!
!
!
W
HAT IS 
O
NLINE 
L
EARNING
The focus of this report is online education.  To ensure consistency the same 
definitions have been used for all ten years of these national reports.  These 
definitions were presented to the respondents at the beginning of the survey and 
then repeated in the body of individual questions where appropriate. 
Online courses are those in which at least 80 percent of the course content is 
delivered online.  Face-to-face instruction includes courses in which zero to 29 
percent of the content is delivered online; this category includes both traditional 
and web facilitated courses.  The remaining alternative, blended (sometimes 
called hybrid) instruction has between 30 and 80 percent of the course content 
delivered online.  While the survey asked respondents for information on all 
types of courses, the current report is devoted to only online learning. 
While there is considerable diversity among course delivery methods used by 
individual instructors, the following is presented to illustrate the prototypical 
course classifications used in this study. 
Proportion 
of Content 
Delivered Online 
Type of Course 
Typical Description 
0% 
Traditional 
Course where no online technology used — content is 
delivered in writing or orally. 
1 to 29% 
Web Facilitated 
Course that uses web-based technology to facilitate 
what is essentially a face-to-face course.  May use a 
course management system (CMS) or web pages to 
post the syllabus and assignments. 
30 to 79% 
Blended/Hybrid 
Course that blends online and face-to-face delivery.  
Substantial proportion of the content is delivered 
online, typically uses online discussions, and typically 
has a reduced number of  
face-to-face meetings. 
80+% 
Online 
A course where most or all of the content is delivered 
online.  Typically have no face-to-face meetings. 
Schools may offer online learning in a variety of ways.  The survey asked 
respondents to characterize their face-to-face, blended, and online learning by 
the level of the course (undergraduate, graduate, non-credit, etc.).  Similarly, 
respondents were asked to characterize their face-to-face, blended, and online 
program offerings by level and discipline. 
Export pdf to powerpoint - C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
pdf to powerpoint converter; convert pdf to editable ppt
Export pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
how to convert pdf file to powerpoint presentation; change pdf to ppt
!
!
!
S
URVEY 
F
INDINGS
Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) 
Over the last year we have seen the growth in MOOCs with the creation of non-
profit organizations (Mitx, Edx) or for-profit commercial entities (Coursera, 
Udacity) partnering with multiple institutions and 
creating an online platform for course enrollment 
and distribution.  Although the concept of 
Massive Open Online Courses has been around 
for some time, and the term MOOC was coined 
in 2008 by Dan Barwick
1
, this year’s survey finds 
only 2.6 percent report they currently offer 
MOOCs and slightly less than ten percent (9.4%) 
have plans to offer them.  An additional one-third 
of all institutions report they have no plans for 
adding MOOCs (32.7%), leaving the bulk of all 
institutions (55.4%) still undecided.  Matching the 
pattern of offerings of online courses and 
programs over the last ten years, it is the public 
universities that currently have the higher rates of 
offering MOOCs (4.7%) and the private, for profit 
schools are most likely to be in the planning stages (15.0%). 
When examined by Carnegie classification, it is the research universities (Doctoral/ 
Research institutions) that are in the lead.  They are almost twice as likely to be 
offering MOOCs or planning to offer MOOCs (9.8% vs. the next highest of 4.5% 
for Specialized institutions in offerings and 21.4% vs. the next highest of 11.8% for 
Master’s level institutions for planning). 
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
1
Barwick, Daniel W.. "Views: Does Class Size Matter?". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
Plans for MOOCs - 2012 
No Plans 
Not Decided 
Planning 
Have 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
Will Not be Adding a MOOC Not Yet Decided About a 
MOOC 
Planning to Add MOOC 
Offering(s) 
Have MOOC Offering(s) 
Plans for MOOCs - 2012 
Specialized 
Associates 
Baccalaureate 
Masters 
Doctoral/ Research 
Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
change pdf to powerpoint; convert pdf to powerpoint
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate PDF. WPF: Export PDF. WPF: Print PDF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint
how to convert pdf into powerpoint on; convert pdf to powerpoint using
!
!
!
There is also a relationship between the size of the institution and whether or 
not they have or are planning on a MOOC.  The largest schools (15000+ total 
students) have a higher rate of offering MOOCs (8.9%) and over twenty percent 
(21.4%) are in the planning stage. 
Although the planning of MOOCs appears to follow the same pattern of 
adoption as for online courses and programs, it is the institutions with no 
current online offerings that have taken an early lead in actually offering MOOCs.  
Paradoxically, these are the type of institutions that are also in the majority of 
schools that are not planning to ever offer MOOCs.  Institutions with online 
courses and full programs are in the majority of schools planning to offer 
MOOCs (13.2% vs. 4.0% vs. 3.2%). 
Among those institutions that are planning or currently offering MOOCs, over 
half (50.2%) in the planning stage intend to work or partner with an outside 
organization to offer their MOOCs.  This is a greater proportion planning to 
work with others than among those that already have a MOOC (37.0%).  
Chief academic officer’s opinions about the sustainability, scalability, and 
acceptance of MOOCs in higher education are diverse.  Responses on these 
issues show many institutions are still on the sidelines with a “Neutral” response. 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
Will Not be Adding a 
MOOC 
Not Yet Decided About a 
MOOC 
Planning to Add MOOC 
Offering(s) 
Have MOOC Offering(s) 
Plans for MOOCs - 2012 
Online Courses and Full Programs 
Online Courses Only 
No Online 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
Planning to Add a MOOC 
Currently Have a MOOC 
Percent Working with Others on a MOOC - 2012 
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create
convert pdf to ppt; convert pdf document to powerpoint
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF Export. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF Export. for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in VB
convert pdf to powerpoint online; converting pdf to powerpoint
!
!
!
10 
Overall, academic leaders are split in their opinions about MOOCs as a sustainable 
method for offering courses with 27.8 percent agreeing, 27.0 percent disagreeing, 
and most Chief Academic Officers (45.2%) neutral.  However, almost twice as 
many respondents who will not be adding any MOOCs (39.7%) believe MOOCs 
are not a sustainable method than those institutions that are undecided (21.5%) or 
in the planning stages (18.1%) with those already offering MOOCs at 21.7 percent.  
It is somewhat surprising that chief academic officers at public institutions, with the 
highest percent of institutions already offering MOOCs, also represent the highest 
percent of institutions believing MOOCs are not a sustainable method for offering 
courses.  The opinions of the sustainability by Carnegie classification shows 
Baccalaureate institutions have the highest level of disagreement.  However, among 
all types of institutions, “Neutral” is the modal opinion. 
Whether or not an institution already offers online courses and/or full programs 
does influence the opinion of MOOCs as a sustainable method.  While the modal 
response continued to be “Neutral,” only 18.5 percent of institutions with no 
online offerings agreed MOOCs were sustainable compared to 30.7 percent of 
institutions with online courses and 28.7 percent for institutions with online 
courses and full programs. 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
Specialized 
Associates 
Baccalaureate 
Masters 
Doctoral/ Research 
MOOCs Are a Sustainable Method for Offering Courses - 2012 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
PDF Export. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: PDF Export. Able to export PDF document to HTML file. Able to create convert PDF to SVG file.
convert pdf to powerpoint online for; how to convert pdf into powerpoint slides
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from
convert pdf into powerpoint; convert pdf pages to powerpoint slides
!
!
!
11 
There is relatively high level of agreement among chief academic officers that 
MOOCs represent an important way for institutions to learn about online 
pedagogy.  Less than 20% of all institutions disagree with this statement and this 
is also seen when examined by type of institution (Private for-profit, Private 
nonprofit, or Public).  There are some changes in the distribution of opinions 
when Carnegie classification is used to divide the respondents.  Chief academic 
officers in Baccalaureate and Masters-level institutions are more likely to disagree 
that MOOCs are important for learning about online pedagogy (22.0% and 
22.9%, respectively, and Doctoral/Research institutions are most likely to agree 
(60.0%).  Here again, schools with no online offerings are the least likely to see 
MOOCs as pedagogically important (40.6%). 
Do MOOCs help us understand the scalability and demand for online courses?  
Academic leaders at institutions that offer online courses and/or fully online 
programs overwhelmingly agree they do (60.0% with online courses or full 
programs and 57.8% of institutions with online courses) but only 42.2 percent of 
those at institutions with no online presence agree.  Less than half the private 
for-profit institutions agree with the statement (47.4%), perhaps because they are 
already deeply entrenched in offering online courses and programs and do not 
see the gain from entering this (free) market. 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
Specialized 
Associates 
Baccalaureate 
Masters 
Doctoral/ Research 
MOOCs Are Important for Institutions to Learn About Online 
Pedagogy - 2012 
Agree 
Neutral 
Disagree 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from
how to add pdf to powerpoint slide; export pdf into powerpoint
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create
convert pdf to powerpoint slides; chart from pdf to powerpoint
!
!
!
12 
It is interesting that only a minority of chief academic officers believe MOOCs 
have the potential to attract potential students to their institutions (43.5% 
overall).  Given this response, it may be surprising that institutions are entering 
this type of course offering at all.  Perhaps they are taking the longer view and 
see this as an alternative revenue stream for the future or as a way to build their 
institution’s brand awareness.  Even schools with fully online programs have only 
a slim majority (50.4% agreeing) that believe students will be attracted to an 
institution based on enrollment in a MOOC.  When examined by size of 
institution, some differences are evident.  The largest schools agree MOOCs may 
attract students (59.6%) but there is no clear pattern by size among the smaller 
schools.  Only the respondents of mid-size schools (3,000 – 7,500) also have a 
majority who agree (57.7%). 
A small majority of chief academic officers agree MOOCs are good for students 
to determine if online instruction is appropriate for them, with an equal number 
either neutral or disagreeing (50.6% agree vs. 30.9% neutral and 18.6% disagree).  
These percentages are relatively consistent across type of school and Carnegie 
classification but the responses show some differences by size of institution and 
presence in online offerings.  Smaller and mid-sized institutions are more likely to 
believe MOOCs offer a way for students to determine if online instruction is 
appropriate while the largest institutions disagree.  Possibly because the larger 
institutions already offer many online courses and programs, these institutions 
believe their students are already familiar with online instruction.  However, 
respondents from schools with online courses or both courses and programs 
show a higher percent of agreement than schools with no online presence 
(53.4%, 50.7% and 41.7%, respectively). 
MOOCs are Good for Students to Determine if Online Instruction is Appropriate - 2012 
Under 1500 
1500 - 2999 
3000 - 7499 
7500 - 14999 
15000+ 
Agree 
50.7% 
52.5% 
53.0% 
44.1% 
45.9% 
Neutral 
33.5% 
31.9% 
27.5% 
27.1% 
24.9% 
Disagree 
15.9% 
15.5% 
19.5% 
28.8% 
29.2% 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
Under 1500 
1500 - 2999 
3000 - 7499 
7500 - 14999 
15000+ 
MOOCs Can be Used to Attract Potential Students - 2012 
Agree 
Neutral 
Disagree 
!
!
!
13 
With respect to the acceptance of MOOC coursework in the workplace, only a 
minority of respondents do not believe this coursework will be accepted.  Here 
again, it is the chief academic officers at schools with no online offerings that 
show the largest percent agreement that MOOC instruction will not be accepted 
(30.3% vs. 17.7% for schools with online courses and 17.0% for schools with 
online courses and programs). 
Not surprisingly, many respondents for all types and sizes of schools believe 
credentials for MOOC completion will cause confusion about higher education 
degrees (55.2% overall).  Schools having no online courses show the highest 
agreement (67.0%) followed by Baccalaureate institutions with 62.4 percent, 
Doctoral/Research universities with 60.9 percent, and private, for-profit schools 
with 57.7 percent agreeing MOOC credentials will cause confusion about higher 
education degrees.  A majority of every group of academic leaders agree that 
credentials for MOC completion will cause confusion. 
MOOC Instruction Will Not be 
Accepted in the Workplace - 2012 
Agree 
Neutral 
Disagree 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
Specialized 
Associates 
Baccalaureate 
Masters 
Doctoral/ Research 
Percent Agreeing: Credentials for MOOC Completion Will 
Cause Confusion - 2012 
!
!
!
14 
Are We Heading for Online 2.0? 
Are MOOCs the next paradigm for online education?  Will we now begin to see 
a rethinking of online course structure and delivery?   To explore the readiness 
of institutions to evolve their online, chief academic officers at institutions with 
online offerings were asked to rate their institution’s potential.  The academic 
leaders were queried as to how they would rate their own institution versus 
others on the ability to scale their online offerings and their ability to harness 
online technology to develop new and innovative courses. 
Approximately one-third of chief academic officers at institutions with online 
offerings currently believe their institution is Above Average or Somewhat Above 
Average in their ability to scale their online offerings (34.7%) or to use online 
technology to develop innovative new courses (32.6%).  
Larger institutions (as measured by total enrollment) see themselves in a better 
position to scale their online offerings.  Over forty-five percent of institutions 
with 7,500 or more total students rank themselves as Above Average or Somewhat 
Above Average in their ability to scale their online offerings.  This compares to 
only about thirty percent of the smaller institutions (under 3,000 total 
enrollments) that rank themselves thus. 
Rank: Use Online Technology to 
Develop Innovative New Courses - 
2012 
Above Average 
Somewhat 
Above Average 
Average 
Somewhat 
Below Average 
Below Average 
0% 
5% 
10% 
15% 
20% 
25% 
30% 
35% 
40% 
45% 
50% 
55% 
Under 1500 
1500 - 2999 
3000 - 7499 
7500 - 14999 
15000+ 
Rank: Ability to Scale Our Online Offerings - 2012 
Above Average 
Somewhat Above Average 
Rank:  Ability to Scale Our Online 
Offerings - 2012 
Above Average 
Somewhat 
Above Average 
Average 
Somewhat 
Below Average 
!
!
!
15 
Larger institutions also see themselves in a better position to develop innovative new 
courses.  Nearly forty-five percent of institutions with 7,500 or more total students 
rank themselves as Above Average or Somewhat Above Average on this dimension. 
When examined by Carnegie classification, it is the two-year Associates 
institutions that believe themselves to be in the lead to scale their offerings and 
the Doctoral/Research that feel they are best prepared to develop innovative 
new courses. 
0% 
5% 
10% 
15% 
20% 
25% 
30% 
35% 
40% 
45% 
50% 
Under 1500 
1500 - 2999 
3000 - 7499 
7500 - 14999 
15000+ 
Rank: Use Online Technology to Develop Innovative New 
Courses - 2012
Above Average 
Somewhat Above Average 
0% 
5% 
10% 
15% 
20% 
25% 
30% 
35% 
40% 
45% 
Specialized 
Associates 
Baccalaureate 
Masters 
Doctoral/ Research 
Rank: Ability to Scale Our Online Offerings - 2012 
Above Average 
Somewhat Above Average 
0% 
5% 
10% 
15% 
20% 
25% 
30% 
35% 
40% 
45% 
50% 
Specialized 
Associates 
Baccalaureate 
Masters 
Doctoral/ Research 
Rank: Use Online Technology to Develop Innovative New 
Courses - 2012 
Above Average 
Somewhat Above Average 
!
!
!
16 
Is Online Learning Strategic? 
When this report series began in 2002, less than one-half of all higher education 
institutions reported online education was critical to their long-term strategy.  
That number is now close to seventy percent.  After remaining steady for a 
number of years, the proportion of chief academic officers reporting online 
education is critical to their institution’s long-term strategy displayed small 
increases for each of the previous three years - a trend that continues this year.  
The percentage of institutions that agree “Online education is critical to the long-
term strategy of my institution” reached its highest level in 2012 (69.1%).  The 
percent disagreeing has held steady at just over ten percent for all ten years of 
the survey. 
As noted in previous reports, not all institutions that profess to believe online 
education is critical also include online as a component of their strategic plan.   
There has been a consistent “gap” between those who profess online is critical 
and those that have specifically included online within their strategic plan.  This 
year is no different – just over sixty percent of those institutions with full online 
programs say online significantly represented in their strategic plan.  Among 
those with only online courses, the number is even lower (30.4%). 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Fall 2006 Fall 2007 Fall 2009 Fall 2010 Fall 2011 Fall 2012 
Online Education is Critical to the Long-term Strategy of my Institution – 
Fall 2002 to Fall 2012 
Agree 
Neutral 
Disagree 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
Online Courses and full programs 
Online Courses only 
Percent Agreeing: Online Education is Significantly Represented in 
My Institution's Formal Strategic Plan 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested