Probability Rule 4: Addition Rule for Any Two Events, E
1
and E
2
P(E
1
or E
2
) = P(E
1
) + P(E
2
) − P(E
1
and E
2
)
(4.7)
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
177
For example, 2,100 people in the survey are in the 30-  to 50-year age group. This col-
umn total is a marginal frequency for the age group 30 to 50 years, which is represented by
E
6
. Now notice that 600 respondents are younger than 30 years old and attend a movie
three to nine times a month. The 600 is a joint frequency whose outcome is represented by
e
4
. The joint frequencies are the number of times their associated outcomes occur.
Table 4.4 shows the relative frequencies for the data in Table 4.3. These values are the
probabilities of the events and outcomes.
Suppose we wish to find the probability of E
4
(0 movies) or E
6
(being in the 30-to-50
age group). That is,
P(E
4
or E
6
) = ?
To find this probability, we must use Probability Rule 4.
TABLE 4.4 Edward’s Cinemas—Joint Probability Table
Age Group
Movies 
E
5
E
6
E
7
per Month
Less than 30
30 to 50
Over 50
Total
E
1
e
1
e
2
e
3
≥10 Movies
200/5,000 = 0.04 100/5,000 = 0.02 100/5,000 = 0.02
400/5,000 = 0.08
E
2
e
4
e
5
e
6
3 to 9 Movies 600/5,000 =0.12 900/5,000 =0.18 400/5,000 =0.08
1,900/5,000 = 0.38
E
3
e
7
e
8
e
9
1 to 2 Movies 400/5,000 =0.08 600/5,000 =0.12 500/5,000 =0.10
1,500/5,000 = 0.30
E
4
e
10
e
11
e
12
0 Movies
700/5,000 = 0.14 500/5,000 = 0.10
0/5,000 = 0
1,200/5,000 = 0.24
Total
1,900/5,000 = 0.38 2,100/5,000 = 0.42 1,000/5,000 = 0.20 5,000/5,000 = 1
The key word in knowing when to use Rule 4 is or. The word or indicates addition.
(You may have covered this concept as a unionin a math class. P(E
1
or E
2
) = P(E
1
∪E
2
).).
Figure 4.1 is a Venn diagram that illustrates the application of the Addition Rule for Two
Events. Notice that the probabilities of the outcomes in the overlap between the two events,
E
1
and E
2
, is double-counted when the probabilities of the outcomes in E
1
are added to
those of E
2
. Thus, the probabilities of the outcomes in the overlap, which is E
1
and E
2
,
needs to be subtracted to avoid the double counting.
E
1
E
2
E
and E
2
P(E
or E
2
) = P(E
1
)
+ P(E
2
) - P(E
and E
2
)
FIGURE 4.1
Venn Diagram—
Addition Rule for
Two Events
How to convert pdf into powerpoint on - SDK software API:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf into powerpoint on - SDK software API:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
178
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
Referring to the Edward’s Cinemas situation, the probability of E
4
(0 movies) or E
6
(being in the 30-to-50 age group) is:
P(E
4
or E
6
) = ?
Table 4.5 shows the relative frequencies with the events of interest shaded. The overlap
corresponds to the joint occurrence (intersection) of attending 0 movies and being in the
30-to-50 age group. The probability of the outcomes in the overlap is represented by P(E
4
and E
6
) and must be subtracted. This is done to avoid double-counting the probabilities of
the elementary events that are in both E
4
and E
6
when calculating the P(E
4
or E
6
). Thus,
P(E
4
or E
6
) = P(E
4
) + P(E
6
) - P(E
4
and E
6
)
=0.24 + 0.42 - 0.10
=0.56
Therefore, the probability that a respondent will either be in the 30-to-50 age group or
attend zero movies during a month is 0.56.
What is the probability a respondent will go to 1–2 movies or be in the over-50 age
group? Again, we can use Rule 4:
P(E
3
or E
7
) = P(E
3
) + P(E
7
) − P(E
3
and E
7
)
Table 4.6 shows the relative frequencies for these events. We have
P(E
3
or E
7
) = 0.30 + 0.20 − 0.10 = 0.40
Thus, there is a 0.40 chance that a respondent will go to 1–2 movies or be in the
“over 50” age group.
TABLE 4.5 Edward’s Cinemas—Addition Rule Example
Age Group
Movies 
E
5
E
6
E
7
per Month
Less than 30
30 to 50
Over 50
Total
E
1
e
1
e
2
e
3
≥10 Movies
200/5,000 = 0.04
100/5,000 = 0.02
100/5,000 = 0.02
400/5,000 = 0.08
E
2
e
4
e
5
e
6
3 to 9 Movies
600/5,000 = 0.12
900/5,000 = 0.18
400/5,000 = 0.08 1,900/5,000 = 0.38
E
3
e
7
e
8
e
9
1 to 2 Movies
400/5,000 = 0.08
600/5,000 = 0.12
500/5,000 = 0.10 1,500/5,000 = 0.30
E
4
e
10
e
11
e
12
0 Movies
700/5,000 = 0.14
500/5,000 = 0.10
0/5,000 = 0
1,200/5,000 = 0.24
Total
1,900/5,000 = 0.38 2,100/5,000 = 0.42 1,000/5,000 = 0.20 5,000/5,000 = 1
TABLE 4.6 Edward’s Cinemas—Addition Rule Example
Age Group
Movies 
E
5
E
6
E
7
per Month
Less than 30
30 to 50
Over 50
Total
E
1
e
1
e
2
e
3
≤10 Movies
200/5,000 = 0.04
100/5,000 = 0.02
100/5,000 = 0.02
400/5,000 = 0.08
E
2
e
4
e
5
e
6
3 to 9 Movies
600/5,000 = 0.12
900/5,000 = 0.18
400/5,000 = 0.08 1,900/5,000 = 0.38
E
3
e
7
e
8
e
9
1 to 2 Movies
400/5,000 = 0.08
600/5,000 = 0.12
500/5,000 = 0.10 1,500/5,000 = 0.30
E
4
e
10
e
11
e
12
0 Movies
700/5,000 = 0.14
500/5,000 = 0.10
0/5,000 = 0
1,200/5,000 = 0.24
Total
1,900/5,000 = 0.38 2,100/5,000 = 0.42 1,000/5,000 = 0.20 5,000/5,000 = 1
SDK software API:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pptx or ppt file into the drop area.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
TRY PROBLEM 4.26
Cranston Forest Products
Cranston Forest Products manufactures lumber for
large materials supply centers like Home Depot and Lowe’s. A representative from Home
Depot is due to arrive at the Cranston plant for a meeting to discuss lumber quality. When
the Home Depot representative arrives, he will ask Cranston managers to randomly select
one board from Cranston’s finished goods inventory for a quality check. Boards of three
dimensions and three lengths are in the inventory. The following chart shows the number
of boards of each size and length.
Dimension
E
4
E
5
E
6
Length
2″ × 4″
2″ × 6″
2″ × 8″
Total
E
1
=
8 feet
1,400
1,500
1,100
4,000
E
2
=
10 feet
2,000
3,500
2,500
8,000
E
3
=
12 feet
1,600
2,000
2,400
6,000
Total
5,000
7,000
6,000
18,000
The Cranston manager will be selecting one board at random from the inventory to show
the Home Depot representative. Suppose he is interested in the probability that the board
selected will be 8 feet long or a 2″ × 6″. To find this probability, he can use the following
steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
One board is selected from the inventory and its dimension is obtained.
Step 2 Define the events of interest.
The manager is interested in boards that are 8 feet long.
E
1
=8-foot boards
He is also interested in the 2″ × 6″ dimension, so
E
5
=2″ × 6″ boards
Step 3 Determine the probability for each event.
There are 18,000 boards in inventory, and 4,000 of these are 8 feet long, so
Of the 18,000 boards, 7,000 are 2″ × 6″, so the probability is
Step 4 Determine whether the two events overlap and if so, compute the joint
probability.
Of the 18,000 total boards, 1,500 are 8 feet long and 2″ × 6″. Thus the
joint probability is
PE
E
(
)
,
,
.
1
5
1500
18 000
00833
and
=
=
P(E )
,
,
.
5
7000
18 000
03889
=
=
P(E )
,
,
.
1
4000
18 000
02222
=
=
EX A M P L E   4 - 1 0
Addition Rule for Two Events
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
179
SDK software API:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to ODP/ ODP to PowerPoint. Document & Page Process. PowerPoint Page Edit. Insert Pages into PowerPoint File
www.rasteredge.com
Conditional Probability
The probability that an event will
occur given that some other event
has already happened.
Probability Rule 5: Addition Rule for Mutually Exclusive Events
For two mutually exclusive events E
1
and E
2
,
P(E
1
or E
2
) = P(E
1
) + P(E
2
)
(4.8)
180
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
Step 5 Compute the desired probability using Probability Rule 4.
P(E
1
or E
2
) = P(E
1
) + P(E
5
) - P(E
1
and E
5
)
P(E
1
or E
2
) = 0.2222 + 0.3889 - 0.0833
= 0.5278
The chance of selecting an 8-foot board or a 2″ × 6″ is just under 0.53.
Addition Rule for Mutually Exclusive Events
We indicated previously that when
two events are mutually exclusive, both events cannot occur at the same time. Thus, for
mutually exclusive events,
P(E
1
and E
2
) = 0
Therefore, when you are dealing with mutually exclusive events, the Addition Rule
assumes a different form, shown as Rule 5.
Figure 4.2 is a Venn diagram illustrating the application of the Addition Rule for Mutually
Exclusive Events.
Conditional Probability
In dealing with probabilities, you will often need to determine the chances of two or more
events occurring either at the same time or in succession. For example, a quality control
manager for a manufacturing company may be interested in the probability of selecting
two successive defective products from an assembly line. If the probability of this event is
low, the quality control manager will be surprised when it occurs and might readjust the
production process. In other instances, the decision maker might know that an event has
occurred and may then want to know the probability of a second event occurring. For
instance, suppose that an oil company geologist who believes oil will be found at a certain
drilling site makes a favorable report. Because oil is not always found at locations with a
favorable report, the oil company’s exploration vice president might well be interested in
the probability of finding oil, given the favorable report.
Situations such as this refer to a probability concept known as conditional probability.
Probability Rule 6 offers a general rule for conditional probability. The notation
P(E
1
|E
2
) reads “probability of event E
1
given event E
2
has occurred.” Thus, the probability
of one event is conditional upon a second event having occurred.
E
1
E
2
P(E
or E
2
) = P(E
1
)
+ P(E
2
)
FIGURE 4.2
Venn Diagram—
Addition Rule for Two
Mutually Exclusive
Events
SDK software API:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
www.rasteredge.com
Probability Rule 6: Conditional Probability for Any Two Events
For any two events E
1
, E
2
,
(4.9)
where:
P(E
2
) > 0
P E E
P E
E
PE
( | )
(
)
( )
1 2
1
2
2
=
and
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
181
Rule 6 uses a joint probability, P(E
1
and E
2
), and a marginal probability, P(E
2
), to cal-
culate the conditional probability P(E
1
|E
2
). Note that to find a conditional probability, we
find the ratio of how frequently E
1
occurs to the total number of observations, given that
we restrict our observations to only those cases in which E
2
has occurred.
WEST.NET West.net, an Internet service provider, is in an increasingly competitive indus-
try. The company has studied its customers’ Internet habits. Among the information col-
lected are the data shown in Table 4.7.
The company is focusing on high-volume users, and one of the factors that will influence
West.net’s marketing strategy is whether time spent using the Internet is related to a cus-
tomer’s gender. For example, suppose the company knows a user is female and wants to know
the chances this woman will spend between 20 and 40 hours a month on the Internet. Let:
E
2
={e
3
, e
4
} = Event: Person uses services 20 to 40 hours per month
E
4
={e
1
, e
3
, e
5
} = Event: User is female
A marketing analyst needs to know the probability of E
2
given E
4
.
Table 4.8 shows the relative frequencies of interest. One way to find the desired prob-
ability is as follows:
1. We know E
4
has occurred (customer is female). There are 850 females in the survey.
2. Of the 850 females, 300 use Internet services 20 to 40 hours per month.
3. Then,
However, we can also apply Rule 6, as follows:
PE E
P E
E
PE
( | )
(
)
( )
2
4
2
4
4
=
and
P E E
( | )
.
2
4
300
850
035
=
=
TABLE 4.7 Joint Frequency Distribution for West.net
Gender
E
4
E
5
Hours per Month
Female
Male
Total
E
1
e
1
e
2
<20
450
500
950
E
2
e
3
e
4
20 to 40
300
800
1,100
E
3
e
5
e
6
>40
100
350
450
Total
850
1,650
2,500
Business 
Application
SDK software API:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Bmp, Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
TRY PROBLEM 4.32
182
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
From Table 4.8, we get the joint probability P(E
2
and E
4
) = 0.12
and
P(E
4
) = 0.34
Then,
PE E
( | )
.
.
.
2
4
012
034
035
=
=
EX A M P L E   4 - 1 1
Computing Conditional Probabilities
Retirement Planning
After the Enron Corporation collapse in late fall, 2001, in
which thousands of Enron employees lost most or all of their retirement savings, many
people began to take a closer look at how their own retirement money is invested. 
A recent survey conducted by a major financial publication yielded the following table,
which shows the number of people in the study by age group and percentage of retire-
ment funds in the stock market.
Percentage of Retirement Investments in the Stock Market
Age of 
E
5
E
6
E
7
E
8
E
9
Investor
<5%
5 < 10%
10 < 30%
30 < 50%
50% or more Total
E
1
<30 years
70
240
270
80
55
715
E
2
30 < 50 years
90
300
630
1,120
1,420
3,560
E
3
50 < 65 years 110
305
780
530
480
2,205
E
4
65 years
200
170
370
260
65
1,065
Total
470
1,015
2,050
1,990
2,020
7,545
The publication’s editors are interested in knowing the probability that someone 65 or
older will have 50% or more of retirement funds invested in the stock market. Assuming
the data collected in this study reflect the population of investors, the editors can find this
conditional probability using the following steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
A randomly selected person age 65 or older has his or her portfolio ana-
lyzed for percentage of retirement funds in the stock market.
Step 2 Define the events of interest.
In this case, we are interested in two events:
E
4
=65+ years
E
9
=50% or more in stocks
TABLE 4.8 Joint Relative Frequency Distribution for West.net
Gender
E
4
E
5
Hours per Month
Female
Male
Total
E
1
e
1
e
2
<20
450/2,500 = 0.18
500/2,500 = 0.20
950/2,500 = 0.38
E
2
e
3
e
4
20 to 40
300/2,500 = 0.12
800/2,500 = 0.32
1,100/2,500 = 0.44
E
3
e
5
e
6
>40
100/2,500 = 0.04
350/2,500 = 0.14
450/2,500 = 0.18
Total
850/2,500 = 0.34
1,650/2,500 = 0.66
2,500/2,500 = 1.00
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
183
Step 3 Define the probability statement of interest.
The editors are interested in
P(E
9
|E
4
) = Probability of 50% or more stocks given 65+ years
Step 4 Convert the data to probabilities using the relative frequency assess-
ment method.
We begin with the event that is given to have occurred (E
4
). A total of
1,065 people in the study were 65+ years of age. Of the 1,065 people, 
65 had 50% or more of their retirement funds in the stock market.
Thus, the conditional probability that someone 65 or older will have 50%
or more of retirement assets in the stock market is 0.061. This value can be
found using Step 5 as well.
Step 5 Use Probability Rule 6 to find the conditional probability.
The necessary probabilities are found using the relative frequency assess-
ment method:
and the joint probability is
Then using Probability Rule 6 we get
PE E
P E
E
PE
( | )
(
)
( )
.
.
.
9
4
9
4
4
00086
01412
00
=
=
=
and 
661
P E
E
(
)
,
.
9
4
65
7545
00086
and
=
=
P(E )
,
,
.
4
1065
7545
01412
=
=
PE E
P E
E
P E
( | )
(
)
( )
9
4
9
4
4
=
and
PE E
( | )
,
.
9
4
65
1065
0061
=
=
Business 
Application
Tree Diagrams
Another way of organizing the events of an experiment that aids in the
calculation of probabilities is the tree diagram.
WEST.NET (
C
O
N
T
I
N
U
E
D
) Figure 4.3 illustrates the tree diagram for West.net, the Internet
service provider discussed earlier. Note that the branches at each node in the tree diagram
represent mutually exclusive events. Moving from left to right, the first two branches indi-
cate the two  customer  types  (male  and  female—mutually  exclusive  events).  Three
branches grow from each of these original branches, representing the three possible cate-
gories for Internet use. The probabilities for the events male and female are shown on the
first two branches. The probabilities shown on the right of the tree are the joint probabili-
ties for each combination of gender and hours of use. These figures are found using Table
4.8, which was shown earlier. The probabilities on the branches following the male and
female branches showing hours of use are conditional probabilities. For example, we can
find the probability that a male customer (E
5
) will spend more than 40 hours on the
Internet (E
3
) by
PE |E
P E
E
PE
(
)
(
)
( )
.
.
.
3 5
3
5
5
014
066
02121
=
=
=
and
TRY PROBLEM 4.41
Cranston Forest Products
In Example 4-10, the manager at the Cranston Forest
Products Company reported the following data on the boards in inventory:
Dimension
E
4
E
5
E
6
Length
2″ × 4″
2″ × 6″
2″ × 8″
Total
E
1
=8 feet
1,400
1,500
1,100
4,000
E
2
=10 feet
2,000
3,500
2,500
8,000
E
3
=12 feet
1,600
2,000
2,400
6,000
Total
5,000
7,000
6,000
18,000
EX A M P L E   4 - 1 2
Checking for Independence
184
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
P(E
1
and E
5
) = 0.20
P(E
1
|E
5
)
<20 hours
P(E
3
|E
5
)
>40 hours
= 0.4848
P(E
2
|E
5
)
20 to 40 hours
Male
P(E
5
) = 0.66
Female
P(E
4
) = 0.34
P(E
2
and E
5
) = 0.32
P(E
3
and E
5
) = 0.14
P(E
1
and E
4
) =  0.18
P(E
2
and E
4
) =  0.12
P(E
3
and E
4
) = 0.04
= 0.3529
P(E
2
|E
4
)
20 to 40 hours
P(E
1
|E
4
)
<20 hours
= 0.1176
P(E
3
|E
4
)
>40 hours
= 0.3030
= 0.2121
= 0.5294
FIGURE 4.3
Tree Diagram for
West.net
Conditional Probability for Independent Events
We earlier discussed that two
events are independent if the occurrence of one event has no bearing on the probability that
the second event occurs. Therefore, when two events are independent, the rule for condi-
tional probability takes a different form, as indicated in Probability Rule 7.
Probability Rule 7: Conditional Probability for Independent Events
For independent events E
1
, E
2
,
(4.10)
and
PE E
P E
PE
( | )
( )
( )
2
1
2
1
0
=
>
P E E
P E
P E
( | )
( )
( )
1
2
1
2
0
=
>
As Rule 7 shows, the conditional probability of one event occurring, given a second inde-
pendent event has already occurred, is simply the probability of the event occurring.
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
185
He will be selecting one board at random from the inventory to show a visiting customer.
Of interest is whether the length of the board is independent of the dimension. This can
be determined using the following steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
A board is randomly selected and its dimensions determined.
Step 2 Define one event for length and one event for dimension.
Let E
2
=event that the board is 10 feet long and E
5
=event that the board
is a 2″ × 6″ dimension.
Step 3 Determine the probability for each event.
Step 4 Assess the joint probability of the two events occurring.
Step 5 Compute the conditional probability of one event given the other
using Probability Rule 6.
Step 6 Check for independence using Probability Rule 7.
Because P(E
2
|E
5
) = 0.50  P(E
2
) = 0.4444, the two events are not inde-
pendent and, therefore, board length and board dimension are not indepen-
dent.
PE E
P E
E
PE
( | )
(
)
( )
.
.
.
2
5
2
5
5
01944
03889
05
=
=
=
and 
00
PE
E
(
)
,
,
.
2
5
3500
18 000
01944
and
=
=
PE
PE
( )
,
,
.
( )
,
,
2
5
8000
18 000
04444
7000
18 00
=
=
=
and
00
03889
= .
Multiplication Rules
We needed the joint probability of two events in the discussion on addition of two events
and in the discussion on conditional probability. We were able to find P(E
1
and E
2
) simply
by examining the joint relative frequency tables. However, we often need to find P(E
1
and
E
2
) when we do not know the joint relative frequencies. When this is the case, we can use
the multiplication rule for two events.
Multiplication Rule for Two Events
CHAPTER OUTCOME #3
Probability Rule 8: Multiplication Rule for Any Two Events
For two events, E
1
and E
2
,
P(E
1
and E
2
) = P(E
1
)P(E
2
|E
1
)
(4.11)
REAL COMPUTER CO. To illustrate how to find a joint probability, consider an example
involving the Real Computer Co., a manufacturer of personal computers, that uses two
suppliers for CD-ROM drives. These parts are intermingled on the manufacturing-floor
inventory rack. When a computer is assembled, the CD-ROM unit is pulled randomly from
inventory without regard to which company made it. Recently, a customer ordered two per-
sonal computers. At the time of assembly, the CD-ROM inventory contained 30 MATX
units and 50 Quinex units. What is the probability that both computers ordered by this cus-
tomer will have MATX units?
Business 
Application
186
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
To answer this question, we must recognize that two events are required to form the
desired outcome. Therefore, let
E
1
=Event: MATX CD-ROM in first computer
E
2
=Event: MATX CD-ROM in second computer
The probability that both computers contain MATX units is written as P(E
1
and E
2
). The
key word here is and, as contrasted with the Addition Rule, in which the key word is or.
The and signifies that we are interested in the joint probability of two events, as noted by
P(E
1
and E
2
). To find this probability, we employ Probability Rule 8.
P(E
1
and E
2
=
P(E
1
)P(E
2
|E
1
)
We start by assuming that each CD-ROM in the inventory has the same chance of being
selected for assembly. For the first computer,
Then, because we are not replacing the first CD-ROM, we find P(E
2
|E
1
) by
Now, by Rule 8,
P(E
1
and E
2
) = P(E
1
)P(E
2
|E
1
) = (0.375)(0.3671)
=0.1377
Therefore, there is a 13.77% chance the two personal computers will get MATX
CD-ROMS.
Using a Tree Diagram
REAL COMPUTER (
C
O
N
T
I
N
U
E
D
) A tree diagram can be used to display the situation fac-
ing Real Computer Co. The two branches on the left side of the tree in Figure 4.4 show the
possible CD-ROM options for the first computer. The two branches coming from each of
the first branches show the possible CD-ROM options for the second computer. The prob-
abilities at the far right are the joint probabilities for the CD-ROM options for the two com-
puters. As we determined previously, the probability that both computers will get a MATX
unit is 0.1377, as shown on the top right on the tree diagram.
We can use the Multiplication Rule and the Addition Rule in one application when we
determine the probability that two systems will have different CD-ROMs. Looking at
Figure 4.4, we see there are two ways this can happen.
P[(MATX and Quinex) or (Quinex and MATX)] = ?
If the first CD-ROM is a MATX and the second one is a Quinex, then the first cannot
be a Quinex and the second a MATX. These two events are mutually exclusive and, there-
fore, Rule 6 can be used to calculate the required probability. The joint probabilities (gen-
erated from the Multiplication Rule) are shown on the right side of the tree. To find the
desired probability, using Rule 6 we can add the two joint probabilities:
P[(MATX and Quinex) or (Quinex and MATX)] =
0.2373
+
0.2373
=0.4746
The chance that a customer buying two computers will get two different CD-ROMs is 47.46%.
P E E
( | )
2
1
=
Number of remaining MATX units
Numb
eer of remaining CD-ROM units
=
=
29
79
03671
.
P(E )
1
=
Number of MATX units
Number of CD-ROMs
in inventory
=
=
30
80
0.375
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested