CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
187
P(MATX and MATX) = 0.375 × 0.3671 = 0.1377
MATX
P = 29/79 = 0.3671
Quinex
P = 50/79 = 0.6329
MATX
P = 30/80 = 0.375
Quinex
P = 50/80 = 0.625
Computer 1
Computer 2
P(MATX and Quinex) = 0.375 × 0.6329 = 0.2373
P(Quinex and MATX) = 0.625 × 0.3797 = 0.2373
P(Quinex and Quinex) = 0.625 × 0.6203 = 0.3877
MATX
P = 30/79 = 0.3797
Quinex
P = 49/79 = 0.6203
FIGURE 4.4
Tree Diagram for the
CD-ROM Example
Multiplication Rule for Independent Events
When we determined the probability
that two computers would have a MATX CD-ROM unit, we used the general multiplica-
tion rule (Rule 8). The general multiplication rule requires that conditional probability
be used because the probability associated with the second computer depends on the
CD-ROM selected for the first computer. The chance of obtaining a MATX was lowered
from 30/80 to 29/79, given the first CD-ROM was a MATX.
However, if the two events of interest are independent, the imposed condition does
not alter the probability, and the Multiplication Rule takes the form shown in Probability
Rule 9.
Probability Rule 9: Multiplication Rule for Independent Events
For independent events E
1
, E
2
,
P(E
1
and E
2
) = P(E
1
)P(E
2
)
(4.12)
The joint probability of two independent events is simply the product of the probabilities
of the two events. Rule 9 is the primary way that you can determine whether any two
events are independent. If the product of the probabilities of the two events equals the joint
probability, then the events are independent.
Medlin Accounting
Medlin Accounting prepares tax returns for individuals and
companies. Over the years, the firm has tracked its clients and has discovered that 12% of
the individual returns have been selected for audit by the Internal Revenue Service. On
one particular day, the firm signed two new individual tax clients. The firm is interested
in the probability that at least one of these clients will be audited. This probability can be
found using the following steps:
Step 1 Define the experiment.
The IRS randomly selects a tax return to audit.
Step 2 Define the possible outcomes.
For a single client, the following outcomes are defined:
A= audit
N= no audit
EX A M P L E   4 - 1 3
Using the Multiplication Rule and the Addition Rule
TRY PROBLEM 4.31
Change pdf to powerpoint on - SDK control service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Change pdf to powerpoint on - SDK control service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
CHAPTER OUTCOME #4
188
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
Bayes’ Theorem
As decision makers, you will often encounter situations that require you to assess proba-
bilities for events of interest. Your assessment may be based on relative frequency or sub-
jectivity. However, you may then come across new information that causes you to revise
the probability assessment. For example, a human resource manager who has interviewed
a person for a sales job might assess a low probability that the person will succeed in sales.
However, after seeing the person’s very high score on the company’s sales aptitude test, the
manager might revise her assessment upward. A medical doctor might assign an 80%
chance that a patient has a particular disease. However, after seeing positive results from a
lab test, he might increase his assessment to 95%.
In these situations, you will need a way to formally incorporate the new information.
One very useful tool for doing this is called Bayes’ Theorem, which is named for the
Reverend Thomas Bayes, who developed the special application of conditional probability
in the 1700s. Letting event B be an event that is given to have occurred, the conditional
probability of event E
i
occurring can be computed using Equation 4.9:
PE B
P E
B
PB
i
i
( | )
(
)
( )
=
and
For each of the clients, we define the outcomes as
Client 1: A
1
; N
1
Client 2: A
2
; N
2
Step 3 Define the overall event of interest.
The event that Medlin Accounting is interested in is
E= at least one client is audited
Step 4 List the outcomes for the events of interest.
The possible outcomes for which at least one client will be audited are as
follows:
E
1
:
A
1
A
2
both are audited
E
2
:
A
1
N
2
one client is audited
E
3
:
N
1
A
2
Step 5 Compute the probabilities for the events of interest.
Assuming the chances of the clients being audited are independent of each
other, probabilities for the events are determined using Probability Rule 9
for independent events:
P(E
1
) = P(A
1
and A
2
) = 0.12 × 0.12 = 0.0144
P(E
2
) = P(A
1
and N
2
) = 0.12 × 0.88 = 0.1056
P(E
3
) = P(N
1
and A
2
) = 0.88 × 0.12 = 0.1056
Step 6 Determine the probability for the overall event of interest.
Because events E
1
, E
2
, and E
3
are mutually exclusive, compute the proba-
bility of at least one client being audited using Rule 5, the Addition Rule
for Mutually Exclusive Events:
P(E
1
or E
2
or E
3
) = P(E
1
) + P(E
2
) + P(E
3
)
=0.0144 + 0.1056 + 0.1056
=0.2256
The chance of one or both of the clients being audited is 0.2256.
SDK control service:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Able to view and edit PowerPoint rapidly. Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PowerPoint to Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
189
The numerator can be reformulated using the Multiplication Rule (Equation 4.11) as
P(E
i
and B) = P(E
i
)P(B|E
i
)
The conditional probability is then:
The denominator, P(B), can be found by adding the probability of the k possible ways that
event B can occur. This is
P(B) = P(E
1
)P(B|E
1
) + P(E
2
)P(B|E
2
) +
...
+P(E
k
)P(BE
k
)
Then Bayes’ Theorem is formulated as Equation 4.13.
P E B
P E P B E
P B
i
i
i
( | )
(
( | )
( )
=
)
Bayes’ Theorem
(4.13)
where:
E
i
=ith event of interest of the k possible events
B= Event that has occurred that might impact P(E
i
)
Events E
1
to E
k
are mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive.
P E B
PE P B E
PE P B E
PE P B E
i
i
i
( | )
( ) ( | )
( ) ( | )
( ) ( |
=
+
1
1
2
22
)
( ) ( | )
+
+
.. .
P E P B E
k
k
VARDEN SOAP CO. The Varden Soap Company has two production facilities, one in Ohio
and one in Virginia. The company makes the same type of soap at both facilities. The Ohio
plant makes 60% of the company’s total soap output, and the Virginia plant 40%. All soap
from the two facilities is sent to a central warehouse, where it is intermingled. After exten-
sive study, the quality assurance manager has determined that 5% of the soap produced in
Ohio and 10% of the soap produced in Virginia is unusable due to quality problems. When
the company sells a defective product, it incurs not only the cost of replacing the item but
also the loss of goodwill. The vice president for production would like to allocate these
costs fairly between the two plants. To do so, he knows he must first determine the proba-
bility that a defective item was produced by a particular production line. Specifically, he
needs to answer these questions:
1. What is the probability that the soap was produced at the Ohio plant, given that the
soap is defective?
2. What is the probability that the soap was produced at the Virginia plant, given that
the soap is defective?
In notation form, with D representing the event that an item is defective, what the manager
wants to know is
P(Ohio | D) = ?
P(Virginia | D) = ?
We can use Bayes’ Theorem (Equation 4.13) to determine these probabilities, as follows:
We know that event D(defective soap) can happen if it is made in either Ohio or Virginia. Thus,
P(D) = P(Ohio and Defective) + P(Virginia and Defective)
P(D) = P(Ohio)P(D|Ohio) + P(Virginia)P(D|Virginia)
P
D
P
P D
PD
(
| )
(
) ( |
)
( )
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
=
Business 
Application
SDK control service:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint in C# .NET Programming Project. PowerPoint Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
Business 
Application
190
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
We already know that 60% of the soap comes from Ohio and 40% from Virginia. So,
P(Ohio) = 0.60 and P(Virginia) = 0.40. These are called the prior probabilities. Without
Bayes’ Theorem, we would likely allocate the total cost of defects in a 60/40 split between
Ohio and Virginia, based on total production. However, the new information about the
quality from each line is
P(D|Ohio) = 0.05 and P(D|Virginia) = 0.10
which can be used to properly allocate the cost of defects. This is done using Bayes’
Theorem.
then,
and
These probabilities are called the revised probabilities. The prior probabilities have been
revised given the new quality information. We now see that 42.86% of the cost of defects
should be allocated to the Ohio plant, and 57.14% should be allocated to the Virginia plant.
Note, the denominator P(D) is the overall probability of defective soap. This prob-
ability is
P(D) = P(Ohio) P(D|Ohio) + P(Virginia)P(D|Virginia)
=(0.60)(0.05) + (0.40)(0.10)
=0.03 + 0.04
=0.07
Thus, 7% of all the soap made by Varden is defective.
You might prefer to use a tabular approach like that shown in Table 4.9 when you
apply Bayes’ Theorem. Another alternative is to use a tree diagram, as illustrated in the
following business application involving the IRS.
Bayes’ Theorem Using a Tree Diagram
IRS AUDIT This year experts project that 20% of all taxpayers will file an incorrect tax
return. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) itself is not perfect. IRS auditors claim there is
an error when no problem exists about 10% of the time. The audits also indicate no error
with a tax return when in fact there really is a problem about 30% of the time.
P
D
P
P D
P
(
| )
(
) ( |
)
(
Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
Vir
=
gginia
Virginia
Ohio)
Ohio
Virg
) ( |
)
(
( |
)
(
P D
P
PD
P
+
iinia| )
( . )( . )
( . )( . ) ( . )( .
D =
+
040 0 10
040 0 10
060 0
005
05714
)
= .
P
D
(
| )
( . )( . )
( . )( . ) ( . )(
Ohio
=
+
060 0 05
060 0 05
040 0
.. )
.
10
04286
=
P
D
P
PD
P
P D
(
| )
(
) ( |
)
(
) ( |
)
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
=
++P
P D
(
) ( |
)
Virginia
Virginia
TABLE 4.9 Bayes’ Theorem Calculations for Varden Soap
Prior
Conditional
Joint
Revised
Events
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Ohio
0.60
0.05
(0.60)(0.05) = 0.03
0.03/0.07 = 0.4286
Virginia
0.40
0.10
(0.40)(0.10) = 0.04
0.04/0.07 = 0.5714
0.07
1.0000
SDK control service:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
Such as load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, convert PowerPoint to PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file, as well as add
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
create image on desired PowerPoint slide, merge/split PowerPoint file, change the order of How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to SVG
www.rasteredge.com
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
191
The IRS has just notified a taxpayer there is an error in his return. What is the proba-
bility that the return actually has an error? We use the following notation:
E= The return actually contains an error
NE = The return contains no error
AE = Audit says an error exists
ANE = Audit says no error
Then, we are interested in determining
P(E|AE) = ?
From the information provided, we know the following:
P(E) = 0.20
P(ANE|E) = 0.30
P(AE| NE) = 0.10
P(NE) = 0.80
P(AE|E) = 0.70
P(ANE| NE) = 0.90
We need to use Bayes’ Theorem to determine the probability of interest. A tree dia-
gram can be used to do this. Figure 4.5 shows the tree diagram and probabilities. Now,
From Figure 4.5 we see that P(E and AE) = 0.14. To find P(AE), we add the probabilities
of the ways in which AE occurs (audit says an error occurred), because those two ways are
mutually exclusive.
P(AE) = P(E and AE) + P(NE and AE) = 0.14 + 0.08 = 0.22
Then,
The probability that the return contains an error,  given that the IRS audit indicates an error
exists, is 0.6364.
PE AE
PE
AE
PAE
( | )
(
)
( )
.
.
.
=
=
=
and 
014
022
06364
P E AE
PE
AE
P AE
( | )
(
)
( )
?
=
=
and 
P(E and AE) = (0.20)(0.70) = 0.14
AE = audit indicates
error
P(AE|E) = 0.70
ANE = audit indicates
no error
P(ANE|E) = 0.30
E = error
P(E) = 0.20
NE = no error
P(NE) = 0.80
P(E and ANE) = (0.20)(0.30) = 0.06
P(NE and AE) = (0.80)(0.10) = 0.08
P(NE and ANE) = (0.80)(0.90) = 0.72
AE = audit indicates
error
P(AE|NE) = 0.10
ANE = audit indicates
no error
P(ANE|NE) = 0.90
FIGURE 4.5
Tree Diagram for the
IRS Audit Example
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) Document. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
TRY PROBLEM 4.35
192
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
EX A M P L E   4 - 1 4
Bayes’ Theorem
Techtronics Equipment Corporation
The Techtronics Equipment Corporation
has developed a new electronic device that it would like to sell to the U.S. military for
use in fighter aircraft. The sales manager believes there is a 0.60 chance that the mili-
tary will place an order. However, after making an initial sales presentation, military
officials will often ask for a second presentation to other military decision makers.
Historically, 70% of successful companies are asked to make a second presentation,
whereas  50% of unsuccessful companies are asked back a second time. Suppose
Techtronics Equipment has just been asked to make a second presentation; what is the
revised probability that the company will make the sale? This probability can be deter-
mined using the following steps:
Step 1 Define the events.
In this case, there are two events:
S= sale
N= no sale
Step 2 Determine the prior probabilities for the events.
The probability of the events prior to knowing whether a second presenta-
tion will be requested are
P(S) = 0.60
P(N) = 0.40
Step 3 Define an event that if it occurs, could alter the prior probabilities.
In this case, the altering event is the invitation to make a second presenta-
tion. We label this event as SP.
Step 4 Determine the conditional probabilities.
The conditional probabilities are associated with being invited to make a
second presentation:
P(SP|S) = 0.70
P(SP |N) = 0.50
Step 5 Use the tabular approach for Bayes’ Theorem to determine the revised
probabilities.
These correspond to
P(S | SP) and P(N| SP)
Prior
Conditional
Joint
Revised
Event
Probability
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
S= sale
0.60
P(SP|S) = 0.70 P(S)P(SP|S) =(0.60)(0.70) = 0.42
0.42/0.62 =0.6774
N=no sale
0.40
P(SP|N) = 0.50 P(S)P(SP|S) =(0.40)(0.50) = 0.20
0.20/0.62 =0.3226
0.62
1.0000
Thus, using Bayes’ Theorem, if Techtronics Equipment gets a second pre-
sentation opportunity, the probability of making the sale is revised upward
from 0.60 to 0.6774.
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
193
4-2: Exercises
Skill Development
4-26. Historically, on Christmas Day the weather in a
certain Midwestern city has had the following 
distribution:
Event
Relative Frequency
Clear & dry
.20
Cloudy & dry
.30
Rain
.40
Snow
.10
a. Based on these data, what is the probability that
next Christmas will be dry?
b. Based on the data, what is the probability 
that next Christmas will be rainy or cloudy 
and dry?
c. Supposing next Christmas is dry, determine the
probability that it will also be cloudy.
4-27. A fast-food restaurant has determined that the
chance a customer will order a soft drink is 0.90.
The probability that a customer will order a ham-
burger is 0.60. The probability that a customer will
order french fries is 0.50.
a. If a customer places an order, what is the proba-
bility that the order will include a soft drink and
no fries if these two events are independent?
b. The restaurant has also determined that if a 
customer orders a hamburger, the probability the
customer will also order fries is 0.80. Determine
the probability that the order will include a 
hamburger and fries.
4-28. A basketball team has 10 players. Five are seniors,
2 are juniors, and 3 are sophomores. Two players
are randomly selected to serve as captains for the
next game. What is the probability that both play-
ers selected are seniors?
4-29. A paint store carries three brands of paint. A cus-
tomer wants to buy another gallon of paint to
match paint that she purchased at the store previ-
ously. She can’t recall the brand name and does not
wish to return home to find the old can of paint. So
she selects two of the three brands of paint at ran-
dom and buys them.
a. What is the probability that she matched the
paint brand?
b. Her husband also goes to the paint store and
fails to remember what brand to buy. So he also
purchases two of the three brands of paint at
random. Determine the probability that both the
woman and her husband fail to get the correct
brand of paint. (Hint: Are the husband’s selec-
tions independent of his wife’s selections?)
4-30. An event occurs with probability P(E
1
) = 0.35,
P(E
2
) = 0.15, P(E
3
) = 0.40. If the event B occurs,
the probability becomes P(E
1
|B) = 0.25, 
P(B) = 0.30.
a. Calculate P(E
1
and B).
b. Compute P(E
1
or B).
c. Assume that E
1
, E
2
, and E
3
are independent
events. Calculate P(E
1
and E
2
and E
3
).
4-31. A construction company has submitted two bids,
one to build a large hotel in London and the other
to build a commercial office building in New York
City. The company believes it has a 40% chance of
winning the hotel bid and a 25% chance of winning
the office building bid. The company also believes
that winning the hotel bid is independent of win-
ning the office building bid.
a. What is the probability the company will win
both contracts?
b. What is the probability the company will win at
least one contract?
c. What is the probability the company will lose
both contracts?
4-32. A small manufacturing plant has sales offices
located in four cities: Dallas, Seattle, Boston, and
Los Angeles. An analysis of the plant’s Accounts
receivables reveals the number of overdue invoices
by days, as shown here.
Days Overdue Dallas Seattle Boston Los Angeles
Under 30 days
137
122
198
287
30–60 days
85
46
76
109
61–90 days
33
27
55
48
Over 90 days
18
32
45
66
Assume the invoices are stored and managed from a
central database.
a. What is the probability that a randomly selected
invoice from the database is from the Boston
sales office?
b. What is the probability that a randomly selected
invoice from the database is between 30 and 90
days overdue?
c. What is the probability that a randomly selected
invoice from the database is over 90 days old
and from the Seattle office?
d. If a randomly selected invoice is from the Los
Angeles office, what is the probability that it is
60 or fewer days overdue?
4-33. A quality manager for a major computer manufac-
turer has collected the following data on the quality
status of disk drives by supplier. She inspected a
total of 700 disk drives.
Drive Status
Supplier
Working
Defective
Company A
120
10
Company B
180
15
Company C
50
5
Company D
300
20
a. Based on these inspection data, what is the
probability of randomly selecting a disk drive
from company B?
b. What is the probability of a defective disk drive
being received by the computer company?
c. What is the probability of a defect given that
company B supplied the disk drive?
4-34. Three events occur with probabilities of P(E
1
) =
0.35, P(E
2
) = 0.15, P(E
3
) = 0.40. Other probabili-
ties are: P(B | E
1
) = 0.25, P(B | E
2
) = 0.15, 
P(B| E
3
) = 0.60.
a. Compute P(E
1
|B).
b. Compute P(E
2
|B).
c. Compute P(E
3
|B).
4-35. A Harris study conducted for Lincoln Mercury
indicated (USA Today Snapshots, April 2005) that
42% of men and 61% of women would stop and
ask for directions. The U.S. Census Bureau’s 2004
census determined that for individuals 18 or over,
48.2% were men and 51.8% were women. This
exercise addresses this age group.
a. A randomly chosen driver gets lost on a road
trip. Determine the probability that the driver is
a woman and stops to ask for directions.
b. Calculate the probability that the driver stops to
ask for directions.
c. Given that a driver stops to ask for directions,
determine the probability that the driver was 
a man.
Business Applications
4-36. A local photocopy shop has three black-and-white
copy machines and two color copiers. Based on
historical data, the chances that each black-and-
white copier will be down for repairs is 0.10. The
color copiers are more of a problem and are down
20% of the time each.
a. Based on this information, what is the probabil-
ity that if a customer needs a color copy, both
color machines will be down for repairs?
b. If a customer wants both a color copy and a
black-and-white copy, what is the probability
that the necessary machines will be available?
(Assume that the color copier can also be used
to make a black-and-white copy if needed.)
c. If the manager wants to have at least a 99%
chance of being able to furnish a black-and-white
copy upon demand, is the present configuration
194
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
sufficient? (Assume that the color copier can
also be used to make a black-and-white copy if
needed.) Back up your answer with appropriate
probability computations.
d. What is the probability that all five copiers will
be up and running at the same time? Suppose
the manager added a fifth black-and-white
copier; how would the probability of all copiers
being ready at any one time be affected?
4-37. Refer to Problem 4.36. The owners of the photocopy
shop are going to open a new photocopy store. They
wish to meet the increasing demand for color photo-
copies and to have more reliable service. As a goal,
they would like to have at least a 99.9% chance of
being able to furnish a black-and-white copy or a
color copy upon demand. They also wish to purchase
only four copiers. They have asked for your advice
regarding the mix of black-and-white and color
copiers. Supply them with your advice. Provide
calculations and reasons to support your advice.
4-38. The Ace Construction Company has submitted a
bid on a state government project in Delaware. The
price of the bid was predetermined in the bid speci-
fications. The contract is to be awarded on the basis
of a blind drawing from those who have bid. Five
other companies have also submitted bids.
a. What is the probability of the Ace Construction
Company winning the bid?
b. Suppose that there are two contracts to be
awarded by a blind draw. What is the probability
of Ace winning both contracts? Assume sam-
pling with replacement.
c. Referring to part b, what is the probability of
Ace not winning either contract?
d. Referring to part b, what is the probability of
Ace winning exactly one contract?
4-39. A manager of a gasoline filling station is thinking
about a promotion that she hopes will bring in
more business to the full-service island. She is
considering the option that when a customer
requests a fill-up, if the pump stops with the dollar
amount at $9.99, the customer will get the gasoline
free. Previous studies show that 70% of the cus-
tomers require $10.00 or more when they fill up,
so would not be eligible for the free gas. What is
the probability that a customer will get free gas at
this station if the promotion is implemented?
4-40. Referring to Problem 4.39, suppose the manager is
concerned about alienating customers who buy
$10.00 or more, since they would not be eligible to
win the free gas under the original concept. To
overcome this, she is thinking about changing the
contest. The customer will get free gas if any of the
following happens:
$9.99, $11.11, $12.22, $13.33, $14.44, $15.55
$16.66, $17.77, $18.88, $19.99
194
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
195
Past data show that only 5% of all customers
require $20.00 or more. If one of these big-
volume customers arrives, he will get to blind
draw a ball from a box containing 100 balls 
(99 red, 1 white). If the white ball is picked, the
customer gets his gas free. Considering this new
promotion, what is the probability that a customer
will get free gas?
4-41. For a number of years, the Seattle, Washington real
estate market has been booming with prices 
skyrocketing. Recently, the Washington Real Estate
Commission studied the sales patterns in Seattle for
single-family homes. One chart presented in the
commission’s report is reproduced here. It shows
the number of homes sold by price range and num-
ber of days the home was on the market.
Days on the Market
Price Range ($000)
1–7
8–30
Over 30
Under $200
125
15
30
$200–$500
200
150
100
$501–$1,000
400
525
175
Over $1,000
125
140
35
a. Using the relative frequency approach to proba-
bility assessment, what is the probability that a
house will be on the market more than 7 days?
b. Is the event 1–7 days on the market independent
of the price $200–$500?
c. Suppose a home has just sold in Seattle and was
on the market less than 8 days, what is the most
likely price range for that home?
4-42. A marketing research company has randomly sur-
veyed 200 men who watch professional sports. The
men were separated according to their educational
level (college degree or not) and whether they pre-
ferred the NBA or the NFL. The results of the sur-
vey are shown here.
Sports 
College 
No College 
Preference
Degree
Degree
NBA
40
55
NFL
10
95
a. What is the probability that a randomly selected
survey participant prefers the NFL?
b. What is the probability that a randomly selected
survey participant has a college degree and
prefers the NBA?
c. Suppose a survey participant is randomly
selected and you are told that he has a college
degree. What is the probability that this man
prefers the NFL?
d. Is a survey participant’s preference for the NBA
independent of having a college degree?
4-43. A corporation has 11 manufacturing plants. Seven
of the plants are domestic and 4 are outside the
United States. Each year a performance evaluation
is conducted for 4 randomly selected plants. What
is the probability that a performance evaluation will
include at least 1 plant outside the United States?
(Hint: Begin by finding the probability that only
domestic plants are selected.)
4-44. The Skiwell Manufacturing Company gets materi-
als for its cross-country skis from two suppliers.
Supplier A’s materials make up 30% of what is
used, with supplier B providing the rest. Past
records indicate that 15% of supplier A’s materials
are defective and 10% of B’s are defective. Since it
is impossible to tell which supplier the materials
came from once they are in inventory, the manager
wants to know which supplier most likely supplied
the defective materials the foreman has brought to
his attention. Provide the manager this information.
4-45. Alpine Cannery is currently processing vegetables
from the summer harvest. The manager has found
acase of cans that has not been properly sealed.
There are three lines that processed cans of this
type, and the manager wants to know which line
is most likely to be responsible for this mistake.
Provide the manager this information.
Contribution
Proportion
Line
to Total
Defective
1
0.40
0.05
2
0.35
0.10
3
0.25
0.07
4-46. A major electronics manufacturers has determined
that when one of its televisions is sold, there is 0.08
chance that the set will need service before the
warranty period expires. It has also assessed a 0.05
chance that a DVD player will need service prior to
the expiration of the warranty expireing.
a. Suppose a customer purchases one of the com-
pany’s televisions and one of the DVD players.
What is the probability that at least one of the
products will require service prior to the war-
ranty period expiring?
b. Suppose a retailer sells four televisions on a par-
ticular Saturday. What is the probability that
none of the four will need service prior to the
warranty expiring?
c. Suppose a retailer sells four televisions on a par-
ticular Saturday. What is the probability that at
least one needs repair?
4-47. A distributor of Christmas tree lights has four sup-
pliers from which she purchases lights. This past
season she purchased 40% of the lights from
Franklin Lighting, 30% from Wilson & Sons, 
20% from Evergreen Supply, and the rest from 
196
CHAPTER 4 • USING PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS
A. L. Scott. In prior years, 3% of Franklin’s lights
were defective, 6% of the Wilson’s lights were
defective, 2% of Evergreen’s were defective, and
8% of the Scott lights were defective. When the
lights arrive at the distributor, she puts them in
inventory without identifying the supplier. Suppose
that a light string has been pulled from inventory;
what is the probability that it was supplied by
Franklin Lighting?
4-48. USA Today reported (“Study finds better survival
rates at ‘high-volume’ hospitals,” July 25, 2005)
that “high-volume” hospitals performed at least
77% of bladder removal surgeries; “low-volume”
hospitals performed at most 23%. Assume the per-
centages are 77% and 23%. In the first two weeks
after surgery, 3.1% of patients at low-volume cen-
ters died compared to 0.7% at the high-volume
hospitals.
a. Calculate the probability that a randomly chosen
bladder-cancer patient had surgery at a high-
volume hospital and survived the first two weeks
after surgery.
b. Calculate the probability that a randomly chosen
bladder-cancer patient survived the first two
weeks after surgery.
c. If two bladder-cancer patients were chosen ran-
domly, determine the probability that only one
would survive the first two weeks after surgery.
d. If two bladder-cancer patients were chosen ran-
domly, determine the probability that at least one
would survive the first two weeks after surgery.
4-49. The Committee for the Study of the American
Electorate indicated that 60.7% of the voting-age
voters cast ballots in the 2004 presidential election.
They also indicated that 85.3% of registered voters
voted in the election. The proportion of those who
voted for President Bush was 50.8.
a. Determine the proportion of voting-age voters
who voted for President Bush.
b. Determine the proportion of voting-age voters
who were registered to vote.
Computer Database Exercises
4-50. A Courtyard Hotel by Marriott conducted a survey
of its guests. Sixty-two surveys were completed.
Based upon the data from the survey, found in the
file CourtyardSurvey, determine the following
probabilities using the relative frequency assess-
ment method.
a. Of two customers selected, what is the probabil-
ity that both will be on a business trip?
b. What is the probability that a customer will be
on a business trip or experienced a hotel prob-
lem during a stay at the Courtyard?
c. What is the probability that a customer on busi-
ness has an in-state area code phone number?
d. Based on the data in the survey, can the
Courtyard manager conclude that a customer’s
rating regarding staff attentiveness is indepen-
dent of whether he or she is traveling on busi-
ness, pleasure, or both? Use the rules of proba-
bility to make this determination.
4-51. Continuing with the Marriott survey done by the
managers of a Wisconsin Marriott Courtyard,
based on the data from the survey, found in the file
CourtyardSurvey, determine the following proba-
bilities using the relative frequency assessment
method.
a. Of two customers selected, what is the probabil-
ity that neither will be on a business trip?
b. What is the probability that a customer will be
on a business trip or did not experience a hotel
problem during a stay at the Courtyard?
c. What is the probability that a customer on a
pleasure trip has an in-state area code phone
number?
4-52. The data file Colleges contains data on over 1,300
colleges and universities in the United States.
Suppose a company is planning to award a signifi-
cant grant to a randomly selected college or univer-
sity. Using the relative frequency method for
assessing probabilities and the rules of probability,
respond to the following. (If data are missing for a
needed variable, reduce the number of colleges in
the study appropriately.)
a. What is the probability that the grant will go to 
a private college or university?
b. What is the probability that the grant will go to a
college or university that has a student/faculty
ratio over 20?
c. What is the probability that the grant will go to a
college or university that is both private and has
a student/faculty ratio over 20?
d. If the company decides to split the grant into
two grants, what is the probability that both
grants will go to California colleges and uni-
versities? What might you conclude if this did
happen?
4-53. A Harris survey conducted in April of 2005 asked,
in part, what the most important reason was that
people gave for never using a wireless phone exclu-
sively. The responses were: (1) Like the safety of
traditional phone, (2) Need line for Net access, (3)
Pricing not attractive enough, (4) Weak or unreli-
able cell signal at home, (5) Coverage not good
enough, and (6) Other. The file entitled Wireless
contains the responses for the 1,088 respondents.
a. Of those respondents 36 or older, determine the
probability that an individual in this age group
would not use a wireless phone exclusively
because of some type of difficulty in placing
and receiving calls with a wireless phone.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested