The Investigation and Management of 
the Small–for–Gestational–Age Fetus
Green–top Guideline No. 31
2nd Edition | February 2013 | Minor revisions – January 2014
Converting pdf to ppt online - control software system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Converting pdf to ppt online - control software system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
2of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
The Investigation and Management of the
Small–for–Gestational–Age Fetus
This is the second edition of this guideline. It replaces the first edition which was published in November
2002 under the same title.
Executive Summary of Recommendations
Risk factors for a SGA fetus/neonate
All women should be assessed at booking for risk factors for a SGA fetus/neonate to identify those who
require increased surveillance.
Women who have a major risk factor (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.0) should be referred for serial ultrasound
measurement of fetal size and assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler from 26–28
weeks of pregnancy (Appendix 1).
Women who have three or more minor risk factors should be referred for uterine artery Doppler at 20–24
weeks of gestation (Appendix 1).
Second trimester DS markers have limited predictive accuracy for delivery of a SGA neonate.
A low level (0.415 MoM) of the first trimester marker PAPP–A should be considered a major risk factor
for delivery of a SGA neonate.
In high risk populations uterine artery Doppler at 20–24 weeks of pregnancy has a moderate predictive
value for a severely SGA neonate.
In women with an abnormal uterine artery Doppler at 20–24 weeks of pregnancy, subsequent
normalisation of flow velocity indices is still associated with an increased risk of a SGA neonate.
Repeating uterine artery Doppler is therefore of limited value.
Women with an abnormal uterine artery Doppler at 20–24 weeks (defined as a pulsatility index [PI] 
95
th
centile) and/or notching should be referred for serial ultrasound measurement of fetal size and
assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler commencing at 26–28 weeks of pregnancy.  
Women with a normal uterine artery Doppler do not require serial measurement of fetal size and serial
assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler unless they develop specific pregnancy
complications, for example antepartum haemorrhage or hypertension. However, they should be offered
a scan for fetal size and umbilical artery Doppler during the third trimester.
Serial ultrasound measurement of fetal size and assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler
should be offered in cases of fetal echogenic bowel.
Abdominal palpation has limited accuracy for the prediction of a SGA neonate and thus should not be
routinely performed in this context.
Serial measurement of symphysis fundal height (SFH) is recommended at each antenatal appointment
from 24 weeks of pregnancy as this improves prediction of a SGA neonate.
B
P
P
P
P
B
A
C
P
C
C
B
control software system:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Your PDF file is converted to look just the same as it does in your office software. Creating a PDF from PPTX/PPT has never been so easy! Easy converting!
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word. PDF, MS-Excel, MS-PPT to Word Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
3of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
SFH should be plotted on a customised chart rather than a population–based chart as this may improve
prediction of a SGA neonate.
Women with a single SFH which plots below the 10
th
centile or serial measurements which demonstrate
slow or static growth by crossing centiles should be referred for ultrasound measurement of fetal size.
Women in whom measurement of SFH is inaccurate (for example: BMI 35, large fibroids, hydramnios)
should be referred for serial assessment of fetal size using ultrasound.
Optimum method of diagnosing a SGA fetus and FGR
Fetal abdominal circumference (AC) or estimated fetal weight (EFW) 10
th
centile can be used to
diagnose a SGA fetus.
Use of a customised fetal weight reference may improve prediction of a SGA neonate and adverse
perinatal outcome. In women having serial assessment of fetal size, use of a customised fetal weight
reference may improve the prediction of normal perinatal outcome.
Routine measurement of fetal AC or EFW in the third trimester does not reduce the incidence of a SGA
neonate nor does it improve perinatal outcome. Routine fetal biometry is thus not justified.
Change in AC or EFW may improve the prediction of wasting at birth (neonatal morphometric indicators)
and adverse perinatal outcome suggestive of FGR.
When using two measurements of AC or EFW to estimate growth velocity, they should be at least 
3 weeks apart to minimise false–positive rates for diagnosing FGR. More frequent measurements of
fetal size may be appropriate where birth weight prediction is relevant outside of the context of
diagnosing SGA/FGR.
Where the fetal AC or EFW is 10
th
centile or there is evidence of reduced growth velocity, women should
be offered serial assessment of fetal size and umbilical artery Doppler.
Investigations that are indicated in SGA fetuses
Offer referral for a detailed fetal anatomical survey and uterine artery Doppler by a fetal medicine
specialist if severe SGA is identified at the 18–20 week scan.
Karyotyping should be offered in severely SGA fetuses with structural anomalies and in those detected
before 23 weeks of gestation, especially if uterine artery Doppler is normal.
Serological screening for congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) and toxoplasmosis infection should be
offered in severely SGA fetuses.
Testing for syphilis and malaria should be considered in high risk populations.
Uterine artery Doppler has limited accuracy to predict adverse outcome in SGA fetuses diagnosed
during the third trimester.
A
C
C
P
P
A
P
P
C
P
C
C
C
C
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
This VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion tutorial will illustrate our effective PPT to PDF converting control SDK from following aspects.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
image or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF that can be converted from PPT document, please corresponding VB.NET guide for converting PowerPoint document
www.rasteredge.com
Interventions to be considered in the prevention of SGA fetuses/neonates
Antiplatelet agents may be effective in preventing SGA birth in women at high risk of pre-eclampsia
although the effect size is small.
In women at high risk of pre-eclampsia, antiplatelet agents should be commenced at, or before, 16
weeks of pregnancy.
There is no consistent evidence that dietary modification, progesterone or calcium prevent birth of a
SGA infant. These interventions should not be used for this indication.
Interventions to promote smoking cessation may prevent delivery of a SGA infant. The health benefits
of smoking cessation indicate that these interventions should be offered to all women who are pregnant
and smoke.
Antithrombotic therapy appears to be a promising therapy for preventing delivery of a SGA infant in 
high-risk women. However there is insufficient evidence, especially concerning serious adverse effects,
to recommend its use.
Interventions to be considered in the preterm SGA fetus
Women with a SGA fetus between 24
+0
and 35
+6
weeks of gestation, where delivery is being considered,
should receive a single course of antenatal corticosteroids.
Optimal method and frequency of fetal surveillance in SGA
In a high–risk population, the use of umbilical artery Doppler has been shown to reduce perinatal
morbidity and mortality. Umbilical artery Doppler should be the primary surveillance tool in the 
SGA fetus.
When umbilical artery Doppler flow indices are normal it is reasonable to repeat surveillance every 
14 days.
More frequent Doppler surveillance may be appropriate in a severely SGA fetus.
When umbilical artery Doppler flow indices are abnormal (pulsatility or resistance index >+2 SDs above
mean for gestational age) and delivery is not indicated repeat surveillance twice weekly in fetuses with
end–diastolic velocities present and daily in fetuses with absent/reversed end–diastolic frequencies.
CTG should not be used as the only form of surveillance in SGA fetuses.
Interpretation of the CTG should be based on short term fetal heart rate variation from computerised
analysis.
Ultrasound assessment of amniotic fluid volume should not be used as the only form of surveillance in
SGA fetuses.
Interpretation of amniotic fluid volume should be based on single deepest vertical pocket.
Biophysical profile should not be used for fetal surveillance in preterm SGA fetuses.
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
4of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
B
C
C
P
A
A
D
A
A
P
A
P
A
A
A
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Customize PPT Document Rendering Options in VB.
to render and convert PPT slide to various formats, including PDF, BMP, TIFF, SVG, PNG, JPEG, GIF and JBIG2. In the process of converting PPT slide to any of
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
control add-on can do PPT creating, loading controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
5of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
In the preterm SGA fetus, middle cerebral artery (MCA) Doppler has limited accuracy to predict
acidaemia and adverse outcome and should not be used to time delivery.
In the term SGA fetus with normal umbilical artery Doppler, an abnormal middle cerebral artery Doppler
(PI 5
th
centile) has moderate predictive value for acidosis at birth and should be used to time delivery.
Ductus venosus Doppler has moderate predictive value for acidaemia and adverse outcome.
Ductus venosus Doppler should be used for surveillance in the preterm SGA fetus with abnormal
umbilical artery Doppler and used to time delivery.
The optimal gestation to deliver the SGA fetus
In the preterm SGA fetus with umbilical artery AREDV detected prior to 32 weeks of gestation, delivery
is recommended when DV Doppler becomes abnormal or UV pulsations appear, provided the fetus is
considered viable and after completion of steroids. Even when venous Doppler is normal, delivery is
recommended by 32 weeks of gestation and should be considered between 30–32 weeks of gestation.
If MCA Doppler is abnormal, delivery should be recommended no later than 37 weeks of gestation.
In the SGA fetus detected after 32 weeks of gestation with an abnormal umbilical artery Doppler,
delivery no later than 37 weeks of gestation is recommended.
In the SGA fetus detected after 32 weeks of gestation with normal umbilical artery Doppler, a senior
obstetrician should be involved in determining the timing and mode of birth of these pregnancies.
Delivery should be offered at 37 weeks of gestation.
How the SGA fetus should be delivered
In the SGA fetus with umbilical artery AREDV delivery by caesarean section is recommended.
In the SGA fetus with normal umbilical artery Doppler or with abnormal umbilical artery PI but
end–diastolic velocities present, induction of labour can be offered but rates of emergency caesarean
section are increased and continuous fetal heart rate monitoring is recommended from the onset of
uterine contractions.
Early admission is recommended in women in spontaneous labour with a SGA fetus in order to instigate
continuous fetal heart rate monitoring.
1. Purpose and scope
The purpose of this guideline is to provide advice that is based on the best evidence where available in order
to guide clinicians, regarding the investigation and management of the small–for–gestational age (SGA) fetus.
The guideline reviews the risk factors for a SGA fetus and provides recommendations regarding screening,
diagnosis and management, including fetal monitoring and delivery. 
1.1 Population and setting
Unselected pregnant women in community settings.
High-risk women (calculated on the basis of past obstetric history, current medical disorders or ultrasound
diagnosis) in the hospital setting. 
The guideline does not address multiple pregnancies or pregnancies with fetal abnormalities. 
P
B
C
A
P
C
P
A
B
P
P
control software system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert PowerPoint to BMP Image with VB PPT
in VB class for rendering and converting PowerPoint presentations converters, such as VB.NET PDF Converter, Excel to the corresponding guide on C# PPT to BMP
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
doc.ConvertToDocument(DocumentType.TIFF, @"output.tif"); C# Demo for Converting PowerPoint to TIFF. Add references (Extra); Load your PPT (.pptx) document.
www.rasteredge.com
1.2. Interventions to be studied
Comparison of modalities to screen for and diagnose a SGA fetus.
Comparison of modalities to monitor a SGA fetus. 
2. Definitions
Small–for–gestational age (SGA) refers to an infant born with a birth weight less than the 10
th
centile.
Historically SGA birth has been defined using population centiles. But, the use of centiles customised for
maternal characteristics (maternal height, weight, parity and ethnic group) as well as gestational age at
delivery and infant sex, identifies small babies at higher risk of morbidity and mortality than those identified
by population centiles.
1–2
With respect to the fetus, definitions of SGA birth and severe SGA vary. For the
purposes of this guideline, SGA birth is defined as an estimated fetal weight (EFW) or abdominal
circumference (AC) less than the 10
th
centile and severe SGA as an EFW or AC less than the 3
rd
centile.
3
Other
definitions will be discussed where relevant. 
Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is not synonymous with SGA. Some, but not all, growth restricted
fetuses/infants are SGA while 50–70% of SGA fetuses are constitutionally small, with fetal growth appropriate
for maternal size and ethnicity.
4
The likelihood of FGR is higher in severe SGA infants. Growth restriction
implies a pathological restriction of the genetic growth potential. As a result, growth restricted fetuses may
manifest evidence of fetal compromise (abnormal Doppler studies, reduced liquor volume). Low birth weight
(LBW) refers to an infant with a birth weight < 2500 g.
As some of the definitions used in the published literature vary, or as in the case of FGR, can be used
inappropriately, further clarification is given where necessary throughout the guideline when referring to 
the evidence.
3. Background
Small fetuses are divided into normal (constitutionally) small, non–placenta mediated growth restriction, for
example; structural or chromosomal anomaly, inborn errors of metabolism and fetal infection, and placenta
mediated growth restriction. Maternal factors can affect placental transfer of nutrients, for example; low
pre–pregnancy weight, under nutrition, substance abuse or severe anaemia. Medical conditions can affect
placental implantation and vasculature and hence transfer, for example; pre-eclampsia, autoimmune disease,
thrombophilias, renal disease, diabetes and essential hypertension. 
As a group, structurally normal SGA fetuses are at increased risk of perinatal mortality and morbidity but most
adverse outcomes are concentrated in the growth restricted group. Several studies have shown that neonates
defined as SGA by population–based birthweight centiles but not customised centiles are not at increased risk
of perinatal morbidity or mortality.
1,2,5
Clinical examination is a method of screening for fetal size, but is unreliable in detecting SGA fetuses.
Diagnosis of a SGA fetus usually relies on ultrasound measurement of fetal abdominal circumference or
estimation of fetal weight. Management of the SGA fetus is directed at timely delivery. A number of
surveillance tests are available, including cardiotocography, Doppler and ultrasound to assess biophysical
activity but there is controversy about which test or combination of tests should be used to time delivery,
especially in the fetus.
4. Identification and assessment of evidence
This guideline was developed in accordance with standard methodology for producing RCOG Green–top
Guidelines. Medline, Pubmed, all EBM reviews (Cochrane CRCT, Cochrane database of Systematic Reviews,
6of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
control software system:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF. Online C# Tutorial for Converting MS Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to PDF. MS Office
www.rasteredge.com
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
7of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
methodology register, ACP journal club, DARE HTA, Maternity and Infant Care), EMBASE and TRIP were
searched for relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta–analyses and cohort
studies. The search was restricted to articles published between 2002 and September 2011. Search words
included ‘fetal growth retardation’, ‘fetal growth restriction’, ‘infant, small for gestational age’, including all
relevant Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms. The search was limited to humans and the English language. 
5. What are the risk factors for a SGA fetus/neonate? What is the optimum method of
screening for the SGA fetus/neonate and care of “at risk” pregnancies?
Methods employed in the first and second trimesters, to predict the likelihood of a SGA fetus/neonate include:
medical and obstetric history and examination, maternal serum screening and uterine artery Doppler.
Methods of screening for the SGA fetus/neonate in the second and third trimester are abdominal palpation
and measurement of symphysis fundal height (SFH) (including customised charts). 
5.1 History 
All women should be assessed at booking for risk factors for a SGA fetus/neonate to identify those who
require increased surveillance.
Women who have a major risk factor (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.0) should be referred for serial ultrasound
measurement of fetal size and assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler from 26–28
weeks of pregnancy (Appendix 1).
Women who have three or more minor risk factors should be referred for uterine artery Doppler at 20–24
weeks of gestation (Appendix 1).
A table of risk factors and associated odds ratios (ORs) for the birth of a SGA neonate, where evidence is
consistent and not affected by adjustment for confounders, is presented in Appendix 1. It is acknowledged
that other risk factors may need to be considered on an individual basis.
Women that have previously had a SGA neonate have at least a twofold increased risk of a subsequent SGA
neonate.
6–8
The risk is increased further after two SGA births.
7
Classification of prior infant birthweight is best
done using customised centiles.
1–2
This can be done using computer software that can be downloaded from the
internet.
9
Women with a prior history of other placenta–mediated diseases are also at increased risk of a
subsequent SGA neonate. This includes prior pre-eclampsia
8
and prior stillbirth,
7
and in particular those with a
history of previous preterm unexplained stillbirth, due to the association with FGR.
10
While termination of
pregnancy is not a risk factor for a SGA infant,
11
the evidence regarding recurrent miscarriage is inconsistent.
12,13
Maternal medical conditions associated with an increased risk of a SGA neonate are diabetes with vascular
disease,
14
moderate and severe renal impairment (especially when associated with hypertension),
15
antiphospholipid syndrome
16
and chronic hypertension.
17
Systemic lupus erythematosus
18
and certain types
of congenital heart disease, in particular cyanotic congenital heart disease, are associated with increased
likelihood of a SGA neonate but there are no papers reporting ORs.
19
The risk will therefore need to be
assessed on an individual basis. The evidence for an association with asthma, thyroid disease, inflammatory
bowel disease and depression is less convincing. Studies report a weak or non–significant association with
LBW but do not differentiate between the effect on SGA and preterm birth, and with confidence intervals
[CIs] often crossing one. Therefore, if uncomplicated and adequately treated, these are not considered to be
risk factors for a SGA fetus.
20,21
Maternal risk factors associated with an increased risk of a SGA neonate are maternal age ≥ 35 years, with a
further increase in those ≥ 40 years old,
22
African American
23
or Indian/Asian ethnicity,
2,24
nulliparity,
25
social
deprivation,
26
unmarried status,
27
body mass index (BMI) < 20,
28–30
BMI > 25,
28,29
maternal SGA,
31
daily vigorous
P
P
B
exercise,
32
a short (< 6 months) or long (> 60 months) inter–pregnancy interval
33
and heavy vaginal bleeding
during the first trimester.
34
The effect of some of these risk factors is reduced once adjusted for other
associated factors and thus they are not included in Appendix 1. Maternal exposure to domestic violence
during pregnancy has been shown in a systematic review to be associated with low birth weight (Adjusted
OR [AOR] 1.53, 95% CI 1.28–1.82).
35
Low maternal weight gain has been shown to be associated with a SGA
infant in a preterm population (OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.9–12.6)
13
but it is no longer recommended that women are
routinely weighed during pregnancy.
36
Several maternal exposures have a seemingly causative relationship with a SGA infant, including moderate
alcohol intake,
37
drug use (with cocaine use during pregnancy being the most significant)
38
and cigarette
smoking.
39
The effects of smoking are dose dependent.
29
Other risk factors are maternal caffeine consumption ≥ 300 mg per day in the thirdtrimester
40
and a low fruit
intake pre–pregnancy, while a high green leafy vegetable intake pre–pregnancy has been reported to be protective
(AOR 0.44, 95% CI 0.24–0.81).
32
Singleton pregnancies following IVF are also a risk factor for a SGA fetus.
41
Changing paternity has been associated with an increased risk of a SGA infant,
42
although a recent
systematic review demonstrated inconclusive evidence.
43
A paternal history of SGA birth is a risk
factor for a SGA fetus.
44
There is insufficient evidence to determine how risk factors relate to each other in the individual woman and
consequently how these risk factors should be managed. This includes abnormal maternal Down syndrome
serum markers (see below). Further evidence may become available from the SCOPE study.
45
This guideline
has therefore categorized risk factors into major and minor based on published ORs for the birth of a SGA
neonate. Major risk factors (OR > 2.0) should prompt referral for serial ultrasound measurement of fetal size
and assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler. The presence of multiple minor risk factors is
likely to constitute a significant risk for the birth of a SGA neonate and there is a rationale for further screening
using uterine artery Doppler at 20 weeks (see below). 
5.2 Biochemical markers used for Down Syndrome (DS) Screening 
Second trimester DS markers have limited predictive accuracy for delivery of a SGA neonate.
A low level (0.415 MoM) of the first trimester marker PAPP–A should be considered a major risk factor
for delivery of a SGA neonate.
Due to their placental origin, several biochemical markers have been investigated as screening tests for a 
SGA fetus.
Two systematic reviews found low predictive accuracy for alpha fetoprotein (AFP) (> 2.5 MoM or 
< 0.25 MoM), elevated hCG (> 3.0 MoM) and inhibin A (≥ 2.0 MoM), low unconjugated estriol (< 0.5
MoM) and the combined triple test to predict a SGA fetus.
46,47
One review found methodological and
reporting limitations in all studies, resulting in great heterogeneity, concluding that serum markers
were only useful as a means of contributing to the overall assessment of risk for a pregnancy.
47
In women with elevated AFP, there is no evidence that increased fetal surveillance has any benefit.
48
Similarly, there is a lack of evidence for the use of aspirin in women with raised hCG.
49
In a large series of 49 801 women at 11
+
0 to 13
+6
weeks, low PAPP–A (but not beta HCG) was inversely
associated with risk of being SGA. Using a 5
th
centile (0.415 MoM) cut off, ORs for A SGA infant (birthweight
< 10
th
centile) and severe SGA (birthweight < 3
rd
centile) were 2.7 and 3.66 respectively.
50 
A systematic review 
8of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Evidence
level 3
P
B
Evidence
level 3
Evidence
level
1+/2+
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
9of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
found that an unexplained low first trimester PAPP–A (< 0.4 MoM) and/or a low hCG (< 0.5 MoM) were
associated with an increased frequency of adverse obstetrical outcome including a SGA infant.
47
There is some evidence that addition of fetal size at 18–20 weeks of gestation or fetal growth
between 11–14 and 18–20 weeks of gestation to first trimester serum markers improves prediction
of a SGA infant.
51,52
However, different ultrasound parameters have been used and it is unclear what
combination provides optimum prediction.
5.3 Uterine artery Doppler
In high risk populations uterine artery Doppler at 20–24 weeks of pregnancy has a moderate predictive
value for a severely SGA neonate.
In women with an abnormal uterine artery Doppler at 20–24 weeks of pregnancy, subsequent
normalisation of flow velocity indices is still associated with an increased risk of a SGA neonate.
Repeating uterine artery Doppler is therefore of limited value.
Women with an abnormal uterine artery Doppler at 20–24 weeks (defined as a pulsatility index [PI] 
95
th
centile) and/or notching should be referred for serial ultrasound measurement of fetal size and
assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler commencing at 26–28 weeks of pregnancy.
Women with a normal uterine artery Doppler do not require serial measurement of fetal size and serial
assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler unless they develop specific pregnancy
complications, for example antepartum haemorrhage or hypertension. However, they should be offered
a scan for fetal size and umbilical artery Doppler during the third trimester.
SGA birth, particularly when severe (birth weight < 3
rd
centile) or necessitating delivery < 36 weeks of gestation,
is characterised by failure of trophoblast invasion of the myometrial uterine spiral arteries and reduced
uteroplacental blood flow. Non–pregnant and first trimester artery blood flow velocity waveforms are associated
with low end–diastolic velocities and an early diastolic notch. Persistent notching or abnormal flow velocity ratios
after 24 weeks of gestation are associated with inadequate trophoblast invasion of the myometrial spiral arteries.
53
However reduced endovascular trophoblast invasion of decidual spiral arteries has been associated with the same
waveform abnormalities as early as 10–14 weeks of pregnancy.
54
A systematic review and meta–analysis summarised the results from 61 studies testing 41 131 pregnant women
with uterine artery Doppler (in both first and second trimesters) and assessed the value of different Doppler
flow velocity indices.
55
SGA birth in low risk patients was best predicted by an increased pulsatility index (PI)
(defined as > 95
th
centile) with diastolic notching (positive likelihood ratio [LR+] 9.1, 95% CI 5.0–16.7; negative
likelihood ratio [LR–] 0.89, 95% CI 0.85–0.93). Severe SGA (birthweight < 5
th
or < 3
rd
centile) in low risk
populations was best predicted in the second trimester by an increased PI (LR+ 13.7, 95% CI 10.3–16.9; LR–
0.34, 95% CI 0.23–0.48) or an increased PI with notching (LR+ 14.6, 95% CI 7.8–26.3; LR– 0.78, 95% CI
0.68–0.87). Uterine artery Doppler to predict a SGA infant in high risk populations overall showed low
predictive characteristics; an increased PI or notching in the second trimester best predicted a SGA infant (LR+
3.6, 95% CI 2.0–5.1; LR– 0.40, 95% CI 0.14–0.65). Prediction of severe SGA showed moderate utility with the
best prediction by a resistance index (> 0.58 or > 90
th
centile) and notching in the second trimester (LR+ 10.9,
95% CI 10.4–11.4; LR– 0.20, 95% CI 0.14–0.26). Although first trimester uterine artery Doppler studies suggest
a high specificity (91–96%) and high negative predictive values (91–99%), the low sensitivity (12–25%) for a
SGA neonate suggest early screening cannot be recommended on current evidence.
55
There were three studies included in this review that looked at prediction of early onset SGA, all 
of which were in low risk/unselected populations.
55
Increased PI in the second trimester has been
shown to be predictive of delivery of a SGA fetus < 34 weeks in two studies (LR+ 13.7, 95% CI 
P
P
Evidence
level 2+
A
C
Evidence
level 1
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
10of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
11.3–16.7; LR– 0.37, 95% CI 0.27–0.52) and < 32 weeks in one study (LR+ 14.6, 95% CI 11.5–18.7;
LR– 0.31 0.18–0.53).
In approximately 60% of cases with abnormal uterine artery Doppler at 20–22 weeks of gestation, PI remains
increased at 26–28 weeks.
56
This group had the highest risk of a SGA infant (32%) compared to control women
with normal Doppler at 20–22 weeks of gestation (1%). However, even when uterine artery PI normalised by 26–28
weeks of gestation, the incidence of a SGA infant was higher than in controls (9.5%). Thus at present the evidence
suggests that repeating uterine artery Doppler later in the second trimester appears to be of limited value.
A systematic review assessing the effects on pregnancy outcome of routine utero–placental
Doppler ultrasound in the second trimester showed no benefit to mother or baby. However this
review included only two studies involving 4993 participants and women were all low risk for
hypertensive disorders.
57
The combination of uterine artery Doppler and maternal serum markers has been shown in
case–control and cohort studies to have an improved predictive ability for the SGA neonate, although
predictive values are still poor.
58–60
Use of combination testing in the second trimester appears to predict
adverse outcome related to placental insufficiency more effectively than first trimester screening.
61
The developers’ interpretation of the evidence relating to uterine artery Doppler screening is that the LR– is
insufficient to negate the risk associated with a major risk factor for a SGA neonate. In these women we would
not recommend uterine artery Doppler, as it would not change care. They should be offered serial assessment
of fetal size and umbilical artery Doppler from 26–28 weeks of pregnancy. For women with multiple minor
risk factors, the developers consider there to be value in uterine artery Doppler screening at 20–24 weeks of
pregnancy, with the institution of serial assessment of fetal size and umbilical artery Doppler from 26–28
weeks of pregnancy in those with an abnormal result, given the LR+. In those with a normal result there may
still be value in a single assessment of fetal size and umbilical artery Doppler during the third trimester. 
5.4 Fetal echogenic bowel
Serial ultrasound measurement of fetal size and assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler
should be offered in cases of fetal echogenic bowel.
Fetal echogenic bowel has been shown to be independently associated with a SGA neonate (AOR 2.1, 95% CI
1.5–2.9) and fetal demise (AOR 9.6, 95% CI 5.8–15.9).
62
Serial measurements of fetal size and umbilical artery
Doppler is indicated following confirmation of echogenic bowel. 
An algorithm to assist in the screening of the SGA fetus is provided in Appendix 2. Risk should be assessed at
booking and then reassessed at 20–24 weeks in the light of additional screening information, for example;
Down syndrome markers, 18–20 week fetal anomaly scan. Several pregnancy complications (pre-eclampsia,
7,17
pregnancy–induced hypertension,
17
unexplained antepartum haemorrhage
46
and abruption
63
) increase the
risk of a SGA neonate and are indications for serial assessment of fetal size and umbilical artery Doppler.
5.5 Clinical examination
Abdominal palpation has limited accuracy for the prediction of a SGA neonate and thus should not be
routinely performed in this context.
Serial measurement of symphysis fundal height (SFH) is recommended at each antenatal appointment
from 24 weeks of pregnancy as this improves prediction of a SGA neonate.
SFH should be plotted on a customised chart rather than a population–based chart as this may improve
prediction of a SGA neonate.
Evidence
level 1
Evidence
level 1++
Evidence
level 2+
C
B
C
P
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested