Careers in Cartography and GIS
1
Careers
in
Cartography
and GIS
This booklet is published by the Cartographic and 
Geographic Information Society, whose mission is to 
support research, education, and practice to improve 
the understanding, creation, analysis, and use of 
maps and geographic information to support 
effective decision-making and improve the 
quality of life.  CaGIS 
serves both students 
and professionals 
in the fields of 
cartography and 
GIS. 
ic and 
ion is to 
improve
e of 
www.cartogis.org
Convert pdf to editable ppt online - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
add pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf to powerpoint with
Convert pdf to editable ppt online - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
how to change pdf to powerpoint format; image from pdf to powerpoint
2
Careers in Cartography and GIS is published as a service to the discipline by 
the Cartography and Geographic Information Society (CaGIS) which is solely 
responsible for its content.  It is an updated version (2008) of brochures by the 
same name published in 1998 and 2001. 
Additional copies of this publication can be ordered for $1 each, plus shipping and handling, by 
contacting CaGIS by e-mail (cagis@acsm.net), or by writing to: CaGIS, c/o ACSM, 6 Montgomery Village 
Avenue, Suite 403, Gaithersburg, MD 20879.   Telephone: (240) 632-9522. 
The brochure is also available for free; pdf download at 
www.cartogis.org.   
Contributors
Main text:  Rob Edsall, University of Minnesota
Additional text: David Cowen, University of South Carolina; Barbara Buttenfi eld, University of Colorado; 
Kathryn Clement, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Max Ethridge, U.S. Geological Survey, Egan, MN ; 
Dennis Fitzsimons, Humboldt State University; Robert McMaster, University of Minnesota; Stuart Shea, TASC, 
Reston, VA; Timothy Trainor, U.S. Bureau of the Census; Paul Young, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA
Research and Career profi les: Jillian Elder and Terry Song, Arizona State University 
Editor and lead designer: Rob Edsall, University of Minnesota
The US Department of Labor lists
Geospatial Technology 
as one of three
emerging 
industries 
with the
highest 
demand for workers and 
potential for growth 
in the 
coming decade!
CaGIS is a Member Organization of the American Congress 
of Surveying and Mapping (www.acsm.net).  CaGIS serves 
as the U.S. Member 
Organization of 
the International 
Cartographic Society 
(www.icaci.org).
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
to convert PDF document to editable & searchable to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to Download and try RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF for .NET
converting pdf to powerpoint; how to change pdf to powerpoint slides
Careers in Cartography and GIS
3
CARTOGRAPHY?  Hasn’t the world already been mapped?
For the most part, yes, but professional map makers no longer just create maps of places that have never 
been mapped before.  Think of all the different uses of maps that you’ve seen... tourists navigating around a 
new city, mountain bikers planning their next ride, businesspeople figuring out where to build a new store, 
scientists identifying all the different types of plants and animals in a region, weather reporters showing 
the paths of hurricanes... cartographers and geographic information professionals are working behind the 
scenes to collect 
up-to-date information
and display them on 
maps and computers
to help a diverse 
range of users do an infinite number of things.
So... it’s more than just Rand McNally that hires map makers?
Rand McNally is a well-known company that has been producing maps for over a century, but people in 
the mapping sciences are everywhere: in 
engineering
recreation
health care
city planning
environmental 
and
earth sciences
planetary astronomy
real estate
local 
and 
federal 
government
universities
the Internet
... and since so much information in the world now is collected 
with geographic coordinates, 
careers in the mapping sciences are among the fastest-
growing and most in-demand professions
in North America.
This brochure will show you the wide variety of professions in
Cartography 
and
GIS
two major careers in the mapping sciences 
using geospatial technology.  Inside, we 
introduce 
you to folks who 
work with 
maps and computers
every day, explain
some 
terms
and 
tools
that you’ll encounter all the time in this career, and
tell you 
about the kinds of 
jobssalaries
and
technologies 
you’ll fi nd in
Cartography 
and
GIS.
4
What is GIS?  Should I learn about it if 
I want to be a map maker?
GIS stands for 
geographic information systems. 
In today’s digital age, billions of 
pieces of data are collected every day, and much of this information includes a component that 
tells the geographic location of the data (this is called 
georeferencing
).  GISs are automated 
systems used to capture, edit, store, manipulate, analyze and display all this  spatial data. 
Almost all maps of places on the earth are created today using these computerized systems.  
Becoming expert in GIS qualifies you for a huge array of jobs that 
use spatial information.
GIS is about
much more than just making maps,
though.  It’s a tool with a 
mind-boggling number of uses, from modeling how far a toxic spill will reach given wind 
and water currents, to analyzing the best location for a new cell phone tower, to storing and 
maintaining data about global climate change, to finding the most energy-efficient route for 
your mail carrier, to helping government officials figure out how to get aid to storm vicitms, to   
determining the vulnerability of a wetlands area to pollution.
As long as a project has a spatial component, GIS and mapping sciences can be involved.  And 
guess what?  
There aren’t enough professionals who are expert in GIS 
to go around. 
The digital revolution has created an unprecedented demand for people 
who understand how to make and use maps.
job titles in Cartography and GIS
In the 
private sector
, individuals are needed who are well 
versed in geographical and cartographic concepts but also 
feel comfortable working with the hardware and software that 
drive the applications. These positions reflect the growing 
importance of GIS in all sectors of society and require a 
unique combination of education and skills.
GIS Coordinator
Technical Support Analyst
Database Analyst
Consultant/Project Manager
Project Manager
Software Engineer
Internet Product Software Engineer
Applications Programmer
GIS Software Product Specialist
Industry Marketing Manager
GIS Instructor
Data Publisher
Database and System Integrator
Computer Mapping Technician 
GIS Database Administrator & GIS 
Systems Analyst
GIS Manager/Information Services 
Planner 
GIS Manager/Senior Level
GIS Specialist
GIS Data Manager
Senior GIS Analyst
Senior Software Engineer
GIS Sales Manager
Administrator & GIS Systems 
Analyst
GIS Manager/Information Services 
Planner 
GIS Manager/Senior Level
GIS Specialist
GIS Data Manager
Senior GIS Analyst
Senior Software Engineer
GIS Sales Manager
Administrator & GIS Systems 
Analyst
GIS Manager/Information Services 
Planner 
GIS Manager/Senior Level
GIS Specialist
GIS Data Manager
Senior GIS Analyst
Senior Software Engineer
GIS Sales Manager
GIS Analyst II
Careers in Cartography and GIS
5
Some federal agencies
with careers in 
cartography and GIS
National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration 
National Geodetic Survey
U.S. Geological Survey
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Bureau of Land Management
National Park Service
U.S. Forest Service 
Environmental Protection Agency
National Geospatial Intelligence 
Agency 
É
soils
land uses
distances to 
streams
slope
wetlands
Data from satellites, aerial photos, digital maps, 
other digital data, and information in layers 
can be integrated in a GIS to answer 
questions such as how 
vulnerable a wetland 
might be to damage 
from nearby 
factories and 
homes. 
Using GIS
to determine vulnerability to pollution in 
a wetlands area
vulnerability
soi
lan
dis
str
slo
we
vul
6
Some mapping specialties
While most of us are most familiar with 
road maps and weather maps, there are 
several specialized maps for specific uses, 
and although they may use the same kinds 
of information, their requirements are 
different.
cadastral maps
record and delineate 
legal property lines. Cadastral maps 
are critical to local governments, city 
planning, emergency response efforts, 
and real estate activities. 
topographic maps
represent the 
terrain - mountains and valleys - of the 
earth’s surface.  They also often include 
vegetation, buildings, transportation lines, 
boundary lines, water bodies, and place 
names. 
nautical and aeronautical charts
provide critical information about the 
elevation of terrain and the depth of 
water bodies.
These maps are designed 
specifically for sea and air navigation.
image-based maps
use aerial and 
satellite images like those on the base 
layer of Internet maps, combined with 
other data, such as reference grids 
or roads derived from conventional 
geometric map sources.
thematic maps
portray the 
geographical distribution of specific 
geographic features such as soils, 
vegetation, geology, or statistics like 
population density, tax rates, or air quality. 
geovisualization
is a special category 
of map use that employs interactive and 
animated maps on a computer to display 
complex information about things like 
weather, sea temperature (El Nino), 
global warming, or greenhouse gases. 
These displays, often in three dimensions, 
represent an exciting new category of 
maps made possible through elaborate 
mathematical computations performed on 
computers.
É
Any advice for people thinking 
about a career in GIS? 
GIS is 
such a growing industry that you can 
make of it whatever your interests 
dictate.  Almost all industries utilize 
GIS these days so you can pursue 
a job path that falls within your 
interest.  Could be teaching, could be 
analysis, public health, oceanography, 
cartography, etc.... you can really 
work in a niche 
that you love.
These days so many 
industries utilize GIS that 
there is a career path 
that can interest almost 
everyone.
University GIS coor
Describe your job and your duties. 
As the GIS Coordinator, my primary 
responsibilities are to teach advanced 
GIS courses and coordinate the GISci 
(Geographic Information Science) 
Certificate Program. In addition, I assist 
in other university courses with GIS/
GPS related course materials and act as a 
consultant for any GIS needs that the faculty 
and staff may have. 
Why is your job rewarding or 
enjoyable? 
It’s enjoyable because I don’t simply use 
GIS, but I also teach others to use the 
technology.   To see a student go beyond 
what has been taught in class and use the 
technology for their own interests is very 
rewarding.
Careers in Cartography and GIS
7
A study by the 
American Society of 
Photogrammetry and Remote 
Sensing (ASPRS) found that the 
biggest growth areas for geospatial 
professionals this decade will be 
environmental management and 
consultingcivil governmentdefense 
and security, and transportation 
engineering
Cartographer of 
custom maps
Bryan Conant, Director of Mapping Services, maps.com
Describe your job and your duties. 
Maps.com was 
founded in 1991 and since its inception has become a leader 
in the custom mapping industry.   My role at Maps.com is to 
oversee and manage the production of custom maps for our clients.
What types of education would you suggest to folks who are thinking about 
cartography or GIS as a career?
My best advice for GIS students is to study design 
and cartography.   On the other hand cartographers need to know GIS.  Many ‘old school’ 
cartographers don’t know GIS and as a result spend much more time creating their maps than 
they could with the use of GIS.  GIS is a fantastic tool to get data and create 
maps in a much faster manner.  
Talk about your typical day at work.   
I work with my staff of 
cartographers and editors, working with sales, problem solving, and dealing 
with our clients.  I spend a lot of the day in 
front of the computer emailing, tracking 
numbers within spreadsheets, proofing maps, 
and occasionally producing maps.  As a 
manager I am constantly looking at maps and 
researching ways to create maps faster and 
more accurately
.
rdinator
Robbyn Abbitt, Department of Geography, Miami University of Ohio
How do you keep up with GIS? 
In order to 
stay productive with the ever-changing field of 
GIS, I frequently attend traning workshops. 
It’s critical to take advantage of local GIS 
user groups and workshops and to 
have knowledge of other GIS users.
Any advice for people 
thinking about a career in 
GIS?
My advice for those thinking about a career 
in GIS is to investigate taking courses in 
GIS.  Many universities and colleges offer 
professional certificate programs in GIS.  By 
completing these types of programs you 
ensure a future employer that you have the 
necessary training and education to be hired 
into a GIS position.  
8
How 
much do 
cartographers 
and GIS 
professionals 
make?  
Salaries vary 
considerably from one 
location to another. The map 
at right estimates salaries for 
cartographers and mapping 
technicians by state.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor 
Statistics does not have 
a separate category of 
occupation simply called 
“GIS analysts” or “GIS 
practitioners.”  
GIS analysts who concentrate 
on solving problems with 
geographic methods are 
called, simply, 
geographers
 
In 2006, the median salary 
for geographers was about 
$61,000.   The highest paid 
GIS analysts are those who 
create new software or design 
databases; they are classified 
as 
computer applications 
software engineers
or 
database administrators
In 2006, computer 
applications software 
engineers had median annual 
earnings of about $77,000.  
http://www.acinet.org/acinet
http://www.bls.gov/
Web cartographer & 
project manager
David Heyman, Axis Maps, Madison, WI
David is a co-founder of Axis Maps, a cartography company 
that focuses on “communicating information and the 
opportunity to turn data into knowledge.”  They create print, 
interactive, and mash-up maps. 
What’s a hot job in cartography/GIS these days?
Interactive cartography... Web services like Yahoo!, Microsoft, 
and Google are letting people see geography in brand new 
ways and the Internet has opened up a massive portal to 
access and share data.  
Any advice for people thinking about a career in 
mapping? 
I think for a career in interactive cartography, 
someone should have three core skill sets. First, 
they should have a foundation in GIS and data 
management. Second, they should have a desire to 
design both maps and user interfaces. 
Cartography is about the visual 
communication of information and 
great design is like great writing 
or speaking; it leads to better 
communication. Finally, 
they should have some 
programming knowledge to 
actually put all their 
great ideas to work.
t
m
d
C
c
g
o
c
t
p
a
How is a map made?
 
No matter what the purpose, making a map requires similar steps. Here is a 
summary of some of the major steps involved in producing a map.
Where do you get the data to put on a map?
Geospatial professionals can collect and evaluate mappable information 
first-hand through 
field work
, or second-hand from 
existing maps, 
aerial photographs, statistical reports, 
or
computerized data 
files
Do you have to start with a blank computer screen every time?
Almost all maps now start with a base map that isn’t created specifically for 
the map that’s being made.  In most cases, someone (often the local, state, or 
federal government) has already compiled detailed digital information, like 
streets and rivers and boundaries, and that information is available for map 
makers using GIS.  Sometimes, the map maker needs to purchase data from 
a “vendor” if the map is really specialized.  Because 
no map or analysis 
is any good without accurate data
, it is important that databases 
are developed according to rigorous standards and carefully edited and 
maintained.
So let’s say I have all this information - I’ll just make a map.  
What’s the big deal?
There are a lot of choices that a cartographer has to make when it comes 
to designing the map: how should the round earth be transformed to 
the flat page or screen (
map projection
), what size and extent should 
the map cover (
scale
), what colors and shapes should be on the map 
(
symbols
), how will it be printed or displayed?  Fortunately, with computers, 
cartographers can now try out a bunch of map design choices - not so long 
ago, each change was really time-consuming and expensive.  
And then the map is printed?
Lots of maps wind up on paper in some way - some using computer-driven 
printers and plotters, others using offset lithography.   But nowadays there 
are many 
digital ways to display the final map
 And the design of 
digital maps is different from those made on paper, and there are a 
lot of different digital formats.  Imagine how different maps have to 
look if they’re designed for 
in-car GPS navigation system 
screens
, or tiny 
cell phone displays
, or 
online mapping 
applications
, or 
video games
 A lot of modern mapping 
will be digital, and it’s a good idea to be familiar and 
comfortable with computers - and even programming - as a 
future geospatial professional.  
good stuff 
to take in high school to 
prepare for a cartography 
or GIS career
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
English
Graphic Art
Foreign Languages
Social Studies 
Algebra I &II
Calculus
Geometry
Trigonometry 
Computer Applications
Computer Programming
Careers in Cartography and GIS
9
É
S many maps designed for 
the Internet are now interac-
tive in lots of different ways.  
This map interface from axis-
maps (see page 8) lets users 
change colors and classes of 
the thematic map on the fly
10
Academic Cartographer
Jon Kimerling, Professor and Author, Oregon State University
I first knew that I 
wanted to be 
a cartographer when
I was 10 years old 
and made my first
map for a class.
Many cartographers find their home in universities, teaching about 
maps, GIS, and geography, and conducting research in map creation, 
design, and understanding.  Dr. Kimerling has written several books 
on cartography and is an editor of the Atlas of the Pacific Northwest.
When did you know that this is the career you wanted 
to pursue? 
I knew that I wanted to be a professor of cartography 
by the end of my undergraduate career when I discovered that I 
really liked explaining things about cartography to others, and that 
I liked doing research in cartography.
What kinds of education would you suggest if I’m 
thinking about cartography as a career? 
Cartography 
is an interesting career because it is a true blend of art, science, 
and technology. Making professional quality maps requires a 
strong education in geography with a focus on cartography and 
remote sensing, mathematics through basic calculus and statistics, 
introductory computer science including programming and 
database management, and basic graphic design.
What makes your job enjoyable?
I am blessed with a 
wonderful career as an academic cartographer. Every day I enjoy 
coming to my department and working with students and fellow 
faculty members. Although I teach the same courses each year, 
every day is different, and I am constantly challenged by changes 
in cartography and questions asked by students. I have never been 
bored as a professor.
going the distance
Many institutions now offer distance-education certifi cation or 
degree programs in GIS onine.  Here are a few:
http://www.ucgis.org/
Birkbeck College 
http://www.bbk.ac.uk/Departments/
Geography/online.htm
California State University 
Bakersfi eld
http://academic.csub.edu/~vkohli/giscert.
html 
Charles Sturt University
http://clio.mit.csu.edu.au/gis 
Curtin University 
http://www.cage.curtin.edu.au/gis/
distance.htm 
University of Denver
http://www.du.edu/gis/
Elmhurst College
http://www.elmhurst.edu/~geo/
GISCertProgram.html 
ESRI Virtual Campus
http://campus.esri.com/ 
University of Leeds
http://www.geog.leeds.ac.uk/odl/ 
University of North Dakota
http://www.conted.und.edu/ddp/gis/ 
Northwest Missouri State 
University
http://www.nwmissouri.edu/gis 
Pennsylvania State World Campus
http://www.worldcampus.psu.edu/pub/
programs/gis/index.shtml 
University of Southern Queensland
http://www.usq.edu.au/handbook/2002/
engineer/index.htm 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested