GUIDELINES FOR 
ACCESSIBLE 
INFORMATION 
ICT FOR INFORMATION ACCESSIBILITY 
IN LEARNING (ICT4IAL) 
Convert pdf to ppt online without email - software control dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to ppt online without email - software control dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Guidelines for Accessible Information 
European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive 
Education, 2015 
© 2015 by the European Agency for Special Needs 
and Inclusive Education. Guidelines for Accessible Information. ICT for 
Information Accessibility in Learning (ICT4IAL). This work is an Open 
Educational Resource licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-
ShareAlike 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ or send a letter to Creative 
Commons, PO Box 1866, Mountain View, CA 94042, USA. 
Editor: Marcella Turner-Cmuchal, European Agency for Special Needs and 
Inclusive Education. 
This project has been funded with support from the European 
Union. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and 
the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which 
may be made of the information contained therein. 
The ICT for Information Accessibility in Learning project is a multi-disciplinary 
network of the following European and international partners, representing 
learning and ICT communities 
Global Initiative for 
Inclusive ICTs
International Association of 
Universities
United Nations 
Educational, Scientific 
and Cultural 
Organization
The ICT for Information Accessibility in Learning project partners wish to 
gratefully acknowledge everyone who contributed to the project, particularly 
the Partner Advisory Group, the Guideline Development Workshop Experts and 
those who gave feedback on the Guidelines. The full list appears in the 
Acknowledgements section of the ICT4IAL website. 
DAISY Consortium
European Agency for Special 
Needs and Inclusive 
Education
European Schoolnet
Guidelines for Accessible Information 
CONTENTS 
Preamble ............................................................................................... 5 
Introduction and rationale for the Guidelines .............................................. 6 
What is meant by ‘accessible information’? .............................................. 7 
Who are these Guidelines for? ................................................................ 8 
What support is provided through the Guidelines? .................................... 9 
Step 1: Making different types of information accessible ............................ 12 
Section 1: Making your text accessible .................................................. 12 
1.1 How to make your textual information accessible ........................... 12 
1.2 Resources to help make your textual information accessible ............ 14 
Section 2: Making your images accessible ............................................. 15 
2.1 How to make your image-based information accessible ................... 15 
2.2 Resources to help make your image-based information accessible.... 15 
Section 3: Making your audio accessible ................................................ 16 
3.1 How to make your audio information accessible ............................. 16 
3.2 Resources to help make your audio information accessible .............. 16 
Section 4: Making your video accessible ................................................ 18 
4.1 How to make your video media accessible ..................................... 18 
4.2 Resources to help make your video media accessible ...................... 18 
Step 2: Making the delivery of media accessible ....................................... 19 
Section 1: Making your electronic documents accessible.......................... 19 
1.1 How to make your electronic documents accessible ........................ 19 
1.2 Resources to help make your electronic documents accessible ......... 20 
Section 2: Making your online resources accessible ................................ 22 
2.1 How to make your online resources accessible ............................... 22 
2.2 Resources to help make your online resources accessible ................ 23 
Section 3: Making your printed material accessible ................................. 25 
3.1 How to make your printed material accessible ............................... 25 
3.2 Resources to help make your printed material accessible ................ 25 
Applying the Guidelines to different media and specific formats .................. 26 
Slideshows and presentations .............................................................. 26 
Guidelines for Accessible Information 
Step 1: .......................................................................................... 26 
Step 2: .......................................................................................... 27 
Online or e-learning tools .................................................................... 28 
Step 1: .......................................................................................... 28 
Step 2: .......................................................................................... 28 
PDF documents .................................................................................. 30 
Step 1: .......................................................................................... 30 
Step 2: .......................................................................................... 30 
Glossary .............................................................................................. 31 
Key terms ......................................................................................... 31 
Guidelines for Accessible Information 
PREAMBLE 
The Guidelines for accessible information are an open educational resource 
(OER) to support the creation of accessible information in general and for 
learning in particular. These Guidelines do not aim to contain all available 
information on accessibility or cover every aspect of the field, but to 
summarise and link to existing and useful resources which can be helpful for 
non-information and communications technologies (ICT) experts. 
The purpose of developing such Guidelines is to support the work of 
practitioners and organisations working in the field of education to provide 
accessible information to all learners who require and will benefit from more 
accessible information. The procedure for creating accessible information is 
universal. Therefore, these Guidelines support all individuals or organisations 
wishing to create information that is accessible in different formats. 
The justifications for the development of such Guidelines are very clear in both 
European and international policy, which highlight access to information as a 
human right. The ICT4IAL website includes a summary of these key policies. 
Within the Guidelines you will find: 
a general introduction, description of the main terms, the target group 
and scope of the Guidelines; 
steps to make information and media accessible, including 
recommendations and relevant resources; 
examples of accessibility checklists for specific formats; and 
an extensive glossary providing working definitions of relevant terms. 
The Guidelines include two steps for action that build upon each other. By 
following the Guidelines in Step 1 to make different types of information 
accessible, Step 2 becomes easier, as already accessible information is 
available to be used within the different media. 
The Guidelines give guidance on actions to be taken and resources are 
provided which give more in-depth information. 
The Guidelines have been developed as an OER and are intended to be 
adapted to varying contexts and technological developments, as well as to 
grow with usage. 
Throughout all sections of the Guidelines, you will find links either to an 
explanation of a key term within the glossary or to external resources. 
These Guidelines were developed through the ICT for Information Accessibility 
in Learning (ICT4IAL) project, which was co-funded by the Lifelong Learning 
Programme of the European Commission
Guidelines for Accessible Information 
INTRODUCTION AND RATIONALE FOR THE 
GUIDELINES 
During this time of technical innovation, every person can potentially become 
an author of information that is used for learning, but not everyone needs to 
be an expert in making information accessible. However, it is important for 
everyone to be aware that information may not be accessible to different users 
depending on the way it is presented. 
Currently the World Health Organization (WHO) states: 
Over a billion people, about 15% of the world’s population, have some 
form of disability. 
Between 110 million and 190 million adults have significant difficulties in 
functioning. 
Rates of disability are increasing due to population ageing and increases 
in chronic health conditions, among other causes (WHO, 2014). 
Some 15% of the world’s population cannot access information, unless it is 
made accessible. 
Within the Guidelines, the term ‘learners with disabilities and/or special needs’ 
is used to refer to the potential target group of people who can benefit from 
more accessible information provision. This phrasing respects the terminology 
of both the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with 
Disabilities – UNCRPD (2006) and agreements reached with the ICT4IAL 
project partners, as the term ‘special needs’ often covers a broader range of 
learners with additional needs than those identified as having disabilities as 
defined under the UNCRPD. 
It is now technologically possible for many people to create and share 
information. In addition, there are numerous resources for these authors to 
learn how to create documents that do not exclude anyone from accessing and 
using them. This does not require every author of information to become an 
expert in information accessibility for all forms of disabilities and/or special 
needs, but it does mean that all authors should aim to achieve a minimum 
standard of information accessibility that is universally beneficial for all users. 
It is crucial to provide information in general – and information for learning in 
particular – in a way that is accessible to all users. Providing information that 
is not accessible creates an additional barrier for learners with disabilities 
and/or special needs. Information that is not accessible does not support 
people in the best way possible and excludes them from benefiting from and 
participating in knowledge exchange. 
With this rationale in mind, the ICT for Information Accessibility in Learning 
project developed a set of Guidelines to support practitioners in creating 
accessible material. 
Guidelines for Accessible Information 
As an open educational resource (OER) – which permits free use and re-
purposing by others – these Guidelines aim to provide easy and practical 
instructions for authors to create accessible information that can be shared 
through accessible media. The Guidelines can be applied to all types of 
information produced, but will be especially beneficial to learners with 
disabilities and/or special needs when applied to information for learning. 
However, accessibility of information is not only beneficial for learners with 
disabilities and/or special needs, but has the potential to benefit all learners. 
Therefore the Guidelines also take an inclusive approach and do not focus on 
single disabilities. 
What is meant by ‘accessible information’? 
Within the Guidelines ‘accessibility is understood as described in Article 9 of 
the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities as: 
… appropriate measures to ensure to persons with disabilities access, on 
an equal basis with others, to the physical environment, to transportation, 
to information and communications, including information and 
communications technologies and systems, and to other facilities and 
services open or provided to the public, both in urban and in rural areas 
(United Nations, 2006, p. 8). 
This is a wider concept covering many environmental and physical factors. The 
Guidelines focus on one area within this definition – the accessibility of 
information. 
Within the Guidelines, information is understood to refer to a message or data 
that is communicated concerning a specific issue. Specifically, these Guidelines 
focus on the aim of sharing messages to inform learners and build knowledge 
in a learning environment. 
Within the Guidelines the different types of information considered are text, 
image, audio and video. These types of information can be shared or delivered 
through different media channels, such as electronic documents, online 
resources, videos and printed material. 
These media channels usually contain different types of information 
simultaneously. 
In relation to media channels, the Guidelines consider how information is 
converted or packaged into a certain format using (for example) text-editing 
programmes – and delivered or presented to the user. 
In education, the types of materials this applies to include (but are not limited 
to): 
Learning materials 
Course content 
Course descriptions 
Guidelines for Accessible Information 
Registration information and registration systems 
Research material 
University and library websites 
Catalogues and repositories 
e-learning software and learning platforms. 
Accessible information is understood as information provided in formats that 
allow every user and learner to access content ‘on an equal basis with others’ 
(UNCRPD). Accessible information is ideally information that: 
allows all users and learners to easily orientate themselves within the 
content; and 
can be effectively perceived and understood by different perception 
channels, such as using eyes and/or ears and/or fingers. 
Accessibility is not the same as usability. Accessibility is about ensuring people 
with disabilities and/or special needs have access on an equal basis as 
everyone else. Usability is about creating an effective, efficient and satisfactory 
user experience. 
Full 100% accessibility of information for every user or learner is an ideal that 
is not easy to achieve. However, technology allows us to create and share 
information in a way in which the content is adaptable by the user, which 
means users may change the content according to their needs. 
Numerous additional terms related to accessibility appear throughout this 
resource. All relevant terms are defined in the glossary
Who are these Guidelines for? 
The intended audience for these Guidelines is any individual or organisation 
that creates, publishes, distributes and/or uses information within a learning 
environment. This includes, but is not limited to, information providers such 
as: 
School staff 
Librarians 
University staff 
Communication officers 
Publishers 
Support groups and non-governmental organisations. 
It is important to note that, although an individual author or information 
provider can initiate many actions to improve accessibility, providing accessible 
information in general and for learning in particular may require the 
involvement of a wider group of stakeholders, for example: 
Guidelines for Accessible Information 
Decision makers in schools and universities who support accessible 
approaches and have agreed policies on accessibility; 
Computer scientists and information technology (IT) experts responsible 
for establishing accessible internet platforms, tools, sites and repositories 
where accessible information can be shared. 
The Guidelines focus on possibilities for non-expert practitioners to create 
accessible information within their working environments. Recommendations 
for organisations on how to support accessible information provision at an 
organisational level have been developed in the Accessible Information 
Provision for Lifelong Learning project. 
What support is provided through the Guidelines? 
The Guidelines aim to be content and context free, but offer some concrete 
examples of how they can be applied to different learning situations. 
The Guidelines consider different levels of information accessibility, ranging 
from easy instructions to professional instructions, and include some aspects 
for ICT and accessibility experts. There are many steps an average IT user can 
take to achieve a certain degree of accessibility. However, the creation of some 
materials – such as e-books and interactive learning materials – requires more 
sophisticated software than the average user may have access to. These 
Guidelines focus on the steps every practitioner can take to make the learning 
information they produce as accessible as possible. 
These Guidelines are available as a stand-alone document, as well as an OER 
that supports searching across different types of information and media. The 
Guidelines as OER are open for users to adapt to their context, as well as to 
comment on and contribute to. 
The Guidelines build on a set of premises: 
The general steps to achieve accessible information are universal. 
Therefore the Guidelines apply to information in general and to 
information for learning in particular. 
The Guidelines take an inclusive approach and do not focus on particular 
disabilities or special educational needs. 
The challenges regarding the accessibility of content vary hugely 
according to the structural complexity of the content. For example, a 
typical bestseller book is structurally less complex than 
educational/scientific material. 
The accessibility of learning materials has specific challenges, for 
example interactivity between the learner and the content, filling in 
forms or usage of formulas for which technology does not yet offer easy 
solutions for non-ICT experts. 
In some cases, providing accessible information is not enough. Many 
users and learners with disabilities and/or special needs also require 
Guidelines for Accessible Information 
10 
access to assistive technologies. The use of assistive devices is not made 
redundant by the provision of accessible information, but complements 
it. 
Providers of information in general and information for learning in 
particular do not have to be accessibility experts in order to achieve a 
basic level of information accessibility. 
The Guidelines do not encompass every step in the production of 
accessible information, nor do they replace existing resources. The 
Guidelines are a carefully considered and validated starting point for 
producing accessible information that leads to more detailed resources 
including descriptions, tutorials, recommendations or standards. 
The Guidelines are not a static resource, but are intended to be adapted 
to varying contexts, technological developments and to grow with usage 
(for example, adaptations could be made for texts with a right-to-left 
reading direction). 
The Guidelines can support the creation of new, accessible content, as 
well as support the review of existing material. 
Currently technology is in a transition phase regarding the production, 
distribution and reading of accessible information. Software allows users 
to create most material in an accessible format. However, in newer 
technologies, such as e-books, games and mobile applications, software 
for average users to create this is not always available. Therefore there 
are currently limits to what the average user can create with accessibility 
in mind. 
Given the limits of producing accessible information with average 
software, there are actions which can be outsourced to third parties, 
such as IT specialists or web developers. These Guidelines can support 
requirements to be mentioned as criteria in the procurement process. 
These Guidelines build on two steps for action: 
Step 1 describes how to create accessible information via text, images, and 
audio. 
Step 2 considers how media can be made accessible – for example, electronic 
documents, online sources or printed material. 
These two steps build upon each other. By following the Guidelines in Step 1 to 
make different types of information accessible, Step 2 becomes easier as 
already accessible information is available to be used within the different 
media. 
For each step, the Guidelines provide recommendations on how different types 
of information can be made accessible. Each recommendation is accompanied 
by a list of resources available to support this process. The resources listed in 
the following sections are categorised into: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested