gnuplot 4.6
121
the key box. This is useful mainly when you are putting a box around the key and want larger borders
around the key entries.
All plotted curves of plots and splots are titled according to the default option autotitles. The automatic
generation of titles can be suppressed by noautotitles; then only those titles explicitly dened by (s)plot
... title ... will be drawn.
The command set key autotitle columnheader causes the rst entry in each column of input data to be
interpreted as a text string and used as a title for the corresponding plot. If the quantity being plotted is a
function of data from several columns, gnuplot may be confused as to which column to draw the title from.
In this case it is necessary to specify the column explicitly in the plot command, e.g.
plot "datafile" using (($2+$3)/$4) title columnhead(3) with lines
An overall title can be put on the key (title "<text>") | see also syntax (p. 41) for the distinction
between text in single- or double-quotes. The key title uses the same justication as do the plot titles.
The defaults for set key are on, right, top, vertical, Right, noreverse, noinvert, samplen 4, spacing
1.25, title "", and nobox. The default <linetype> is the same as that used for the plot borders. Entering
set key default returns the key to its default conguration.
The key is drawn as a sequence of lines, with one plot described on each line. On the right-hand side (or
the left-hand side, if reverse is selected) of each line is a representation that attempts to mimic the way
the curve is plotted. On the other side of each line is the text description (the line title), obtained from the
plot command. The lines are vertically arranged so that an imaginary straight line divides the left- and
right-hand sides of the key. It is the coordinates of the top of this line that are specied with the set key
command. In a plot, only the x and y coordinates are used to specify the line position. For a splot, x, y
and z are all used as a 3D location mapped using the same mapping as the graph itself to form the required
2D screen position of the imaginary line.
When using the TeX or other terminals where formatting information is embedded in the string, gnuplot
can only estimate the correctly exact width of the string for key positioning. If the key is to be positioned
at the left, it may be convenient to use the combination set key left Left reverse.
If splot is being used to draw contours, the contour labels will be listed in the key. If the alignment of these
labels is poor or a dierent number of decimal places is desired, the label format can be specied. See set
clabel (p.103) for details.
Examples:
This places the key at the default location:
set key default
This disables the key:
unset key
This places a key at coordinates 2,3.5,2 in the default (rst) coordinate system:
set key at 2,3.5,2
This places the key below the graph:
set key below
This places the key in the bottom left corner, left-justies the text, gives it a title, and draws a box around
it in linetype 3:
set key left bottom Left title ’Legend’ box 3
Key placement
To understand positioning, the best concept is to think of a region, i.e., inside/outside, or one of the margins.
Along with the region, keywords left/center/right (l/c/r) and top/center/bottom (t/c/b) control where
within the particular region the key should be placed.
When in inside mode, the keywords left (l), right (r), top (t), bottom (b), and center (c) push the key
out toward the plot boundary as illustrated:
Convert pdf back to powerpoint - application software tool:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf back to powerpoint - application software tool:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
122
gnuplot 4.6
t/l
t/c
t/r
c/l
c
c/r
b/l
b/c
b/r
When in outside mode, automatic placement is similar to the above illustration, but with respect to the
view, rather than the graph boundary. That is, a border is moved inward to make room for the key outside of
the plotting area, although this may interfere with other labels and may cause an error on some devices. The
particular plot border that is moved depends upon the position described above and the stacking direction.
For options centered in one of the dimensions, there is no ambiguity about which border to move. For the
corners, when the stack direction is vertical, the left or right border is moved inward appropriately. When
the stack direction is horizontal, the top or bottom border is moved inward appropriately.
The margin syntax allows automatic placement of key regardless of stack direction. When one of the margins
lmargin (lm), rmargin (rm), tmargin (tm), and bmargin (bm) is combined with a single, non-con icting
direction keyword, the following illustrated positions may contain the key:
l/tm c/tm r/tm
t/lm
t/rm
c/lm
c/rm
b/lm
b/rm
l/bm c/bm r/bm
Keywords above and overare synonymous with tmargin. For version compatibility, above or overwithout
an additional l/c/r or stack direction keyword uses center and horizontal. Keywords below and under
are synonymous with bmargin. For compatibility, below or under without an additional l/c/r or stack
direction keyword uses center and horizontal. A further compatibility issue is that outside appearing
without an additional t/b/c or stack direction keyword uses top, right and vertical (i.e., the same as t/rm
above).
The <position> can be a simple x,y,z as in previous versions, but these can be preceded by one of ve
keywords (rst, second, graph, screen, character) which selects the coordinate system in which the
position of the rst sample line is specied. See coordinates (p. 22) for more details. The eect of
left, right, top, bottom, and center when <position> is given is to align the key as though it were text
positioned using the label command, i.e., left means left align with key to the right of <position>, etc.
Key samples
By default, each plot on the graph generates a corresponding entry in the key. This entry contains a plot
title and a sample line/point/box of the same color and ll properties as used in the plot itself. The font
and textcolor properties control the appearance of the individual plot titles that appear in the key. Setting
the textcolor to "variable" causes the text for each key entry to be the same color as the line or ll color for
that plot. This was the default in some earlier versions of gnuplot.
The length of the sample line can be controlled by samplen. The sample length is computed as the sum of
the tic length and <sample
length> times the character width. samplen also aects the positions of point
samples in the key since these are drawn at the midpoint of the sample line, even if the sample line itself is
not drawn.
The vertical spacing between lines is controlled by spacing. The spacing is set equal to the product of the
pointsize, the vertical tic size, and <vertical
spacing>. The program will guarantee that the vertical spacing
is no smaller than the character height.
The <width
increment> is a number of character widths to be added to or subtracted from the length of the
string. This is useful only when you are putting a box around the key and you are using control characters
in the text. gnuplot simply counts the number of characters in the string when computing the box width;
this allows you to correct it.
application software tool:How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Back Color.
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:VB.NET Word: Word Conversion SDK for Changing Word Document into
completed. To convert PDF back to Word document in VB.NET, please refer to this page: VB.NET Imaging - Convert PDF to Word Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
123
Label
Arbitrary labels can be placed on the plot using the set label command.
Syntax:
set label {<tag>} {"<label text>"} {at <position>}
{left | center | right}
{norotate | rotate {by <degrees>}}
{font "<name>{,<size>}"}
{noenhanced}
{front | back}
{textcolor <colorspec>}
{point <pointstyle> | nopoint}
{offset <offset>}
unset label {<tag>}
show label
The <position> is specied by either x,y or x,y,z, and may be preceded by rst, second, graph, screen,
or character to select the coordinate system. See coordinates (p.22) for details.
The tag is an integer that is used to identify the label. If no <tag> is given, the lowest unused tag value is
assigned automatically. The tag can be used to delete or modify a specic label. To change any attribute of
an existing label, use the set label command with the appropriate tag, and specify the parts of the label to
be changed.
The <label text> can be a string constant, a string variable, or a string- valued expression. See strings
(p. 39), sprintf (p. 27), and gprintf (p.114).
By default, the text is placed  ush left against the point x,y,z. To adjust the way the label is positioned with
respect to the point x,y,z, add the justication parameter, which may be left, right or center, indicating
that the point is to be at the left, right or center of the text. Labels outside the plotted boundaries are
permitted but may interfere with axis labels or other text.
If rotate is given, the label is written vertically (if the terminal can do so, of course). If rotate by
<degrees> is given, conforming terminals will try to write the text at the specied angle; non-conforming
terminals will treat this as vertical text.
Font and its size can be chosen explicitly by font "<name>f,<size>g" if the terminal supports font
settings. Otherwise the default font of the terminal will be used.
Normally the enhanced text mode string interpretation, if enabled for the current terminal, is applied to all
text strings including label text. The noenhanced property can be used to exempt a specic label from
the enhanced text mode processing. The can be useful if the label contains underscores, for example. See
enhanced text (p.23).
If front is given, the label is written on top of the graphed data. If back is given (the default), the label is
written underneath the graphed data. Using front will prevent a label from being obscured by dense data.
textcolor <colorspec> changes the color of the label text. <colorspec> can be a linetype, an rgb color, or
apalette mapping. See help for colorspec (p.34) and palette (p. 139). textcolor may be abbreviated
tc.
‘tc default‘ resets the text color to its default state.
‘tc lt <n>‘ sets the text color to that of line type <n>.
‘tc ls <n>‘ sets the text color to that of line style <n>.
‘tc palette z‘ selects a palette color corresponding to the label z position.
‘tc palette cb <val>‘ selects a color corresponding to <val> on the colorbar.
‘tc palette fraction <val>‘, with 0<=val<=1, selects a color corresponding to
the mapping [0:1] to grays/colors of the ‘palette‘.
‘tc rgb "#RRGGBB"‘ selects an arbitrary 24-bit RGB color.
If a <pointstyle> is given, using keywords lt, pt and ps, see style (p. 91), a point with the given style
and color of the given line type is plotted at the label position and the text of the label is displaced slightly.
This option is used by default for placing labels in mouse enhanced terminals. Use nopoint to turn o the
drawing of a point near the label (this is the default).
application software tool:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, is a 100% clean .NET solution for C# developers to permanently rotate PDF document page and save rotated PDF document back or as
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:C# Image: Tutorial for Collaborating, Marking & Annotating
Besides, more annotations can be drawn and saved back to the database We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
www.rasteredge.com
124
gnuplot 4.6
The displacement defaults to 1,1 in pointsize units if a <pointstyle> is given, 0,0 if no <pointstyle> is
given. The displacement can be controlled by the optional oset <oset> where <oset> is specied
by either x,y or x,y,z, and may be preceded by rst, second, graph, screen, or character to select the
coordinate system. See coordinates (p.22) for details.
If one (or more) axis is timeseries, the appropriate coordinate should be given as a quoted time string
according to the timefmt format string. See set xdata (p.159) and set timefmt (p.156).
The EEPIC, Imagen, LaTeX, and TPIC drivers allow nn in a string to specify a newline.
Label coordinates and text can also be read from a data le (see labels (p.55)).
Examples:
To set a label at (1,2) to "y=x", use:
set label "y=x" at 1,2
To set a Sigma of size 24, from the Symbol font set, at the center of the graph, use:
set label "S" at graph 0.5,0.5 center font "Symbol,24"
To set a label "y=x^2" with the right of the text at (2,3,4), and tag the label as number 3, use:
set label 3 "y=x^2" at 2,3,4 right
To change the preceding label to center justication, use:
set label 3 center
To delete label number 2, use:
unset label 2
To delete all labels, use:
unset label
To show all labels (in tag order), use:
show label
To set a label on a graph with a timeseries on the x axis, use, for example:
set timefmt "%d/%m/%y,%H:%M"
set label "Harvest" at "25/8/93",1
To display a freshly tted parameter on the plot with the data and the tted function, do this after the t,
but before the plot:
set label sprintf("a = %3.5g",par_a) at 30,15
bfit = gprintf("b = %s*10^%S",par_b)
set label bfit at 30,20
To display a function denition along with its tted parameters, use:
f(x)=a+b*x
fit f(x) ’datafile’ via a,b
set label GPFUN_f at graph .05,.95
set label sprintf("a = %g", a) at graph .05,.90
set label sprintf("b = %g", b) at graph .05,.85
To set a label displaced a little bit from a small point:
set label ’origin’ at 0,0 point lt 1 pt 2 ps 3 offset 1,-1
To set a label whose color matches the z value (in this case 5.5) of some point on a 3D splot colored using
pm3d:
set label ’text’ at 0,0,5.5 tc palette z
application software tool:C# TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF File(s) with C# Programming
C#.NET Demo Code for Merging & Splitting TIFF File(s). // split TIFF document into 2 parts and save them back to disk TIFFDocument.SplitDocument(sourceFilePath
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:RasterEdge Product Refund Policy
the first step for you is to sign and send back RasterEdge Software We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
125
Linetype
The set linetype command allows you to redene the basic linetypes used for plots. The command options
are identical to those for "set style line". Unlike line styles, redenitions by set linetype are persistent;
they are not aected by reset.
For example, linetypes one and two default to red and green. If you redene them like this:
set linetype 1 lw 2 lc rgb "blue" pointtype 6
set linetype 2 lw 2 lc rgb "forest-green" pointtype 8
everywhere that uses lt 1 will now get a thick blue line rather than a thin red line (the previous default
meaning of lt 1). This includes uses such as the denition of a temporary linestyle derived from the base
linetype 1.
Note: This command is new to gnuplot version 4.6. It supersedes a rather cryptic command in version 4.2
"set style increment user". The older command is now deprecated.
This mechanism can be used to dene a set of personal preferences for the sequence of lines used in gnuplot.
The recommended way to do this is to add to the run-time initialization le ~ /.gnuplot a sequence of
commands like
if ((GPVAL_VERSION < 4.5) \
|| (!strstrt(GPVAL_COMPILE_OPTIONS,"+USER_LINETYPES"))) \
exit
set linetype 1 lc rgb "dark-violet" lw 2 pt 0
set linetype 2 lc rgb "sea-green"
lw 2 pt 7
set linetype 3 lc rgb "cyan"
lw 2 pt 6 pi -1
set linetype 4 lc rgb "dark-red"
lw 2 pt 5 pi -1
set linetype 5 lc rgb "blue"
lw 2 pt 8
set linetype 6 lc rgb "dark-orange" lw 2 pt 3
set linetype 7 lc rgb "black"
lw 2 pt 11
set linetype 8 lc rgb "goldenrod"
lw 2
set linetype cycle 8
Every time you run gnuplot the line types will be initialized to these values. You may initialize as many
linetypes as you like. If you do not redene, say, linetype 3 then it will continue to have the default properties
(in this case blue, pt 3, lw 1, etc). The rst few lines of the example script insure that the commands will
be skipped by older versions of gnuplot.
Similar script les can be used to dene theme-based color choices, or sets of colors optimized for a particular
plot type or output device.
The command set linetype cycle 8 tells gnuplot to re-use these denitions for the color and linewidth of
higher-numbered linetypes. That is, linetypes 9-16, 17-24, and so on will use this same sequence of colors
and widths. The point properties (pointtype, pointsize, pointinterval) are not aected by this command.
unset linetype cycle disables this feature. If the line properties of a higher numbered linetype are explicitly
dened, this takes precedence over the recycled low-number linetype properties.
Lmargin
The command set lmargin sets the size of the left margin. Please see set margin (p.127) for details.
Loadpath
The loadpath setting denes additional locations for data and command les searched by the call, load,
plot and splot commands. If a le cannot be found in the current directory, the directories in loadpath
are tried.
Syntax:
set loadpath {"pathlist1" {"pathlist2"...}}
show loadpath
application software tool:C# PDF: Start to Create, Load and Save PDF Document
can use PDFDocument object to do bulk operations like load, save, convert images/document to page in the document), you can save it back to a PDF file or
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:C# Imaging - Linear ITF-14 Barcode Generator
Y to control barcode image area on PDF, TIFF, Word 14 barcode image fore and back colors in BarcodeHeight = 200; barcode.AutoResize = true; //convert barcode to
www.rasteredge.com
126
gnuplot 4.6
Path names may be entered as single directory names, or as a list of path names separated by a platform-
specic path separator, eg. colon (’:’) on Unix, semicolon (’;’) on DOS/Windows/OS/2 platforms. The show
loadpath, save and save set commands replace the platform-specic separator with a space character (’
’).
If the environment variable GNUPLOT
LIB is set, its contents are appended to loadpath. However, show
loadpath prints the contents of set loadpath and GNUPLOT
LIB separately. Also, the save and save
set commands ignore the contents of GNUPLOT
LIB.
Locale
The locale setting determines the language with which fx,y,zgfd,mgtics will write the days and months.
Syntax:
set locale {"<locale>"}
<locale> may be any language designation acceptable to your installation. See your system documentation
for the available options. The command set locale "" will try to determine the locale from the LC
TIME,
LC
ALL, or LANG environment variables.
To change the decimal point locale, see set decimalsign (p. 109). To change the character encoding to
the current locale, see set encoding (p. 112).
Logscale
Syntax:
set logscale <axes> {<base>}
unset logscale <axes>
show logscale
where <axes> may be any combinations of x, x2, y, y2, z, cb, and r in any order. <base> is the base
of the log scaling (default is base 10). If no axes are specied, the command aects all axes except r. The
command unset logscale turns o log scaling for all axes. Note that the ticmarks generated for logscaled
axes are not uniformly spaced. See set xtics (p.163).
Examples:
To enable log scaling in both x and z axes:
set logscale xz
To enable scaling log base 2 of the y axis:
set logscale y 2
To enable z and color log axes for a pm3d plot:
set logscale zcb
To disable z axis log scaling:
unset logscale z
Macros
If command line macro substitution is enabled, then tokens in the command line of the form
@<stringvariablename> will be replaced by the text string contained in <stringvariablename>. See sub-
stitution (p. 39).
Syntax:
set macros
application software tool:How to C#: Create a Winforms Control
pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Back Color.
www.rasteredge.com
application software tool:VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
a touch of history to the image which can help bring back the sweet We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
127
Mapping
If data are provided to splot in spherical or cylindrical coordinates, the set mapping command should be
used to instruct gnuplot how to interpret them.
Syntax:
set mapping {cartesian | spherical | cylindrical}
Acartesian coordinate system is used by default.
For a spherical coordinate system, the data occupy two or three columns (or using entries). The rst two
are interpreted as the azimuthal and polar angles theta and phi (or "longitude" and "latitude"), in the units
specied by set angles. The radius r is taken from the third column if there is one, or is set to unity if
there is no third column. The mapping is:
x = r * cos(theta) * cos(phi)
y = r * sin(theta) * cos(phi)
z = r * sin(phi)
Note that this is a "geographic" spherical system, rather than a "polar" one (that is, phi is measured from
the equator, rather than the pole).
For acylindrical coordinate system, the data againoccupy twoor three columns. The rst two are interpreted
as theta (in the units specied by set angles) and z. The radius is either taken from the third column or
set to unity, as in the spherical case. The mapping is:
x = r * cos(theta)
y = r * sin(theta)
z = z
The eects of mapping can be duplicated with the using lter on the splot command, but mapping may
be more convenient if many data les are to be processed. However even if mapping is used, using may
still be necessary if the data in the le are not in the required order.
mapping has no eect on plot.
world.dem: mapping demos.
Margin
The margin is the distance between the plot border andthe outer edge of the canvas. The size of the margin
is chosen automatically, but can be overridden by the set margin commands. show margin shows the
current settings. To alter the distance between the inside of the plot border and the data in the plot itself,
see set osets (p.134).
Syntax:
set bmargin {{at screen} <margin>}
set lmargin {{at screen} <margin>}
set rmargin {{at screen} <margin>}
set tmargin {{at screen} <margin>}
show margin
The default units of <margin> are character heights or widths, as appropriate. A positive value denes the
absolute size of the margin. A negative value (or none) causes gnuplot to revert to the computed value.
For 3D plots, only the left margin can be set using character units.
The keywords at screen indicates that the margin is specied as a fraction of the full drawing area. This
can be used to precisely line up the corners of individual 2D and 3D graphs in a multiplot. This placement
ignores the current values of set origin andset size, and is intended as analternative method for positioning
graphs within a multiplot.
Normally the margins of a plot are automatically calculated based on tics, tic labels, axis labels, the plot
title, the timestamp and the size of the key if it is outside the borders. If, however, tics are attached to the
axes (set xtics axis, for example), neither the tics themselves nor their labels will be included in either the
margin calculation or the calculation of the positions of other text to be written in the margin. This can
lead to tic labels overwriting other text if the axis is very close to the border.
128
gnuplot 4.6
Mouse
The command set mouse enables mouse actions for the current interactive terminal. It is usually enabled
by default in interactive mode, but disabled by default if commands are being read from a le.
There are two mouse modes. The 2D mode works for plot commands and for splot maps (i.e. set view
with z-rotation 0, 90, 180, 270 or 360 degrees, including set view map). In this mode the mouse position is
tracked and you can pan or zoom using the mouse buttons or arrow keys. Some terminals support toggling
individual plots on/o by clicking on the corresponding key title or on a separate widget.
For 3D graphs splot, the view and scaling of the graph can be changed with mouse buttons 1 and 2,
respectively. A vertical motionof Button 2 with the shift key held down changes the xyplane. If additionally
to these buttons the modier <ctrl> is held down, the coordinate axes are displayed but the data are
suppressed. This is useful for large data sets.
Mousing is not available inside multiplot mode. When multiplot is completed using unset multiplot, then
the mouse will be turned on again but acts only on the most recent plot within the multiplot (like replot
does).
Syntax:
set mouse {doubleclick <ms>} {nodoubleclick} \
{{no}zoomcoordinates} \
{noruler | ruler {at x,y}} \
{polardistance{deg|tan} | nopolardistance} \
{format <string>} \
{clipboardformat <int>/<string>} \
{mouseformat <int>/<string>} \
{{no}labels {"labeloptions"}} \
{{no}zoomjump} {{no}verbose}
unset mouse
The options noruler and ruler switch the ruler o and on, the latter optionally setting the origin at the
given coordinates. While the ruler is on, the distance in user units from the ruler origin to the mouse is
displayed continuously. By default, toggling the ruler has the key binding ’r’.
The option polardistance determines if the distance between the mouse cursor and the ruler is also shown
in polar coordinates (distance and angle in degrees or tangent (slope)). This corresponds to the default key
binding ’5’.
Choose the option labels to dene persistent gnuplot labels using Button 2. The default is nolabels, which
makes Button 2 draw only a temporary label at the mouse position. Labels are drawn with the current
setting of mouseformat. The labeloptions string is passed to the set label command. The default is
"point pointstyle 1" which will plot a small plus at the label position. Temporary labels will disappear at
the next replot or mouse zoom operation. Persistent labels can be removed by holding the Ctrl-Key down
while clicking Button 2 on the label’s point. The threshold for how close you must be to the label is also
determined by the pointsize.
If the option verbose is turned on the communication commands are shown during execution. This option
can also be toggled by hitting 6 in the driver’s window. verbose is o by default.
Press ’h’ in the driver’s window for a short summary of the mouse and key bindings. This will also display
user dened bindings or hotkeys which can be dened using the bind command, see help for bind (p.36).
Note, that user dened hotkeys may override the default bindings. See also help for bind (p. 36) and
label (p. 123).
Doubleclick
The doubleclick resolution is given in milliseconds and used for Button 1, which copies the current mouse
position to the clipboard. The default value is 300 ms. Setting the value to 0 ms triggers the copy on a
single click.
gnuplot 4.6
129
Mouseformat
The set mouse format command species a format string for sprintf() which determines how the mouse
cursor [x,y] coordinates are printed to the plot window and to the clipboard. The default is "% #g".
set mouse clipboardformat and set mouse mouseformat are used for formatting the text on Button1
and Button2 actions { copying the coordinates to the clipboard and temporarily annotating the mouse
position. An integer argument selects one of the format options in the table below. A string argument is
used as a format for sprintf() in option 6 and should contain two  oat speciers. Example:
‘set mouse mouseformat "mouse x,y = %5.2g, %10.3f"‘.
Use set mouse mouseformat "" to turn this string o again.
The following formats are available:
0
default (same as 1)
1
axis coordinates
1.23, 2.45
2
graph coordinates (from 0 to 1)
/0.00, 1.00/
3
x = timefmt
y = axis
[(as set by ‘set timefmt‘), 2.45]
4
x = date
y = axis
[31. 12. 1999, 2.45]
5
x = time
y = axis
[23:59, 2.45]
6
x = date time
y = axis
[31. 12. 1999 23:59, 2.45]
7
format from ‘set mouse mouseformat‘, e.g. "mouse x,y = 1.23,
2.450"
Scrolling
X and Y axis scaling in both 2D and 3D graphs can be adjusted using the mouse wheel. <wheel-up>
scrolls up (increases both YMIN and YMAX by ten percent of the Y range, and increases both Y2MIN and
Y2MAX likewise), and <wheel down> scrolls down. <shift-wheel-up> scrolls left (decreases both XMIN
and XMAX, and both X2MIN and X2MAX), and <shift-wheel-down> scrolls right. <control-wheel-up>
zooms in toward the center of the plot, and <control-wheel-down> zooms out. <shift-control-wheel-up>
zooms in along the X and X2 axes only, and <shift-control-wheel-down> zooms out along the X and X2
axes only.
X11 mouse
If multiple X11 plot windows have been opened using the set term x11 <n> terminal option, then only
the current plot window supports the entire range of mouse commands and hotkeys. The other windows
will, however, continue to display mouse coordinates at the lower left.
Zoom
Zooming is usually accomplished by holding down the left mouse button and dragging the mouse to delineate
azoom region. Some platforms may require using a dierent mouse button. The original plot can be restored
by typing the ’u’ hotkey in the plot window. The hotkeys ’p’ and ’n’ step back and forth through a history
of zoom operations.
The option zoomcoordinates determines if the coordinates of the zoom box are drawn at the edges while
zooming. This is on by default.
If the option zoomjump is on, the mouse pointer will be automatically oset a small distance after starting
azoom region with button 3. This can be useful to avoid a tiny (or even empty) zoom region. zoomjump
is o by default.
Multiplot
The command set multiplot places gnuplot in the multiplot mode, in which several plots are placed on
the same page, window, or screen.
Syntax:
130
gnuplot 4.6
set multiplot
{ title <page title> {font <fontspec>} {enhanced|noenhanced} }
{ layout <rows>,<cols>
{rowsfirst|columnsfirst} {downwards|upwards}
{scale <xscale>{,<yscale>}} {offset <xoff>{,<yoff>}}
}
unset multiplot
For some terminals, no plot is displayed until the command unset multiplot is given, which causes the
entire page to be drawn and then returns gnuplot to its normal single-plot mode. For other terminals, each
separate plot command produces an updated display, either by redrawing all previous ones and the newly
added plot, or by just adding the new plot to the existing display.
The area to be used by the next plot is not erased before doing the new plot. The clear command can be
used to do this if wanted, as is typically the case for "inset" plots.
Any labels or arrows that have been dened will be drawn for each plot according to the current size and
origin (unless their coordinates are dened in the screen system). Just about everything else that can be
set is applied to each plot, too. If you want something to appear only once on the page, for instance a
single time stamp, you’ll need to put a set time/unset time pair around one of the plot, splot or replot
commands within the set multiplot/unset multiplot block.
The multiplot title is separate from the individual plot titles, if any. Space is reserved for it at the top of
the page, spanning the full width of the canvas.
The commands set origin and set size must be used to correctly position each plot if no layout is specied
or if ne tuning is desired. See set origin (p.134) and set size (p.146) for details of their usage.
Example:
set multiplot
set size 0.4,0.4
set origin 0.1,0.1
plot sin(x)
set size 0.2,0.2
set origin 0.5,0.5
plot cos(x)
unset multiplot
This displays a plot of cos(x) stacked above a plot of sin(x).
set size and set origin refer to the entire plotting area used for each plot. Please also see set term size
(p. 21). If you want to have the axes themselves line up, you can guarantee that the margins are the same
size with the set margin commands. See set margin (p.127) for their use. Note that the margin settings
are absolute, in character units, so the appearance of the graph in the remaining space will depend on the
screen size of the display device, e.g., perhaps quite dierent on a video display and a printer.
With the layout option you can generate simple multiplots without having to give the set size and set
origin commands before each plot: Those are generated automatically, but can be overridden at any time.
With layout the display will be divided by a grid with <rows> rows and <cols> columns. This grid is
lled rows rst or columns rst depending on whether the corresponding option is given in the multiplot
command. The stack of plots can grow downwards or upwards. Default is rowsrst and downwards.
Each plot can be scaled by scale and shifted with oset; if the y-values for scale or oset are omitted, the
x-value will be used. unset multiplot will turn o the automatic layout and restore the values of set size
and set origin as they were before set multiplot layout.
Example:
set size 1,1
set origin 0,0
set multiplot layout 3,2 columnsfirst scale 1.1,0.9
[ up to 6 plot commands here ]
unset multiplot
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested