…………………………….............................................................................................. 
WE ARE SUPPORTED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF ESSEX, THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL 
RESEARCH COUNCIL, AND THE JOINT INFORMATION SYSTEMS COMMITTEE 
DOCUMENTATION INGEST PROCESSING 
PROCEDURES 
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 
International Licence. To view a copy of this licence, visit 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ 
PUBLIC 
02 NOVEMBER 2015 
Version: 08.00 
………………………......... 
+44 (0)1206 872001 
sharonb@essex.ac.uk 
www.data-archive.ac.uk 
………………………......... 
UK DATA ARCHIVE 
UNIVERSITY OF ESSEX 
WIVENHOE PARK 
COLCHESTER 
ESSEX, CO4 3SQ 
………………………………………………………………………………………………… 
Pdf conversion to powerpoint - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
how to convert pdf into powerpoint on; converting pdf to powerpoint slides
Pdf conversion to powerpoint - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
pdf into powerpoint; pdf to ppt converter online
CD078-DocumentationIngestProcessingProcedures_08_00w.doc 
Page 2 of 14 
Contents 
1.
Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 3
2.
Documentation formats .................................................................................................................... 3
3.
The PDF/A standard .......................................................................................................................... 3
4.
PDF/A and UK Data Archive data documentation ................................................................. 4
5.
Creating PDF/A compliant files in Word .................................................................................... 4
5.1.
Reading the files in Acrobat and checking PDF/A compliance .............................................. 4
6.
Excel documentation ......................................................................................................................... 5
6.1.
Creating PDF documents from MS Excel ................................................................................... 5
7.
Creating PDF documents from text files (RTF and plain text) ......................................... 6
8.
Creating PDF documents from other word-processing software .................................... 6
9.
Paper (hard copy) documentation ............................................................................................... 6
9.1.
Creating Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) files from hard copy (paper) documentation
6
10.
Creating PDF documents from TIFFS and other image files ......................................... 6
10.1.
Optical Character Recognition (OCR) ......................................................................................... 6
11.
Using the Adobe Acrobat ‘TouchUp Text’ Tool ................................................................... 7
12.
Production standards for PDF study documentation ....................................................... 7
12.1.
Filenames ......................................................................................................................................... 7
12.2.
Document grouping ....................................................................................................................... 7
12.3.
General PDF editing operations ................................................................................................... 7
12.4.
Amalgamating files ........................................................................................................................ 7
12.5.
Cropping ........................................................................................................................................... 8
12.6.
Deleting/rotating pages ................................................................................................................ 8
12.7.
Moving pages .................................................................................................................................. 8
12.8.
Adding notes to PDF files ............................................................................................................. 8
13.
Enabling easy Nesstar text entry ............................................................................................. 8
14.
Bookmarking .................................................................................................................................... 8
14.1.
Setting bookmarks to ‘Fit Page’ magnification ........................................................................ 9
14.2.
Hierarchical bookmark structures ............................................................................................... 9
14.3.
Setting the final PDF document properties .............................................................................. 9
15.
Adding headers to documentation (branding) ................................................................. 10
15.1.
Background ................................................................................................................................... 10
15.2.
Exceptions ...................................................................................................................................... 10
15.3.
Adding headers to Word documents ......................................................................................... 11
15.4.
Adding headers to Adobe PDF documents ............................................................................... 11
15.5.
Adding headers to other documentation formats ................................................................. 12
16.
Special Licence Data Dictionary documentation ............................................................. 13
17.
Creating index files ...................................................................................................................... 14
18.
Administrative metadata: Read and Note files ................................................................ 14
Scope 
What is in this guide? 
This guide covers standards and procedures for the preparation and preservation of documentation for UK 
Data Archive studies.  
What is not covered by this guide? 
Data processing – see separate documents Quantitative Data Ingest Processing Procedures [CD081], Data 
Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
area. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file. The perfect conversion tool.
chart from pdf to powerpoint; export pdf to powerpoint
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for PowerPoint Conversions. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
convert pdf to editable powerpoint online; convert pdf to ppt online without email
CD078-DocumentationIngestProcessingProcedures_08_00w.doc 
Page 3 of 14 
Ingest Processing Quick Reference [CD080] and Qualitative Data Ingest Processing Procedures [CD093] 
 Administrative metadata (‘Read’ and ‘Note’ files) that provide extra information for users and 
describe the ingest processing history of each study. 
 Conversion of study-related email correspondence to Adobe PDF format. 
It should be noted that some of the documents referenced within the text below are not publicly available, but 
external readers may of course contact the Archive in case of query. 
1. Introduction 
Unlike data files, there are no ‘set’ ingest processing standards for documentation files. However, an ingest 
standard (A*, A, B or C) is allocated to denote the nature of the documentation materials deposited as part of 
a study/data collection (see separate document Data Ingest Processing Standards for further details). 
However, value is added to study documentation through the creation of user guides and other 
documentation, and the addition of bookmarks to aid navigation. 
2. Documentation formats 
The primary documentation dissemination format created at the Archive is Adobe Portable Document Format 
(PDF). As with data formats, successful documentation archiving requires a balance between effective 
archival preservation and the provision of documentation in popular and well-supported software formats to 
enable easy secondary use. While Adobe PDF is not an ideal archival format (though the PDF/A standard is 
developing – see section 2.1 below), Adobe Reader software is free and easily available on the web (see 
www.adobe.com ), and most data users will be able to access it.  
Adobe PDF format also has advantages in that documents are relatively difficult to edit, and so have some 
inherent protection against inadvertent change by the user. 
Most documentation is currently deposited in MS Office formats, i.e. Word, Rich Text Format (RTF) or Excel. 
These formats are relatively easy to convert to PDF. 
3. The PDF/A standard 
Where possible, it is desirable to ensure that study folder materials are converted to PDF/A format. The 
Archive is moving towards using the PDF/A standard for all study documentation. 
PDF/A is a file format for the archiving of electronic documents, based on Adobe’s PDF Reference Version 
1.4. It is defined by ISO standard 19005-1:2005, published in 2005, and is implemented within Adobe 
Acrobat versions 5 onwards. The standard identifies a ‘profile’ for electronic documents that ensures they 
can be reproduced in exactly the same format in the future. Therefore, it requires PDF/A documents to be 
fully self-contained. All metadata and other information necessary to display the document in the same 
format each time is embedded in the file. This includes (but is not limited to) all content (text, raster images 
and vector graphics), fonts, and colour information. A PDF/A standard document cannot be reliant on 
externally-sourced information, e.g. hyperlinks. Further information on settings and the PDF/A standard is 
available at 
http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/formats/fdd/fdd000125.shtml
The ISO standard defines two levels of PDF/A compliance for PDF files: 
1. PDF/A-1a (level A compliance) 
2. PDF/A-1b (level B compliance) 
PDF/A-1b is the basic level of compliance, and aims at ensuring reliable reproduction of the document. 
Documents converted to PDF/A-1b are acceptable for archiving. PDF/A-1a is a higher level of compliance, 
which is harder to attain, and includes PDF/A-1b compliance plus document structure (‘tagging’), aiming to 
ensure that document content is also fully searchable. Microsoft Word versions 2010 onwards enable easier 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET is a professional .NET PDF solution that provides complete and advanced PDF document processing features.
embed pdf into powerpoint; online pdf converter to powerpoint
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to TIFF in C#.NET
Supported. Load, Save Document. Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to
convert pdf to powerpoint with; add pdf to powerpoint slide
CD078-DocumentationIngestProcessingProcedures_08_00w.doc 
Page 4 of 14 
conversion to PDF/A-1a, which should be used where possible for Archive documentation. However, due to 
the diverse nature of documents deposited (which often includes PDF documents that are not PDF/A 
compatible, the standard is not currently rigidly enforced, but used wherever possible.  
4. PDF/A and UK Data Archive data documentation 
Conversion of born-digital UK Data Archive study documentation to PDF/A-1b is relatively straightforward 
using Microsoft Word 2010 and Adobe Acrobat version 9, but it is not infallible. It is also worth considering at 
this stage that the Archive’s holdings contain many older studies that include PDF documents scanned from 
paper, which are unlikely to become compliant to either PDF/A level. 
5. Creating PDF/A compliant files in Word 
Open the relevant document in Word (2010 and above). Convert it as follows: 
 Select the ‘File’ menu ( top left-hand tab), then the ‘Save and Send’ option from the left-hand side 
section of the screen. 
 Select ‘Create XPS/PDF document’ from the middle section. 
 Click on the ‘Create XPS/PDF’ button in the right hand section. The ‘Publish’ window will appear – 
check the filename and location is correct for the PDF file and then click on the ‘Options’ button on 
the bottom right. 
From the top down, set the following options (they only need to be set once, and should remain selected for 
future documents): 
 Under ‘Page Range’ check that the page selection etc. is correct for the file to be created. 
 Under ‘Publish what’, select ‘Document’ (not ‘Document including markup’) 
 Under ‘Include non-printing information’, select ‘Create bookmarks’ with the ‘Using Headings’ option. 
(Note that if there are no headings in the document you’re using  this option will not be available – try 
again with a multi-page document with headings) and ensure that the ‘Document structure tags for 
accessibility’ is ticked. 
 Under ‘PDF options’, select ‘ISO 19005-1 compliant PDF/A’. 
When ready, click ‘OK’ and then the ‘Publish’ button in the Publish window.  
5.1. Reading the files in Acrobat and checking PDF/A compliance 
When the document opens in Adobe Acrobat 9 and above, a header may appear stating ‘You are viewing 
this document in PDF/A mode’.  If so, this setting needs to be changed, otherwise no edits or amendments 
can be made to the file. To change the settings (they only need to be set once, and should remain selected 
for future documents): 
 Go to the Edit tab on the top menu  
 Choose ‘Preferences’ (bottom of the menu list).  
 Highlight ‘Documents’ in the left-hand section and under ‘PDF/A View Mode’ select ‘Never’ from the 
drop-down list instead of the ‘Only for PDF/A documents’ that is set by default. Click OK to save.  
To check PDF/A compliance: 
 Go to the Advanced tab on the top menu Preflight.  
 In the Preflight window, select ‘Verify compliance with PDF/A1-a’ from the list.  
 Click on the ‘Analyze’ button. Usually, it should return ‘No problems found’, meaning that the file is 
PDF/A1-a compliant. If problems are listed, try going back and selecting the ‘Analyze and Fix’ button 
instead. 
Files created from electronic documents via Word 2010 will usually be PDF/A1-a  compliant, but there are 
exceptions. If PDF/A1-a compliance fails, try checking for PDF/A1-b compliance instead, using the same 
method but choosing ‘Verify compliance with PDF/A1-b’ instead, though this may fail too. In case of query, or 
if attempts to produce PDF/A-compliant documents consistently fail, please consult the Data Curation 
Manager.  
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, like PPTXDocument and PPTXPage. PowerPoint Conversion. XDoc.PowerPoint SDK for .NET empowers C# developers
changing pdf to powerpoint; adding pdf to powerpoint
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
PowerPoint to PDF Conversion Overview. RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint empowers your C#.NET application with advanced PowerPoint to PDF conversion functionality.
changing pdf to powerpoint file; convert pdf to powerpoint slide
CD078-DocumentationIngestProcessingProcedures_08_00w.doc 
Page 5 of 14 
6. Excel documentation  
Documentation may also be deposited in MS Excel format. The most common examples include variable 
lists and codebooks and occasionally questionnaires.  
Excel documentation should always be checked carefully to ensure that it contains only material that can be 
classed as documentation and made available via the Discover catalogue record webpage. All spreadsheets 
and worksheets within the file should be checked accordingly, including linked data used to create graphs, 
etc. If data are found in the file, the depositor should be contacted and clarification sought as to whether the 
data element should be removed from the file or it should be treated as data and made available subject to 
authentication along with the rest of the data files. 
If the Excel file includes text or set formatting, or makes use of a ‘freeze pane’ scrolling facility, it may not be 
easy to create successful PDF conversions. In this case, the document may be left in Excel format, and a 
suitable note added to the Note file. If the file to remain in Excel format is part of the documentation for 
secondary users, a copy should be archived under an SN/excel/ directory.  The original document should 
also be archived under /noissue/. 
6.1. Creating PDF documents from MS Excel 
Microsoft Excel 2010 and earlier files can also be converted to PDF files in a similar fashion to Word 2010 
documents 
Open the relevant document in Excel 2010. Convert it as follows: 
 Select the ‘File’ menu (top left-hand tab), then the ‘Save and Send’ option from the left-hand side 
section of the screen. 
 Select ‘Create XPS/PDF document’ from the middle section. 
 Click on the ‘Create XPS/PDF’ button in the right hand section. The ‘Publish’ window will appear – 
check the filename and location is correct for the PDF file and then click on the ‘Options’ button on 
the bottom right. 
From the top down, set the following options (they should remain selected for future documents): 
 Under ‘Page Range’ check that the page selection etc. is correct for the file to be created (usually 
‘All’). 
 Under ‘Publish what’, ‘Active sheet’ will be selected. (This can be changed to ‘Entire workbook’, but 
this may not be appropriate for the file to be converted – conversion by sheet may be a better option 
- this can be decided on a case-by-case basis) 
 Under ‘Include non-printing information’, ensure ‘Document structure tags for accessibility’ is ticked. 
 Under ‘PDF options’, select ‘ISO 19005-1 compliant PDF/A’. 
When ready, click ‘OK’ and then the ‘Publish’ button in the Publish window.  
However, there are some points to remember (and some pitfalls to be avoided):  
 It is very important to make sure all columns are set wide enough in the Excel file to display all the 
text within them prior to PDF conversion. If this is not done, the PDF file will display the cells with 
truncated text. 
 Large Excel spreadsheets may also cause problems in Acrobat due to the limitations of the printable 
area, so such conversions should be checked very carefully. Reduction to a percentage of page size 
is possible in Excel via the Print dialog box in order to make the sheet display on one page, but for 
very large Excel sheets this may render the resulting PDF to such a small size it may need a great 
deal of magnification to be legible. 
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
Conversion of MS Office to PDF. This guide give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file
how to change pdf to ppt on; convert pdf file into ppt
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF - PDF Conversion & Rendering SDK for C#.NET. A best C# PDF converter control for adobe PDF document conversion in Visual Studio .NET applications.
drag and drop pdf into powerpoint; pdf conversion to powerpoint
CD078-DocumentationIngestProcessingProcedures_08_00w.doc 
Page 6 of 14 
7. Creating PDF documents from text files (RTF and plain text) 
Text files (both plain text or RTF) can easily be converted to PDF via MS Word 2010. Any format editing of 
the file should be carried out in MS Word prior to PDF conversion. It should be possible to ensure PDF/A 
compliance via MS Word (see section 2.3.2 above). 
8. Creating PDF documents from other word-processing 
software 
Other proprietary formats may occasionally be deposited at the UK Data Archive (MS Works, WordPerfect, 
Claris Works, Open Office, etc.). Such files may be imported directly into MS Word and then converted to 
PDF (some editing may be required), or first exported from their proprietary format as RTF and then imported 
into Word for further conversion.  
9. Paper (hard copy) documentation  
The deposit of hard copy documentation at the Archive is becoming increasingly rare, but sometimes still 
occurs, meaning that the paper copy must be scanned to create electronic documentation for preservation 
and dissemination. 
9.1. Creating Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) files from hard copy 
(paper) documentation 
Before scanning, check with the depositor (if not already done) whether the document is available in 
electronic format. 
If the hard copy documentation is double-sided, it should for ease be photocopied to single-sided format 
before scanning. Material that is primarily text should normally be scanned at 300dpi resolution, though 
higher resolution may be used where required. All material should be scanned into TIFF format, which is a 
flexible and adaptable format for handling images and data within a single file. Older studies in the Archive’s 
collection will have one TIFF file for each documentation page; this is preferable for archival standards in 
case of future file corruption, and should be the norm when processing hard copy documentation, but more 
recent studies may have many pages in one TIFF file. The TIFF files will be further converted to PDF, but the 
original TIFF files must also be archived on the Archive preservation system. Instructions on how to use the 
current Archive document scanner are available in the Appendix to this document. 
Note: All original TIFF files for each study processed must be preserved on the Archive’s preservation 
system. To do so, all TIFF files produced from scanning hard copy documentation should be placed directly 
into a directory named after the four-digit Archive study number. 
10. Creating PDF documents from TIFFS and other image files 
Scanned images from paper documentation (TIFFs) and other image files supplied by the depositor (in any 
common ingest format, such as .jpg) are easily imported into PDF, using the ‘File’ drop-down menu and 
selecting ‘Create PDF’ (a multiple files version is available). If any image editing needs to be carried out to 
enhance legibility, it is generally easier to edit the TIFF images in a graphics program such as Paint Shop 
Pro or Adobe Photoshop, before conversion to PDF. If so, the editing work should be carried out on a copy of 
the TIFF file to avoid problems.  
10.1. Optical Character Recognition (OCR) 
All scanned hard copy material should be subjected to OCR, except where the text content is minimal (i.e. 
not scans of pictures or photographs, etc.). Such TIFFs can simply be opened into Acrobat, saved as a PDF 
file and then inserted into any PDF document (see below for details of merging files and moving pages). 
OCR may be carried out in Adobe Acrobat (depending on the version used).  If the OCR option is available, 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document. Provide Free Demo Code for PDF Conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint in C# Program.
and paste pdf into powerpoint; pdf to powerpoint converter online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
resolution, bit depth, scaling, etc. Implement Conversion from PowerPoint to PDF in VB.NET, Converting PowerPoint document to PDF
convert pdf into powerpoint; how to convert pdf to powerpoint slides
CD078-DocumentationIngestProcessingProcedures_08_00w.doc 
Page 7 of 14 
select ‘Recognize Text using OCR’  and ‘Start’ from the ‘Document’ menu in Acrobat, and  specify the 
following preferences before running the OCR: 
 Primary OCR language: English (UK) 
 PDF Output Style: Searchable image (exact) 
 Downsample: Low (300dpi) 
OCR should also be carried out on born-digital documentation for studies destined for Nesstar (see section 
13 below). 
11. Using the Adobe Acrobat ‘TouchUp Text’ Tool 
The ‘TouchUp Text’ tool in Adobe Acrobat may be useful for limited editing of text once OCR software has 
been run on scanned hard copies. After selecting the icon, place the cursor over the text to be edited. A box 
will appear within which the text can be amended. This tool also allows very limited editing to be carried out, 
such as moving text along on the same line, which may be useful when pagination has gone astray. Extra 
lines of text cannot be added. More extensive editing will need to be done on the original tiff file using 
Photoshop or PaintShop Pro, as noted above.  
12. Production standards for PDF study documentation 
12.1. Filenames  
The Archive has some standards for the naming of PDF and other documentation files, though a degree of 
flexibility is required and practised according to the requirements of the study. The filenames of deposited 
files are usually retained, though this may be decided on a case-by-case basis. The study number is 
normally added as a prefix, though some depositors (such as the Centre for Longitudinal Studies) prefer this 
is not done. All filename changes are recorded in the study Note file, and if the information is also needed by 
users, in the study Read file. 
12.2. Document grouping 
The work of the (now completed) Survey Question Bank project based at the Archive, -highlighted some 
useful groupings for particular types of study documentation, especially for larger studies. All studies are 
individual, and the groupings chosen will depend on the nature of the study documentation, but it may be 
clearer for users to group documents according to type rather than putting them all together in one ‘user 
guide’. For example, questionnaires may be grouped together, and fieldwork documents such as interviewer 
instructions may be grouped together.. 
12.3. General PDF editing operations 
This section covers some of the most common procedures used in the Adobe Acrobat software. 
Note: these instructions are based on Adobe Acrobat 9 Professional, and may differ from other versions of 
the software. See the ‘Help’ guide and documentation in other versions of Adobe Acrobat software for 
alternative specifications and instructions. 
12.4. Amalgamating files 
From the ‘File’ menu in Adobe Acrobat, select ‘Create PDF’ then ‘From multiple files’. This will show an 
interface which can be used to browse, select, and set the order and combination of, multiple PDF files (held 
together in one directory). 
Alternatively, open the current PDF file at the page at which another file is to be inserted, ‘drag’ the desired 
file onto the open PDF file and ‘drop’ it in the main text area (not the bookmark margin). Selecting the 
‘Document’ drop-down menu, ‘Insert Pages’, then choosing the file to insert, will also perform the same 
action. 
CD078-DocumentationIngestProcessingProcedures_08_00w.doc 
Page 8 of 14 
12.5. Cropping 
The cropping tool utility is useful for editing documentation pages scanned from paper hard copies. 
Unwanted marks from document pages, e.g. dark margins or staple marks can be removed. To use the 
cropping tool, select the cropping icon from the toolbar, or ‘Crop Pages’ from the ‘Document’ menu.  Draw a 
box around the area to be kept; anything outside the box will be deleted. 
12.6. Deleting/rotating pages 
Choose ‘Delete Pages’ from the ‘Document’ drop-down menu. A dialogue box will appear as a final prompt 
before the decision is made to delete a page. To rotate misaligned pages, select ‘Rotate Pages’ from the 
‘Document’ drop-down menu. 
12.7. Moving pages 
To move pages around within a PDF document, click on the ‘Pages’ tab at the left-hand side. The images will 
appear in the left-hand section. Images can then be ‘dragged’ as necessary to a different location in the 
document. 
12.8. Adding notes to PDF files 
Notes may be added to PDF documents by selecting ‘Comments’ and then ‘Add Sticky Note’ from the ‘Tools’ 
menu. A note can be added on any page by clicking the mouse and typing in the box that appears. Notes are 
sometimes used to draw users’ attention to anomalies in the documentation, for example filenames and 
formats referenced that differ from those available from the Archive. Ingest processing staff should be aware 
the ‘author’ of the note will appear as the licensed owner of the Adobe Acrobat software, which will often be 
the login name of the staff member. This should be amended to ‘UK Data Archive’ by changing the ‘Author’ 
box entry under the ‘General’ tab in ‘Properties’, which may be accessed by clicking on the ‘Options’ tab 
within the open note.  
13. Enabling easy Nesstar text entry 
Where the study in question is destined for Nesstar, certain operations performed on the Adobe PDF file can 
make question text entry from PDF easier in the Nesstar interface. These include saving the file in the latest 
version of Adobe Acrobat (9.0 or above) and running Optical Character Recognition (OCR) on the file, even 
when it is born digital rather than scanned from hard copy paper format. To OCR a PDF file, go to the 
Document menu and select ‘OCR Text Recognition’ > ‘Recognise text using OCR’ and follow the instructions 
onscreen. 
14. Bookmarking  
All PDF documentation files should be ‘bookmarked’ to aid user navigation, whether they are in the format of 
a single user guide, or multiple volumes. The optimum density of bookmarking is obviously content-specific 
and depends on the length and section division of the document. Do not ‘over-bookmark’, which can be 
distracting for the reader. Any necessary amalgamation of files, or deletion/movement of pages within the 
PDF file should be carried out before bookmarks are added. 
To create a bookmark in Adobe Acrobat, select the ‘Bookmark’ tab, along the left-hand side of the visible 
document screen.  This will open a section at that side, in which the bookmarks will be created. Choose the 
‘Select’ tool icon. The word(s) required on the document page (e.g. a heading) can be highlighted. Once this 
is done, press ‘Ctrl+B’, and the selected text will appear as a bookmark in the Bookmark pane. Alternatively, 
a new bookmark may also be created using the ‘Edit’ drop-down menu and selecting ‘Add Bookmark’. The 
resulting bookmark text may be edited as necessary. However, if a blank bookmark is required for text to be 
typed in, press ‘Ctrl+B’ and an ‘Untitled’ bookmark will appear, which may be edited as necessary.  Insert the 
bookmark text in ‘sentence case’ (upper case initial letters for all nouns, lower case for conjunctions, etc.). If 
numerous bookmarks have been inserted, remember to save the file regularly. Many files are now deposited 
CD078-DocumentationIngestProcessingProcedures_08_00w.doc 
Page 9 of 14 
in PDF format, often with bookmarks already added by the depositor. In many cases, these bookmarks have 
been created by the Adobe ‘Distiller’ plug-in, and may need - editing to conform to Archive standards. If the 
editing required is significant, recreating the bookmarks from scratch may be the easiest option. 
14.1. Setting bookmarks to ‘Fit Page’ magnification 
All bookmarks should be added with the document page set at ‘Fit Page’ magnification, which is the Archive 
standard. Note that if a bookmark is added whilst the page is magnified, that is how the bookmark will be set.  
Bookmarks that open with pages in an assortment of magnifications make for a very unprofessional 
appearance, and should be avoided. Files may arrive from the depositor with bookmarks set like this, in 
which case all bookmarks must be reset to ‘Fit Page’.  Remember to proof-read bookmarks thoroughly: there 
is no facility within Adobe Acrobat to spell-check them. 
14.2. Hierarchical bookmark structures 
For documentation associated with quantitative studies, bookmarks should be ‘nested’ within a hierarchical 
structure. As a general rule, if the document contains a comprehensive contents page, the titles of the 
bookmarks and their hierarchical structure should reflect that. When all bookmarks have been created, the 
hierarchy should be closed leaving just the top bookmark visible (normally ‘User Guide’). However, there are 
some special cases where the depositor’s preference is that the bookmark hierarchy is left extended with 
major section bookmarks visible. 
For documentation associated with qualitative data collections, it is preferred that the bookmarks hierarchy is 
also left extended with major section bookmarks visible. See section 8 below for details. 
Example of a hierarchical bookmark structure 
14.3. Setting the final PDF document properties 
Document properties should be set so that the PDF document opens with the bookmarks panel visible, and 
so that the correct document metadata (now routinely read by internet search engines such as Google) 
settings are present. In addition, if a Document Title is added and the file saved in Acrobat version 9 or later, 
the latest zipdiss12 labelling program will automatically pick up the title to add to the ‘makelbl’ program file 
list. 
To do this, go to the ‘File’ menu and select ‘Document Properties’ and add the following settings: 
Under the ‘Description’ tab, add a suitable document title in the ‘Title’ box, such as ‘General Household 
Survey Questionnaire 2005’. Under ‘Author’, add ‘UK Data Archive’, or if the PDF file has been created by 
the depositor prior to deposit, the original organisation name should be used. Current practice is to leave the 
subject field blank, though this may change as metadata becomes increasingly important in the future. 
CD078-DocumentationIngestProcessingProcedures_08_00w.doc 
Page 10 of 14 
Under the ‘Initial View’ tab, to ensure that the document opens with the correct magnification and that 
bookmarks are displayed, the following items should be checked: 
 Show: ‘Bookmarks and Page’ 
 Page Layout: ‘Single page’ 
 Magnification: ‘Fit Page’ 
 Window options: ‘Centre Window on Screen’. 
For qualitative data collections where a user guide has been created from a combination of files, the 
bookmarks hierarchy should be left extended with major section bookmarks visible. This helps users to see 
at a glance the contents of the user guide, as given in the example from study 6429 below. The header page 
information described section 14.2 below may also be seen in situ here.  
Bookmark hierarchy example (from study 6429) 
15. Adding headers to documentation (branding)  
15.1. Background 
Google and similar web searches now return results that include searchable PDF documents. If a search 
results in a ‘hit’ on a document in the Discover catalogue on the UKDS web site, it may not be obvious to the 
searcher that the document is part of a study held at the UK Data Archive. 
Therefore, where possible, an informative header should be included to ‘brand’ the first page of each PDF 
file as part of the UKDS study documentation. (The principle is similar to the addition of a header to 
qualitative interview transcripts.)  This policy applies whether the documentation consists of one file or 
multiples. Note that the presence of an Archive header does not imply any claim on copyright, which remains 
with the original document copyright holder. It is merely a branding device used to aid web searchers and 
identify a component of the Archive collection. 
15.2. Exceptions 
There are some occasions where branding with suitable headers may not be possible or desirable. 
 Where the depositor has specified particular requirements for documentation, including 
bookmark formats and the retention of file names (see also section 9.2 above) 
 ‘Locked’ (password-protected) PDF files where no editing is possible. Some PDF files may 
have been created with a high level of security, which limits user options. Unless the password to 
‘unlock’ them is available, neither headers nor bookmarks can be added. This may occur when, for 
example, the PDF file has been created on behalf of the depositor by a secondary survey contractor. 
All reasonable efforts should be made to obtain either a Word version of the PDF file, an ‘unlocked’ 
copy of the PDF file, or the password. If this proves fruitless, it should be recorded in the study Note 
and Read files as appropriate that the file was unable to be edited and so it has not been processed 
to the usual Archive standard. 
 The depositor objects to the presence of an Archive header in their documents. Most 
depositors will not mind a discreet header, but if a request to remove it is received, this should of 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested