an airplane has a top speed of 450
mph, and the distance between city A and city B is 900 miles, we can say the probability the
plane will make the trip in 1.5 hours is zero—it can’t happen. These examples involve situa-
tions where we are certainof the outcome and our 1 and 0 probabilities reflect this.
However, in most business situations, we do not have certainty, but instead are uncer-
tain. For instance, if a local pizza company is given the right to sell pizzas at college foot-
ball games, then knowing how many pizzas to have on hand so as not to run short or to
have too many leftover pizzas involves uncertainty. The manager does not know for sure
how many pizzas will be demanded. If he decides to stock 300 pizzas, he might say that the
chance of needing more than 300 pizzas is 0.30. This value between 0 and 1 reflects his
uncertainty about the demand for pizzas at the game.
application control tool:VB.NET Image: Multi-page TIFF Editor SDK; Process TIFF in VB.NET
class application. In this section, we list all supported VB.NET multi-page TIFF processing & editing APIs with following chart. If
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Converter Control SDK; Convert TIFF to Image &
From following chart, you will find brief summaries on each type of supported This VB.NET TIFF to PDF conversion control toolkit enables developers to perform
www.rasteredge.com
Sample Space
The collection of all outcomes
thatcan result from a selection,
decision, or experiment.
Experiment
A process that produces a single
outcome whose result cannot be
predicted with certainty.
CHAPTER 4 4 • • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
159
Events and Sample Space
As discussed in Chapter 1, data come in many forms and are
gathered in many ways. In a business environment, when a sample is selected or a decision is
made, there are generally many possible outcomes. In probability language, the process that
produces the outcomes is an experiment. In business situations, the experiment can range
from an investment decision to a personnel decision to a choice of warehouse location.
For instance, a very simple experiment might involve flipping a coin one time. When
this experiment is performed, two possible experimental outcomes can occur: head and
tail. If the coin-tossing experiment is expanded to involve two flips of the coin, the experi-
mental outcomes are
Head on first flip and Head on second flip, denoted by (H,H)
Head on first flip and tail on second flip, denoted by (H,T)
Tail on first flip and Head on second flip, denoted by (T,H)
Tail on first flip and Tail on second flip, denoted by (T,T)
The collection of possible experimental outcomes is called the sample space.
Able Accounting
A partner for Able Accounting, a large regional accounting firm,
is analyzing the performance of her many audit teams. She is particularly interested in
whether the audits are finished by the projected completion date. She is interested in
determining the sample space (possible outcomes) for two randomly selected audits. To
do this, she can use the following steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
The experiment is the audit. Of interest is the status of an audit completion.
Step 2 Define the outcomes for one trial of the experiment.
The partner can define the outcomes to be
e
1
=Audit done early
e
2
=Audit done on time
e
3
=Audit done late
Step 3 Define the sample space.
The sample space (SS) for an experiment involving a single audit is
SS={e
1
, e
2
, e
3
}
If the experiment is expanded to include two audits, the sample space is
SS={e
1
, e
2
, e
3
, e
4
, e
5
, e
6
, e
7
, e
8
, e
9
}
where the outcomes include what happens on both audits and are 
defined as
Outcome
Audit 1
Audit 2
e
1
early
early
e
2
early
on time
e
3
early
late
e
4
on time
early
e
5
on time
on time
e
6
on time
late
e
7
late
early
e
8
late
on time
e
9
late
late
EXAMPLE 4-1
Defining the Sample Space
TRY PROBLEM 4.1
application control tool:C# Word: How to Read Barcodes from Word with C#.NET Library DLL
we list all supported linear and 2d barcode types in the following chart and you C# Word PDF-417 Barcode Reading Tutorial, Detecting C# ISBN Barcode from Word.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET Image: VB.NET Sample Code to Draw EAN-13 Barcode on Image
AddFloatingItem(item) rePage.MergeItemsToPage() REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/ean13.pdf", New PDFEncoder From the chart below, you can view all the EAN-13
www.rasteredge.com
160
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
TRY PROBLEM 4.2
TRY PROBLEM 4.1
Using Tree Diagrams
A tree diagram is often a useful way to define the sample space
for an experiment that helps ensure that no outcomes are omitted. Example 4-3 illustrates
how a tree diagram is used.
EXAMPLE 4-2
Defining the Sample Space
Lincoln Marketing Research
Recently, Lincoln Marketing Research in Lincoln,
Nebraska, was retained to interview television viewers to determine whether they objected
to having ads for hard liquor on TV. The analyst assigned to the project is interested in list-
ing the sample space (possible outcomes). To do this, he can use the following steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
The experiment involves selecting three television viewers and posing the
question: “Would you object to hard-liquor advertisements on television?”
Step 2 Determine the outcome for a single trial of the simple experiment.
The possible outcomes when one person is interviewed are
no
yes
Step 3 Define the sample space.
If three people are interviewed (3 trials), the sample space (possible out-
comes) is
Outcome
Viewer 1
Viewer 2
Viewer 3
e
1
=
no
no
no
e
2
=
no
no
yes
e
3
=
no
yes
no
e
4
=
no
yes
yes
e
5
=
yes
no
no
e
6
=
yes
no
yes
e
7
=
yes
yes
no
e
8
=
yes
yes
yes
For instance, one possible experimental outcome is e
1
, all three people say
no. Thus this outcome is (no, no, no).
EXAMPLE 4-3
Using a Tree Diagram to Define the Sample Space
Lincoln Marketing Research
In Example 4-2, Lincoln Marketing Research was
involved in a project in which television viewers were asked whether they objected to
hard-liquor advertisements being shown on television. The analyst is interested in listing
the sample space, using a tree diagram as an aid, when three viewers are interviewed. The
following steps can be used:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
Three people are interviewed and asked, “Would you object to hard-liquor
advertisements on television?” Thus, the experiment consists of three trials.
Step 2 Define the outcomes for a single trial of the experiment.
The possible outcomes when one person is interviewed are
no
yes
application control tool:C# Excel: Read, Decode & Scan Barcode Image from Excel
link in the following chart. C# Excel: Read Data Matrix Barcode Image, C# Excel: Scan Interleaved 2 of 5 Barcode Image. C# Excel: Decode PDF-417 Barcode Image, C#
www.rasteredge.com
CHAPTER 4 4 • • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
161
No
Yes
Step 3 Define the sample space for three trials using a tree diagram.
Begin by determining the outcomes for a single trial. Illustrate these with
tree branches beginning on the left side of the page:
For each of these branches, add branches depicting the outcomes for a
second trial. Continue until the tree has the number of sets of branches
corresponding to the number of trials.
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
No, No, No
No, No, Yes
No, Yes, No
No, Yes, Yes
Yes, No, No 
Yes, No, Yes
Yes, Yes, No
Yes, Yes, Yes
Trial 1
Trial 2
Trial 3
Experimental Outcomes
A collection of possible outcomes is called an event. An example will help clarify
these terms.
Event
A collection of experimental
outcomes.
Able Accounting
The Able Accounting firm in Example 4-1 is interested in the
sample space for an audit experiment in which the outcome of interest is the audit’s com-
pletion status. The sample space is the list of all possible outcomes from the experiment.
The accounting firm is also interested in specifying the outcomes that make up an event
of interest. This can be done using the following steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
The experiment consists of two randomly chosen audits.
EXAMPLE 4-4
Defining an Event of Interest
TRY PROBLEM 4.10
Mutually Exclusive Events
Two events are mutually exclusive
if the occurrence of one event
precludes the occurrence of the
other event.
162
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
Mutually Exclusive Events
Keeping in mind the definitions for experiment, sample
space, and events, we introduce two additional concepts. The first is mutually exclusive
events.
ABLE ACCOUNTING (
C
O
N
T
I
N
U
E
D
) Consider again the Able Accounting firm example.
The possible outcomes for two audits are
Experimental Outcomes
Audit 1
Audit 2
e
1
=
early
early
e
2
=
early
on time
e
3
=
early
late
e
4
=
on time
early
e
5
=
on time
on time
e
6
=
on time
late
e
7
=
late
early
e
8
=
late
on time
e
9
=
late
late
Suppose we define one event as consisting of the outcomes in which at least one of the
two audits is late.
E
1
={e
3
, e
6
, e
7
, e
8
, e
9
}
Step 2 List the outcomes associated with one trial of the experiment.
For a single audit the following completion-status possibilities exist:
Audit done early
Audit done on time
Audit done late
Step 3 Define the sample space.
For two audits (two trials), we define the sample space:
Experimental Outcome
Audit 1
Audit 2
e
1
=
early
early
e
2
=
early
on time
e
3
=
early
late
e
4
=
on time
early
e
5
=
on time
on time
e
6
=
on time
late
e
7
=
late
early
e
8
=
late
on time
e
9
=
late
late
Step 4 Define the event of interest.
The event of interest at least one audit is completed late is composed of all
the outcomes in which one or more audits are late. This event (E) is
E={e
3
, e
6
, e
7
, e
8
, e
9
}
There are five ways in which one or more audits are completed late.
Further, suppose we define two more events as follows:
E
2
=neither audit is late ={e
1
, e
2
, e
4
, e
5
}
E
3
=both audits are finished at the same time ={e
1
, e
5
, e
9
}
Events E
1
and E
2
are mutually exclusive: If E
1
occurs, E
2
cannot occur; if E
2
occurs, E
1
cannot occur. That is, if at least one audit is late, then it is not possible for neither audit to
be late. We can verify this fact by observing that no outcomes in E
1
appear in E
2
. This
observation provides another way of defining mutually exclusive events: Two events are
mutually exclusive if they have no common outcomes.
Independent and Dependent Events
A second probability concept is that of inde-
pendentversus dependentevents.
MOBILE EXPLORATION Mobile Exploration is a subsidiary of the Mobile Corporation and
is responsible for oil and natural gas exploration worldwide. During the exploration phase,
seismic surveys are conducted that provide information about the earth’s underground for-
mations. Based on past history, the company knows that if the seismic readings are favorable,
oil or gas more likely will be discovered than if the seismic readings are not favorable.
However, the readings are not perfect indicators. Suppose the company currently is exploring
in the eastern part of Australia. The possible outcomes for the seismic survey are defined as
e
1
=favorable
e
2
=unfavorable
If the company decides to drill, the outcomes are defined as
e
3
=strike oil or gas
e
4
=dry hole
If we let the event Abe that the seismic survey is favorable and event Bbe that the hole is
dry, we can say that the events Aand Bare not mutually exclusive, because if one event
occurs, it does not preclude the other event from occurring. We can also say that the two
events are dependent because the chance of a dry hole depends on whether the seismic sur-
vey is favorable or unfavorable.
CHAPTER 4 4 • • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
163
TRY PROBLEM 4.8
Barcelona Assembly
Barcelona Assembly, located in Barcelona, Spain, does con-
tract assembly work for Hewlett-Packard. Each item produced on the assembly line can be
thought of as an experimental trial. The managers at this facility can analyze their process
to determine whether the events of interest are mutually exclusive using the following steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
The experiment is producing a part on an assembly line.
Step 2 Define the outcomes for a single trial of the experiment.
On each trial the outcome is either a goodor a defectiveitem.
Step 3 Define the sample space.
If two products are produced (two trials), the following sample space is
defined:
Experimental Outcomes
Product 1
Product 2
e
1
= good
good
e
2
= good
defective
e
3
= defective
good
e
4
= defective
defective
EXAMPLE 4-5
Mutually Exclusive Events
Dependent Events
Two events are dependent if the
occurrence of one event impacts
the probability of the other event
occurring.
Independent Events
Two events are independent if the
occurrence of one event in no way
influences the probability of the
occurrence of the other event.
Business 
Application
TRY PROBLEM 4.11
Galaxy Furniture
The managers at Galaxy Furniture plan to hold a special promo-
tion over Labor Day Weekend. Each customer making a purchase exceeding $100 will
qualify to select an envelope from a large drum. Inside the envelope are coupons for per-
centage discounts off the purchase total. At the beginning of the weekend, there were
500 coupons. Four hundred of these were for 10% discount, 50 were for 20% discount,
45 were for 30%, and 5 were for 50% discount. Customers were interested in determining
EXAMPLE 4-6
Classical Probability Assessment
Classical Probability
Assessment
The method of determining
probability based on the ratio of
the number of ways an outcome
or event of interest can occur to
the number of ways anyoutcome
or event can occur when the
individual outcomes are equally
likely.
CHAPTER OUTCOME #1
164
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
Step 4 Determine whether the events are mutually exclusive.
Let event E
1
be defined as both products produced are good, and let event
E
2
be defined as at least one product is defective:
Then events E
1
and E
2
are determined to be mutually exclusive because the
two events have no outcomes in common. Having two good items and at
the same time having at least one defective item is not possible.
E
e
E
1
1
2
=
=
=
both good   {
at
least one defectiv
}
ee  {
=
e e e
2
3
4
, , }
Methods of Assigning Probability
Part of the confusion surrounding probability may be due to the fact that probability can be
assigned to outcomes in more than one way. There are three common ways to assign prob-
ability to outcomes: classical probability assessment, relative frequency of occurrence,
and subjective probability assessment. The following notation is used when we refer to the
probability of an event:
P(E
i
) =probability of event E
i
occurring
Classical Probability Assessment
The first method of probability assessment involves
classical probability, or a prioriprobability.
You are probably already familiar with classical probability. It had its beginning with
games of chance and is still most often discussed in those terms.
Consider again the experiment of flipping a coin one time. There are two possible
outcomes: head and tail. Each of these is equally likely. Thus, using the classical assess-
ment method, the probability of a head is the ratio of the number of ways a head can occur
(1 way) to the total number of ways any outcome can occur (2 ways). Thus we get
The chance of a head occurring is 1 out of 2, or 0.50.
In those situations in which all possible outcomes are equally likely, the classical
probability measurement is defined in Equation 4.1.
Classical Probability Assessment
(4.1)
PE
E
i
i
( )=
Numberofways canoccur
Totalnumb
eerofpossibleoutcomes
P(
.
head)
way
ways
=
=
=
1
2
1
2
050
CHAPTER 4 4 • • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
165
the probability of getting a particular discount amount. The probabilities can be deter-
mined using classical assessment with the following steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
An envelope is selected from a large drum.
Step 2 Determine whether the possible outcomes are equally likely.
In this case, the envelopes with the different discount amounts are
unmarked from the outside and are thoroughly mixed in the drum. Thus,
any one envelope has the same probability of being selected as any other
envelope. The outcomes are equally likely.
Step 3 Determine the total number of outcomes.
There are 500 envelopes in the drum.
Step 4 Define the event of interest.
We might be interested in assessing the probability that the first customer
will get a 20% discount.
Step 5 Determine the number of outcomes associated with the event of
interest.
There are 50 coupons with a discount of 20% marked on them.
Step 6 Compute the classical probability using Equation 4.1:
Note: After the first customer selects an envelope from the drum, the
probability that the next customer will get a particular discount will
change, because the values in the denominator and possibly the 
numerator will change.
P E
E
i
i
( )=
Numberofways canoccur
Totalnumb
eerofpossibleoutcomes
Discount
Num
P( %
)
20
=
bberofways
canoccur
Totalnumberofp
20%
oossibleoutcomes
50
500
0.10
=
As you can see, the classical approach to probability measurement is fairly straight-
forward. Many games of chance are based on classical probability assessment. However,
classical probability assessment is difficult to apply to most business situations. Rarely are
the individual outcomes equally likely. For instance, you might be thinking of starting a
business. The sample space is
SS={Succeed, Fail}
Would it be reasonable to use classical assessment to determine the probability that your
business will succeed? If so, we would make the following assessment:
If this were true, then the chance of any business succeeding would be 0.50. Of course, this
is not true. Too many factors go into determining the success or failure of a business. The
possible outcomes (Succeed, Fail) are not equally likely. Instead, we need another method
of assessment in these situations.
Relative Frequency Assessment
The relative frequency assessmentapproach is
based on actual observations.
Equation 4.2 shows how the relative frequency assessment method is used to assess
probabilities.
P(Succeed)=
1
2
Relative Frequency 
Assessment
The method that defines
probability as the number of times
an event occurs divided by 
the total number of times an
experiment is performed in a large
number of trials.
Business 
Application
166
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
TABLE 4.1 Hathaway Heating & Air Conditioning Co.
Customer Category
E
1
E
2
Commercial
Residential
Total
E
3
Heating Systems
55
145
200
E
4
Air-Conditioning
Systems
45
255
300
Total
100
400
500
Relative Frequency
(4.2)
where:
E
i
=The event of interest
N=Number of trials
HATHAWAY HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING The sales manager at Hathaway
Heating & Air Conditioning has recently developed the customer profile shown in
Table 4.1. The profile is based on a random sample of 500 customers. As a promotion
for the company, the sales manager plans to randomly select a customer once a month
and perform a free service on the customer’s system. What is the probability that the
first customer selected is a residential customer? What is the probability that the first
customer has a Hathaway heating system?
To determine the probability that the customer selected is residential, we determine
from Table 4.1the number of residential customers and divide by the total number of cus-
tomers, both residential and commercial. We then apply Equation 4.2:
Thus, there is an 80% chance the customer selected will be a residential customer.
The probability the customer selected has a Hathaway heating system is determined by
the ratio of the number of customers with heating systems to the number of total customers.
There is a 40% chance the randomly selected customer will have a Hathaway heating system.
The sales manager hopes the customer selected is a residential customer with a heat-
ing system. Because there are 145 customers in this category, the relative frequency
method assesses the probability of this event occurring as follows:
There is a 29% chance the customer selected will be a residential customer with a heating
system.
PE
E
P
( )
)
(
2
3
with (
Residential with Heating)
=
==
=
145
500
0.29
PE
P
( )
(
.
3
200
500
040
=
=
=
Heating)
PE
P
( )
(
.
2
400
500
080
=
=
=
Residential)
P E
E
N
i
i
( )
Numberoftimes occurs
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested