considered viable and after completion of steroids. Even when venous Doppler is normal, delivery is
recommended by 32 weeks of gestation and should be considered between 30–32 weeks of gestation.
If MCA Doppler is abnormal, delivery should be recommended no later than 37 weeks of gestation.
In the SGA fetus  detected after 32 weeks of gestation with an  abnormal umbilical artery  Doppler,
delivery no later than 37 weeks of gestation is recommended.
In the SGA fetus detected after 32 weeks of gestation with normal umbilical artery Doppler, a senior
obstetrician should be involved in determining the timing and mode of birth of these pregnancies.
Delivery should be offered at 37 weeks of gestation.
At present there is no effective intervention to alter the course of FGR except delivery. Timing delivery is
therefore a critical issue in order to balance the risks of prematurity against those of continued intrauterine
stay; death and organ damage due to inadequate tissue perfusion.
178
Gestational age is a critical determinant in decision–making. Various tools exist to  predict  survival  in very
preterm births, such as the prematurity risk evaluation measure (PREM) score, which is a system derived from
UK  cohorts and incorporates  gestational age and EFW.
179
In FGR detected prior to  33 weeks of gestation,
gestational age was found to be the most significant determinant of total survival until 27 weeks and intact
survival until 29 weeks.
168
The second critical determinant in decision–making is the interpretation of surveillance tests which should
accurately predict perinatal outcomes of importance (death, major morbidity and neurodevelopmental delay).
Existing  studies  investigating  the  relationship  between  fetal  surveillance  tests  and  neurodevelopmental
outcome have recently been reviewed.
185
Several studies have reported the sequence of changes in Doppler
and biophysical  parameters  as  FGR  worsens.
170,181,182
While  most fetuses showed a  deterioration  of  arterial
Doppler indices before the occurrence of an abnormal DV PIV or biophysical abnormalities, the relationship
between venous Doppler and biophysical abnormalities was not consistent. For example, more than 50% of
fetuses delivered because of cCTG abnormalities had a normal DV PIV.
181
11.1 Preterm SGA fetus
The RCT growth restriction intervention trial (GRIT) compared the effect of delivering early (after
completion of a steroid course) with delaying birth for as long as possible (i.e. until the obstetrician
was no longer uncertain).
183
Between 24–36 weeks of gestation, 588 fetuses were recruited. Median
time–to–delivery was 0.9 days in the early group and 4.9 days in the delay group. There was no
difference in total deaths prior to discharge  (10% versus  9%, OR 1.1,  95%  CI 0.6–1.8), inferring
obstetricians are delivering sick preterm fetuses at about the correct time to minimise mortality.
183
At  2 years  overall rates  of  death  (12%  versus  11%  respectively)  or  severe  disability,  defined  as 
a  Griffiths  developmental  quotient  ≤  70  or  presence  of  motor  or  perceptual  severe  disability 
(7%  versus  4%)  were  similar  (OR  1.1,  95%  CI  0.7–1.8).
184
These  findings  are  consistent  with
observational studies suggesting that fetal deterioration does not have an independent impact on
neurodevelopment in early–onset FGR.
180
On the basis of GRIT, the evidence reviewed in Section 10 and that perinatal mortality increases
from 12% in fetuses with umbilical artery AREDV to 39% when DV PIV is increased (and 41% with
absence or reversal of DV A–wave)
178
it would seem reasonable to recommend delivery when the
DV Doppler becomes  abnormal or UV pulsations  are  present,  provided  the  fetus is  considered
viable (usually when gestational age is ≥ 24 weeks and EFW is > 500 g)
181, 185
and after completion
of steroids. Based on available evidence it is not known whether delivery should be recommended
as soon as the DV PIV becomes abnormal or whether delivery should be deferred until the DV
21 of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
C
P
A
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 4
Convert pdf file to powerpoint online - SDK application service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to powerpoint online - SDK application service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
A–wave becomes  absent/reversed. This  key question is  being addressed in  the  ongoing trial of
umbilical and fetal flow in a European RCT which aims to determine whether delivery based on
reduced short term variability on cCTG leads to better neurodevelopmental outcome in surviving
infants than delivery based on DV Doppler.
186
By 31 weeks of gestation, neonatal mortality and disability rates in this population are low; in GRIT,
mortality and disability rates in fetuses delivered at 31–36 weeks were 5% and 4% respectively
183
while in the large  series of early onset FGR reported by Baschat et al.,
168
mortality was 8.6% in
fetuses  delivered  at  31  weeks  and  2.6%  in  those  delivered  at  32  weeks.  Given  the  mortality
associated with umbilical artery AREDV alone
178
delivery should be considered based on this finding
alone after 30 weeks of gestation and recommended no later than 32 weeks of gestation.
11.2 Near term / term SGA fetus
One randomised equivalence trial exists comparing the effect of induction of labour or expectant
monitoring in women beyond 36 weeks of gestation with suspected FGR (defined as a fetal AC or
EFW  <  10
th
centile  or  flattening  of  the  growth  curve  in  the  third  trimester,  as  judged  by  the
clinician).
187
Between 36–41 weeks of gestation, 650 fetuses were recruited; 14 had umbilical artery
AREDV.  Expectant  monitoring  consisted  of  twice  weekly  CTG  and  ultrasound  examinations.
Induction group infants were delivered 9.9 (95% CI 8.6–11.3) days earlier and weighed 130 g (95%
CI  71–188)  less. A  total  of  5.3%  infants  in  the  induction  group  experienced  adverse  outcome
(defined as death, umbilical artery pH < 7.05 or admission to intensive care) compared to 6.1% in
the  expectant  monitoring  group  (difference  –0.8%,  95%  CI  –4.3–3.2).  Caesarean  section  was
performed in 14% of women  in both groups.
187
Based  on  these  results,  it is reasonable  to  offer
delivery in SGA infants at 37 weeks of gestation.
Given the evidence reviewed in Section 10 and the increased risk of adverse outcomes in term/
near term SGA fetuses with increased umbilical artery PI and those with a normal umbilical artery
Doppler but reduced MCA PI, delivery should be recommended by 37 weeks of gestation.
An algorithm to assist in the management of the SGA fetus is provided in Appendix 3. 
12. How should the SGA fetus be delivered?
In the SGA fetus with umbilical artery AREDV delivery by caesarean section is recommended.
In  the  SGA  fetus  with  normal  umbilical  artery  Doppler  or  with  abnormal  umbilical  artery  PI  but
end–diastolic velocities present, induction of labour can be offered but rates of emergency caesarean
section are increased and continuous fetal heart rate monitoring is recommended from the onset of
uterine contractions.
Early admission is recommended in women in spontaneous labour with a SGA fetus in order to instigate
continuous fetal heart rate monitoring.
Compared to appropriate–for–gestational age fetuses, term and near term SGA fetuses are at increased risk of
FHR  decelerations in  labour, emergency  caesarean  section for  suspected fetal  compromise  and metabolic
acidaemia at delivery. This reflects a lower prelabour pO
2
and pH,
188
greater cord compression secondary to
oligohydramnios
189
and a greater fall in pH and higher lactate levels when FHR decelerations are present.
190
Reported  rates of  emergency CS  for suspected  fetal  compromise  vary  from 6–45% but  a  rate  of  ~15%  is
probably reasonable for fetuses with an AC or EFW < 10
th
centile, with higher rates in those with serial AC or
EFW measurements suggestive of FGR.
98,191,192
No RCTs of mode of delivery in the SGA fetus were identified. 
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
22 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Evidence
level 4
Evidence
level 1+
Evidence
level 2–
P
B
P
SDK application service:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
www.rasteredge.com
Delivery in all recent studies reporting outcome of viable SGA fetuses with umbilical artery AREDV has been
by caesarean section and thus it is not possible to determine the likelihood of adverse outcome (including
emergency CS for  suspected fetal compromise) associated with induced/spontaneous  labour. Older series
report rates of intrapartum fetal heart decelerations necessitating CS of 75–95%.
193,194
More recent prospective
data on the outcome of labour in SGA fetuses with an abnormal umbilical artery Doppler but end–diastolic
velocities  is  also  extremely  limited;  suspected  fetal  compromise  (necessitating  emergency  CS)  has  been
reported  in  17–32%  of  such  cases,  compared  to  6–9%  in  SGA  fetuses  with  normal  umbilical  artery
Doppler.
191,192,195
Although, it is acknowledged that knowledge of Doppler may lower obstetricians’ threshold
for emergency CS.
196
The offer of induction of labour with continuous FHR monitoring is therefore reasonable
in term and near term fetuses, as well as SGA fetuses without umbilical artery AREDV. The procedures for
induction of labour should follow existing guidance.
197
13. Suggested audit topics
All units should audit their antenatal detection rate of the SGA neonate. Definition of a SGA neonate should
be based on customised birthweight standards. Suggested auditable standards are as follows:
All women should have a formal assessment of their risk of delivering a SGA neonate at booking.
All women with a major risk factor for a SGA neonate should be offered serial ultrasound measurement of
fetal size and assessment of wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler. 
All women with a SGA fetus should have serial ultrasound measurement of fetal size and assessment of
wellbeing with umbilical artery Doppler. 
All women with a SGA fetus where delivery is considered between 24
+0
and 35
+6
weeks of gestation should
receive a single course of antenatal corticosteroids.
14. What are the areas for future research?
Research may be required to evaluate the effectiveness of/determine:
How combinations of risk factors for a SGA neonate (historical, biochemical and ultrasound) relate to each
other in the individual woman.
Interventions, specifically aspirin, in women classified as being at high risk of delivering a SGA neonate
based on combined historical, biochemical, and ultrasound marker screening in the first trimester. 
Introducing  customised  SFH  and  EFW  charts  into  clinical  practice  on  substantive  clinical  endpoints
(perinatal mortality/morbidity and service utilisation). 
Routine third trimester ultrasound assessment of fetal size  combined with  umbilical artery Doppler on
substantive clinical endpoints (perinatal mortality/morbidity and service utilisation). 
Oxygen therapy in severe early–onset SGA foetuses associated with umbilical artery AREDV on substantive
clinical endpoints (perinatal mortality/morbidity and service utilisation). 
Optimal frequency and content of fetal surveillance in SGA fetuses with both a normal umbilical artery
Doppler and also an abnormal umbilical artery Doppler but with end–diastolic frequencies present.
Measuring amniotic fluid volume and MCA Doppler in the near term SGA fetuses with a normal umbilical
artery Doppler on substantive clinical endpoints (perinatal morbidity and service utilisation).
Potential health economic benefit of investment in maternity services to provide recommendations in this
guideline and future health outcomes of the children. 
References
23of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
1. Clausson B, Gardosi J, Francis A, Cnattingius S. Perinatal outcome
in SGA births defined by customised versus population–based
birthweight standards. BJOG 2001;108:830–4.
2.  Figueras F, Figueras J, Meler E, Eixarch E, Coll O, Gratecos E, et al.
Customised birthweight standards accurately predict perinatal
morbidity. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonat Ed 2007;92:277–80.
3.  Chang TC, Robson SC, Boys RJ, Spencer JA. Prediction of the
small for gestational age infant: which ultrasonic measurement
is best? Obstet Gynecol 1992;80:1030–8.
4.  Alberry M, Soothill P. Management of fetal growth restriction.
Arch Dic Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2007;92:62–7.
5.  Odibo AO, Francis A, Cahill AG, Macones GA, Crane JP, Gardosi J.
Association between pregnancy complications and
small–for–gestational–age birth weight defined by customized
fetal growth standards versus a population–based standard. J
Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2011;24:411–7.
6.  Wolfe HM, Gross TL, Sokol RJ. Recurrent small for gestational
age birth: perinatal risks and outcomes. Am J Obstet Gynecol
1987;157:288–93.
7.  Kleijer ME, Dekker GA, Heard AR. Risk factors for intrauterine
growth restriction in a socio–economically disadvantaged
region. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2005;18:23–30.
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
8.  Ananth CV, Peltier MR, Chavez MR, Kirby RS, Getahun D,
Vintzileos AM. Recurrence of ischemic placental disease. Obstet
Gynecol 2007;110:128–33.9. 
9.  Gestation Network Growth Charts. [https://www.gestation.net/
fetal_growth/download_grow.htm].
10. Gardosi J, Kady SM, McGeown P, Francis A, Tonks A. Classification
of stillbirth by relevant condition of death (ReCoDe):
population based cohort study. BMJ 2005;331:113–7.
11.  Shah PS, Zao J. Induced termination of pregnancy and low
birthweight and preterm birth: a systematic review and
meta–analyses. BJOG 2009;116:1425–42.
12.  Spinillo A, Capuzzo E, Piazzi G, Nicola S, Colonna L, Iasci A.
Maternal high–risk factors and severity of growth deficit in
small for gestational age infants. Early Hum Dev
1994;38:35–43.
13.  Lang JM, Lieberman E, Cohen A. A comparison of risk–factors
for preterm labour and term small–for–gestational–age birth.
Epidemiology 1996;7:369–76.
14.  Howarth C, Gazis A, James D. Associations of type 1 diabetes
mellitus, maternal vascular disease and complications of
pregnancy. Diabet Med 2007;24:1229–34.
15.  Fink JC, Schwartz M, Benedetti TJ, Stehman–Breen CO.
Increased risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes among
women with renal disease. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol
1998;12:277–87.
16.  Yasuda M, Takakuwa K, Tokunaga A, Tanaka K. Prospective
studies of the association between anticardiolipin antibody and
outcome of pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol 1995;86:555–9.
17.  Allen VM, Joseph KS, Murphy KE, Magee LA, Ohlsson A. The
effect of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy on small for
gestational age and stillbirth: a population based study. BMC
Pregnancy Childbirth 2004;4:17–25.
18.  Yasmeen S, Wilkins EE, Field NT, Sheikh RA, Gilbert WM.
Pregnancy outcomes in women with systemic lupus
erythematosus. J Matern Fetal Med 2001;10:91–6.
19.  Drenthen W, Pieper PG, Roos–Hesselink JW, van Lottum WA,
Voors AA, Mulder BJ, et al. Outcome of pregnancy in women
with congenital heart disease: a literature review. J Am Coll
Cardiol 2007;49:2303–11.
20.  McCowan L, Horgan RP. Risk factors for small for gestational
age infants. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol
2009;23:779–93.
21.  Grote NK, Bridge JA, Gavin AR, Melville JL, Iyengar S, Katon WJ.
A meta–analysis of depression during pregnancy and the risk
of preterm birth, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth
restriction. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2010;67:1012–24.
22.  Odibo AO, Nelson D, Stamilio DM, Sehdev HM, Macones GA.
Advanced maternal age is an independent risk factor for
intrauterine growth restriction. Am J Perinatol 2006;23:325–8.
23.  Kramer MS. Determinants of low birth weight: methodological
assessment and meta–analysis. Bull World Health Organ
1987;65:663–737. 
24. Alexander GR, Wingate MS, Mor J, Boulet S. Birth outcomes of
Asian–Indian–americans. Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2007;97:215–20.
25.  Shah PS, Knowledge Synthesis Group on Determinants of
LBW/PT Births. Parity and low birth weight and pre–term
birth: a systematic review and meta–analyses. Acta Obstet
Gynecol Scand 2010;89:862–75.
26.  Blumenshine P, Egarter S, Barclay CJ, Cubbin C, Braveman PA.
Socioeconomic disparities in adverse birth outcomes: a
systematic review. Am J Prev Med 2010;39:263–72.
27.  Shah PS, Zao J, Ali S. Maternal marital status and birth
outcomes: a systematic review and meta–analyses. Matern
Child Health J 2011;15:1097–109. 
28. Gardosi J, Francis A. Adverse pregnancy outcome and association
with small for gestational age birthweight by customized and
popualtion–based centiles. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2009;201:1–8.
29.  Kramer MS, Platt R, Yang H, McNamara H, Usher RH. Are all
growth restricted newborns created equal(ly)? Pediatrics
1999;103:599–602.
30.  Han Z, Mulla S, Beyene J, Liao G, McDonald SD; Knowledge
Synthesis Group. Maternal underweight and the risk of
preterm birth and low birth weight: a systematic review and
meta–analyses. Int J Epidemiol 2011;40:65–101.
31.  Shah PS, Shah V, Knowledge Synthesis Group on Determinants
of LBW/PT Births. Influence of maternal birth status on
offspring: a systematic review and meta–analysis. Acta Obstet
Gynecol Scand 2009;88:1307–18.
32.  McCowan LM, Roberts CT, Dekker GA, Taylor RS, Chan EH,
Kenny LC, et al. Risk factors for small–for–gestational–age
infants by customised birthweight centiles: data from an
international prospective cohort study. BJOG
2010;117:1599–607.
33.  Conde–Agudelo A, Rosas–Bermúdez A, Kafury–Goeta AC. Birth
spacing and risk of adverse perinatal outcomes: a
meta–analysis. JAMA 2006;295:1809–23.
34.  Weiss JL, Malone FD, Vidaver J, Ball RH, Nyberg DA, Comstock
CH, et al. Threatened abortion: A risk factor for poor pregnancy
outcome, a population–based screening study. Am J Obstet
Gynecol 2004;190:745–50.
35.  Shah JS, Shah J, Knowledge Synthesis Group on Determinants
of LBW/PT Births. Maternal exposure to domestic violence and
pregnancy and birth outcomes: a systematic review and
meta–analysis. J Womens Health 2010;19:2017–31.
36.  National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE).
Antenatal care. Routine care for the healthy pregnant
woman. London:NICE;2008.
37.  Jaddoe VW, Bakker R, Hofman A, Mackenbach JP, Moll HA,
Steegers EA, et al. Moderate alcohol consumption during
pregnancy and the risk of low birth weight and preterm birth.
The generation R study. Ann Epidemiol 2007;17:834–40.
38.  Gouin K, Murphy K, Shah PS, Knowledge Synthesis Group on
Determinants of LBW/PT Births. Effects of cocaine use during
pregnancy on low birthweight and preterm birth: systematic
review and metaanalyses. Am J Obstet Gynecol
2011;204:340:1–12.
39.  McCowan LM, Dekker GA, Chan E, Stewart A, Chappell LC,
Hunter M, et al. Spontaneous preterm birth and small for
gestational age infants in women who stop smoking early in
pregnancy: prospective cohort study. BMJ 2009;338:b1081.
40.  CARE Study group. Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy
and risk of fetal growth restriction: a large prospective
observational study. BMJ 2008;337:a2332.
41.  Jackson RA, Gibson KA, Wu YW, Croughan MS. Perinatal
outcomes in singletons following in vitro fertilization: a meta-
analysis. Obstet Gynecol 2004;103:551–63. 
42.  Krulewitch CJ, Herman AA, Yu Kf, Johnson YR. Does changing
paternity contribute to the risk of intrauterine growth
retardation? Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 1997;11(Suppl 1):41–7.
43.  Shah PS, Knowledge Synthesis Group on determinants of
LBW/PT births. Paternal factors and low birthweight, preterm
and small for gestational age births: a systematic review. Am J
Obstet Gynecol 2010;202:103–23.
44.  Jaquet D, Swaminathan S, Alexander GR, Czernichow P, Collin
D, Salihu HM, et al. Significant paternal contribution to the risk
for small for gesational age. BJOG 2005;112:153–9.45. 
45.  The SCOPE Pregnancy Research Study.
[http://www.scopestudy.net/].
46.  Gagnon A, Wilson RD, Audibert F, Allen VM, Blight C, Brock JA, et
al. Obstetrical complications associated with abnormal maternal
serum markers analytes. J Obstet Gynaecol Can 2008;30:918–49.
47.  Morris RK, Cnossen JS, Langejans M, Robson SC, Kleijnen J, Ter
Riet G, et al. Serum screening with Down's syndrome markers
to predict pre-eclampsia and small for gestational age:
systematic review and meta–analysis. BMC Pregnancy
Childbirth 2008;8:33.
48.  Huerta–Enochian G, Katz V, Erfurth S. The association of
abnormal alpha–fetoprotein and adverse pregnancy outcome;
does increased fetal surveillance affect pregnancy outcome?
Am J Obstet Gynecol 2001;184:1549–53.
49.  Wenstrom KD, Hauth JC, Goldenberg RL, DuBard MB, Lea C.
The effect of low–dose aspirin on pregnancies complicated by
elevated human chorionic gonadotrophin levels. Am J Obstet
Gynecol 1995;173:1292–6. 
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
24 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
SDK application service:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
SharePoint. C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB library download and VB.NET online source code
www.rasteredge.com
25of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
50.  Spencer K, Cowans NJ, Avgidou K, Molina F, Nicolaides KH.
First-Trimester Biochemical Markers of Aneuploidy and the
Prediction of Small-for-Gestational Age Fetuses. Obstetrical &
Gynaecolgical Survey 2009; 64:370-2.
51.  Fox NS, Shalom D, Chasen ST. Second–trimester fetal growth as
a predictor of poor obstetric and neonatal outcome in patients
with low first trimester serum pregnancy–associated plasma
protein–A and a euploid fetus. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2009;33:34–8.
52.  Kirkegaard I, Henriksen TB, Uldbjerg N. Early fetal growth,
PAPP–A and free β–hCG in relation to risk of delivering a
small–for–gestational age infant. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2011;37:341–7.
53.  Lin S, Shimizu I, Suehara N, Nakayama M, Aono T. Uterine artery
Doppler velocimetry in realtion to trophoblast migration into
the myometrium of the placental bed. Obstet Gynecol
1995;85:760–5.
54.  Prefumo F, Sebire NJ, Thilaganathan B. Decreased endovascular
trophoblast invasion in first trimester pregnancies with
high–resistance uterine artery Doppler indices. Hum Reprod
2004;19:206–9.
55.  Cnossen JS, Morris RK, ter Riet G, Mol BW, van der Post JA,
Coomarasamy A, et al. Use of uterine artery Doppler
ultrasonography to predict pre-eclampsia and intrauterine
growth restriction: a systematic review and bivariate
meta–analysis. CMAJ 2008;178:701–11.
56.  Ghi T, Contro A, Youssef F, Giorgetta F, Farina A, Pilu G, et al.
Persistence of increased uterine artery resistance in the third
trimester and pregnancy outcome. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2010;36:577–81.
57.  Stampalija T, Gyte GML, Alfirevic Z. Utero–placental Doppler
ultrasound for improving pregnancy outcome. Cochrane
Database Syst Rev 2010;(9):CD008363.
58.  Pilalis A, Souka AP, Antsaklis P, Daskalakis G, Papantoniou N,
Mesogitis S, et al. Screening for pre-eclampsia and fetal growth
restriction by uterine artery Doppler and PAPP–A at 11–14
weeks gestation. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2007;29:135–40.
59.  Filippi E, Staughton J, Peregrine E, Jones P, Huttly W, Peebles
DM, et al. Uterine artery Doppler and adverse pregnancy
outcome in women with extreme levels of fetoplacental
proteins used for Down syndrome screening. Ultrasound
Obstet Gynecol 2011;37:520–27.
60.  Dane B, Dane C, Kiray M, Cetin A, Koldas M, Erginbas M.
Correlation between first–trimester maternal serum markers,
second trimester uterine artery doppler indices and pregnancy
outcome. Gynecol Obstet Invest 2010;70:126–31.
61.  Costa SL, Proctor L, Dodd JM, Toal M, Okun N, Johnson JA, et al.
Screening for placental insufficiency in high risk pregnancies:
Is earlier better? Placenta 2008;29:1034–40.
62.  Goetzinger KR, Cahill AG, Macones GA, Odibo AO. Echogenic
bowel on second–trimester ultrasonography. Obstet Gynecol
2011;117:1341–8.
63.  Harlev A, Levy A, Zaulan Y, Koifman A, Mazor M, Wiznitzer A, et
al. Idiopathic bleeding during the second half of pregnancy as
a risk factor for adverse perinatal outcome. J Matern Fetal
Neonatal Med 2008;21:331–5.
64.  Tikkanen M. Placental abruption: epidemiology, risk factors and
consequences. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2011;90:140–9.
65.  Bais JM, Eskes M, Pel M, Bonsel GJ, Bleker OP. Effectiveness of
detection of intrauterine growth retardation by abdominal
palpation as screening test in a low risk population: an
observational study. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol
2004;116:164–9.
66.  Kean LH, Liu DTY. Antenatal care as a screening tool for the
detection of small for gestational age babies in the low risk
population. J Obstet Gynecol 1996;16:77–82.
67.  Hall MH, Chng PK, MacGillivray I. Is routine antenatal care
worthwhile? Lancet 1980;2:78–80.
68.  Rosenberg K, Grant JM, Hepburn M. Antenatal detection of
growth retardation: actual practice in a large maternity
hospital. BJOG 1982;89:12–5.
69.  Morse K, Williams A, Gardosi J. Fetal growth screening by
fundal height measurement. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet
Gynaecol 2009;23:809–18.
70.  Belizán JM, Villar J, Nardin JC, Malamud J, De Vicurna LS.
Diagnosis of intrauterine growth retardation by a simple
clinical method: measurement of uterine height. Am J Obstet
Gynecol 1978;131:643–6.
71.  Cnattingius S, Axelsson O, Lindmark G. Symphysis–fundus
measurements and intrauterine growth retardation. Acta Obstet
Gynecol Scand 1984;63:335–40.
72.  Mathai M, Jairaj P, Muthurathnam S. Screening for
light–for–gestational age infants: a comparison of three simple
measurements. BJOG 1987;94:217–21.
73.  Persson B, Stangenberg M, Lunell NO, Brodin U, Holmberg NG,
Vaclavinkova V. Prediction of size of infants at birth by
measurement of symphysis fundus height. BJOG
1986;93:206–11.
74.  Bailey SM, Sarmandal P, Grant JM. A comparison of three
methods of assessing inter–observer variation applied to
measurements of symphysis–fundus height. BJOG
1989;96:1266–71.
75.  Pearce JM, Campbell S. A comparison of symphysis–fundal
height and ultrasound as screening tests for
light–for–gestational age infants. BJOG 1987;94:100–4.
76.  Neilson JP. Symphysis–fundal height in pregnancy. Cochrane
Database Syst Rev 2000;(2):CD000944.
77.  Gardosi J, Francis A. Controlled trial of fundal height
measurement plotted on customised antenatal growth charts.
BJOG 1999;106:309–17.
78.  Wright J, Morse K, Kady S, Francis A. Audit of fundal height
measurement plotted on customised growth charts. MIDIRS
Midwifery Dig 2006;16:341–5.
79.  Chauhan SP,Magann EF. Screening for fetal growth restriction.
Clin Obstet Gynecol 2006;49:284–94.
80.  Chauhan SP, Cole J, Sanderson M, Magann EF, Scardo JA.
Suspicion of intrauterine growth restriction: Use of abdominal
circumference alone or estimated fetal weight below 10%. J
Mat Fetal Neonat Med 2006;19:557–62.
81.  Kayem G, Grange G, Breart G, Goffinet F. Comparison of fundal
height measurement and sonographically measured fetal
abdominal circumference in the prediction of high and low
birth weight at term. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2009;34:566–71. 
82.  Scioscia M, Vimercati A, Ceci O, Vicino M, Selvaggi LE. Estimation
of birth weight by two–dimensional ultrasonography: a critical
appraisal of its accuracy. Obstet Gynecol 2008;111:57–65.
83.  Chien PF, Owen P, Khan KS. Validity of ultrasound estimation of
fetal weight. Obstet Gynecol 2000;95:856–60.84. Robson SC,
Gallivan S, Walkinshaw SA, Vaughan J, Rodeck CH. Ultrasonic
estimation of fetal weight; use of targeted formulas in small for
gestational age fetuses. Obstet Gynecol 1993;82:359–64. 
85. Thiebaugeorges O, Fresson J, Audibert F, Guihard–Costa AM,
Frydman R, Droulle P. Diagnosis of small–for–gestational age
fetuses between 24 and 32 weeks, based on standard
sonographic measurements. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2000;16:49–55.
86.  Hadlock FP, Harrist RB, Sharman RS, Deter RL, Park SK.
Estimation of fetal weight with the use of head, body and
femur measurements–a prospective study. Am J Obstet
Gynecol 1985;151:333–7.
87.  Chitty LS, Altman DG, Henderson A, Campbell S. Charts of fetal
size: 3. Abdominal measurements. BJOG 1994;101:125–31.
88.  Pang MW, Leung TN, Sahota DS, Lau TK, Chang AM. Customizing
fetal biometric charts. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2003;22:271–6.
89.  de Jong CL, Gardosi J, Baldwin C, Francis A, Dekker GA, van
Geijn HP. Fetal weight gain in a serially scanned high–risk
population. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 1998;11:39–43.
90.  de Jong CL, Francis A, Van Geijn HP, Gardosi J. Customised fetal
weight limits for antenatal detection of fetal growth restriction.
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2000;15:36–40.
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to High quality jpeg file can be exported from PDF in Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Choose file display mode. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
91.  Mikolajczyk RT, Zhang J, Betran AP, Souza JP, Mori R,
Gülmezoglu AM, et al. A global reference for fetal–weight and
birthweight percentiles. Lancet 2011;377:1855–61.
92.  Mongelli M, Gardosi J. Reduction of false–positive diagnosis of
fetal growth restriction by application of customized fetal
growth standards. Obstet Gynecol 1996;88:844–8.
93.  Bricker L, Neilson JP, Dowswell T. Routine ultrasound in late
pregnancy (after 24 weeks’ gestation). Cochrane Database Syst
Rev 2008;(4):CD001451.
94.  McKenna D, Tharmaratnam S, Mahsud S, Bailie C, Harper A,
Dornan J. A randomized trial using ultrasound to identify the
high–risk fetus in a low–risk population. Obstet Gynecol
2003;101:626–32.
95.  Owen P, Donnet ML, Ogston SA, Christie AD, Howie PW, Patel
NB. Standards for ultrasound fetal growth velocity. BJOG
1996;103:60–9.
96.  Larsen T, Petersen S, Greisen G, Larsen JF. Normal fetal growth
evaluated by longitudinal ultrasound examinations. Early Hum
Dev 1990;24:37–45.
97.  Royston P. Calculation of unconditional and conditional
reference intervals for foetal size and growth from longitudinal
measurements. Stat Med 1995;14:1417–36. 
98.  Robson SC, Chang TC. Intrauterine growth retardation. In: Reed
G, Claireaux A, Cockburn F, editors. Diseases of the Fetus and
the Newborn. 2nd ed. London: Chapman and Hall;1994.
p.277–86.
99.  Chang TC, Robson SC, Spencer JA, Gallivan S. Identification of
fetal growth retardation: comparison of Doppler waveform
indices and serial ultrasound measurements of abdominal
circumference and fetal weight. Obstet Gynecol 1993;82:230–6.
100. Chang TC, Tobson SC, Spencer JA, Gallivan S. Prediction of
perinatal morbidity at term in small fetuses: comparison of fetal
growth and Doppler ultrasound. BJOG 1994;101:422–7.
101. Mongelli M, Sverker EK, Tambyrajia R. Screening for fetal
growth restriction: a mathematical model of the effect of time
interval and ultrasound error. Obstet Gynecol 1998;92:908–12.
102. Chauhan SP, Magann EF, Dohrety DA, Ennen CS, Niederhauser
A, Morrison JC. Prediction of small for gestational age
newborns using ultrasound estimated and actual amniotic fluid
volume: published data revisited. ANZJOG 2008;48:160–4.
103. Owen P, Khan KS, Howie P. Single and serial estimates of
amniotic fluid volume and umbilical artery resistance in the
prediction of intrauterine growth restriction. Ultrasound
Obstet Gynecol 1999;13:415–9.
104. Niknafs P, Sibbald J. Accuracy of single ultrasound parameters in
detection of fetal growth restriction. Am J Perinatol
2001;18:325–34.
105. Morris RK, Malin G, Robson SC, Kleijnen J, Zamora J, Khan KS.
Fetal umbilical artery Doppler to predict compromise of
fetal/neonatal wellbeing in a high–risk population: systematic
review and bivariate meta–analysis. Ultrasound Obstet
Gynecol 2011;37:135–42.
106. Snijders RJ, Sherrod C, Gosden CM, Nicolaides KH. Fetal growth
retardation: associated malformations and chromosomal
abnormalities. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993;168:547–55.
107. Anandakumar C, Chew S, Wong YC, Malarvishy G, Po LU,
Ratnam SS. Early asymmetric IUGR and aneuploidy. J Obstet
Gynaecol Res 1996;22:365–70.
108. Hendrix N, Berghella V. Non–placental causes of intrauterine
growth restriction. Semin Perinatol 2008;32:161–5.
109. Freeman K, Oakley L, Pollak A, Buffolano W, Petersen E,
Semprini AE, et al. Association between congenital
toxoplasmosis and preterm birth, low birthweight and small
for gestational age birth. BJOG 2005;112:31–7.
110. Yakoob MY, Zakaria A, Waqar SN, Zafar S, Wahla AS, Zaidi SK, et
al. Does malaria during pregnancy affect the newborn? J Pak
Med Assoc 2005;55:543–6.
111. Severi FM, Bocchi C, Visentin A, Falco P, Cobellis L, Florio P, et al.
Uterine and fetal cerebral Doppler predict the outcome of
third–trimester small–for–gestational age fetuses with normal
umbilical artery Doppler. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2002;19:225–8.
112. Vergani P, Roncaglia N, Ghidini A, Crippa I, Cameroni I,
Orsenigo F, et al. Can adverse neonatal outcome be predicted
in late preterm or term fetal growth restriction? Ultrasound
Obstet Gynecol 2010;36:166–70.
113. Oros D, Figueras F, Cruz–Martinez R, Meler E, Munmany M,
Gratacos E. Longitudinal changes in uterine, umbilical and fetal
cerebral Doppler indices in late–onset small–for–gestational
age fetuses. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2011;37:191–5.
114. Duley L, Henderson–Smart DJ, Meher S, King JF. Antiplatelet
agents for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007;(2):CD004659.
115.Askie LM, Duley L, Henderson–Smart DJ, Stewart LA, PARIS
Collaborative Group. Antiplatelet agents for prevention of 
pre-eclampsia: a meta–analysis of individual patient data.
Lancet 2007;369:1791–8.
116. Bujold E, Roberge S, Lacasse Y, Bureau M, Audibert F, Marcoux S,
et al. Prevention of pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth
restriction with aspirin started in early pregnancy. Obstet
Gynecol 2010;116:402–14.
117. Bujold E, Morency AM, Roberge S, Lacasse Y, Forest JC, Giguere
Y. Acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of pre-eclampsia and
intra-uterine growth restriction in women with abnormal
uterine artery Doppler: a systematic review and meta–analysis.
J Obstet Gynecol Can 2009;31:818–26.
118. Kramer MS, Kakuma R. Energy and protein intake in
pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2010;(9): CD000032. 
119. Haider BA, Bhutta ZA. Multiple–micronutrient supplementation
for women during pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev
2006;(4):CD004905.
120. Say L, Gulmezoglu AM, Hofmeyer JG. Maternal nutrient
supplementation for suspected impaired fetal growth.
Cochrane Summaries;2010 [http://summaries.cochrane.org/
CD000148/maternal–nutrient–supplementation–for–suspected
–impaired–fetal–growth].
121. Makrides M, Duley L, Olsen SF. Marine oil, and other
prostaglandin precursor, supplementation for pregnancy
complicated by pre-eclampsia or intrauterine growth
retardation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2006;(3):CD003402.
122. Meher S, Duley L. Progesterone for preventing pre-eclampsia
and its complications. Cochrane Database Syst Rev
2006;(4):CD006175.
123. Hofmeyr GJ, Lawrie TA, Atallah AN, Duley L. Calcium
supplementation during pregnancy for preventing
hypertensive disorders and related problems. Cochrane
Database Syst Rev 2010;(8):CD001059.
124. Lumley J, Chamberlain C, Dowswell T, Oliver S, Oakley L,
Watson L. Interventions to promote smoking cessation during
pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2009;(3):CD001055.
125. Dodd JM, McLeod A, Windrim R, Kingdom J. Anthithrombotic
therapy for improving maternal and infant health outcomes in
women considered at risk of placental dysfunction. Cochrane
Database Syst Rev 2010;(6):CD006780.
126. Abalos E, Duley L, Steyn WD, Henderson–Smart DJ.
Antihypertensive drug therapy for mild to moderate
hypertension during pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev
2007;(1):CD002252.
127. Magee L, Duley L. Oral beta–blockers for mild to moderate
hypertension during pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev
2003;(3):CD002863.
128. Nabhan AF, Elsedawy MM. Tight control of mild–moderate
pre–existing or non–proteinuric gestational hypertension.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011;(7):CD006907.
129. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Antenatal
Corticosteroids to Prevent Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality.
Green–top Guideline no. 7. London:RCOG;2010.
130. Say L, Gulmezoglu MA, Hofmeyer JG. Bed rest in hospital for
suspected impaired fetal growth. Cochrane Database Syst Rev
1996;(1):CD000034.
131. Say L, Gulmezoglu MA, Hofmeyr GJ. Maternal oxygen
administration for suspected impaired fetal growth. Cochrane
Database Syst Rev 2003;(1):CD000137.
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
26 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
27of 34
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
132. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Magnesium
Sulphate to Prevent Cerebal Palsy following Preterm Birth.
Scientific Impact Paper No. 29. London;RCOG:2011. 
133. Australian Research Centre for Health of Women and Babies.
Antenatal Magnesium Sulphate Prior to Preterm Birth for
Neuroprotection of the Fetus, Infant and Child – National
Clinical Practice Guidelines.Adelaide;ARCH:2010.
134. Morris RK, Malin G, Robson SC, Kleijnen J, Zamora J, Khan KS.
Fetal umbilical artery Doppler to predict compromise of fetal/
neonatal wellbeing in high–risk popualtion: systematic review
and bivariate meta–analysis. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2011;37: 135–42.
135. Alfirevic Z, Stampalija T, Gyte GL. Fetal and umbilical Doppler
ultrasound in high–risk pregnancies. Cochrane Database Syst
Rev 2010;(1):CD007529.pub2.
136. Soothill PW, Ajayi RA, Campbell S, Nicolaides KH. Prediction of
morbidity in small and normally grown fetuses by fetal heart
rate variability, biophysical profile score and umbilical artery
Doppler studies. BJOG 1993;100:742–5.
137. Haley J, Tuffnell DJ, Johnson N. Randomised controlled trial of
cardiotocography versus umbilical artery Doppler in the
management of small for gestational age fetuses. BJOG
1997;104:431–5.
138. Almstrom H, Ekman G, Axelsson O, Ulmsten U, Cnattingius S,
Maesel A, et al. Comparison of umbilical artery velocimetry and
cardiotocography for surveillance of small–for–gestational–age
fetuses. Lancet 1992;340:936–40.
139. Williams KP, Farquharson DF, Bebbington M, Dansereau J,
Galerneau F, Wilson RD, et al. Screening for fetal wellbeing in a
high risk pregnant population comparing the nonstress test
with umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry: A randomized
controlled clinical trial. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2003;188:1366–71. 
140. Maulik D, Yarlagadda P, Youngblood JP, Ciston P. Comparative
efficacy of umbilical arterial Doppler indices for predicting
adverse perinatal outcome. Am J Obstet Gynecol
1991;164:1434–9.
141. Figueras F, Eixarch E, Gratacos E, Gardosi J. Predictiveness of
antenatal umbilical artery Doppler for adverse pregnancy
outcome in small–for–gestational age according to customised
birthweight centiles: population–based study. BJOG
2008;115:590–94.
142. Nienhuis SJ, Vles JS, Gerver WJ, Hoogland HJ. Doppler
ultrasonography in suspected intrauterine growth retardation: a
randomized clinical trial. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
1997;9:6–13.
143. McCowan LM, Harding JE, Roberts AB, Barker SE, Ford C,
Stewart AW. A pilot randomized controlled trial of two
regimens of fetal surveillance for small–for–gestational–age
fetuses with normal results of umbilical artery Doppler
velocimetry. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2000;182:81–6.
144. Lindqvist PG, Molin J. Does antenatal identification of
small–for–gestational age fetuses significantly improve their
outcome? Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2005;25:258–64. 
145. Figueras F, Eixarch E, Meler E, Iraola A, Figueras J, Puerto B, et al.
Small–for–gestational–age fetuses with normal umbilical artery
Doppler have suboptimal perinatal and neurodevelopmental
outcome. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2008;136:34–8.
146. Alfirevic Z, Stampalija T, Gyte GLM. Fetal and umbilical artery
Doppler ultrasound in normal pregnancy. Cochrane Database
of Syst Rev 2010:(8):CD001450.
147. Grivell RM, Alfirevic Z, Gyte GML, Devane D. Antenatal
cardiotocography for fetal assessment. Cochrane Database
Syst Rev 2010;(1):CD007863.
148. Dawes GS, Moulden M, Redman CW. Improvements in
computerised fetal heart rate pattern analysis antepartum. J
Perinat Med 1996;24:25–36.
149. Serra V, Bellver J, Moulden M, Redman CW. Computerized
analysis of normal fetal heart rate pattern throughout gestation.
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2009;34:74–9.
150. Turan S, Turan OM, Berg C, Moyano D, Bhide A, Bower S, et al.
Computerized fetal heart rate analysis, Doppler ultrasound 
and biophysical profile score in the prediction of acid–base
status of growth–restricted fetuses. Ultrasound Obstet 
Gynecol 2007;30:750–6.
151. Serra V, Moulden M, Bellver J, Redman CW. The value of the
short–term fetal heart rate variation for timing the delivery of
the growth–retarded fetuses. BJOG 2008;115:1101–7.
152. Magann EF, Isler CM, Chauhan SP, Martin JN. Amniotic fluid
volume estimation and the biophysical profile. Obstet 
Gynecol 2000;96:640–2.
153. Nabhan AF, Abdelmoula YA. Amniotic fluid index versus single
deepest vertical pocket as a screening test for preventing
adverse pregnany outcome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev
2008;(3):CD006593.
154. Zhang J, Troendle J, Meikle S, Klebanoff MA, Rayburn WF.
Isolated oligohydramnios is not associated with adverse
perinatal outcomes. BJOG 2004;111:220–5.
155. Chauhan SP, Sanderson M, Hendrix NW, Magann EF, Devoe LD.
Perinatal outcome and amniotic fluid index in the antepartum
and intrapartum periods: A meta–analysis. Am J Obstet Gynecol
1999;181:1473–8.
156. Bastide A, Manning F, Harman C, Lange I, Morrison I. Ultrasound
evaluation of amniotic fluid: outcome of pregnancies with
severe oligohydramnios. Am J Obstet Gynecol
1986;154:895–900.
157. Manning FA. Fetal biophysical profile: a critical appraisal. Fetal
Mat Med Rev 1997;9:103–23.
158. Baschat AA, Galan HL, Bhide A, Berg C, Kush ML, Oepkes D, et
al. Doppler and biophysical assessment in growth restricted
fetuses: distribution of test results. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2006;27:41–7.
159. Lalor JG, Fawole B, Alfirevic Z, Devane D. Biophysical profile for
fetal assessment in high risk pregnancies. Cochrane Database
Syst Rev 2008;(1):CD007529.
160. Dayal AK, Manning FA, Berck DJ, Mussalli GM, Avila C, Harman
CR, et al. Fetal death after normal biophysical profile score: 
An eighteen–year experience. Am J Obstet Gynecol
1999;181:1231–6.
161.Kaur S, Picconi JL, Chadha R, Kruger M, Mari G. Biophysical
profile in the treatment of intrauterine growth–restricted
fetuses who weigh <1000g. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2008;199:1–4.
162. Rizzo G, Capponi A, Arduini D, Romanini C. The value of fetal
arterial and venous flows in predicting pH and blood gases
measured in umbilical blood at cordocentesis in growth
restricted fetuses. BJOG 1995;102:963–9.
163. Arduini D, Rizzo G, Romanini C. Changes in pulsatility index
from fetal vessels preceding the onset of late decelerations 
in growth retarded fetuses. Obstet Gynecol 1992;79:605–10.
164. Dubiel M, Gudmundsson S, Gunnarsson G, Marsal K. Middle
cerebral artery velocimetry as a predictor of hypoxemia in
fetuses with increased resistance to blood flow in the
umbilical artery. Early Hum Dev 1997;47:177–84.
165. Morris RK, Say R, Robson SC, Kleijen J, Khan KS. Systematic
review of middle cerebral artery Doppler to predict fetal
growth restriction/compromise of fetal wellbeing. Arch Dis
Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2008;93(Suppl 1):31–6.
166. Ozeren M, Dinc H, Ekmen U, Senekayli C, Aydemir V. Umbilical
and middle cerebral artery Doppler indices in patients with
pre-eclampsia. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol
1999;82:11–6.
167. Vergani P, Roncaglia N, Ghidini A, Cripper I, Cameroni I,
Orsenigo F, et al. Can adverse neonatal outcome be predicted
in late preterm or term fetal growth restriction? Ultrasound
Obstet Gynecol 2010;36:166–70.
168. Baschat AA, Cosmi E, Bilardo CM, Wolf H, Berg C, Rigano S, et al.
Predictors of neonatal outcome in early–onset placental
dysfunction. Obstet Gynecol 2007;109:253–61. 
169. Fieni S, Gramellini D, Piantelli G. Lack of normalisation of
middle cerebral artery velocity prior to fetal death before 30th
week of gestation: a report of three cases. Ultrasound Obstet
Gynecol 2004;24:474–5.
170. Baschat AA, Gembruch U, Harman CR. The sequence of
changes in Doppler and biophysical parameters as severe 
fetal growth restriction worsens. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2001;18:571–7.
171. Oros D, Figueras F, Cruz–Martinez R, Meler E, Munmany M,
Gratecos E. Longitudinal changes in uterine, umbilical and fetal
cerebral Doppler indices in late–onset small–for–gestational–age
fetuses. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2011;37:191–5.
172. Hershkovitz R, Kingdom JC, Geary M, Rodeck CH. Fetal cerebral
blood flow redistribution in late gestation: identification of
compromise in small fetuses with normal umbilical artery
Doppler. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2000;15:209–12. 
173. Severi FM, Bocchi C, Visentin A, Falco P, Cobellis L, Florio P, et 
al. Uterine and fetal cerebral Doppler predict the outcome of
third–trimester small–for–gestational age fetuses with normal
umbilical artery Doppler. Ultrsound Obstet Gynecol
2002;19:225–8. 
174. Cruz–Martinez R, Figueras F, Hernandez–Andrade E, Oros D,
Gratecos E. Fetal brain Doppler to predict cesarean delivery 
for nonreassuring fetal status in term small–for–gestational–age
fetuses. Obstet Gynecol 2011;117:618–26.
175. Yagel S, Kivilevitch Z, Cohen SM, Valsky DV, Messing B, Shen O,
et al. The fetal venous system, Part II: ultrasound evaluation of
the fetus with congenital venous system malformation or
developing circulatory compromise. Ultrasound Obstet
Gynecol 2010;36:93–111.
176. Morris RK, Selman TJ, Verma M, Robson SC, Kleijnen J, Khan KS.
Systematic review and meta–analysis of the test accuracy of
ductus venosus Doppler to predict compromise of fetal/neonatal
wellbeing. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2010;152:3–12.
177. Baschat AA, Guclu S, Kush ML, Gembruch U, Weiner CP, Harman
CR. Venous Doppler in the prediction of acid–base status of
growth restricted fetuses with elevated placental blood flow
resistance. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2004;191:277–84. 
178. Baschat AA. Doppler application in the delivery timing of the
preterm growth–restricted fetus; another step in the right
direction. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2004;23:111–8.
179. Cole TJ, Hey E, Richmond S. The PREM score: a graphical tool
for predicting survival in very preterm births. Arch Dis Fetal
Neonat Ed 2010; 95:14–9.
180. Baschat AA. Neurodevelopment following fetal growth restriction
and its relationship with antepartum parameters of placental
dysfunction. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2011;37:501–14.
181. Ferrazzi E, Bozzo M, Rigano S, Bellotti M, Morabito A, Pardi G, et
al. Temporal sequence of abnormal Doppler changes in the
peripheral and central circulatory systems of the severely
growth–restricted fetus. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
2002;19:140–6.
182. Hecher K, Bilardo CM, Stigter RH, Ville Y, Hackelöer BJ, Kok HJ, et
al. Monitoring of fetuses with intrauterine growth restriction: a
longitudinal study. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2002;18:565–70.
183. GRIT Study Group. A randomised trial of timed delivery for the
compromised preterm fetus: short term outcomes and
Bayesian interpretation. BJOG 2003;110:27–32.
184. Thornton JG, Hornbuckle J, Vail A, Spiegelhalter DJ, Levene M;
GRIT study group. Infant wellbeing at 2 years of age in the
Growth Restriction Intervention Trial (GRIT): multicentred
randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2004;364:513–20.
185. Wilkinson AR, Ahluwalia J, Cole A, Crawford D, Fyle J, Gordon A,
et al. Management of babies born extremely preterm at less
than 26 weeks of gestation: a framework for clinical practice at
the time of birth. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed
2009;94:2–5.
186. Lees C. Protocol 02PRT/34 Trial of umbilical and fetal flow in
Europe (TRUFFLE): a multicentre randomised study. [http://
www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/misc/protocol/02PRT–34].
187. Boers KE, Vijgen SM, Bijlenga D, van der Post JA, Bekedam DJ,
Kwee A, et al. Induction versus expectant monitoring for
intrauterine growth restriction at term: randomised
equivalence trial (DIGITAT). BMJ 2010;341.
188. Nicolaides KH, Economides DL, Soothill PW. Blood gases, pH
and lactate in appropriate and small for gestational age fetuses.
Am J Obstet Gynecol 1989;161:996–1001.
189. Robson SC, Crawford RA, Spencer JA, Lee A. Intrapartum
amniotic fluid and its relationship to fetal distress. Am J Obstet
Gynecol 1992;166:78–82.
190. Lin CC, Moawad AH, Rosenow PJ, River P. Acid–base
characteristics of fetuses with intrauterine growth retardation
during labour and delivery. Am J Obstet Gynecol
1980;137:553–9.
191. Burke G, Stuart B, Crowley P, Ni Scanaill S, Drumm J. Is
intrauterine growth retardation with normal umbilical artery
blood flow a benign condition? BMJ 1990;300:1044–5.
192. Baschat AA, Weiner CP. Umbilical artery Doppler screening for
detection of the small fetus in need of antepartum
surveillance. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2000;182:154–8.
193. Karsdrop VH, van Vugt JM, van Geijn HP, Kostense PJ, Arduim D,
Montenegro N, et al. Clinical significance of absent or reversed
end diastolic waveforms in umbilical artery. Lancet
1994;344:1664–8.
194. Forouzan I. Absence of End–Diastolic Flow Velocity in the
Umbilical Artery: A Review. Obstet Gynecol Survey
1995;50:219–27.
195. Li H, Gudmundsson S, Olofsson P. Prospect of vaginal delivery
of growth restricted fetuses with abnormal umbilical artery
blood flow. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2003;82:828–33.
196. Almström H, Axelsson O, Ekman G, Ingemarsson I, Maesel A,
Arström K, et al. Umbilical artery velocimetry may influence
clinical interpretation of intrapartum cardiotocograms. Acta
Obstet Gynecol Scand 1995;74:526–9.
197. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE).
Induction of labour. London;NICE:2008.
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
28of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Appendix I: Summary of Risk Factors for a Small–for–Gestational–Age Neonate.
Table A: Available from history at booking (usually prior to 12 weeks)
Risk category
Definition of risk
Definition of outcome
Estimate
Point estimate and 
measure
measure 
95% CI
Maternal Risk Factors
Age
Maternal age ≥35 years
22
BW < 10th centile population
OR
1.4 (1.1–1.8)
Maternal age > 40 years
22
BW < 10th centile population
OR
3.2 (1.9–5.4)
Parity
Nulliparity
25
BW < 10th centile population*
OR
1.89 (1.82–1.96)
BMI
BMI < 20
28
BW < 10th centile customised
OR
1.2 (1.1–1.3)
BMI 25–29.9
28
BW < 10th centile customised
RR
1.2 (1.1–1.3)
BMI ≥ 30
28
BW < 10th centile customised
RR
1.5 (1.3–1.7)
Maternal substance 
Smoker
32
BW < 10th centile customised
AOR
1.4 (1.2–1.7)
Exposure
Smoker 1–10 cigarettes per day
29
BW < 9.9th centile population
OR
1.54 (1.39–1.7)
Smoker ≥ 11 cigarettes per day
29
BW < 9.9th centile population
OR
2.21 (2.03–2.4)
Cocaine
38
BW < 10th centile population
OR
3.23 (2.43–4.3)
IVF
IVF singleton pregnancy
41
BW < 10th centile
OR
1.6 (1.3–2.0)
Exercise
Daily vigorous exercise
32
BW < 10th centile customised
AOR
3.3 (1.5–7.2)
Diet
Low fruit intake pre–pregnancy
32
BW < 10th centile customised
AOR
1.9 (1.3–2.8)
Previous Pregnancy History
Previous SGA
Previous SGA baby
8
BW < 10th centile customised
OR
3.9 (2.14–7.12)
Previous Stillbirth
Previous stillbirth
8
BW < 10th centile customised
OR
6.4 (0.78–52.56)
Previous pre-eclampsia
Pre-eclampsia
9
BW < 10th centile population
AOR
1.31 (1.19–1.44)
Pregnancy Interval
Pregnancy interval < 6 months
33
SGA not defined*
AOR
1.26 (1.18–1.33)
Pregnancy interval ≥ 60 months
33
SGA not defined*
AOR
1.29 (1.2–1.39)
Maternal Medical History
SGA◊
Maternal SGA
31
BW < 10th centile population*
OR
2.64 (2.28–3.05)
Hypertension
Chronic hypertension
17
BW < 10th centile population
ARR
2.5 (2.1–2.9)
Diabetes
Diabetes with vascular disease
14
BW < 10th centile population
OR
6 (1.5–2.3)
Renal disease
Renal impairment
15
BW < 10th centile population
AOR
5.3 (2.8–10)
APLS
Antiphospholipid syndrome
16
FGR no definition
RR
6.22 (2.43–16.0)
Paternal Medical History◊
SGA
Paternal SGA
43
BW < 10th centile population
OR
3.47 (1.17–10.27)
Table B: Current pregnancy complications/developments
Risk category
Definition of risk
Definition of outcome
Estimate
Point estimate and 
measure
measure 
95% CI
Threatened miscarriage
Heavy bleeding similar to menses
34
BW < 10th centile population
AOR
2.6 (1.2–5.6)
Ultrasound appearance 
Echogenic bowel
62
BW < 10th centile population
AOR
2.1 (1.5–2.9)
Pre-eclampsia
Pre-eclampsia
8
BW < 10th centile customised
AOR
2.26 (1.22–4.18)
Pregnancy induced 
Mild
17
BW <10th centile population
RR
1.3 (1.3–1.4)
hypertension
Severe
17
BW < 10th centile population
RR
2.5 (2.3–2.8)
Placental abruption
Placental abruption
61
SGA not defined*
OR range
1.3–4.1
Unexplained APH
Unexplained APH
44
‘IUGR’ not defined
OR
5.6 (2.5–12.2)
Weight gain◊
Low maternal weight gain
13
BW < 10th centile population 
OR
4.9 (1.9–12.6)
Exposure◊
Caffeine ≥ 300 mg/day in 
BW < 10th centile population
OR
1.9 (1.3–2.8)
third trimester
40
DS marker
PAPP–A < 0.4 MoM
45
BW < 10th centile population
OR
2.6
* Denotes data from systematic review
◊ Information regarding these risk factors may be unobtainable
Major risk factors are in bold
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31
29 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 31 
30 of 34
© Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
APPENDIXII: Screening for Small–for–Gestational–Age (SGA) Fetus
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested