gnuplot 4.6
111
Several algorithms are available to calculate the approximation from the raw data. Some of these algorithms
can take additional parameters. These interpolations are such the closer the data point is to a grid point,
the more eect it has on that grid point.
The splines algorithm calculates an interpolation based on "thin plate splines". It does not take additional
parameters.
The qnorm algorithm calculates a weighted average of the input data at each grid point. Each data point
is weighted inversely by its distance from the grid point raised to the norm power. (Actually, the weights
are given by the inverse of dx^norm + dy^norm, where dx and dy are the components of the separation of
the grid point from each data point. For some norms that are powers of two, specically 4, 8, and 16, the
computation is optimized by using the Euclidean distance in the weight calculation, (dx^2+dy^2)^norm/2.
However, any non-negative integer can be used.) The power of the norm can be specied as a single optional
parameter. This algorithm is the default.
Finally, several smoothing kernels are available to calculate weighted averages: z = Sum
i w(d
i) * z
i/
Sum
iw(d
i), where z
iis the value of the i-th data point and d
iis the distance between the current grid
point and the location of the i-th data point. All kernels assign higher weights to data points that are close
to the current grid point and lower weights to data points further away.
The following kernels are available:
gauss :
w(d) = exp(-d*d)
cauchy :
w(d) = 1/(1 + d*d)
exp :
w(d) = exp(-d)
box :
w(d) = 1
if d<1
= 0
otherwise
hann :
w(d) = 0.5*(1-cos(2*pi*d))
if d<1
w(d) = 0
otherwise
When using one of these ve smoothing kernels, up to two additional numerical parameters can be specied:
dx and dy. These are used to rescale the coordinate dierences when calculating the distance: d
i= sqrt(
((x-x
i)/dx)**2 + ((y-y
i)/dy)**2 ), where x,y are the coordinates of the current grid point and x
i,y
iare
the coordinates of the i-th data point. The value of dy defaults to the value of dx, which defaults to 1. The
parameters dx and dy make it possible to control the radius over which data points contribute to a grid
point IN THE UNITS OF THE DATA ITSELF.
The optional keyword kdensity2d, which must come after the name of the kernel, but before the (optional)
scale parameters, modies the algorithm so that the values calculated for the grid points are not divided by
the sum of the weights ( z = Sum
iw(d
i) * z
i). If all z
iare constant, this eectively plots a bivariate
kernel density estimate: a kernel function (one of the ve dened above) is placed at each data point, the
sum of these kernels is evaluated at every grid point, and this smooth surface is plotted instead of the
original data. This is similar in principle to + what the smooth kdensity option does to 1D datasets. (See
kdensity2d.dem for usage demo)
A slightly dierent syntax is also supported for reasons of backwards compatibility. If no interpolation
algorithm has been explicitly selected, the qnorm algorithm is assumed. Up to three comma-separated,
optional parameters can be specied, which are interpreted as the the number of rows, the number of
columns, and the norm value, respectively.
The dgrid3d option is a simple scheme which replaces scattered data with weighted averages on a regular
grid. More sophisticated approaches to this problem exist and should be used to preprocess the data outside
gnuplot if this simple solution is found inadequate.
See also
dgrid3d.dem: dgrid3d demo.
and
scatter.dem: dgrid3d demo.
Dummy
The set dummy command changes the default dummy variable names.
And paste pdf to powerpoint - Library application class:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
And paste pdf to powerpoint - Library application class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
112
gnuplot 4.6
Syntax:
set dummy {<dummy-var>} {,<dummy-var>}
show dummy
By default, gnuplot assumes that the independent, or "dummy", variable for the plot command is "t" if
in parametric or polar mode, or "x" otherwise. Similarly the independent variables for the splot command
are "u" and "v" in parametric mode (splot cannot be used in polar mode), or "x" and "y" otherwise.
It may be more convenient to call a dummy variable by a more physically meaningful or conventional name.
For example, when plotting time functions:
set dummy t
plot sin(t), cos(t)
At least one dummy variable must be set on the command; set dummy by itself will generate an error
message.
Examples:
set dummy u,v
set dummy ,s
The second example sets the second variable to s.
Encoding
The set encoding command selects a character encoding. Syntax:
set encoding {<value>}
set encoding locale
show encoding
Valid values are
default
- tells a terminal to use its default encoding
iso_8859_1 - the most common Western European encoding used by many
Unix workstations and by MS-Windows. This encoding is
known in the PostScript world as ’ISO-Latin1’.
iso_8859_15 - a variant of iso_8859_1 that includes the Euro symbol
iso_8859_2 - used in Central and Eastern Europe
iso_8859_9 - used in Turkey (also known as Latin5)
koi8r
- popular Unix cyrillic encoding
koi8u
- ukrainian Unix cyrillic encoding
cp437
- codepage for MS-DOS
cp850
- codepage for OS/2, Western Europe
cp852
- codepage for OS/2, Central and Eastern Europe
cp950
- MS version of Big5 (emf terminal only)
cp1250
- codepage for MS Windows, Central and Eastern Europe
cp1251
- codepage for 8-bit Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
cp1254
- codepage for MS Windows, Turkish (superset of Latin5)
sjis
- shift-JIS Japanese encoding
utf8
- variable-length (multibyte) representation of Unicode
entry point for each character
The command set encoding locale is dierent from the other options. It attempts to determine the current
locale from the runtime environment. On most systems this is controlled by the environmental variables
LC
ALL, LC
CTYPE, or LANG. This mechanism is necessary, for example, to pass multibyte character
encodings such as UTF-8 or EUC
JP to the wxt and cairopdf terminals. This command does not aect
the locale-specic representation of dates or numbers. See also set locale (p. 126) and set decimalsign
(p. 109).
Generally you must set the encoding before setting the terminal type. Note that encoding is not supported
by all terminal drivers and that the device must be able to produce the desired non-standard characters.
Library application class:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page.
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
113
Fit
The set t command controls the options for the t command.
Syntax:
set fit {logfile {"<filename>"}}
{{no}quiet}
{{no}errorvariables}
{{no}prescale}
unset fit
show fit
The <lename> argument must be enclosed in single or double quotes.
If no lename is given or unset t is used the log le is reset to its default value "t.log" or the value of
the environmental variable FIT
LOG.
If the given logle name ends with a / or n, it is interpreted to be a directory name, and the actual lename
will be "t.log" in that directory.
If the errorvariables option is turned on, the error of each tted parameter computed by t will be copied
to a user-dened variable whose name is formed by appending "
err" to the name of the parameter itself.
This is useful mainly to put the parameter and its error onto a plot of the data and the tted function, for
reference, as in:
set fit errorvariables
fit f(x) ’datafile’ using 1:2 via a, b
print "error of a is:", a_err
set label ’a=%6.2f’, a, ’+/- %6.2f’, a_err
plot ’datafile’ using 1:2, f(x)
If the prescale option is turned on, parameters are prescaled by their initial values before being passed to
the Marquardt-Levenberg routine. This helps tremendously if there are parameters that dier in size by
many orders of magnitude. Fit parameters with an initial value of exactly zero are never prescaled.
By default the information written to the log le is also echoed to the terminal session. set t quiet turns
o the echo.
Fontpath
The fontpath setting denes additional locations for font les searched when including font les. Currently
only the postscript terminal supports fontpath. If a le cannot be found in the current directory, the
directories in fontpath are tried. Further documentation concerning the supported le formats is included
in the terminal postscript section of the documentation.
Syntax:
set fontpath {"pathlist1" {"pathlist2"...}}
show fontpath
Path names may be entered as single directory names, or as a list of path names separated by a platform-
specic path separator, eg. colon (’:’) on Unix, semicolon (’;’) on DOS/Windows/OS/2 platforms. The show
fontpath, save and save set commands replace the platform-specic separator with a space character (’ ’)
for maximum portability. If a directory name ends with an exclamation mark (’!’) also the subdirectories
of this directory are searched for font les.
If the environmental variable GNUPLOT
FONTPATH is set, its contents are appended to fontpath. If it
is not set, a system dependent default value is used. It is set by testing several directories for existence when
using the fontpath the rst time. Thus, the rst call of set fontpath, show fontpath, save fontpath,
plot, or splot with embedded font les takes a little more time. If you want to save this time you may set
the environmental variable GNUPLOT
FONTPATH since probing is switched o, then. You can nd out
which is the default fontpath by using show fontpath.
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
114
gnuplot 4.6
show fontpath prints the contents of the user-dened fontpath and the system fontpath separately. How-
ever, the save and save set commands save only the user-specied parts of fontpath.
For terminal drivers that access fonts by lename via the gd library, the font search path is controlled by
the environmental variable GDFONTPATH.
Format
The format of the tic-mark labels can be set with the set format command or with the set tics format
or individual set faxisgtics format commands.
Syntax:
set format {<axes>} {"<format-string>"}
set format {<axes>} {’<format-string>’}
show format
where <axes> is either x, y, xy, x2, y2, z, cb or nothing (which applies the format to all axes). The
following two commands are equivalent:
set format y "%.2f"
set ytics format "%.2f"
The length of the string is restricted to 100 characters. The default format is "% g", but other formats such
as "%.2f" or "%3.0em" are often desirable. The format "$%g$" is often desirable for LaTeX. If no format
string is given, the format will be returned to the default. If the empty string "" is given, tics will have no
labels, although the tic mark will still be plotted. To eliminate the tic marks, use unset xtics or set tics
scale 0.
Newline (nn) and enhanced text markup is accepted in the format string. Use double-quotes rather than
single-quotes in this case. See also syntax (p. 41). Characters not preceded by "%" are printed verbatim.
Thus you can include spaces and labels in your format string, such as "%g m", which will put " m" after
each number. If you want "%" itself, double it: "%g %%".
See also set xtics (p.163) for more information about tic labels, and set decimalsign (p.109) for how
to use non-default decimal separators in numbers printed this way. See also
electron demo (electron.dem).
Gprintf
The string function gprintf("format",x) uses gnuplot’s own format speciers, as do the gnuplot commands
set format, set timestamp, and others. These format speciers are not the same as those used by the
standard C-language routine sprintf(). gprintf() accepts only a single variable to be formatted. Gnuplot
also provides an sprintf("format",x1,x2,...) routine if you prefer. For a list of gnuplot’s format options, see
format speciers (p.114).
Format speciers
The acceptable formats (if not in time/date mode) are:
Library application class:C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C# Guide C#.NET Demo Code: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. This C#
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; VB.NET: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page.
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
115
Tic-mark label numerical format speciers
Format
Explanation
%f
oating point notation
%e or %E exponential notation; an "e" or "E" before the power
%g or %G the shorter of %e (or %E) and %f
%x or %X hex
%o or %O octal
%t
mantissa to base 10
%l
mantissa to base of current logscale
%s
mantissa to base of current logscale; scientic power
%T
power to base 10
%L
power to base of current logscale
%S
scientic power
%c
character replacement for scientic power
%b
mantissa of ISO/IEC 80000 notation (ki, Mi, Gi, Ti, Pi, Ei, Zi, Yi)
%B
prex of ISO/IEC 80000 notation (ki, Mi, Gi, Ti, Pi, Ei, Zi, Yi)
%P
multiple of pi
A’scientic’ power is one such that the exponent is a multiple of three. Character replacement of scientic
powers ("%c") has been implemented for powers in the range -18 to +18. For numbers outside of this range
the format reverts to exponential.
Other acceptable modiers (which come after the "%" but before the format specier) are "-", which left-
justies the number; "+", which forces all numbers to be explicitly signed; " " (a space), which makes
positive numbers have a space in front of them where negative numbers have "-"; "#", which places a
decimal point after  oats that have only zeroes following the decimal point; a positive integer, which denes
the eld width; "0" (the digit, not the letter) immediately preceding the eld width, which indicates that
leading zeroes are to be used instead of leading blanks; and a decimal point followed by a non-negative
integer, which denes the precision (the minimum number of digits of an integer, or the number of digits
following the decimal point of a  oat).
Some systems may not support all of these modiers but may also support others; in case of doubt, check
the appropriate documentation and then experiment.
Examples:
set format y "%t"; set ytics (5,10)
# "5.0" and "1.0"
set format y "%s"; set ytics (500,1000)
# "500" and "1.0"
set format y "%+-12.3f"; set ytics(12345)
# "+12345.000 "
set format y "%.2t*10^%+03T"; set ytic(12345)# "1.23*10^+04"
set format y "%s*10^{%S}"; set ytic(12345)
# "12.345*10^{3}"
set format y "%s %cg"; set ytic(12345)
# "12.345 kg"
set format y "%.0P pi"; set ytic(6.283185)
# "2 pi"
set format y "%.0f%%"; set ytic(50)
# "50%"
set log y 2; set format y ’%l’; set ytics (1,2,3)
#displays "1.0", "1.0" and "1.5" (since 3 is 1.5 * 2^1)
There are some problem cases that arise when numbers like 9.999 are printed with a format that requires
both rounding and a power.
If the data type for the axis is time/date, the format string must contain valid codes for the ’strftime’
function (outside of gnuplot, type "man strftime"). See set timefmt (p. 156) for a list of the allowed
input format codes.
Time/date speciers
In time/date mode, the acceptable formats are:
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and paste PDF file page.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and paste PDF file page.
www.rasteredge.com
116
gnuplot 4.6
Tic-mark label Date/Time Format Speciers
Format
Explanation
%a
abbreviated name of day of the week
%A
full name of day of the week
%b or %h abbreviated name of the month
%B
full name of the month
%d
day of the month, 01{31
%D
shorthand for "%m/%d/%y" (only output)
%F
shorthand for "%Y-%m-%d" (only output)
%k
hour, 0{23 (one or two digits)
%H
hour, 00{23 (always two digits)
%l
hour, 1{12 (one or two digits)
%I
hour, 01{12 (always two digits)
%j
day of the year, 1{366
%m
month, 01{12
%M
minute, 0{60
%p
"am" or "pm"
%r
shorthand for "%I:%M:%S %p" (only output)
%R
shorthand for %H:%M" (only output)
%S
second, integer 0{60 on output, (double) on input
%s
number of seconds since start of year 2000
%T
shorthand for "%H:%M:%S" (only output)
%U
week of the year (week starts on Sunday)
%w
day of the week, 0{6 (Sunday = 0)
%W
week of the year (week starts on Monday)
%y
year, 0-99 in range 1969-2068
%Y
year, 4-digit
Except for the non-numerical formats, these may be preceded by a "0" ("zero", not "oh") to pad the eld
length with leading zeroes, and a positive digit, to dene the minimum eld width (which will be overridden
if the specied width is not large enough to contain the number). The %S format also accepts a precision
specier so that fractional seconds can be written. There is a 24-character limit to the length of the printed
text; longer strings will be truncated.
Examples:
Suppose the text is "76/12/25 23:11:11". Then
set format x
# defaults to "12/25/76" \n "23:11"
set format x "%A, %d %b %Y" # "Saturday, 25 Dec 1976"
set format x "%r %D"
# "11:11:11 pm 12/25/76"
Suppose the text is "98/07/06 05:04:03.123456". Then
set format x "%1y/%2m/%3d %01H:%02M:%06.3S" # "98/ 7/ 6 5:04:03.123"
Function style
This form of the command is deprecated. Please see set style function (p. 151).
Functions
The show functions command lists all user-dened functions and their denitions.
Syntax:
show functions
For information about the denition and usage of functions in gnuplot, please see expressions (p. 25).
See also
gnuplot 4.6
117
splines as user defined functions (spline.dem)
and
use of functions and complex variables for airfoils (airfoil.dem).
Grid
The set grid command allows grid lines to be drawn on the plot.
Syntax:
set grid {{no}{m}xtics} {{no}{m}ytics} {{no}{m}ztics}
{{no}{m}x2tics} {{no}{m}y2tics}
{{no}{m}cbtics}
{polar {<angle>}}
{layerdefault | front | back}
{ {linestyle <major_linestyle>}
| {linetype | lt <major_linetype>}
{linewidth | lw <major_linewidth>}
{ , {linestyle | ls <minor_linestyle>}
| {linetype | lt <minor_linetype>}
{linewidth | lw <minor_linewidth>} } }
unset grid
show grid
The grid can be enabled and disabled for the major and/or minor tic marks on any axis, and the linetype
and linewidth can be specied for major and minor grid lines, also via a predened linestyle, as far as the
active terminal driver supports this.
Additionally, a polar grid can be selected for 2D plots | circles are drawn to intersect the selected tics, and
radial lines are drawn at denable intervals. (The interval is given in degrees or radians, depending on the
set angles setting.) Note that a polar grid is no longer automatically generated in polar mode.
The pertinent tics must be enabled before set grid can draw them; gnuplot will quietly ignore instructions
to draw grid lines at non-existent tics, but they will appear if the tics are subsequently enabled.
If no linetype is specied for the minor gridlines, the same linetype as the major gridlines is used. The
default polar angle is 30 degrees.
If front is given, the grid is drawn on topof the graphed data. If back is given, the grid is drawn underneath
the graphed data. Using front will prevent the grid from being obscured by dense data. The default setup,
layerdefault, is equivalent to back for 2D plots. In 3D plots the default is to split up the grid and the
graph box into two layers: one behind, the other in front of the plotted data and functions. Since hidden3d
mode does its own sorting, it ignores all grid drawing order options and passes the grid lines through the
hidden line removal machinery instead. These options actually aect not only the grid, but also the lines
output by set border and the various ticmarks (see set xtics (p.163)).
Zgrid lines are drawn on the bottom of the plot. This looks better if a partial box is drawn around the plot
|see set border (p. 101).
Hidden3d
The set hidden3d command enables hidden line removal for surface plotting (see splot (p. 169)). Some
optional features of the underlying algorithm can also be controlled using this command.
Syntax:
set hidden3d {defaults} |
{ {front|back}
{{offset <offset>} | {nooffset}}
{trianglepattern <bitpattern>}
{{undefined <level>} | {noundefined}}
{{no}altdiagonal}
118
gnuplot 4.6
{{no}bentover} }
unset hidden3d
show hidden3d
In contrast to the usual display in gnuplot, hidden line removal actually treats the given function or data
grids as real surfaces that can’t be seen through, so plot elements behind the surface will be hidden by it.
For this to work, the surface needs to have ’grid structure’ (see splot datale (p.170) about this), and it
has to be drawn with lines or with linespoints.
When hidden3d is set, both the hidden portion of the surface and possibly its contours drawn on the base
(see set contour (p. 106)) as well as the grid will be hidden. Each surface has its hidden parts removed
with respect to itself and to other surfaces, if more than one surface is plotted. Contours drawn on the
surface (set contour surface) don’t work.
Labels and arrows are always visible and are unaected. The key box is never hidden by the surface. As of
gnuplot version 4.6, hidden3d also aects 3D plotting styles points, labels, vectors, and impulses even if
no surface is present in the graph. Individual plots within the graph may be explicitly excluded from this
processing by appending the extra option nohidden3d to the with specier.
Hidden3d does not aect solid surfaces drawn using the pm3d mode. To achieve a similar eect purely
for pm3d surfaces, use instead set pm3d depthorder. To mix pm3d surfaces with normal hidden3d
processing, use the option set hidden3d front to force all elements included in hidden3d processing to be
drawn after any remaining plot elements. Then draw the surface twice, once with lines lt -2 and a second
time with pm3d. The rst instance will include the surface during calculation of occluded elements but
will not draw the surface itself.
Functions are evaluated at isoline intersections. The algorithm interpolates linearly between function points
or data points when determining the visible line segments. This means that the appearance of a function
may be dierent when plotted with hidden3d than when plotted with nohidden3d because in the latter
case functions are evaluated at each sample. Please see set samples (p.146) and set isosamples (p.119)
for discussion of the dierence.
The algorithm used to remove the hidden parts of the surfaces has some additional features controllable by
this command. Specifying defaults will set them all to their default settings, as detailed below. If defaults
is not given, only explicitly specied options will be in uenced: all others will keep their previous values, so
you can turn on/o hidden line removal via set fnoghidden3d, without modifying the set of options you
chose.
The rst option, oset, in uences the linetype used for lines on the ’back’ side. Normally, they are drawn
in a linetype one index number higher than the one used for the front, to make the two sides of the surface
distinguishable. You can specify a dierent linetype oset to addinstead of the default 1, by oset <oset>.
Option nooset stands for oset 0, making the two sides of the surface use the same linetype.
Next comes the option trianglepattern <bitpattern>. <bitpattern> must be a number between 0 and
7, interpreted as a bit pattern. Each bit determines the visibility of one edge of the triangles each surface
is split up into. Bit 0 is for the ’horizontal’ edges of the grid, Bit 1 for the ’vertical’ ones, and Bit 2 for
the diagonals that split each cell of the original grid into two triangles. The default pattern is 3, making all
horizontal and vertical lines visible, but not the diagonals. You may want to choose 7 to see those diagonals
as well.
The undened <level> option lets you decide what the algorithm is to do with data points that are
undened (missing data, or undened function values), or exceed the given x-, y- or z-ranges. Such points
can either be plotted nevertheless, or taken out of the input data set. All surface elements touching a point
that is taken out will be taken out as well, thus creating a hole in the surface. If <level> = 3, equivalent to
option noundened, nopoints will be thrown away at all. This may produce all kinds of problems elsewhere,
so you should avoid this. <level> = 2 will throw away undened points, but keep the out-of-range ones.
<level> = 1, the default, will get rid of out-of-range points as well.
By specifying noaltdiagonal, you can override the default handling of a special case can occur if undened
is active (i.e. <level> is not 3). Each cell of the grid-structured input surface will be divided in two triangles
along one of its diagonals. Normally, all these diagonals have the same orientation relative to the grid. If
exactly one of the four cell corners is excluded by the undened handler, and this is on the usual diagonal,
both triangles will be excluded. However if the default setting of altdiagonal is active, the other diagonal
gnuplot 4.6
119
will be chosen for this cell instead, minimizing the size of the hole in the surface.
The bentover option controls what happens to another special case, this time in conjunction with the
trianglepattern. For rather crumply surfaces, it can happen that the two triangles a surface cell is divided
into are seen from opposite sides (i.e. the original quadrangle is ’bent over’), as illustrated in the following
ASCII art:
C----B
original quadrangle: A--B
displayed quadrangle:
|\
|
("set view 0,0")
| /|
("set view 75,75" perhaps) | \ |
|/ |
| \ |
C--D
|
\|
A
D
If the diagonal edges of the surface cells aren’t generally made visible by bit 2 of the <bitpattern> there,
the edge CB above wouldn’t be drawn at all, normally, making the resulting display hard to understand.
Therefore, the default option of bentover will turn it visible in this case. If you don’t want that, you may
choose nobentover instead. See also
hidden line removal demo (hidden.dem)
and
complex hidden line demo (singulr.dem).
Historysize
Note: the command set historysize is only available when gnuplot has been congured to use the GNU
readline library.
Syntax:
set historysize <int>
unset historysize
When leaving gnuplot, the value of historysize is used for truncating the history to at most that much lines.
The default is 500. unset historysize will disable history truncation and thus allow an innite number of
lines to be written to the history le.
Isosamples
The isoline density (grid) for plotting functions as surfaces may be changed by the set isosamples command.
Syntax:
set isosamples <iso_1> {,<iso_2>}
show isosamples
Each function surface plot will have <iso
1> iso-u lines and <iso
2> iso-v lines. If you only specify <iso
1>,
<iso
2> will be set to the same value as <iso
1>. By default, sampling is set to 10 isolines per u or v axis.
Ahigher sampling rate will produce more accurate plots, but will take longer. These parameters have no
eect on data le plotting.
An isoline is a curve parameterized by one of the surface parameters while the other surface parameter is
xed. Isolines provide a simple means to display a surface. By xing the u parameter of surface s(u,v), the
iso-u lines of the form c(v) = s(u0,v) are produced, and by xing the v parameter, the iso-v lines of the form
c(u) = s(u,v0) are produced.
When a function surface plot is being done without the removal of hidden lines, set samples controls the
number of points sampled along each isoline; see set samples (p.146) and set hidden3d (p. 117). The
contour algorithm assumes that a function sample occurs at each isoline intersection, so change in samples
as well as isosamples may be desired when changing the resolution of a function surface/contour.
120
gnuplot 4.6
Key
The set key command enables a key (or legend) describing plots on a plot.
The contents of the key, i.e., the names given to each plotted data set and function and samples of the
lines and/or symbols used to represent them, are determined by the title and with options of the fsgplot
command. Please see plot title (p. 91) and plot with (p.91) for more information.
Syntax:
set key {on|off} {default}
{{inside | outside} | {lmargin | rmargin | tmargin | bmargin}
| {at <position>}}
{left | right | center} {top | bottom | center}
{vertical | horizontal} {Left | Right}
{{no}opaque}
{{no}reverse} {{no}invert}
{samplen <sample_length>} {spacing <vertical_spacing>}
{width <width_increment>}
{height <height_increment>}
{{no}autotitle {columnheader}}
{title "<text>"} {{no}enhanced}
{font "<face>,<size>"} {textcolor <colorspec>}
{{no}box { {linestyle | ls <line_style>}
| {linetype | lt <line_type>}
{linewidth | lw <line_width>}}}
{maxcols {<max no. of columns> | auto}}
{maxrows {<max no. of rows> | auto}}
unset key
show key
The key contains a title and a sample (line, point, box) for each plot in the graph. The key may be turned
o by requesting set key o or unset key. Individual key entries may be turned o by using the notitle
keyword in the corresponding plot command.
Elements within the key are stacked according to vertical or horizontal. In the case of vertical, the key
occupies as few columns as possible. That is, elements are aligned in a column until running out of vertical
space at which point a new column is started. The vertical space may be limited using ’maxrows’. In the
case of horizontal, the key occupies as few rows as possible. The horizontal space may be limited using
’maxcols’.
By default the key is placed in the upper right inside corner of the graph. The keywords left, right, top,
bottom, center, inside, outside, lmargin, rmargin, tmargin, bmargin (, above, over, below and
under) may be used to automatically place the key in other positions of the graph. Also an at <position>
may be givento indicate precisely where the plot should be placed. In this case, the keywords left, right, top,
bottom and center serve an analogous purpose for alignment. For more information, see key placement
(p. 121).
Justication of the plot titles within the key is controlled by Left or Right (default). The text and sample
can be reversed (reverse) and a box can be drawn around the key (box f...g) in a specied linetype and
linewidth, or a user-dened linestyle.
By default the key is built up one plot at a time. That is, the key symbol and title are drawn at the same
time as the corresponding plot. That means newer plots may sometimes place elements on top of the key.
set key opaque causes the key to be generated after all the plots. In this case the key area is lled with
background color and then the key symbols and titles are written. Therefore the key itself may obscure
portions of some plot elements. The default can be restored by set key noopaque.
By default the rst plot label is at the top of the key and successive labels are entered below it. The invert
option causes the rst label to be placed at the bottom of the key, with successive labels entered above it.
This option is useful to force the vertical ordering of labels in the key to match the order of box types in a
stacked histogram.
The <height
increment> is a number of character heights to be added to or subtracted from the height of
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested