gnuplot 4.6
171
Matrix
Gnuplot can interpret matrix input in two dierent ways. The rst of these assumes a uniform grid of x and
ycoordinates, and assigns each value in the input matrix to one element of this uniform grid. This is the
default for ascii data input, but not for binary input. Example commands for plotting uniform matrix data:
splot ’file’ matrix using 1:2:3
# ascii input
splot ’file’ binary general using 1:2:3 # binary input
In a uniform grid matrix the z-values are read in a row at a time, i. e.,
z11 z12 z13 z14 ...
z21 z22 z23 z24 ...
z31 z32 z33 z34 ...
and so forth.
For ascii input, a blank line or comment line ends the matrix, and starts a new surface mesh. You can
select among the meshes inside a le by the index option to the splot command, as usual. The second
interpretation assumes a non-uniform grid with explicit x and y coordinates. The rst row of input data
contains the y coordinates; the rst column of input data contains the x coordinates. For binary input data,
the rst element of the rst row must contain the number of data columns. (This number is ignored for ascii
input). Both the coordinates and the data values in a binary input are treated as single precision  oats.
Example commands for plotting non-uniform matrix data:
splot ’file’ nonuniform matrix using 1:2:3 # ascii input
splot ’file’ binary matrix using 1:2:3
# binary input
Thus the data organization for non-uniform matrix input is
<N+1> <y0>
<y1>
<y2> ... <yN>
<x0> <z0,0> <z0,1> <z0,2> ... <z0,N>
<x1> <z1,0> <z1,1> <z1,2> ... <z1,N>
:
:
:
:
...
:
which is then converted into triplets:
<x0> <y0> <z0,0>
<x0> <y1> <z0,1>
<x0> <y2> <z0,2>
:
:
:
<x0> <yN> <z0,N>
<x1> <y0> <z1,0>
<x1> <y1> <z1,1>
:
:
:
These triplets are then converted into gnuplot iso-curves and then gnuplot proceeds in the usual manner
to do the rest of the plotting.
Acollection of matrix and vector manipulation routines (in C) is provided in binary.c. The routine to write
binary data is
int fwrite_matrix(file,m,nrl,nrl,ncl,nch,row_title,column_title)
An example of using these routines is provided in the le bf
test.c, which generates binary les for the demo
le demo/binary.dem.
Usage in plot:
plot ‘a.dat‘ matrix
plot ‘a.dat‘ matrix using 1:3
plot ’a.gpbin’ {matrix} binary using 1:3
Convert pdf to powerpoint online no email - control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to powerpoint online no email - control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
172
gnuplot 4.6
will plot rows of the matrix, while using 2:3 will plot matrix columns, and using 1:2 the point coordinates
(rather useless). Applying the every option you can specify explicit rows and columns.
Example { rescale axes of a matrix in an ascii le:
splot ‘a.dat‘ matrix using (1+$1):(1+$2*10):3
Example { plot the 3rd row of a matrix in an ascii le:
plot ’a.dat’ matrix using 1:3 every 1:999:1:2
(rows are enumerated from 0, thus 2 instead of 3).
Gnuplot can read matrix binary les by use of the option binary appearing without keyword qualications
unique to general binary, i.e., array, record, format, or letype. Other general binary keywords for
translation should also apply to matrix binary. (See binary general (p. 74) for more details.)
Example datale
Asimple example of plotting a 3D data le is
splot ’datafile.dat’
where the le "datale.dat" might contain:
# The valley of the Gnu.
0 0 10
0 1 10
0 2 10
1 0 10
1 1 5
1 2 10
2 0 10
2 1 1
2 2 10
3 0 10
3 1 0
3 2 10
Note that "datale.dat" denes a 4 by 3 grid ( 4 rows of 3 points each ). Rows (datablocks) are separated
by blank records.
Note also that the x value is held constant within each dataline. If you instead keep y constant, and plot
with hidden-line removal enabled, you will nd that the surface is drawn ’inside-out’.
Actually for grid data it is not necessary to keep the x values constant within a datablock, nor is it necessary
to keep the same sequence of y values. gnuplot requires only that the number of points be the same
for each datablock. However since the surface mesh, from which contours are derived, connects sequentially
corresponding points, the eect of anirregular grid on a surface plot is unpredictable andshouldbe examined
on a case-by-case basis.
Grid data
The 3D routines are designed for points in a grid format, with one sample, datapoint, at each mesh inter-
section; the datapoints may originate from either evaluating a function, see set isosamples (p. 119), or
reading a datale, see splot datale (p. 170). The term "isoline" is applied to the mesh lines for both
functions and data. Note that the mesh need not be rectangular in x and y, as it may be parameterized in
uand v, see set isosamples (p.119).
control SDK platform:RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
Q3: Why there's no license information in my it via the email which RasterEdge's online store sends powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:RasterEdge Product License Agreement
is active, you may contact RasterEdge via email. permitted by applicable law, in no event shall powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
173
However, gnuplot does not require that format. In the case of functions, ’samples’ need not be equal to
’isosamples’, i.e., not every x-isoline sample need intersect a y-isoline. In the case of data les, if there
are an equal number of scattered data points in each datablock, then "isolines" will connect the points
in a datablock, and "cross-isolines" will connect the corresponding points in each datablock to generate a
"surface". In either case, contour and hidden3d modes may give dierent plots than if the points were in
the intended format. Scattered data can be converted to a fdierentg grid format with set dgrid3d.
The contour code tests for z intensity along a line between a point on a y-isoline and the corresponding point
in the next y-isoline. Thus a splot contour of a surface with samples on the x-isolines that do not coincide
with a y-isoline intersection will ignore such samples. Try:
set xrange [-pi/2:pi/2]; set yrange [-pi/2:pi/2]
set style function lp
set contour
set isosamples 10,10; set samples 10,10;
splot cos(x)*cos(y)
set samples 4,10; replot
set samples 10,4; replot
Splot surfaces
splot can display a surface as a collection of points, or by connecting those points. As with plot, the points
may be read from a data le or result from evaluation of a function at specied intervals, see set isosamples
(p. 119). The surface may be approximated by connecting the points with straight line segments, see set
surface (p.153), in which case the surface can be made opaque with set hidden3d. The orientation from
which the 3d surface is viewed can be changed with set view.
Additionally, for points in a grid format, splot can interpolate points having a common amplitude (see set
contour (p. 106)) and can then connect those new points to display contour lines, either directly with
straight-line segments or smoothed lines (see set cntrparam (p. 104)). Functions are already evaluated
in a grid format, determined by set isosamples and set samples, while le data must either be in a grid
format, as described in data-le, or be used to generate a grid (see set dgrid3d (p.110)).
Contour lines may be displayed either on the surface or projected onto the base. The base projections of
the contour lines may be written to a le, and then read with plot, to take advantage of plot’s additional
formatting capabilities.
Stats (Statistical Summary)
Syntax:
stats ’filename’ [using N[:M]] [name ’prefix’] [[no]output]]
This command prepares a statistical summary of the data in one or two columns of a le. The using specier
is interpreted in the same way as for plot commands. See plot (p. 73) for details on the index (p. 80),
every (p. 79), and using (p. 85) directives. Data points are ltered against both xrange and yrange
before analysis. See set xrange (p. 161). The summary is printed to the screen by default. Output can
be redirected to a le by prior use of the command set print, or suppressed altogether using the nooutput
option.
In addition to printed output, the program stores the individual statistics into three sets of variables. The
rst set of variables reports how the data is laid out in the le:
STATS_records
# total number of in-range data records
STATS_outofrange
# number of records filtered out by range limits
STATS_invalid
# number of invalid/incomplete/missing records
STATS_blank
# number of blank lines in the file
STATS_blocks
# number of indexable data blocks in the file
The second set reports properties of the in-range data from a single column. If the corresponding axis is
autoscaled (x-axis for the 1st column, y-axis for the optional secondcolumn) then no range limits are applied.
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Convert Excel to PDF document free
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class. C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in
www.rasteredge.com
174
gnuplot 4.6
If two columns are being analysed in a single stats command, the the sux "
x" or "
y" is appended to
each variable name. I.e. STATS
min
xis the minimum value found in the rst column, while STATS
min
y
is the minimum value found in the second column.
STATS_min
# minimum value of in-range data points
STATS_max
# maximum value of in-range data points
STATS_index_min
# index i for which data[i] == STATS_min
STATS_index_max
# index i for which data[i] == STATS_max
STATS_lo_quartile
# value of the lower (1st) quartile boundary
STATS_median
# median value
STATS_up_quartile
# value of the upper (3rd) quartile boundary
STATS_mean
# mean value of in-range data points
STATS_stddev
# standard deviation of the in-range data points
STATS_sum
# sum
STATS_sumsq
# sum of squares
The third set of variables is only relevant to analysis of two data columns.
STATS_correlation
# correlation coefficient between x and y values
STATS_slope
# A corresponding to a linear fit y = Ax + B
STATS_intercept
# B corresponding to a linear fit y = Ax + B
STATS_sumxy
# sum of x*y
STATS_pos_min_y
# x coordinate of a point with minimum y value
STATS_pos_max_y
# x coordinate of a point with maximum y value
It may be convenient to track the statistics from more than one le at the same time. The name option
causes the default prex "STATS" to be replaced by a user-specied string. For example, the mean value of
column 2 data from two dierent les could be compared by
stats "file1.dat" using 2 name "A"
stats "file2.dat" using 2 name "B"
if (A_mean < B_mean) {...}
The index reportedin STATS
index
xxx corresponds to the value of pseudo-column 0 ($0) inplot commands.
I.e. the rst point has index 0, the last point has index N-1.
Data values are sorted to nd the median and quartile boundaries. If the total number of points N is odd,
then the median value is taken as the value of data point (N+1)/2. If N is even, then the median is reported
as the mean value of points N/2 and (N+2)/2. Equivalent treatment is used for the quartile boundaries.
For an example of using the stats command to help annotate a subsequent plot, see
stats.dem.
The current implementation does not allow analysis if either the X or Y axis is set to log-scaling. This
restriction may be removed in a later version.
System
system "command" executes "command" using the standard shell. See shell (p. 169). If called as
a function, system("command") returns the resulting character stream from stdout as a string. One
optional trailing newline is ignored.
This can be used to import external functions into gnuplot scripts:
f(x) = real(system(sprintf("somecommand %f", x)))
Test
This command graphically tests or presents terminal and palette capabilities.
Syntax:
control SDK platform:VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
The encoded images in PDF file can also be viewed and processed online through our VB.NET PDF web viewer. No, image quality will not degrade.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C#: Frequently Asked Questions for Using XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .
If you have additional questions or requests, please send email to support@rasteredge. com. The site configured in IIS has no permission to operate.
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
175
test {terminal | palette [rgb|rbg|grb|gbr|brg|bgr]}
test or test terminal creates a display of line and point styles and other useful things appropriate for and
supported by the terminal you are just using.
test palette plots proles of R(z),G(z),B(z), where 0<=z<=1. These are the RGB components of the
current color palette. It also plots the apparent net intensity as calculated using NTSC coecients to map
RGB onto a grayscale. The optional parameter, a permutation of letters rgb, determines the sequence in
which the r,g,b proles are drawn.
Undene
Clear one or more previously dened user variables. This is useful in order to reset the state of a script
containing an initialization test.
Avariable name can contain the wildcard character * as last character. If the wildcard character is found,
all variables with names that begin with the prex preceding the wildcard will be removed. This is useful to
remove several variables sharing a common prex. Note that the wildcard character is only allowed at the
end of the variable name! Specifying the wildcard character as sole argument to undene has no eect.
Example:
undefine foo foo1 foo2
if (!exists("foo")) load "initialize.gp"
bar = 1; bar1 = 2; bar2 = 3
undefine bar*
# removes all three variables
Unset
Options set using the set command may be returned to their default state by the corresponding unset
command. The unset command may contain an optional iteration clause. See iteration (p. 71).
Examples:
set xtics mirror rotate by -45 0,10,100
...
unset xtics
# Unset labels numbered between 100 and 200
unset for [i=100:200] label i
Terminal
The default terminal that is active at the time of program entry depends on the system platform, gnuplot
build options, andthe environmental variable GNUTERM. Whatever this default may be, gnuplot saves it in
the internal variable GNUTERM. The unset terminal command restores this initial state. It is equivalent
to set terminal GNUTERM.
Update
This command writes the current values of the t parameters into the given le, formatted as an initial-value
le (as described in the tsection). This is useful for saving the current values for later use or for restarting
aconverged or stopped t.
Syntax:
update <filename> {<filename>}
control SDK platform:C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert Dicom to Tiff Image File
If you need to convert and change one image to another image in C# program, there would be no need for RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:RasterEdge Product License Options
Among all listed products on purchase page, Twain SDK has no Server License and only SDK To know more details or make an order, please contact us via email.
www.rasteredge.com
176
gnuplot 4.6
If a second lename is supplied, the updated values are written to this le, and the original parameter le is
left unmodied.
Otherwise, if the le already exists, gnuplot rst renames it by appending .old and then opens a new le.
That is, "update ’fred’" behaves the same as "!rename fred fred.old; update ’fred.old’ ’fred’". [On
DOS and other systems that use the twelve-character "lename.ext" naming convention, "ext" will be "old"
and "lename" will be related (hopefully recognizably) to the initial name. Renaming is not done at all on
VMS systems, since they use le-versioning.]
Please see t (p. 63) for more information.
While
Syntax:
while (<expr>) {
<commands>
}
Execute a block of commands repeatedly so long as <expr> evaluates to a non-zero value. This command
cannot be mixed with old-style (un-bracketed) if/else statements. See if (p.70).
Part IV
Terminal types
Complete list of terminals
Gnuplot supports a large number of output formats. These are selected by choosing an appropriate terminal
type, possibly with additional modifying options. See set terminal (p. 154).
This document may describe terminal types that are not available to you because they were not congured
or installed on your system. To see a list of terminals available on a particular gnuplot installation, type ’set
terminal’ with no modiers.
Aed767
The aed512 and aed767 terminal drivers support AED graphics terminals. The two drivers dier only in
their horizontal ranges, which are 512 and 768 pixels, respectively. Their vertical range is 575 pixels. There
are no options for these drivers.
Aifm
NOTE: Outdated terminal, originally written for Adobe Illustrator 3.0+. Since Adobe Illustrator un-
derstands PostScript level 1 commands directly, you should use set terminal post level1 instead.
Syntax:
set terminal aifm {color|monochrome} {"<fontname>"} {<fontsize>}
Aqua
This terminal relies on AquaTerm.app for display on Mac OS X.
Syntax:
gnuplot 4.6
177
set terminal aqua {<n>} {title "<wintitle>"} {size <x> <y>}
{font "<fontname>{,<fontsize>}"}
{{no}enhanced} {solid|dashed} {dl <dashlength>}}
where <n> is the number of the window to draw in (default is 0), <wintitle> is the name shown in the title
bar (default "Figure <n>"), <x> <y> is the size of the plot (default is 846x594 pt = 11.75x8.25 in).
Use <fontname> to specify the font (default is "Times-Roman"), and <fontsize> to specify the font size
(default is 14.0 pt).
The aqua terminal supports enhancedtext mode (see enhanced (p.23)), except for overprint. Font support
is limited to the fonts available on the system. Character encoding can be selected by set encoding and
currently supports iso
latin
1, iso
latin
2, cp1250, and UTF8 (default).
Lines can be drawn either solid or dashed, (default is solid) and the dash spacing can be modied by
<dashlength> which is a multiplier > 0.
Be
The be terminal type is present if gnuplot is built for the beos operating system and for use with X servers.
It is selected at program startup if the DISPLAY environment variable is set, if the TERM environment
variable is set to xterm, or if the -display command line option is used.
Syntax:
set terminal be {reset} {<n>}
Multiple plot windows are supported: set terminal be <n> directs the output to plot window number n.
If n>0, the terminal number will be appended to the window title and the icon will be labeled gplt <n>.
The active window may distinguished by a change in cursor (from default to crosshair.)
Plot windows remain open even when the gnuplot driver is changed to a dierent device. A plot window
can be closed by pressing the letter q while that window has input focus, or by choosing close from a
window manager menu. All plot windows can be closed by specifying reset, which actually terminates the
subprocess which maintains the windows (unless -persist was specied).
Plot windows will automatically be closed at the end of the session unless the -persist option was given.
The size or aspect ratio of a plot may be changed by resizing the gnuplot window.
Linewidths and pointsizes may be changed from within gnuplot with set linestyle.
For terminal type be, gnuplot accepts (when initialized) the standard X Toolkit options and resources such
as geometry, font, and name from the command line arguments or a conguration le. See the X(1) man
page (or its equivalent) for a description of such options.
A number of other gnuplot options are available for the be terminal. These may be specied either as
command-line options when gnuplot is invoked or as resources in the conguration le ".Xdefaults". They
are set upon initialization and cannot be altered during a gnuplot session.
Command-line
options
In addition to the X Toolkit options, the following options may be specied on the command line when
starting gnuplot or as resources in your ".Xdefaults" le:
‘-mono‘
forces monochrome rendering on color displays.
‘-gray‘
requests grayscale rendering on grayscale or color displays.
(Grayscale displays receive monochrome rendering by default.)
‘-clear‘
requests that the window be cleared momentarily before a
new plot is displayed.
‘-raise‘
raises plot window after each plot.
‘-noraise‘ does not raise plot window after each plot.
‘-persist‘ plots windows survive after main gnuplot program exits.
178
gnuplot 4.6
The options are shown above in their command-line syntax. When entered as resources in ".Xdefaults",
they require a dierent syntax.
Example:
gnuplot*gray: on
gnuplot also provides a command line option(-pointsize <v>) and a resource, gnuplot*pointsize: <v>,
to control the size of points plotted with the points plotting style. The value v is a real number (greater
than 0 and less than or equal to ten) used as a scaling factor for point sizes. For example, -pointsize 2 uses
points twice the default size, and -pointsize 0.5 uses points half the normal size.
Monochrome
options
For monochrome displays, gnuplot does not honor foreground or background colors. The default is black-
on-white. -rv or gnuplot*reverseVideo: on requests white-on-black.
Color
resources
For color displays, gnuplot honors the following resources (shown here with their default values) or the
greyscale resources. The values may be color names as listed in the BE rgb.txt le on your system, hex-
adecimal RGB color specications (see BE documentation), or a color name followed by a comma and an
intensity value from 0 to 1. For example, blue, 0.5 means a half intensity blue.
gnuplot*background: white
gnuplot*textColor: black
gnuplot*borderColor: black
gnuplot*axisColor: black
gnuplot*line1Color: red
gnuplot*line2Color: green
gnuplot*line3Color: blue
gnuplot*line4Color: magenta
gnuplot*line5Color: cyan
gnuplot*line6Color: sienna
gnuplot*line7Color: orange
gnuplot*line8Color: coral
The command-line syntax for these is, for example,
Example:
gnuplot -background coral
Grayscale
resources
When -gray is selected, gnuplot honors the following resources for grayscale or color displays (shown here
with their default values). Note that the default background is black.
gnuplot*background: black
gnuplot*textGray: white
gnuplot*borderGray: gray50
gnuplot*axisGray: gray50
gnuplot*line1Gray: gray100
gnuplot*line2Gray: gray60
gnuplot*line3Gray: gray80
gnuplot*line4Gray: gray40
gnuplot*line5Gray: gray90
gnuplot*line6Gray: gray50
gnuplot*line7Gray: gray70
gnuplot*line8Gray: gray30
gnuplot 4.6
179
Line
resources
gnuplot honors the following resources for setting the width (in pixels) of plot lines (shown here with their
default values.) 0 or 1 means a minimal width line of 1 pixel width. A value of 2 or 3 may improve the
appearance of some plots.
gnuplot*borderWidth: 2
gnuplot*axisWidth: 0
gnuplot*line1Width: 0
gnuplot*line2Width: 0
gnuplot*line3Width: 0
gnuplot*line4Width: 0
gnuplot*line5Width: 0
gnuplot*line6Width: 0
gnuplot*line7Width: 0
gnuplot*line8Width: 0
gnuplot honors the following resources for setting the dash style used for plotting lines. 0 means a solid
line. A two-digit number jk (j and k are >= 1 and <= 9) means a dashed line with a repeated pattern of
jpixels on followed by k pixels o. For example, ’16’ is a "dotted" line with one pixel on followed by six
pixels o. More elaborate on/o patterns can be specied with a four-digit value. For example, ’4441’ is four
on, four o, four on, one o. The default values shown below are for monochrome displays or monochrome
rendering on color or grayscale displays. For color displays, the default for each is 0 (solid line) except for
axisDashes which defaults to a ’16’ dotted line.
gnuplot*borderDashes: 0
gnuplot*axisDashes: 16
gnuplot*line1Dashes: 0
gnuplot*line2Dashes: 42
gnuplot*line3Dashes: 13
gnuplot*line4Dashes: 44
gnuplot*line5Dashes: 15
gnuplot*line6Dashes: 4441
gnuplot*line7Dashes: 42
gnuplot*line8Dashes: 13
Cairolatex
The cairolatex terminal device generates encapsulated PostScript (*.eps) or PDF output using the cairo and
pango support libraries and uses LaTeX for text output using the same routines as the epslatex terminal.
Syntax:
set terminal cairolatex
{eps | pdf}
{standalone | input}
{blacktext | colortext | colourtext}
{header <header> | noheader}
{mono|color} {solid|dashed}
{{no}transparent} {{no}crop} {background <rgbcolor>}
{font <font>} {fontscale <scale>}
{linewidth <lw>} {rounded|butt} {dashlength <dl>}
{size <XX>{unit},<YY>{unit}}
The cairolatex terminal prints a plot like terminal epscairo or terminal pdfcairo but transfers the texts
to LaTeX instead of including them in the graph. For reference of options not explained here see pdfcairo
(p. 209).
eps and pdf select the type of grahics output. Use eps with latex/dvips and pdf for pd atex.
180
gnuplot 4.6
blacktext forces all text to be written in black even in color mode;
The cairolatex driver oers a special way of controlling text positioning: (a) If any text string begins with
’f’, you also need to include a ’g’ at the end of the text, and the whole text will be centered both horizontally
and vertically by LaTeX. (b) If the text string begins with ’[’, you need to continue it with: a position
specication (up to two out of t,b,l,r,c), ’]f’, the text itself, and nally, ’g’. The text itself may be anything
LaTeX can typeset as an LR-box. nrulefgfg’s may help for best positioning. See also the documentation for
the pslatex (p.216) terminal driver. To create multiline labels, use nshortstack, for example
set ylabel ’[r]{\shortstack{first line \\ second line}}’
The back option of set label commands is handled slightly dierent than in other terminals. Labels using
’back’ are printed behind all other elements of the plot while labels using ’front’ are printed above everything
else.
The driver produces two dierent les, one for the eps or pdf part of the gure and one for the LaTeX part.
The name of the LaTeX le is taken from the set output command. The name of the eps/pdf le is derived
by replacing the le extension (normally ’.tex’) with ’.eps’ or ’.pdf’ instead. There is no LaTeX output if no
output le is given! Remember to close the output le before next plot unless in multiplot mode.
In your LaTeX documents use ’ninputflenameg’ to include the gure. The ’.eps’ or ’.pdf’ le is included by
the command nincludegraphicsf...g, so you must also include nusepackagefgraphicxg in the LaTeX preamble.
If you want to use coloured text (option colourtext) you also have to include nusepackagefcolorg in the
LaTeX preamble.
The behaviour concerning font selection depends on the header mode. In all cases, the given font size is used
for the calculation of proper spacing. When not using the standalone mode the actual LaTeX font and font
size at the point of inclusion is taken, so use LaTeX commands for changing fonts. If you use e.g. 12pt as
font size for your LaTeX document, use ’", 12"’ as options. The font name is ignored. If using standalone
the given font and font size are used, see below for a detailed description.
If text is printed coloured is controlled by the TeX booleans nifGPcolor and nifGPblacktext. Only if
nifGPcolor is true and nifGPblacktext is false, text is printed coloured. You may either change them in
the generated TeX le or provide them globally in your TeX le, for example by using
\newif\ifGPblacktext
\GPblacktexttrue
in the preamble of your document. The local assignment is only done if no global value is given.
When using the cairolatex terminal give the name of the TeX le in the set output command including the
le extension (normally ".tex"). The graph lename is generated by replacing the extension.
If using the standalone mode a complete LaTeX header is added to the LaTeX le; and "-inc" is added
to the lename of the gaph le. The standalone mode generates a TeX le that produces output with the
correct size when using dvips, pdfTeX, or VTeX. The default, input, generates a le that has to be included
into a LaTeX document using the ninput command.
If a font other than "" or "default" is givenit is interpretedas LaTeX font name. It contains up to three parts,
separated by a comma: ’fontname,fontseries,fontshape’. If the default fontshape or fontseries are requested,
they can be omitted. Thus, the real syntax for the fontname is ’ffontnamegf,fontseriesgf,fontshapeg’. The
naming convention for all parts is given by the LaTeX font scheme. The fontname is 3 to 4 characters
long and is built as follows: One character for the font vendor, two characters for the name of the font, and
optionally one additional character for special fonts, e.g., ’j’ for fonts with old-style numerals or ’x’ for expert
fonts. The names of many fonts is described in
http://www.tug.org/fontname/fontname.pdf
For example, ’cmr’ stands for Computer Modern Roman, ’ptm’ for Times-Roman, and ’phv’ for Helvetica.
The font series denotes the thickness of the glyphs, in most cases ’m’ for normal ("medium") and ’bx’ or
’b’ for bold fonts. The font shape is ’n’ for upright, ’it’ for italics, ’sl’ for slanted, or ’sc’ for small caps, in
general. Some fonts may provide dierent font series or shapes.
Examples:
Use Times-Roman boldface (with the same shape as in the surrounding text):
set terminal cairolatex font ’ptm,bx’
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested