gnuplot 4.6
181
Use Helvetica, boldface, italics:
set terminal cairolatex font ’phv,bx,it’
Continue to use the surrounding font in slanted shape:
set terminal cairolatex font ’,,sl’
Use small capitals:
set terminal cairolatex font ’,,sc’
By this method, only text fonts are changed. If you also want to change the math fonts you have to use the
"gnuplot.cfg" le or the header option, described below.
In standalone mode, the font size is taken from the given font size in the set terminal command. To be
able to use a specied font size, a le "size<size>.clo" has to reside in the LaTeX search path. By default,
10pt, 11pt, and 12pt are supported. If the package "extsizes" is installed, 8pt, 9pt, 14pt, 17pt, and 20pt are
added.
The header option takes a string as argument. This string is written into the generated LaTeX le. If using
the standalone mode, it is written into the preamble, directly before the nbeginfdocumentg command. In
the input mode, it is placed directly after the nbegingroup command to ensure that all settings are local to
the plot.
Examples:
Use T1 fontencoding, change the text and math font to Times-Roman as well as the sans-serif font to
Helvetica:
set terminal cairolatex standalone header \
"\\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}\n\\usepackage{mathptmx}\n\\usepackage{helvet}"
Use a boldface font in the plot, not in uencing the text outside the plot:
set terminal cairolatex input header "\\bfseries"
If the le "gnuplot.cfg" is found by LaTeX it is input in the preamble the LaTeX document, when using
standalone mode. It can be used for further settings, e.g., changing the document font to Times-Roman,
Helvetica, and Courier, including math fonts (handled by "mathptmx.sty"):
\usepackage{mathptmx}
\usepackage[scaled=0.92]{helvet}
\usepackage{courier}
The le "gnuplot.cfg" is loaded before the header information given by the header command. Thus, you
can use header to overwrite some of settings performed using "gnuplot.cfg"
Canvas
The canvas terminal creates a set of javascript commands that draw onto the HTML5 canvas element.
Syntax:
set terminal canvas {size <xsize>, <ysize>} {background <rgb_color>}
{font {<fontname>}{,<fontsize>}} | {fsize <fontsize>}
{{no}enhanced} {linewidth <lw>}
{rounded | butt}
{solid | dashed {dashlength <dl>}}
{standalone {mousing} | name ’<funcname>’}
{jsdir ’URL/for/javascripts’}
{title ’<some string>’}
where <xsize> and <ysize> set the size of the plot area in pixels. The default size in standalone mode is
600 by 400 pixels. The default font size is 10.
NB: Only one font is available, the ascii portion of Hershey simplex Roman provided in the le canvastext.js.
You can replace this with the le canvasmath.js, which contains also UTF-8 encoded Hershey simplex Greek
Pdf to ppt converter online - control SDK system:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to ppt converter online - control SDK system:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
182
gnuplot 4.6
and math symbols. For consistency with other terminals, it is also possible to use font "name,size".
Currently the font name is ignored, but browser support for named fonts is likely to arrive eventually.
The default standalone mode creates an html page containing javascript code that renders the plot using
the HTML 5 canvas element. The html page links to two required javascript les ’canvastext.js’ and ’gnu-
plot
common.js’. An additional le ’gnuplot
dashedlines.js’ is needed to support dashed lines. By default
these point to local les, on unix-like systems usually in directory /usr/local/share/gnuplot/<version>/js.
See installation notes for other platforms. You can change this by using the jsdir option to specify either
adierent local directory or a general URL. The latter is usually appropriate if the plot is exported for
viewing on remote client machines.
All plots produced by the canvas terminal are mouseable. The additional keyword mousing causes the
standalone mode to add a mouse-tracking box underneath the plot. It also adds a link to a javascript
le ’gnuplot
mouse.js’ and to a stylesheet for the mouse box ’gnuplot
mouse.css’ in the same local or URL
directory as ’canvastext.js’.
The name option creates a le containing only javascript. Both the javascript function it contains and the
id of the canvas element that it draws onto are taken from the following string parameter. The commands
set term canvas name ’fishplot’
set output ’fishplot.js’
will create a le containing a javascript function shplot() that will draw onto a canvas with id=shplot. An
html page that invokes this javascript function must also load the canvastext.js function as described above.
Aminimal html le to wrap the shplot created above might be:
<html>
<head>
<script src="canvastext.js"></script>
<script src="gnuplot_common.js"></script>
</head>
<body onload="fishplot();">
<script src="fishplot.js"></script>
<canvas id="fishplot" width=600 height=400>
<div id="err_msg">No support for HTML 5 canvas element</div>
</canvas>
</body>
</html>
The individual plots drawn on this canvas will have names shplot
plot
1, shplot
plot
2, and so on. These
can be referenced by external javascript routines, for example gnuplot.toggle
visibility("shplot
plot
2").
Cgi
The cgi and hcgi terminal drivers support SCO CGI drivers. hcgi is for printers; the environment variable
CGIPRNTmust be set. cgi may be used for either a display or hardcopy; the environment variable CGIDISP
is checked, rst, then CGIPRNT. These terminals have no options.
Cgm
The cgm terminal generates a Computer Graphics Metale, Version 1. This le format is a subset of the
ANSI X3.122-1986 standard entitled "Computer Graphics - Metale for the Storage and Transfer of Picture
Description Information".
Syntax:
set terminal cgm {color | monochrome} {solid | dashed} {{no}rotate}
{<mode>} {width <plot_width>} {linewidth <line_width>}
{font "<fontname>,<fontsize>"}
{background <rgb_color>}
[deprecated]
{<color0> <color1> <color2> ...}
control SDK system:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PPTX/PPT File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
Our XDoc.Converter for .NET can help you to easily achieve high performance PDF conversion from Microsoft PowerPoint (.ppt and .pptx).
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
183
solid draws all curves with solid lines, overriding any dashed patterns; <mode> is landscape, portrait, or
default; <plot
width> is the assumed width of the plot in points; <line
width> is the line width in points
(default 1); <fontname> is the name of a font (see list of fonts below) <fontsize> is the size of the font in
points (default 12).
The rst six options can be in any order. Selecting default sets all options to their default values.
The mechanism of setting line colors in the set term command is deprecated. Instead you should set the
background using a separate keyword and set the line colors using set linetype. The deprecated mechanism
accepted colors of the form ’xrrggbb’, where x is the literal character ’x’ and ’rrggbb’ are the red, green and
blue components in hex. The rst color was used for the background, subsequent colors are assigned to
successive line types.
Examples:
set terminal cgm landscape color rotate dashed width 432 \
linewidth 1 ’Helvetica Bold’ 12
# defaults
set terminal cgm linewidth 2 14 # wider lines & larger font
set terminal cgm portrait "Times Italic" 12
set terminal cgm color solid
# no pesky dashes!
Cgm font
The rst part of a Computer Graphics Metale, the metale description, includes a font table. In the picture
body, a font is designated by an index into this table. By default, this terminal generates a table with the
following 35 fonts, plus six more with italic replaced by oblique, or vice-versa (since at least the Microsoft
Oce and Corel Draw CGM import lters treat italic and oblique as equivalent):
CGM fonts
Helvetica
Hershey/Cartographic
Roman
Helvetica Bold
Hershey/Cartographic
Greek
Helvetica Oblique
Hershey/Simplex
Roman
Helvetica Bold Oblique Hershey/Simplex
Greek
Times Roman
Hershey/Simplex
Script
Times Bold
Hershey/Complex
Roman
Times Italic
Hershey/Complex
Greek
Times Bold Italic
Hershey/Complex
Italic
Courier
Hershey/Complex
Cyrillic
Courier Bold
Hershey/Duplex
Roman
Courier Oblique
Hershey/Triplex
Roman
Courier Bold Oblique
Hershey/Triplex
Italic
Symbol
Hershey/Gothic
German
ZapfDingbats
Hershey/Gothic
English
Script
Hershey/Gothic
Italian
15
Hershey/Symbol
Set
1
Hershey/Symbol
Set
2
Hershey/Symbol
Math
The rst thirteen of these fonts are required for WebCGM. The Microsoft Oce CGM import lter imple-
ments the 13 standard fonts listed above, and also ’ZapfDingbats’ and ’Script’. However, the script font may
only be accessed under the name ’15’. For more on Microsoft import lter font substitutions, check its help
le which you may nd here:
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Cgmimp32.hlp
and/or its conguration le, which you may nd here:
C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Grphflt\Cgmimp32.cfg
In the set term command, you may specify a font name which does not appear in the default font table.
In that case, a new font table is constructed with the specied font as its rst entry. You must ensure that
control SDK system:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
How to for XImage. All Formats. XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. View & Process. XImage.Raster. How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
This VB.NET online tutorial page can help you processing control add-on can do PPT creating, loading powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
184
gnuplot 4.6
the spelling, capitalization, and spacing of the name are appropriate for the application that will read the
CGM le. (Gnuplot and any MIL-D-28003A compliant application ignore case in font names.) If you need
to add several new fonts, use several set term commands.
Example:
set terminal cgm ’Old English’
set terminal cgm ’Tengwar’
set terminal cgm ’Arabic’
set output ’myfile.cgm’
plot ...
set output
You cannot introduce a new font in a set label command.
Cgm fontsize
Fonts are scaled assuming the page is 6 inches wide. If the size command is used to change the aspect ratio
of the page or the CGM le is converted to a dierent width, the resulting font sizes will be scaled up or
down accordingly. To change the assumed width, use the width option.
Cgm linewidth
The linewidth option sets the width of lines in pt. The default width is 1 pt. Scaling is aected by the
actual width of the page, as discussed under the fontsize and width options.
Cgm rotate
The norotate option may be used to disable text rotation. For example, the CGM input lter for Word
for Windows 6.0c can accept rotated text, but the DRAW editor within Word cannot. If you edit a graph
(for example, to label a curve), all rotated text is restored to horizontal. The Y axis label will then extend
beyond the clip boundary. With norotate, the Y axis label starts in a less attractive location, but the page
can be edited without damage. The rotate option conrms the default behavior.
Cgm solid
The solid option may be used to disable dashed line styles in the plots. This is useful when color is enabled
and the dashing of the lines detracts from the appearance of the plot. The dashed option conrms the
default behavior, which gives a dierent dash pattern to each line type.
Cgm size
Default size of a CGM plot is 32599 units wide and 23457 units high for landscape, or 23457 units wide by
32599 units high for portrait.
Cgm width
All distances in the CGM le are in abstract units. The application that reads the le determines the size
of the nal plot. By default, the width of the nal plot is assumed to be 6 inches (15.24 cm). This distance
is used to calculate the correct font size, and may be changed with the width option. The keyword should
be followed by the width in points. (Here, a point is 1/72 inch, as in PostScript. This unit is known as a
"big point" in TeX.) Gnuplot expressions can be used to convert from other units.
Example:
set terminal cgm width 432
# default
set terminal cgm width 6*72
# same as above
set terminal cgm width 10/2.54*72
# 10 cm wide
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert PowerPoint to BMP Image with VB PPT
NET PPT document converter allows for PowerPoint conversion to both images and documents, like rendering PowerPoint to BMP, GIF, PNG, TIFF, JPEG, SVG or PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF
All Formats. XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. How to C#: Convert Word, Excel and PPT to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
gnuplot 4.6
185
Cgm nofontlist
The default font table includes the fonts recommended for WebCGM, which are compatible with the Com-
puter Graphics Metale input lter for Microsoft Oce and Corel Draw. Another application might use
dierent fonts and/or dierent font names, which may not be documented. The nofontlist (synonym win-
word6) option deletes the font table from the CGM le. In this case, the reading application should use a
default table. Gnuplot will still use its own default font table to select font indices. Thus, ’Helvetica’ will
give you an index of 1, whichshould get you the rst entry in your application’s default font table. ’Helvetica
Bold’ will give you its second entry, etc.
Context
ConTeXt is a macro package for TeX, highly integrated with Metapost (for drawing gures) and intended
for creation of high-quality PDF documents. The terminal outputs Metafun source, which can be edited
manually, but you should be able to congure most things from outside.
For an average user of ConTeXt + gnuplot module it’s recommended to refer to Using ConTeXt rather
than reading this page or to read the manual of the gnuplot module for ConTeXt.
The context terminal supports the following options:
Syntax:
set term context {default}
{defaultsize | size <scale> | size <xsize>{in|cm}, <ysize>{in|cm}}
{input | standalone}
{timestamp | notimestamp}
{noheader | header "<header>"}
{color | colour | monochrome}
{rounded | mitered | beveled} {round | butt | squared}
{dashed | solid} {dashlength | dl <dl>}
{linewidth | lw <lw>}
{fontscale <fontscale>}
{mppoints | texpoints}
{inlineimages | externalimages}
{defaultfont | font "{<fontname>}{,<fontsize>}"}
In non-standalone (input) graphic only parameters size to select graphic size, fontscale to scale all the
labels for a factor <fontscale> and font size, make sense, the rest is silently ignored and should be congured
in the .tex le which inputs the graphic. It’s highly recommended to set the proper fontsize if document
font diers from 12pt, so that gnuplot will know how much space to reserve for labels.
default resets all the options to their default values.
defaultsize sets the plot size to 5in,3in. size <scale> sets the plot size to <scale> times <default value>.
If two arguments are given (separated with ’,’), the rst one sets the horizontal size and the second one the
vertical size. Size may be given without units (in which case it means relative to the default value), with
inches (’in’) or centimeters (’cm’).
input (default) creates a graphic that can be included into another ConTeXt document. standalone adds
some lines, so that the document might be compiled as-is. You might also want to add header in that case.
Use header for any additional settings/denitions/macros that you might want to include in a standalone
graphic. noheader is the default.
notimestamp prevents printing creation time in comments (if version control is used, one may prefer not
to commit new version when only date changes).
color to make color plots is the default, but monochrome doesn’t do anything special yet. If you have
any good ideas how the behaviour should dier to suit the monochrome printers better, your suggestions are
welcome.
rounded (default), mitered and beveled control the shape of line joins. round (default), butt and
squared control the shape of line caps. See PostScript or PDF Reference Manual for explanation. For
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to detect PDF-417 barcode image from PowerPoint slide. VB.NET APIs to detect and decode
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use .NET Converter to Convert PPT to Raster
VB.NET PPT to raster images converter very well. Check PPT to PNG image converting sample code in VB powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
186
gnuplot 4.6
wild-behaving functions and thick lines it is better to use rounded and round to prevent sharp corners in
line joins. (Some general support for this should be added to Gnuplot, so that the same options could be
set for each line (style) separately).
dashed (default) uses dierent dash patterns for dierent line types, solid draws all plots with solid lines.
dashlength or dl scales the length of the dashed-line segments by <dl>. linewidth or lw scales all
linewidths by <lw>. (lw 1 stands for 0.5bp, which is the default line width when drawing with Metapost.)
fontscale scales text labels for factor <fontscale> relative to default document font.
mppoints uses predened point shapes, drawn in Metapost. texpoints uses easily congurable set of
symbols, dened with ConTeXt in the following way:
\defineconversion[my own points][+,{\ss x},\mathematics{\circ}]
\setupGNUPLOTterminal[context][points=tex,pointset=my own points]
inlineimages writes binary images to a string and only works in ConTeXt MKIV. externalimages writes
PNG les to disk and also works with ConTeXt MKII. Gnuplot needs to have support for PNG images built
in for this to work.
With font you can set font name and size in standalone graphics. In non-standalone (input) mode only the
font size is important to reserve enough space for text labels. The command
set term context font "myfont,ss,10"
will result in
\setupbodyfont[myfont,ss,10pt]
If you additionaly set fontscale to 0.8 for example, then the resulting font will be 8pt big and
set label ... font "myfont,12"
will come out as 9.6pt.
It is your own responsibility to provide proper typescripts (and header), otherwise switching the font will
have no eect. For a standard font in ConTeXt MKII (pdfTeX) you could use:
set terminal context standalone header ’\usetypescript[iwona][ec]’ \
font "iwona,ss,11"
Please take a look intoConTeXt documentation, wiki or mailinglist (archives) for any up-to-date information
about font usage.
Examples:
set terminal context size 10cm, 5cm
# 10cm, 5cm
set terminal context size 4in, 3in
# 4in, 3in
For standalone (whole-page) plots with labels in UTF-8 encoding:
set terminal context standalone header ’\enableregime[utf-8]’
Requirements
You need gnuplot module for ConTeXt
http://ctan.org/pkg/context-gnuplot
and a recent version of ConTeXt. If you want to call gnuplot on-the- y, you also need write18 enabled. In
most TeX distributions this can be set with shell
escape=t in texmf.cnf.
See
http://wiki.contextgarden.net/Gnuplot
for details about this terminal and for more exhaustive help & examples.
gnuplot 4.6
187
Calling gnuplot from ConTeXt
The easiest way to make plots in ConTeXt documents is
\usemodule[gnuplot]
\starttext
\title{How to draw nice plots with {\sc gnuplot}?}
\startGNUPLOTscript[sin]
set format y "%.1f"
plot sin(x) t ’$\sin(x)$’
\stopGNUPLOTscript
\useGNUPLOTgraphic[sin]
\stoptext
This will run gnuplot automatically and include the resulting gure in the document.
Corel
The corel terminal driver supports CorelDraw.
Syntax:
set terminal corel { default
| {monochrome | color
{"<font>" {<fontsize>
{<xsize> <ysize> {<linewidth> }}}}}
where the fontsize and linewidth are specied in points and the sizes ininches. The defaults are monochrome,
"SwitzerlandLight", 22, 8.2, 10 and 1.2.
Debug
This terminal is provided to allow for the debugging of gnuplot. It is likely to be of use only for users who
are modifying the source code.
Dumb
The dumb terminal driver plots into a text block using ascii characters. It has an optional size specication
and a trailing linefeed  ag.
Syntax:
set terminal dumb {size <xchars>,<ychars>} {[no]feed}
{[no]enhanced}
where <xchars> and <ychars> set the size of the text block. The default is 79 by 24. The last newline is
printed only if feed is enabled.
Example:
set term dumb size 60,15
plot [-5:6.5] sin(x) with impulse
1 +-------------------------------------------------+
0.8 +|||++
++||||++
sin(x) +----+ |
0.6 +|||||+
++|||||||+
|
0.4 +||||||+
++|||||||||+
|
0.2 +|||||||+
++|||||||||||+
+|
0 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++|
-0.2 +
+|||||||||||+
+|||||||||||+ |
-0.4 +
+|||||||||+
+|||||||||+ |
188
gnuplot 4.6
-0.6 +
+|||||||+
+|||||||+
|
-0.8 +
+
++||||+
+
+
++||||+ + |
-1 +---+--------+--------+-------+--------+--------+-+
-4
-2
0
2
4
6
Dxf
The dxf terminal driver creates pictures that can be imported into AutoCad (Release 10.x). It has no
options of its own, but some features of its plots may be modied by other means. The default size is 120x80
AutoCad units, which can be changed by set size. dxf uses seven colors (white, red, yellow, green, cyan,
blue and magenta), which can be changed only by modifying the source le. If a black-and-white plotting
device is used, the colors are mapped to diering line thicknesses. See the description of the AutoCad
print/plot command.
Dxy800a
This terminal driver supports the Roland DXY800A plotter. It has no options.
Eepic
The eepic terminal driver supports the extended LaTeX picture environment. It is an alternative to the
latex driver.
The output of this terminal is intended for use with the "eepic.sty" macro package for LaTeX. To use it, you
need "eepic.sty", "epic.sty" and a printer driver that supports the "tpic" nspecials. If your printer driver
doesn’t support those nspecials, "eepicemu.sty" will enable you to use some of them. dvips and dvipdfm do
support the "tpic" nspecials.
Syntax:
set terminal eepic {default} {color|dashed} {rotate} {size XX,YY}
{small|tiny|<fontsize>}
Options: You can give options in any order youwish. ’color’ causes gnuplot to produce ncolorf...g commands
so that the graphs are colored. Using this option, you must include nusepackagefcolorg in the preambel of
your latex document. ’dashed’ will allow dashed line types; without this option, only solid lines with varying
thickness will be used. ’dashed’ and ’color’ are mutually exclusive; if ’color’ is specied, then ’dashed’ will
be ignored. ’rotate’ will enable true rotated text (by 90 degrees). Otherwise, rotated text will be typeset
with letters stacked above each other. If you use this option you must include nusepackagefgraphicxg in
the preamble. ’small’ will use nscriptsize symbols as point markers (Probably does not work with TeX, only
LaTeX2e). Default is to use the default math size. ’tiny’ uses nscriptscriptstyle symbols. ’default’ resets
all options to their defaults = no color, no dashed lines, pseudo-rotated (stacked) text, large point symbols.
<fontsize> is a number which species the font size inside the picture environment; the unit is pt (points),
i.e., 10 pt equals approx. 3.5 mm. If fontsize is not specied, then all text inside the picture will be set in
nfootnotesize.
Notes: Remember to escape the # character (or other chars meaningful to (La-)TeX) by nn (2 backslashes).
It seems that dashed lines become solid lines when the vertices of a plot are too close. (I do not know if
that is a general problem with the tpic specials, or if it is caused by a bug in eepic.sty or dvips/dvipdfm.)
The default size of an eepic plot is 5x3 inches. You can change this using the size terminal option. Points,
among other things, are drawn using the LaTeX commands "nDiamond", "nBox", etc. These commands
no longer belong to the LaTeX2e core; they are included in the latexsym package, which is part of the base
distributionand thus part of any LaTeX implementation. Please do not forget to use this package. Instead of
latexsym, you can also include the amssymb package. All drivers for LaTeX oer a special way of controlling
text positioning: If any text string begins with ’f’, you also need to include a ’g’ at the end of the text, and
the whole text will be centered both horizontally and vertically. If the text string begins with ’[’, you need
to follow this with a position specication (up to two out of t,b,l,r), ’]f’, the text itself, and nally ’g’. The
text itself may be anything LaTeX can typeset as an LR-box. ’nrulefgfg’s may help for best positioning.
gnuplot 4.6
189
Examples: set term eepic
output graphs as eepic macros inside a picture environment;
\input the resulting file in your LaTeX document.
set term eepic color tiny rotate 8
eepic macros with \color macros, \scripscriptsize point markers,
true rotated text, and all text set with 8pt.
About label positioning: Use gnuplot defaults (mostly sensible, but sometimes not really best):
set title ’\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $’
Force centering both horizontally and vertically:
set label ’{\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $}’ at 0,0
Specify own positioning (top here):
set xlabel ’[t]{\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $}’
The other label { account for long ticlabels:
set ylabel ’[r]{\LaTeX\ -- $ \gamma $\rule{7mm}{0pt}}’
Emf
The emf terminal generates an Enhanced Metale Format le. This le format is recognized by many
Windows applications.
Syntax:
set terminal emf {color | monochrome} {solid | dashed}
{enhanced {noproportional}}
{rounded | butt}
{linewidth <LW>} {dashlength <DL>}
{size XX,YY} {background <rgb_color>}
{font "<fontname>{,<fontsize>}"}
{fontscale <scale>}
In monochrome mode successive line types cycle through dash patterns. In color mode successive line
types use successive colors, and only after all 8 default colors are exhausted is the dash pattern incremented.
solid draws all curves with solid lines, overriding any dashed patterns; linewidth <factor> multiplies all
line widths by this factor. dashlength <factor> is useful for thick lines. <fontname> is the name of a
font; and <fontsize> is the size of the font in points.
The nominal size of the output image defaults to 1024x768 in arbitrary units. You may specify a dierent
nominal size using the size option.
Enhanced text mode tries to approximate proportional character spacing. If you are using a monospaced
font, or don’t like the approximation, you can turn o this correction using the noproportional option.
The default settings are color solid font "Arial,12" size 1024,768 Selecting default sets all options to
their default values.
Examples:
set terminal emf ’Times Roman Italic, 12’
set terminal emf dashed
# otherwise all lines are solid
Emxvga
The emxvga, emxvesa and vgal terminal drivers support PCs with SVGA, vesa SVGA and VGA graphics
boards, respectively. They are intended to be compiled with "emx-gcc" under either DOSor OS/2. They also
need VESA and SVGAKIT maintained by Johannes Martin (JMARTIN@GOOFY.ZDV.UNI-MAINZ.DE)
with additions by David J. Liu (liu@phri.nyu.edu).
Syntax:
190
gnuplot 4.6
set terminal emxvga
set terminal emxvesa {vesa-mode}
set terminal vgal
The only option is the vesa mode for emxvesa, which defaults to G640x480x256.
Epscairo
The epscairo terminal device generates encapsulated PostScript (*.eps) using the cairo and pango support
libraries. cairo verion >= 1.6 is required.
Please read the help for the pdfcairo terminal.
Epslatex
The epslatex driver generates output for further processing by LaTeX.
Syntax:
set terminal epslatex
{default}
set terminal epslatex
{standalone | input}
{oldstyle | newstyle}
{level1 | leveldefault}
{color | colour | monochrome}
{background <rgbcolor> | nobackground}
{solid | dashed}
{dashlength | dl <DL>}
{linewidth | lw <LW>}
{rounded | butt}
{clip | noclip}
{palfuncparam <samples>{,<maxdeviation>}}
{size <XX>{unit},<YY>{unit}}
{header <header> | noheader}
{blacktext | colortext | colourtext}
{{font} "fontname{,fontsize}" {<fontsize>}}
{fontscale <scale>}
The epslatex terminal prints a plot as terminal postscript eps but transfers the texts to LaTeX instead
of including in the PostScript code. Thus, many options are the same as in the postscript terminal.
The appearance of the epslatex terminal changed between versions 4.0 and 4.2 to reach better consistency
with the postscript terminal: The plot size has beenchanged from 5 x 3 inches to 5 x 3.5 inches; the character
width is now estimated to be 60% of the font size while the old epslatex terminal used 50%; now, the larger
number of postscript linetypes and symbols are used. To reach an appearance that is nearly identical to the
old one specify the option oldstyle. (In fact some small dierences remain: the symbol sizes are slightly
dierent, the tics are half as large as in the old terminal which can be changed using set tics scale, and the
arrows have all features as in the postscript terminal.)
If you see the error message
"Can’t find PostScript prologue file ... "
Please see and follow the instructions in postscript prologue (p.215).
The option color enables color, while monochrome prefers black and white drawing elements. Further,
monochrome uses gray palette but it does not change color of objects specied withan explicit colorspec.
solid draws all plots with solid lines, overriding any dashed patterns. dashlength or dl scales the length of
the dashed-line segments by <DL>, which is a  oating-point number greater than zero. linewidth or lw
scales all linewidths by <LW>.
By default the generated PostScript code uses language features that were introduced in PostScript Level 2,
notably lters and pattern-ll of irregular objects such as lledcurves. PostScript Level 2 features are condi-
tionally protected so that PostScript Level 1 interpreters do not issue errors but, rather, display a message
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested