TRY PROBLEM 4.10
Thomas’ Dairy Bar
Thomas’ Dairy Bar is located in a busy mall in Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania. Thomas’ sells ice cream and frozen yogurt products. One of the difficulties
in this business is knowing how much of a given product to prepare for the day. The man-
ager is interested in determining the probability that a customer will select yogurt over ice
cream. She has maintained records of customer purchases for the past three weeks. The
probability can be assessed using relative frequency with the following steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
A randomly chosen customer will select between ice cream and yogurt.
Step 2 Define the events of interest.
The manager is interested in the event E
1
customer selects yogurt.
Step 3 Determine the total number of occurrences.
In this case, she has observed 2,250 sales of ice cream and yogurt in the
past three weeks. Thus, N = 2,250.
Step 4 For the event of interest, determine the number of occurrences.
In the past three weeks, 1,570 sales were for yogurt.
Step 5 Use Equation 4.2 to determine the probability assessment.
Thus, based on past history, the chance that a customer will purchase
yogurt is just under 0.70.
PE
E
N
( )
Number of times occurs
1
1
1570
2250
=
=
=
,
,
00 6978
.
EX A M P L E   4 - 7
Relative Frequency Probability Assessment
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
167
POTENTIAL ISSUES WITH THE RELATIVE FREQUENCY ASSESMENT METHOD There
are a couple of concerns that you should be aware of before applying the relative frequency
assessment method. First, in order for this method to be useful, all of the observed fre-
quencies must be comparable. For instance, consider again the case where you are inter-
ested in starting a small business. Two outcomes can occur: business succeeds or business
fails. If we are interested in the probability that the business will succeed, we might be
tempted to study a sample of, say, 200 small businesses that have been started in the past
and determine the number of those that have succeeded—say, 50. Using Equation 4.2 for
the relative frequency method, we get
However, before we can conclude the chance your small business will succeed is 0.25, you
must be sure that the conditions of each of the 200 businesses match your conditions (that
is, location, type of business, management expertise and experience, financial standing,
and so on). If not, then the relative frequency method should not be used.
Another issue involves the size of the denominator in Equation 4.2. If the number of
possible occurrences is quite small, the probability assessment may be unreliable. For
instance, suppose a basketball player has taken five free throws during the season and
missed them all. The relative frequency method would determine the probability that he
will make the next free throw to be
P(
.
make)
made
5 shots
=
=
=
0
0
5
00
P(
.
Succeed) =
=
50
200
025
Convert pdf to editable powerpoint online - software application project:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to editable powerpoint online - software application project:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
168
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
Business 
Application
Subjective Probability
Assessment
The method that defines
probability of an event as
reflecting a decision maker’s state
of mind regarding the chances
that the particular event will occur.
But do you think there is really no chance the next free throw will be made? No, even
the notoriously poor free-throw shooter, Shaquille O’Neal of the NBA’s Miami Heat, has
some chance of making a free throw. The problem is that the base of five free throws is too
small to provide a reliable probability assessment
Subjective Probability Assessment
Unfortunately, even though managers may have
some past experience to guide their decision making, there always will be new factors
affecting each decision that make that experience only an approximate guide to the future.
In other cases, managers may have little or no past experience and, therefore, may not be
able to use a relative frequency as even a starting point in assessing the desired probability.
When past experience is not available, decision makers must make a subjective probabil-
ity assessment. A subjective probability is a measure of a personal conviction that an out-
come will occur. Therefore, in this instance, probability represents a person’s belief that an
event will occur.
HARRISON CONSTRUCTION The Harrison Construction Company is preparing a bid for a
road construction project. The company’s engineers are very good at defining all the ele-
ments of the projects (labor, materials, and so on) and know the costs of these with a great
deal of certainty. In finalizing the bid amount, the managers add a profit markup to the pro-
jected costs. The problem is how much markup to add. If they add too much, they won’t be
the low bidder and may lose the contract. If they don’t mark it up enough, they may get the
project and make less profit than they might have made had they used a higher markup. The
managers are considering four possible markup values, stated as percentages of base costs:
10%
12%
15%
20%
To make their decision, the managers need to assess the probability of winning the
contract at each of these markup levels. Because they have never done another project
exactly like this one, they can’t rely on relative frequency of occurrence. Instead, they must
subjectively assess the probability based on whatever information they currently have
available, such as who the other bidders are, the rapport Harrison has with the potential
client, and so forth.
After considering these values, the Harrison managers make the following assessments:
P(Win at 10%) = 0.30
P(Win at 12%) = 0.25
P(Win at 15%) = 0.15
P(Win at 20%) = 0.05
These assessments indicate the managers’ state of mind regarding the chances of winning
the contract. If new information (for example, a competitor drops out of the bidding)
becomes available before the bid is submitted, these assessments could change.
Each of the three methods by which probabilities are assessed has specific advantages
and specific applications. Regardless of how decision makers arrive at a probability assess-
ment, the rules by which people use these probabilities in decision making are the same.
These rules will be introduced in Section 4.2.
4-1: Exercises
Skill Development
4-1. If two customers are asked to list their choice of ice
cream flavor from among vanilla, chocolate, and
strawberry, list the sample space showing the possi-
ble outcomes.
4-2. Customers at a video store are allowed to rent one,
two, or three movies. Use a tree diagram to list the
sample space for the number of movies rented by
three customers (assuming that each one rents at
least one movie.)
software application project:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
leading methods to convert target PDF document to other editable file formats RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll. How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
NET program. Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email. Password
www.rasteredge.com
4-3. A special roulette wheel, which has only an even
number of red and black spots, has come up red
four times in a row. Assuming that the roulette
wheel is fair, what concept allows a player to know
that the probability the next spin of the wheel will
come up black is 0.5?
4-4. In a survey, respondents were asked to indicate
their favorite brand of cereal (Post or Kellogg’s).
They were allowed only one choice. What is the
probability concept that implies it is not possible
for a single respondent to state both Post and
Kellogg’s to be the favorite cereal?
4-5. In each of the following, indicate what method of
probability assessment would most likely be used
to assess the probability:
a. What is the probability that a major earthquake
will occur in California in the next three years?
b. What is the probability that a customer will
return a purchase for a refund?
c. An inventory of appliances contains four white
washers and one black washer. If a customer
selects one at random, what is the probability
that the black washer will be selected?
4-6. Pat and Tom are long-time friends living in Las
Vegas. They agree on many things, but not the out-
come of the American League pennant race and the
World Series. Pat is originally from Boston and
Tom is from New York. They have a steak dinner
bet on next year’s race, with Pat betting on the Red
Sox and Tom on the Yankees. Both are convinced
they will win.
a. What probability assessment technique is being
used by the two friends?
b. Why would the relative frequency technique not
be appropriate in this situation?
4-7. Students who live on-campus and purchase a meal
plan are randomly assigned to one of three dining
halls: the Commons, Northeast, and Frazier. What
is the probability that the next student to purchase a
meal plan will be assigned to the Commons?
4-8. The following data are for products produced by a
company:
Color
Model
Blue
Brown
White
XB-50
302
105
200
YZ-99
40
205
130
a. Based on the relative frequency assessment
method, what is the probability that a manufac-
tured item is brown?
b. What is the probability that the product 
manufactured is a YZ-99?
c. What is the joint probability that a product 
manufactured is a YZ-99 and brown?
d. Suppose a product was chosen at random.
Consider the two events: The event that model
YZ-99 was chosen and the event that a white
product was chosen. Are these two events mutu-
ally exclusive? Explain.
4-9. A large corporation in search of a CEO and a CFO
has narrowed the fields for each position to a short
list. The CEO candidates graduated, respectively,
from Chicago (C) and three Ivy League universi-
ties: Harvard (H), Princeton (P), and Yale (Y). The
three CFO candidates graduated, respectively, from
MIT (M), Northwestern (N), and two Ivy League
universities: Dartmouth (D) and Brown (B). One
candidate from each of the respective lists is cho-
sen to fill the positions. The event of interest is that
both positions are filled with candidates from the
Ivy League.
a. Determine whether the outcomes are equally
likely.
b. Determine the number of equally likely 
outcomes.
c. Define the event of interest.
d. Determine the number of outcomes associated
with the event of interest.
e. Compute the classical probability of the event of
interest using Equation 4.1.
4-10. The results of a census of 2,500 employees of a
mid-sized company with 401(k) retirement
accounts are as follows:
Account Balance 
(to nearest $)
Male
Female
<$25,000
635
495
$25,000–$49,999
185
210
$50,000–$99,999
515
260
>$100,000
155
45
Suppose researchers are going to sample employees
from the company for further study.
a. Based on the relative frequency assessment
method, what is the probability that a randomly
selected employee will be a female?
b. Based on the relative frequency assessment
method what is the probability that a randomly
selected employee will have a 401(k) account
balance of between $25,000 and $49,999?
c. Compute the probability that a randomly
selected employee will be a female with an
account balance between $50,000 and $99,999?
4-11. Three consumers go to a specialty retailer of con-
sumer electronics to examine HDTVs. Let B indi-
cate that one of the consumers buys an HDTV. 
Let D be that the consumer doesn’t buy an HDTV.
Define the following events: (1) only two con-
sumers buy an HDTV, (2) at most two consumers
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
169
software application project:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins.
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in Visual Basic control to export Word from multiple PDF files in Create editable Word file online without email.
www.rasteredge.com
170
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
buy HDTVs, and (3) at least two consumers buy
HDTVs. Assume these events are equally likely.
a. Determine whether the outcomes are equally
likely.
b. Determine the number of equally likely events.
c. Define the events of interest in each of the events.
To define the events of interest, list the possi-
ble outcomes in each of the following events:
• only two consumers buy an HDTV (E
1
)
• at most two consumers buy HDTVs (E
2
)
• at least two consumers buy HDTVs (E
3
)
d. Determine the number of outcomes associated
with each of the events of interest. Use the clas-
sical probability assessment approach to assign
probabilities to each of the possible outcomes
and calculate the probabilities of the events 
in part.
e. Compute the classical probabilities of each of
the events in part e by using Equation 4.1.
Business Applications
4-12. While recognizing that many new electronic prod-
ucts may not earn a profit, Mary Tangrin, the head
of marketing for Plasco Optics, is enthusiastic
about the new product coming out of the R&D lab.
It will increase the megapixel capability of cell
phone cameras to the 6+ range. She made a pre-
sentation to the company CEO stating the probabil-
ity the company will earn a profit in excess of $20
million next year is 80%. Comment on this proba-
bility assessment.
4-13. The Carlisle Medical Clinic has five doctors on
staff. The doctors have agreed to keep the office
open on Saturdays, but with only three doctors. The
office manager has decided to make up Saturday
schedules in such a way that no set of three doctors
will be in the office together more than once. How
many weeks can be covered by this schedule?
(Hint: Use a tree diagram to list the sample space.)
4-14. A study of the advertisements in the classified sec-
tion of a local newspaper shows that 204 are help-
wanted ads, 520 are real estate ads, and 306 are for
other ads.
a. If the newspaper plans to select an ad at random
each week to be published free, what is the
probability that the ad for a specific week
will be a help-wanted ad?
b. What method of probability assessment is used
to determine the probability in part a?
c. Are the events that a help-wanted ad is chosen
and that an ad for other types of products or ser-
vices is chosen for this promotion on a specific
week mutually exclusive? Explain.
4-15. Larry Miller, owner of the Utah Jazz basketball
team of the NBA, owns several automobile dealer-
ships in Utah and Idaho. One of his dealerships
sells Buick, Cadillac, and Pontiac automobiles. It
also sells used cars that it gets as trade-ins on new
car purchases. Supposing two cars are sold on
Tuesday by the dealership, what is the sample
space for the type of cars that might be sold?
4-16. Blackburn Cedar, Inc. manufactures cedar fencing
material in Marysville, Washington. The com-
pany’s quality manager inspected 5,900 boards and
found that 4,100 could be rated as a #1 grade.
a. If the manager wanted to assess the probability
that a board being produced will be a #1 grade,
what method of assessment would he likely use?
b. Referring to your answer in part a, what would
you assess the probability of a #1 grade board 
to be?
4-17. At a recent meeting of the top managers for
Nabisco, three marking managers were asked to
assess the probability that sales for next year will
be more than 15% higher than the current years.
One manager stated that the probability of this hap-
pening was 0.40. The second manager assessed the
probability to be 0.60, and the third manager stated
the probability to be 0.90.
a. What method of probability assessment are the
three managers using?
b. Which manager is expressing the least uncer-
tainty in the probability assessment?
c. Why is it that the three managers did not pro-
vide the same probability assessment?
4-18. Flying Pie Pizzeria bakes and sells pizzas for three
kinds of customers: dine-in, delivery, and pickup.
Last year’s pizza sales at the Flying Pie showed
that 12,753 orders were for dine-in, 5,893 pizzas
were delivery orders, and 3,122 orders were carry-
out. Suppose an audit of last year’s sales is being
conducted.
a. If a customer order is selected at random, what
is the probability it will be a carryout order?
b. What method of probability assessment was
used to determine the probability in part a?
c. If two customer orders are selected at random,
list the sample space indicating the type of order
for both customers.
4-19. VERCOR provides merger and acquisition consul-
tants to assist corporations when an owner decides
to offer the business for sale. One of their news
releases, “Tax Audit Frequency Is Rising,” written
by David L. Perkins, Jr., a VERCOR partner, origi-
nally appeared in The Business Owner. Perkins
indicated that audits of the largest businesses, those
corporations with assets of $10 million and over,
climbed to 9,560 in 2004. That was up from a low
of 7,125 in 2003. One in six large corporations was
audited in fiscal 2004.
a. Designate the type of probability assessment
method that Perkins used to assess the 
software application project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint. dll. ' pdf convert to txt DocumentConverter.ToDocument("C:\\test.pdf", "C
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
www.rasteredge.com
university will have a major that requires them
to use a computer on a daily basis?
b. Based on the data from this survey, if a student
is a business major, what is the probability of
the student believing that the computer lab facil-
ities are very adequate?
4-23. A company produces scooters used by small busi-
nesses, such as pizza parlors, that find them conve-
nient for making short deliveries. The company is
notified whenever a scooter breaks down, and the
problem is classified as being either mechanical or
electrical. The company then matches the scooter
to the plant where it was assembled. The file
Scooters contains a random sample of 200 break-
downs. Use the data in the file and the relative fre-
quency assessment method to find the following
probabilities:
a. What is the probability the scooter was assem-
bled at the Tyler plant?
b. What is the probability that a scooter breakdown
was due to a mechanical problem?
c. What is the probability that a scooter with an
electrical problem was assembled at the Lincoln
plant?
4-24. A Harris survey conducted in April of 2005 asked,
in part, what was the most important reason that
people give for never using a wireless phone exclu-
sively. The responses were: (1) Like the safety of
traditional phone, (2) Need line for Net access, 
(3) Pricing not attractive enough, (4) Weak or unre-
liable cell signal at home, (5) Coverage not good
enough, and (6) Other. The file entitled Wireless
contains the responses for the 1,088 respondents.
a. Calculate the probability that a randomly chosen
respondent would not use a wireless phone
exclusively because of some type of difficulty 
in placing and receiving calls with a wireless
phone.
b. Calculate the probability that a randomly chosen
person would not use a wireless phone exclu-
sively because of some type of difficulty in plac-
ing and receiving calls with a wireless phone
and is over the age of 55.
c. Determine the probability that a randomly cho-
sen person would not use a wireless phone
exclusively because of a perceived need for Net
access and the safety of a traditional phone.
d. Of those respondents under 36, determine the
probability that an individual in this age group
would not use a wireless phone exclusively
because of some type of difficulty in placing
and receiving calls with a wireless phone.
4-25. CNN staff writer Pariia Bhatnagar reported (“Coke,
Pepsi Losing the Fizz,” March 8, 2005) that
Atlanta-based Coke saw its domestic market share
drop to 43.1% in 2004. New York-based PepsiCo
probability of large corporations being audited
in fiscal 2004.
b. Determine the number of large corporations that
filed tax returns for the 2004 fiscal year.
c. Determine the probability that a large corpora-
tion was not audited using the relative frequency
probability assessment method.
4-20. The results of Fortune Personnel Consultants’ sur-
vey of 405 workers was reported in USA Today
(Snapshots, September 16, 2005). One of the ques-
tions in the survey asked, “Do you feel it’s OK for
your company to monitor your Internet use?” The
possible responses were: (1) Only after informing
me, (2) Does not need to inform me, (3) Only when
company believes I am misusing, (4) Company
does not have right, and (5) Only if I have previ-
ously misused. The following table contains the
results for the 405 respondents:
Response
1
2
3
4
5
Number of 
223
130
32
14
6
Respondents
a. Calculate the probability that a randomly chosen
respondent would indicate that there should be
some restriction concerning the company’s right
to monitor Internet use.
b. Indicate the method of probability assessment
used to determine the probability in part a.
c. Are the events that a randomly selected respon-
dent chose response (1) and that another ran-
domly selected respondent chose response 
(2) independent, mutually exclusive, or depen-
dent events? Explain.
Computer Database Exercises
4-21. According to a September, 2005, article on the
Womensenews.orgWeb site, “...Caesarean sec-
tions, in which a baby is delivered by abdominal
surgery, have increased fivefold in the past 30 years,
prompting concern among health advocates. ...”
The data in the file called Babies indicate whether
the past 50 babies delivered at a local hospital were
delivered using the Caesarean method.
a. Based on these data, what is the probability that
a baby born in this hospital will be born using
the Caesarean method?
b. What concerns might you have about using
these data to assess the probability of a
Caesarean birth? Discuss.
4-22. Recently, a large state university conducted a sur-
vey of undergraduate students regarding their use
of computers. The results of the survey are con-
tained in the data file ComputerUse.
a. Based on the data from the survey, what is the
probability that undergraduate students at this
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
171
software application project:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
www.rasteredge.com
Probability Rule 2
(4.4)
where:
k= Number of outcomes in the sample
e
i
=ith outcome
P e
i
i
k
( )=
=
1
1
Probability Rule 1
For any event E
i
,
0  P(E
i
)  1 for all i
(4.3)
172
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
CHAPTER OUTCOME #2
has used its “Pepsi Challenge” advertising
approach to increase its market share, that stood at
31.7% in 2004. A selection of soft-drink users is
asked to taste the two disguised soft drinks and
indicate which they prefer. The file entitled
Challenge contains the results of a simulated Pepsi
Challenge on a college campus.
a. Determine the probability that a randomly cho-
sen student prefers Pepsi.
b. Determine the probability that one of the 
students prefers Pepsi and is less than 
20 years old.
c. Of those students who are less than 20 years old,
calculate the probability that a randomly chosen
student prefers (1) Pepsi and (2) Coke.
d. Of those students who are at least 20 years old,
calculate the probability that a randomly chosen
student prefers (1) Pepsi and (2) Coke.
4.2 The Rules of Probability
Measuring Probabilities
The probability attached to an event represents the likelihood the event will occur on a
specified trial of an experiment. This probability also measures the perceived uncertainty
about whether the event will occur.
Possible Values and Sum
If we are certain about the outcome of an event, we will
assign the event a probability of 0 or 1, where P(E
i
) = 0 indicates the event E
i
will not
occur, and P(E
i
) = 1 means that E
i
will definitely occur. If we are uncertain about the
result of an experiment, we measure this uncertainty by assigning a probability between 0
and 1. Probability Rule 1 shows that the probability of an event occurring is always
between 0 and 1.
All  possible  outcomes  associated  with  an  experiment  form  the  sample  space.
Therefore, the  sum of the  probabilities of all possible outcomes is 1, as shown by
Probability Rule 2.
Addition Rule for Individual Outcomes
If a single event is composed of two or more
individual outcomes, then the probability of the event is found by summing the probabili-
ties of the individual outcomes. This is illustrated by Probability Rule 3.
Probability Rule 3: Addition Rule for Individual Outcomes
The probability of an event E
i
is equal to the sum of the probabilities of the individual
outcomes forming E
i
. For example, if
E
i
={e
1
, e
2
, e
3
}
then
P(E
i
) = P(e
1
) + P(e
2
) + P(e
3
)
(4.5)
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
173
EDWARD’S CINEMAS Edward’s Cinemas is considering opening a 20-screen complex in
Lansing, Michigan, and has recently performed a resident survey as part of its decision-
making process. One question of particular interest is how often a respondent goes to a
movie during one month. Table 4.2 shows the results of the survey for this question.
The sample space for the experiment for each respondent is
SS = {e
1
, e
2
, e
3
, e
4
}
where the possible outcomes are
e
1
=
10 movies
e
2
=3 to 9 movies
e
3
=1 to 2 movies
e
4
=0 movies
Using the relative frequency assessment approach, we assign the following probabilities.
P(e
1
) =
400/5,000 = 0.08
P(e
2
) = 1,900/5,000 = 0.38
P(e
3
) = 1,500/5,000 = 0.30
P(e
4
) = 1,200/5,000 = 0.24
∑= 1.00
Assume we are interested in the event “respondent attends 1 to 9 movies per month.”
E= Respondent attends 1 to 9 movies
The outcomes that make up E are
E= e
2
, e
3
We can find the probability, P(E), by using Probability Rule 3 (Equation 4.5), as
follows:
P(E) = P(e
2
) + P(e
3
)
=0.38 + 0.30
=0.68
Business 
Application
TABLE 4.2 Edward’s Cinemas Survey Results
Movies Per Month
Frequency
Relative Frequency
10
400
0.08
3 to 9
1,900
0.38
1 to 2
1,500
0.30
0
1,200
0.24
Total
5,000
1.00
TRY PROBLEM 4.26
KFI 640 Radio
The KFI 640 radio station in Dover, Delaware, is a combination
news/talk and “oldies” station. During a 24-hour day, a listener can tune in and hear any
of the following four programs being broadcast:
“oldies” music
news stories
talk programming
commercials
Recently, the station has been having trouble with its transmitter. Each day, the sta-
tion’s signal goes dead for a few seconds; it seems that these outages are equally likely to
occur at any time during the 24-hour broadcast day. There seems to be no pattern regard-
ing what is playing at the time the transmitter problem occurs. The station manager is
concerned about the probability that these problems will occur during either a news story
or a talk show.
Step 1 Define the experiment.
The station conducts its broadcast starting at 12:00 midnight, extending
until a transmitter outage is observed.
Step 2 Define the possible outcomes.
The possible outcomes are the type of programming that is playing when
the transmitter outage occurs. There are four possible outcomes:
e
1
=oldies e
2
=news e
3
=talk shows e
4
=commercials
Step 3 Determine the probability of each possible outcome.
The station manager has determined that out of the 1,440 minutes per
day, 540 minutes are “oldies,” 240 minutes are news, 540 minutes are
talk, and 120 minutes are commercials. Therefore, the probability of 
each type of programming being on at the moment the outage occurs 
is assessed as follows:
EX A M P L E   4 - 8
The Addition Rule for Individual Outcomes
174
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
Outcome = e
i
P(e
i
)
e
1
=oldies 
e
2
=news
e
3
=talk shows
e
4
=commercials
∑= 1.000
P(e )
,
.
4
120
1440
0083
=
=
P(e )
,
.
3
540
1440
0375
=
=
P(e )
,
.
2
240
1440
0167
=
=
P(e )
,
.
1
540
1440
0375
=
=
Note, based on Equation 4.4 (Probability Rule 2), the sum of the probabili-
ties of the individual possible outcomes is 1.0.
Step 4 Define the event of interest.
The event of interest is a transmitter problem occurring during a news or
talk program. This is
E= {e
2
, e
3
}
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
175
Complement Rule
Closely connected with Probability Rules 1 and 2 is the complement
of an event.  The complement of event E is represented by  . Thus, the Complement Rule
is a corollary to Probability Rules 1 and 2.
E
Step 5 Use Probability Rule 3 (Equation 4.5) to compute the desired 
probability.
P(E) = P(e
2
) + P(e
3
)
P(E) = 0.167 + 0.375
P(E) = 0.542
Thus, there is slightly more than a 0.5 probability that when a transmit-
ter problem occurs it will happen during either a news or talk program.
Complement Rule
(4.6)
PE
PE
( )
( )
=1-
That is, the probability of the complement of event E is 1 minus the probability of
event E.
Haupert  Machinery
The  sales manager  for  Haupert  Machinery  in Medford,
Oregon, is preparing to call on a new customer, a building contractor. The sales manager
wants to sell the contractor some equipment. Before making the presentation, the man-
ager lists four possible outcomes and his subjectively assessed probabilities related to the
sales prospect.
Outcomes (Sales)
P(Sales)
0
0.70
$ 2,000
0.20
$15,000
0.07
$50,000
0.03
∑= 1.00
Note that each probability is between 0 and 1 and that the sum of the probabilities is 1, as
required by Rules 1 and 2.
The owner is interested in knowing the probability of sales >$0. This can be found
using the Complement Rule with the following steps:
Step 1 Determine the probabilities for the outcomes.
P($0) = 0.70
P($2,000) = 0.20
P($15,000) = 0.07
P($50,000) = 0.03
EX A M P L E   4 - 9
The Complement Rule
TRY PROBLEM 4.31
Complement
The complement of an event E is
the collection of all possible
outcomes not contained in
eventE. 
CHAPTER OUTCOME #2
176
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
Addition Rule for Two Events
EDWARD’S CINEMAS (
C
O
N
T
I
N
U
E
D
) Suppose the people who conducted the survey for
Edward’s Cinemas also asked questions about the respondents’ ages. The company’s man-
agers consider age important in deciding on location because its theaters do better in areas
with a younger population base. Table 4.3 shows the breakdown of the sample by age
group and by the number of times a respondent goes to a movie per month.
Table 4.3 shows that there are seven events defined. For instance, E
1
is the event that
respondent attends 10 or more movies per month. This event is composed of three individ-
ual outcomes associated with the three age categories. These are
E
1
={e
1
, e
2
, e
3
}
In another case, event E
5
corresponds to a respondent being less than 30 years of age. It is
composed of four individual outcomes associated with the four levels of movie attendance.
These are
E
5
={e
1
, e
4
, e
7
, e
10
}
Table 4.3 illustrates two important concepts in data analysis: joint frequencies and
marginal frequencies. Joint frequencies, which were discussed in Chapter 2, are the values
inside the table. They provide information on age group and movie viewing jointly.
Marginal frequencies are the row and column totals. These values give information on only
the age group or only movie attendance.
Step 2 Find the desired probability.
Let E be the event sales = $0. The probability of not selling anything to
the building contractor is
P(E) = 0.70
The complement,  , is all sales >$0. Using the Complement Rule, the
probability of sales >$0 is
P(Sales >$0) = 1 - P(sales = $0)
P(Sales >$0) = 1 - 0.70
P(Sales >$0) = 0.30
Based on his subjective assessment, there is a 30% chance the sales man-
ager will sell something to the building contractor.
E
TABLE 4.3 Edward’s Cinemas
Age Group
E
5
E
6
E
7
Movies per Month
Less than 30
30 to 50
Over 50
Total
E
1
e
1
e
2
e
3
≥10 Movies
200
100
100
400
E
2
e
4
e
5
e
6
3 to 9 Movies
600
900
400
1,900
E
3
e
7
e
8
e
9
1 to 2 Movies
400
600
500
1,500
E
4
e
10
e
11
e
12
0 Movies
700
500
0
1,200
Total
1,900
2,100
1,000
5,000
Business 
Application
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested