11of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Women with a single SFH which plots below the 10
th
centile or serial measurements which demonstrate
slow or static growth by crossing centiles should be referred for ultrasound measurement of fetal size.
Women in whom measurement of SFH is inaccurate (for example: BMI > 35, large fibroids, hydramnios)
should be referred for serial assessment of fetal size using ultrasound.
Cohort  and  case–control  studies  performed  in  low  risk  populations  have  consistently  shown
abdominal  palpation  to  be  of  limited  accuracy  in  the  detection  of  a  SGA  neonate  (sensitivity
19–21%, specificity 98%) and severely SGA neonate (< 2.3
rd
centile, sensitivity 28%).
65,66
In mixed
risk  populations,  the  sensitivity  increases  to  32–44%.
67,68
In  high  risk  populations  sensitivity  is
reported as 37% for a SGA neonate and 53% for severe SGA.
65
SFH should be measured from the fundus (variable point) to the symphysis pubis (fixed point) with the cm
values  hidden  from  the  examiner.
68
Measurements  should  be  plotted  on  a  customised  centile  chart  (see
below).  Women  with  a  single  SFH  which  plots  below  the  10
th
centile  or  serial  measurements  which
demonstrate slow or static growth (i.e. they cross centiles in a downward direction) should be referred for
further investigation (Appendix 3). There is no evidence to determine the number of centiles to be crossed
to prompt referral. 
A recent systematic review of five studies highlighted the wide variation of predictive accuracy of
SFH measurement for a SGA infant.
69
Although early studies reported sensitivities of 56–86% and
specificities  of  80–93%  for  SFH  detection  of  a  SGA  neonate,
70–72
 large  study  of  2941  women
reported SFH to be less predictive with a sensitivity of 27% and specificity of 88% (LR+ 2.22, 95%
CI 1.77–2.78; LR–  0.83,  95% CI  0.77–0.90).
73
Maternal  obesity,  abnormal  fetal  lie,  large  fibroids,
hydramnios  and  fetal  head  engagement  contribute  to  the  limited  predictive  accuracy  of  SFH
measurement. SFH is associated with significant intra– and inter–observer variation
69,74
and serial
measurement may improve predictive accuracy.
75
The impact on perinatal outcome of measuring SFH is uncertain. A systematic review found only one trial with
1639 women which showed that SFH measurement did not improve any of the perinatal outcomes measured.
76
A customised SFH chart is adjusted for maternal characteristics (maternal height, weight, parity and ethnic group).
Calculation of customised centiles requires computer software that can be downloaded from the Internet.
9
No trials  were  identified that compared customised with non–customised  SFH charts  and thus
evidence  for  their  effectiveness  on  outcomes  such  as  perinatal  morbidity/mortality  is  lacking.
However observational studies suggest that customised SFH charts may improve the detection of a
SGA neonate. In one study, use of customised charts, with referral when a single SFH measurement
fell below the 10
th
centile or the last two measurements were above 10
th
centile but the slope was
flatter than the 10
th
centile line, resulted in improved sensitivity for a SGA neonate (48% versus 29%,
OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.5) compared to abdominal palpation.
77
Use of customised charts was also
associated  with  fewer referrals  for  investigation  and  fewer  admissions. An audit  from  the West
Midlands also showed that use of customised SFH charts detected 36% of SGA neonates compared
with only 16% when customised charts were not used.
78
6. What is the optimum method of diagnosing a SGA fetus and FGR?
Fetal  abdominal  circumference  (AC)  or  estimated  fetal  weight  (EFW) 10
th
centile  can  be  used  to
diagnose a SGA fetus.
P
Evidence
level 2++
Evidence
level 3
P
Evidence
level 2+
A
Changing pdf to powerpoint file - software control dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Changing pdf to powerpoint file - software control dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Use  of  a  customised  fetal  weight  reference  may  improve  prediction  of  a  SGA  neonate  and  adverse
perinatal outcome. In women having serial assessment of fetal size, use of a customised fetal weight
reference may improve the prediction of normal perinatal outcome.
Routine measurement of fetal AC or EFW in the third trimester does not reduce the incidence of a SGA
neonate nor does it improve perinatal outcome. Routine fetal biometry is thus not justified.
Change in AC or EFW may improve the prediction of wasting at birth (neonatal morphometric indicators)
and adverse perinatal outcome suggestive of FGR.
When  using  two  measurements  of  AC  or  EFW  to  estimate  growth  velocity,  they  should  be  at  least 
3  weeks  apart to minimise  false–positive  rates for  diagnosing FGR.  More frequent  measurements  of
fetal  size  may  be  appropriate  where  birth  weight  prediction  is  relevant  outside  of  the  context  of
diagnosing SGA/FGR.
Where the fetal AC or EFW is 10
th
centile or there is evidence of reduced growth velocity, women should
be offered serial assessment of fetal size and umbilical artery Doppler (see Section 7).
6.1 Ultrasound biometry
Two  systematic reviews  have assessed the accuracy of  ultrasound biometric measures,  both  as  individual
measures,  as  ratios,  and  combined  (as  the  EFW).
3,79
Use  of  the  10
th
centile  had  better  sensitivities  and
specificities than other commonly used centiles.
66
In a low risk population sensitivity varies from 0–10% and
specificity 66–99% for any parameter. In a high risk population, fetal AC < 10
th
centile had sensitivity ranging
from 72.9–94.5% and specificity 50.6–83.8%. For EFW < 10
th
centile, sensitivity was 33.3–89.2% and specificity
53.7–90.9%.
3,79
Meta–analysis was not performed in these systematic reviews due to the considerable clinical
and  methodological  heterogeneity  within  the  included  papers.  The  potential  advantage  of  EFW  is  that
customised standards exist and accuracy can more easily be determined against birthweight.
A retrospective study has shown that among high risk patients, EFW and AC < 10
th
centile within
21 days of delivery better predicted a SGA infant than AC < 10
th
centile  (80% versus 49%, OR 4.26,
95%  CI  1.94–9.16).
80
Adverse  perinatal  outcome  was  also  highest  when  both  measures  were 
< 10
th
centile.
80
Kayem et al.
81
found that measurement of AC in low risk women at term was a 
better predictor of birth weight ≤ 2.5 kg than a single measurement of SFH (LR+ 9.9 versus 7.1, 
LR– 0.5 versus 0.6).
Several studies have compared various formulae for estimating fetal weight in unselected patients.
A prospective study compared 35 different formulae and found that most are relatively accurate at
predicting birth weight up to 3500 g.
82
Another study found the Shepard and Aoki formulae to have
the best intraclass correlation coefficient, with EFW showing the smallest mean difference from
actual  birth  weight.
83
Although  formulae  have  been  developed  for  SGA  fetuses,  there  is  little
evidence that accurate prediction of weight is substantially improved
84,85
and in this population the
Hadlock formula
86
may be most appropriate to use.
There  is  no  evidence  to  recommend  one  specific  method  of  measuring AC  (directly  or  derived  from
abdominal diameters) nor which  centile chart to use. The centile charts produced by Chitty et  al.
87
were
optimally constructed and are widely used.
The same maternal characteristics (maternal height, weight, parity and ethnic group) that affect
birth weight affect fetal biometric measures and fetal weight gain,
88,89
providing a rationale for the
use  of a  customised AC or  EFW  chart.
9
 customised  EFW  < 10
th
centile is  predictive of a SGA
neonate (sensitivity 68%, specificity 89%).
90
Use of customised fetal weight centiles to define SGA
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
12 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
A
C
C
C
P
Evidence
level 2++
Evidence
level 2–
Evidence
level 3
software control dll:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. Support to overwrite PDF and save rotation changes to original PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET Word: Word Conversion SDK for Changing Word Document into
VB.NET Word - Convert Word to PDF Using VB. How to Convert Word Document to PDF File in VB.NET Application. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home
www.rasteredge.com
has also been shown to improve the prediction of adverse prenatal outcome;
90,91
OR of adverse
outcomes (stillbirths, neonatal deaths, referral to higher level or special care unit or Apgar score <
 at  5  minutes)  for SGA  neonates versus  those  not  SGA  was  1.59  (95%  CI  1.53–1.66)  for  the
non–customised fetal weight reference compared with 2.84 (95% CI 2.71–2.99) for the customised
reference.
90
Prediction of perinatal mortality was also improved by the customised reference (OR
3.65, 95%  CI 3.40–3.92  versus OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.65–1.89).
91
 further study  demonstrated that
individual growth trajectories of low risk fetuses with normal outcome were less likely to cross
below the  10
th
centile  for  fetal weight  when  using  customised  reference standards  than  when
unadjusted standards were used.
92
However, no trials were  identified that compared customised
with non–customised EFW chartsp.
A meta–analysis, including eight trials comprising 27 024 women, found no evidence that routine
fetal biometry  (with or without assessment of amniotic fluid volume and placental grade)  after 
24 weeks of pregnancy improved perinatal outcome in a low risk population (SGA neonate relative
risk [RR] 0.98, 95% CI 0.74–1.28; perinatal mortality RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.55–1.61).
93
The timing and
content of the ultrasound scan varied substantially between studies and the authors noted high
heterogeneity between studies in the reduction of the risk of a SGA neonate, mainly due to the
findings  of  one  study  in  which  routine  estimation  of  fetal  weight,  amniotic  fluid  volume  and
placental grading at 30–32 and 36–37 weeks of gestation was shown to result in the birth of fewer
SGA neonates (10.4% versus 6.9%, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.50–0.89).
94
The change in fetal size between two time points is a direct measure of fetal growth and hence
serial measurement of AC or EFW (growth velocities) should allow the diagnosis of FGR. However
the optimal method of using serial ultrasound measurements is not clear. Although ‘eyeballing’ a
chart  of individual AC or EFW  measurements  may  give an impression of FGR  a more objective
definition  requires  establishment  of  growth  rate  standards  from  longitudinally  collected  data.
Several standards have been reported,
95,96
including conditional centiles for fetal growth,
97
although
none has  been adopted in  clinical  practice. Reported  mean growth rates  for AC  and  EFW  after 
30 weeks of gestation are 10 mm/14 days and 200 g/14 days although greater variation exists in the
lower  limits  (reflecting  the  methods  used  to  derive  the  standard  deviation  [SD]).
98
However  a
change in AC of < 5mm over 14 days is suggestive of FGR.
95
In a high risk population, identified as
being SGA, Chang et al.
99,100
showed that a change in AC or EFW (defined as a change in SD score of
≥ –1.5) were better predictors of wasting at birth (ponderal index, mid–arm circumference/head
circumference ratio or subscapular skinfold thickness < 2 SD below mean) and adverse perinatal
outcome than the final AC or EFW before delivery.
Mongelli  et  al.
101
used  a  mathematical  model  to  estimate  the  impact  of  time  interval  between
examinations on the false positive rates for FGR (defined as no apparent growth in fetal AC between
two consecutive examinations). When the initial scan was performed at 32 weeks of gestation, the
false positive rates were 30.8%, 16.9%, 8.1% and 3.2% for intervals of 1,2,3 and 4 weeks respectively.
False positive rates were higher when the first scan was performed at 36 weeks of gestation (34.4%,
22.1%, 12.7%, 6.9% respectively). These findings suggest that if two measurements are to be used to
estimate velocity, they should be a minimum of 3 weeks apart to minimise false–positive rates for
diagnosing FGR. This recommendation does not preclude more frequent ultrasound measurements
of AC/EFW to predict fetal size at birth but rather indicates which measurements should be used
to interpret growth.
6.2 Biophysical tests
Biophysical tests, including amniotic fluid volume, cardiotocography (CTG) and biophysical scoring are poor
at diagnosing a small or growth restricted fetus.
102–104
A systematic review of the accuracy of umbilical artery
13 of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Evidence
level 3
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 2+
Evidence
level 3
software control dll:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. together and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at all
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to perform PDF file password adding, deleting and changing in Visual Studio .NET project use C# source code in .NET class. Allow
www.rasteredge.com
Doppler in a high–risk population to diagnose a SGA neonate has shown moderate accuracy (LR+ 3.76, 95%
CI 2.96–4.76; LR– 0.52, 95% CI 0.45–0.61).
105
7. What investigations are indicated in SGA fetuses?
Offer a referral for a detailed fetal anatomical  survey and uterine artery Doppler by a fetal medicine
specialist if severe SGA is identified at the 18–20 week scan.
Karyotyping should be offered in severely SGA fetuses with structural anomalies and in those detected
before 23 weeks of gestation, especially if uterine artery Doppler is normal.
Serological screening  for  congenital cytomegalovirus  (CMV)  and  toxoplasmosis infection  should  be
offered in severe SGA.
Testing for syphilis and malaria should be considered in high risk populations.
Uterine  artery  Doppler  has  limited  accuracy  to  predict  adverse  outcome  in  SGA  fetuses  diagnosed
during the third trimester.
In severe SGA, the incidence of chromosomal abnormalities has been reported to be as high as
19%.
104
Triploidy was the most common chromosomal defect in fetuses referred before 26 weeks of
gestation and trisomy 18 in those referred thereafter. Within this population, the risk of aneuploidy
was found to be higher in fetuses with a structural abnormality, a normal amniotic fluid volume, a
higher  head  circumference/AC  ratio  or  a  normal  uterine  artery  Doppler.
106,107
One  small  study
suggested that, in severely SGA fetuses, the rate of aneuploidy was 20% in fetuses presenting before
23 weeks of gestation, irrespective of the presence of structural anomalies, compared with 0% in
fetuses presenting between 23–29 weeks of gestation.
107
Fetal infections are responsible for up to 5% of SGA fetuses.
108
The most common pathogens are reported to
be cytomegalovirus (CMV), toxoplasmosis, malaria and syphilis,
108
although a recent multicentre study found
no association between  congenital toxoplasmosis and incidence of  a SGA infant.
109
Malaria is a significant
cause of preterm birth and LBW worldwide and it should be considered in those from, or who have travelled
in, endemic areas.
110
The predictive value of uterine artery Doppler in SGA fetuses diagnosed during the third trimester 
is  unclear  and  no systematic  reviews  on  this  topic  were  identified  in  the  literature  search  for 
this  guideline.  Severi  et  al.
111
found  that  uterine  artery  RI  >  0.50  and  bilateral  notching  were
independently associated with emergency caesarean section in this  population (OR 5.0, 95% CI
2.0–12.4; OR 12.2, 95% CI 2.0–74.3 respectively). Other studies have suggested that uterine artery
Doppler has no predictive value.
112,113
8. What interventions should be considered in the prevention of SGA fetuses/neonates?
Antiplatelet agents  may be effective  in preventing SGA birth in  women at high risk of pre-eclampsia
although the effect size is small.
In women at high risk of pre-eclampsia, antiplatelet agents should be commenced at, or before, 16 weeks
of pregnancy.
There is no consistent evidence that dietary modification, progesterone or calcium  prevent birth of a
SGA infant. These interventions should not be used for this indication.
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
14 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
C
P
C
C
C
Evidence
level 2+
Evidence
level 2+
A
C
A
software control dll:VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing the position
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss
www.rasteredge.com
Interventions to promote smoking cessation may prevent delivery of a SGA infant. The health benefits of
smoking cessation indicate that these interventions should be offered to all women who are pregnant
and smoke.
Antithrombotic therapy  appears  to be  a  promising  therapy for preventing delivery of a SGA infant in 
high-risk women. However, there is insufficient evidence, especially concerning serious adverse effects,
to recommend its use.
Antiplatelet  agents  have  been  extensively  investigated  in  women  at  varying  levels  of  risk  for 
pre-eclampsia, with SGA as an outcome in both an individual patient data (IPD) meta–analysis and
a Cochrane review.
114,115
In all pregnant women, the RR of a SGA neonate with therapy was 0.90
(95% CI 0.83–0.98) and for high risk women was 0.89 (95% CI 0.74–1.08). In the IPD meta–analysis
for all pregnant women the RR was 0.90 (95% CI 0.81–1.01). The majority of the included papers
randomised women at risk of pre-eclampsia and therefore it is not possible to determine the RR for
aspirin in women at risk  of a  SGA neonate alone. The Cochrane review  concluded that  further
information was required to assess which women are most likely to benefit, when treatment is best
started and at what dose.
115
A recent systematic review and meta–analysis of five trials, with 414 women, has suggested that, with respect
to women at risk of pre-eclampsia, the timing of commencement of aspirin is important.
116
Where aspirin was
started at 16 weeks of gestation or less the RR of a SGA infant was 0.47 (95% CI 0.30–0.74) and the number
needed to treat was 9 (95% CI 5.0–17.0). No reduction in risk of a SGA infant was found when aspirin was
started after 16 weeks of gestation (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.78–1.10).
A systematic review of nine trials of aspirin, in 1317 women with abnormal uterine artery Doppler,
concluded  that  aspirin  started  before  16  weeks  of  pregnancy  reduced  the  incidence  of 
pre-eclampsia as well as SGA birth (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28–0.92); number needed to treat = 10 (95%
CI 5–50).
117
Aspirin started after 20 weeks was not effective in reducing the risk of a SGA infant. 
It  is  not possible  to  determine to  what extent the  effect of  aspirin  is due to  the  reduction  of 
pre-eclampsia in these women.
Dietary advice/modification interventions in pregnancy have yielded conflicting results in terms of
the incidence of SGA neonates. Based on thirteen trials in 4665 women, balanced energy/protein
supplementation has been associated with a modest increase in mean birth weight and a reduction
in the incidence of SGA neonates (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.56–0.84).
118
These effects did not appear greater
in  under–nourished  women.  In  contrast,  a  review  of  two  trials  with  1076  women,  showed
high–protein  supplementation  reduced  mean  birthweight.
118
The  impact  on  fetal  growth  of
multiple–micronutrient supplementation has been addressed in nine trials involving 15 378 low risk
women. Compared with supplementation of two or less micronutrients or no supplementation or a
placebo, multiple micro–nutrient supplementation resulted in a decrease in SGA neonates (RR 0.92,
95%  CI  0.86–0.99).  However,  this  difference  lost  statistical  significance  when  multiple
micro–nutrient  supplementation  was  compared  with  iron/folic  acid  supplementation  alone.
119
Although maternal nutrient supplementation has been attempted in suspected SGA/FGR (including
intra–amniotic administration of nutrients), there is not enough evidence to evaluate the effects.
120
A
systematic review of six trials, involving 2783 women, found that marine oil and other prostaglandin
precursor supplementation in low risk women did not alter the incidence of SGA neonates.
121
Progesterone and calcium have also been used to prevent pre-eclampsia and its complications in
both high and low risk populations. In this context there is no evidence that either progesterone
(four trials, 1445 women)
122
or calcium (four trials, 13  615 women)
123
is effective in reducing the
incidence of SGA neonates.
15 of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
A
Evidence
level 1++
D
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 1+
software control dll:C# TIFF: Learn to Convert MS Word, Excel, and PPT to TIFF Image
Now, you may load an Excel (.xlsx) file and convert it using RasterEdge.Imaging. PowerPoint; demo code is for rendering and changing PowerPoint (.pptx) document
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET Image: How to Generate Freehand Annotation Through VB.NET
relocating, resizing, rotating, deleting, changing color attributes is easy to annotate image file with freehand drawn as an annotation on documents, like PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Smoking increases the risk of SGA, and 21 trials involving over 20 000 women have addressed the
impact of interventions to promote smoking cessation in pregnancy.
124
Overall interventions reduced
low birth weight (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.73–0.95) and preterm birth but SGA was not reported in the
systematic review as an outcome. Trials using cognitive behavioural therapy and incentives as the
main intervention strategy demonstrated consistent improvements in birthweight.
124
Women who are
able to stop smoking by 15 weeks of gestation can reduce the risk back to that of non–smokers.
39
Antithrombotic  therapy  has  been  used  to  improve  outcome  in  women  considered  at  risk  of
placental dysfunction (primarily  based  on  previous  history  of  pre-eclampsia,  FGR  or stillbirth). 
A systematic review of five studies involving 484 women, four of which compared heparin (either
alone or with dipyridamole) with no treatment, found that heparin reduced the incidence of SGA
neonates  from  25%  to  9%  (RR  0.35,  95%  CI  0.20–0.64)  and  also  reduced  the  incidence  of 
pre-eclampsia.
125
However,  no  differences  were  evident  in  perinatal  mortality  or  preterm  birth
below 34 weeks. The authors concluded  that  while  this therapy  appears promising,  important
information about serious adverse effects and long–term childhood outcomes is unavailable.
Antihypertensive drug therapy for mild to moderate hypertension in pregnancy does not seem to
increase the risk of delivering a SGA neonate (19 trials, 2437 women, RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.89–1.16),
126
but treatment with oral beta–blockers was associated with an increased risk of a SGA neonate (RR
1.36, 95% CI 1.02–1.82), partly dependent on one small outlying trial involving atenolol.
127
Use of
atenolol is therefore best avoided but no recommendation can be made regarding the best agent
or target blood pressure to optimise fetal growth, especially when the fetus is known to be SGA.
128
9. What interventions should be considered in the preterm SGA fetus?
Women with a SGA fetus between 24
+0
and 35
+6
weeks of gestation, where delivery is being considered,
should receive a single course of antenatal corticosteroids.
Women  with  a  SGA  fetus  between  24
+0
and  35
+6
weeks  of  gestation,  where  delivery  is  being
considered,  should  receive  a  single  course  of  antenatal  corticosteroids  to  accelerate  fetal  lung
maturation and reduce neonatal death and morbidity.
129
Bed rest in hospital for a suspected SGA infant has only been evaluated in one trial of 107 women that showed
no differences in any fetal growth parameters.
130
Maternal oxygen administration has been investigated in three trials of SGA fetuses involving 94
women.
131
Methodological  problems  were  identified  in  two  of  the  studies,  both  of  which  had
greater gestational ages of fetuses in the oxygen group. This may account for the increase in birth
weight in the intervention group. Oxygenation was associated with a lower perinatal mortality (RR
0.50, 95% CI 0.32–0.81). The authors of the systematic review concluded there was not enough
evidence to evaluate the benefits and risks of maternal oxygen therapy.
131
A proportion of growth restricted fetuses will be delivered prematurely and consequently be at an increased
risk of developing cerebral palsy. Maternally administered magnesium sulphate has a neuroprotective effect
and reduces the incidence of cerebral palsy amongst preterm infants. Australian guidelines recommend the
administration of magnesium sulphate when delivery is before 30 weeks of gestation.
132,133
10. What is the optimal method and frequency of fetal surveillance in a SGA infant and
what is/are the optimal test/s to time delivery?
A variety of tests are available for surveillance of the SGA fetus. They vary in terms of the time and personnel
required to perform and interpret  them. The purpose of  surveillance is to predict  fetal acidaemia thereby
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
16 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 2+
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 2–
C
Evidence
level 2–
software control dll:VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
to display extra information on your document image file. ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word your document or image by changing its parameters
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C#: How to Edit XDoc.HTML5 Viewer Toolbar Commands
principle also applies equally to changing tabs order exception that four tabs, namely File, Annotation, Signature var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf");
www.rasteredge.com
allowing timely delivery prior to irreversible end–organ damage and intrauterine fetal death. 
10.1 Umbilical artery Doppler
In  a  high–risk  population,  the  use  of  umbilical  artery  Doppler  has been  shown  to reduce  perinatal
morbidity  and  mortality.  Umbilical  artery  Doppler  should  be  the  primary  surveillance  tool  in  the 
SGA fetus.
When  umbilical  artery Doppler  flow  indices  are normal it is reasonable to repeat  surveillance every 
14 days.
More frequent Doppler surveillance may be appropriate in a severely SGA fetus.
When umbilical artery Doppler flow indices are abnormal (pulsatility or resistance index +2 SDs above
mean for gestational age) and delivery is not indicated repeat surveillance twice weekly in fetuses with
end–diastolic velocities present and daily in fetuses with absent/reversed end–diastolic frequencies.
There is compelling evidence that umbilical artery Doppler is a useful tool in the management of the high–risk
pregnancy. A systematic review of 104 observational studies of accuracy, involving 19 191 fetuses, found that
umbilical artery Doppler predicted compromise of fetal/neonatal wellbeing with a pooled LR+ of 3.41 (95%
CI 2.68–4.34) and LR– 0.55 (95%  CI 0.48–0.62).
134
The technique predicted fetal death (LR+ 4.37, 95%  CI
0.88–21.8; LR– 0.25, 95% CI 0.07–0.91) and acidosis (LR+ 2.75, 95% CI 1.48–5.11; LR– 0.58, 0.36–0.94).
134
A systematic review of RCTs of effectiveness of umbilical artery Doppler as a surveillance tool in
high risk pregnancies (16 studies, testing 10 225 fetuses) found that use of umbilical artery Doppler
was associated with a reduction in perinatal deaths from 1.7% to 1.2% (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.52–0.98),
number needed to treat was 203 (95% CI 103–4352).
135
There were also fewer inductions of labour
(RR  0.89,  95%  CI  0.80–0.99)  and  fewer  caesarean  sections  (RR  0.90,  95%  CI  0.84–0.97).  No
difference was found in operative vaginal births (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.80–1.14) nor in Apgar scores 
< 7 at 5 minutes (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.69–1.24).
135
Although not confined to SGA, this group of fetuses
made up a substantial proportion of the tested population. At present the recommendation from
the authors of this Cochrane review is that high risk pregnancies thought to be at risk of placental
insufficiency should be monitored with Doppler studies of the umbilical artery.
Several  individual  studies  have  also  directly  compared  umbilical  artery  Doppler  with  other  tests  in  the
management of the SGA fetus. Umbilical artery Doppler, but not biophysical profile or cardiotography (CTG),
predicted poor perinatal outcomes.
136
Compared to CTG, use of umbilical artery Doppler is associated with
reduced  use  of  antenatal  resources  (monitoring  occasions,  hospital  admissions,  inpatient  stay),  reduced
induction of labour and emergency caesarean section for fetal distress.
137–139
A variety of descriptor indices of umbilical  artery Doppler waveform have been used to  predict  perinatal
outcome. The large systematic review of test accuracy could not comment on which waveform index to use
due to poor reporting in individual studies.
134
Although PI has been widely adopted in the UK, an analysis
using receiver operator curves found that RI had the best discriminatory ability to predict a range of adverse
perinatal outcomes.
140
When defined by customised fetal weight  standards  81% of SGA fetuses  have a normal umbilical
artery Doppler.
141
Outpatient management is safe in this group
142
and it may be reasonable to repeat
Doppler  surveillance  every  14  days;  one  small  randomised  trial  involving  167  SGA  fetuses  with
normal umbilical artery Doppler investigated frequency of surveillance; twice–weekly compared to
two  weekly  monitoring  resulted  in  earlier  deliveries  and  more  inductions  of  labour  with  no
difference  in  neonatal  morbidity.
143
Compared  to  SGA  fetuses  identified  before  delivery  and
17 of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
A
P
B
P
Evidence
level 1++
Evidence
level 2+
monitored with umbilical artery Doppler, unidentified SGA fetuses have a fourfold greater risk of
adverse fetal outcome (OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.5–6.8) and fetal/infant death (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.1–8.5).
144
In
this large series, SGA fetuses (defined as a birth weight deviation 22–27% below the norm, equivalent
to  –2  SDs)  were  monitored  with  two  weekly  umbilical  artery  Doppler.  However,  compared  to
appropriate for gestational age (AGA) fetuses, SGA fetuses with a normal umbilical artery Doppler are
still  at  increased  risk  of  neonatal  morbidity  (OR  2.26,  95%  CI  1.04–4.39)
141
and  adverse
neurodevelopmental outcome.
145
In SGA fetuses with abnormal umbilical artery Doppler where there is not an indication for delivery
the optimal frequency of surveillance is unclear. Until definitive evidence becomes available it is
reasonable to repeat surveillance twice weekly in fetuses with end–diastolic velocities present and
daily in fetuses with absent or reversed end–diastolic velocities (AREDV).
In a low risk or unselected population, a systematic review of five trials, involving 14 185 women,
found no conclusive evidence that routine umbilical artery Doppler benefits mother or baby.
146
As
such, umbilical artery Doppler is not recommended for screening an unselected population.
10.2 Cardiotocography (CTG)
CTG should not be used as the only form of surveillance in SGA fetuses.
Interpretation of the CTG should be based on short term fetal heart rate variation from computerised
analysis.
Antenatal CTG has been compared with no intervention in a Cochrane systematic review of RCTs.
Based  on  four  trials  (1627  fetuses)  of  high  risk  pregnancies  there  was  no  clear  evidence  that
antenatal CTG improved perinatal mortality  (RR 2.05, 95% CI 0.95–4.42). The included trials  all
employed visual analysis and only one trial was regarded as high quality.
147
Unlike  conventional  CTG,  which  has  high  intra–  and  interobserver  variability,  computerised 
CTG  (cCTG)  is  objective  and  consistent.
148
Normal  ranges  for  cCTG  parameters  throughout
gestation  are  available.
149
Fetal  heart  rate  (FHR)  variation  is  the  most  useful  predictor  of  fetal
wellbeing in SGA fetuses;
150,151
a short term variation ≤ 3 ms (within 24 hours of delivery) has been
associated with a higher rate of metabolic acidaemia (54.2% versus 10.5%) and early neonatal death
(8.3% versus 0.5%).
151
Comparison of cCTG with traditional CTG in the Cochrane review (two trials, 469 high risk fetuses)
showed a reduction in perinatal mortality with cCTG (4.2% versus 0.9%, RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.04–0.88)
but no significant difference in perinatal mortality excluding congenital anomalies (RR 0.23, 95%
CI 0.04–1.29), though the meta–analysis was underpowered to assess this outcome, or any other
measure of adverse perinatal outcome.
147
10.3 Amniotic fluid volume
Ultrasound assessment of amniotic fluid volume should not be used as the only form of surveillance in
SGA fetuses.
Interpretation of amniotic fluid volume should be based on single deepest vertical pocket.
Amniotic fluid volume is usually estimated by the single deepest vertical pocket (SDVP) or amniotic
fluid index (AFI) methods; although both correlate poorly with actual amniotic fluid volume.
152
A
Cochrane systematic review (five trials, 3226 women) compared the two methods and concluded
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
18 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Evidence
level 2+
Evidence
level 4
Evidence
level 1+
A
A
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 2+
Evidence
level 1–
P
A
Evidence
level 1+
that there was no evidence that one method was superior in the prevention of adverse perinatal
outcomes. However, compared to a SDVP < 2 cm, when an AFI ≤ 5 cm was used more cases of
oligohydramnios were diagnosed (RR 2.39, 95% CI 1.73–3.28) and more women had induction of
labour (RR 1.92, 95% CI 1.50–2.46) without an improvement in perinatal outcome.
153
The incidence of an AFI ≤ 5 cm in a low risk population is 1.5%.
154
Compared to cases with a normal AFI, the
risk of perinatal mortality and morbidity was not increased in cases with isolated oligohydramnios (RR 0.7,
95%  CI 0.2–2.7) nor in those  with associated conditions, including SGA  fetuses (RR 1.6, 95% CI 0.9–2.6).
Notably over the 8 weeks after the initial diagnosis of oligohydramnios, mean EFW centile did not change
significantly (remaining on 3
rd
centile in SGA fetuses).
154
Oligohydramnios is associated with labour outcome; a systematic review of 18 studies involving 
10 551 women, found an AFI ≤ 5 cm was associated with an increased risk of caesarean section for
fetal distress (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.5–3.4) and an Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes (RR 5.2, 95% CI 2.4–11.3)
but not acidaemia.
155
Although older studies in high risk pregnancies have shown that a reduced
SDVP is associated with increased perinatal mortality,
156
limited information is available about the
accuracy of oligohydramnios to independently predict perinatal mortality and substantive perinatal
morbidity in non–anomalous SGA fetuses monitored with umbilical artery Doppler.
10.4 Biophysical profile (BPP)
Biophysical profile should not be used for fetal surveillance in preterm SGA fetuses.
The biophysical profile (BPP) includes four acute fetal variables (breathing movement, gross body movement,
tone and CTG, and amniotic fluid volume each assigned a score of 2 (if normal) or 0 (if abnormal). Reducing
BPP score is associated with lower antepartum umbilical venous pH and increasing perinatal mortality.
157
The
BPP  is  time consuming and  the incidence of an  equivocal result (6/10) is high (15–20%) in severely  SGA
fetuses,
158
although this rate can be reduced if cCTG is used instead of conventional CTG.
150
A systematic review of the effectiveness of BPP as a surveillance tool in high risk pregnancies (five
studies,  testing 2974  fetuses)  found  that  the  use  of  BPP  was  not  associated  with  a  reduction  in
perinatal deaths (RR  1.33, 95%  CI 0.60–2.98)  or Apgar scores < 7  at 5 minutes (RR 1.27, 95% CI
0.85–1.92).
159
Combined data from the two high quality trials suggested an increased risk of caesarean
section in the BPP group (RR 1.60, 95% CI 1.05–2.44) with no improvement in perinatal outcome.
159
Early observational studies in high risk non–anomalous fetuses reported very low false negative
rates for antepartum acidaemia (0%) and perinatal death within 7 days of a normal test (0.2%).
157,160
However more recent studies in preterm severely SGA fetuses suggest the BPP is not an accurate
predictor of fetal acidaemia
150,161
and that the test has much higher false negative rates (11%) in this
group.
161
BPP is not recommended for fetal surveillance in the preterm SGA fetus.
10.5 Middle cerebral artery (MCA) Doppler
In  the  preterm  SGA  fetus,  middle  cerebral  artery  (MCA)  Doppler  has  limited  accuracy  to  predict
acidaemia and adverse outcome and should not be used to time delivery.
In the term SGA fetus with normal umbilical artery Doppler, an abnormal middle cerebral artery Doppler
(PI 5
th
centile) has moderate predictive value for acidosis at birth and should be used to time delivery.
Cerebral vasodilatation is a manifestation of the increase in diastolic flow, a sign of the ‘brain–sparing effect’
of chronic hypoxia, and results in decreases in Doppler indices of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) such as
the PI. Reduced MCA PI or MCA PI/umbilical artery PI (cerebroplacental ratio) is therefore an early sign of
fetal hypoxia in SGA fetuses.
162–165
19 of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 2+
A
Evidence
level 1+
B
C
No systematic reviews of effectiveness of MCA Doppler as a surveillance tool in high risk or SGA
fetuses were identified. A systematic review of 31 observational studies (involving 3337 fetuses)
found that MCA Doppler had limited predictive accuracy for adverse perinatal outcome (LR+ 2.79,
95% CI 1.10–1.67; LR– 0.56, 95% CI 0.43–0.72) and perinatal mortality (LR+ 1.36, 95% CI 1.10–1.67;
LR– 0.51, 95% CI 0.29–0.89).
165
Most studies investigating MCA Doppler as a predictor of adverse
outcome  in  preterm  SGA  fetuses  have  reported  low  predictive  value,
165–167
especially  when
umbilical artery Doppler is abnormal. In the largest study of predictors of neonatal outcome in SGA
neonates of less than 33 weeks gestational age (n = 604), although MCA PI < –2 SDs was associated
with neonatal death (LR 1.12, 95% CI 1.04–1.21) and major morbidity (LR 1.12, 95% CI 1.1–1.33),
it was not a statistically significant predictor of outcome on logistic regression.
168
Initial findings of
a pre–terminal increase (reversal) of MCA PI have not been confirmed in subsequent reports.
169,170
MCA Doppler may be a more useful test in SGA fetuses detected after 32 weeks of gestation where
umbilical artery Doppler is typically normal.
171
Studies suggest an elevated MCA PI  is associated
with  emergency caesarean  section and  neonatal admission.
172,173
In  one study of  210  term SGA
fetuses with normal umbilical  artery  Doppler, MCA  PI  < 5
th
centile was  predictive of caesarean
section for nonreassuring fetal status (OR 18.0, 95% CI 2.84–750) and neonatal metabolic acidosis,
defined as umbilical artery pH < 7.15 and base deficit > 12 mEq/L (OR 9.0, 95% CI 1.25–395).
174
Based on this evidence it is reasonable to use MCA Doppler to time delivery in the term SGA fetus
with normal umbilical artery Doppler.
10.6 Ductus venosus (DV) and umbilical vein (UV) Doppler
Ductus venosus Doppler has moderate predictive value for acidaemia and adverse outcome.
Ductus  venosus  Doppler  should  be  used  for  surveillance  in  the  preterm  SGA  fetus  with  abnormal
umbilical artery Doppler and used to time delivery.
The Ductus venosus (DV) Doppler flow velocity pattern reflects atrial pressure–volume changes during the
cardiac cycle. As FGR worsens velocity reduces in the DV a–wave owing to increased afterload and preload,
as  well  as  increased  end–diastolic  pressure,  resulting  from  the  directs  effects  of  hypoxia/acidaemia  and
increased adrenergic drive.
175
A retrograde a–wave and pulsatile flow in the umbilical vein (UV) signifies the
onset of overt fetal cardiac compromise.
175
No systematic reviews of effectiveness of venous Doppler  as a surveillance  tool in  high risk or 
SGA  fetuses  were  identified. A  systematic  review  of  18  observational  studies  (involving  2267
fetuses) found that DV Doppler had moderate predictive accuracy for the prediction of perinatal
mortality  in  high  risk  fetuses  with  placental  insufficiency  with  a  pooled  LR+  of  4.21 (95%  CI
1.98–8.96) and LR– of 0.43 (95% CI 0.30–0.61).
175
For prediction of adverse perinatal outcome the
results were LR+ 3.15 (95% CI 2.19–4.54) and LR– 0.49 (95% CI 0.40–0.59).
176
Observational studies have identified venous Doppler as the best predictor of acidaemia.
150,177
Turan
et al.
150
reported an OR of 5.68 (95% CI 1.67–19.32) for an increased DV PI for veins (PIV) and 45.0
(95%  CI  5.0–406.5)  for  UV  pulsation  compared  to  2.12  (95%  CI  0.66–6.83)  for AREDV  in  the
umbilical  artery. In the  large study of predictors of neonatal  outcome in  preterm SGA neonates
referred to above, gestational age was the most significant determinant of intact survival until 29
weeks of gestation but DV Doppler alone predicted intact survival beyond this gestational age.
168
11. What is the optimal gestation to deliver the SGA fetus?
In the preterm SGA fetus with umbilical artery AREDV detected prior to 32 weeks of gestation, delivery
is recommended when DV Doppler becomes abnormal or UV pulsations appear, provided the fetus is
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
20 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 2–
P
A
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 2–
P
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested