First Edition
Guide to 
Electric Power
in Mexico
September 2006
Center for Energy Economics
Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin
and
Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores 
de Monterrey
Convert pdf slides to powerpoint online - SDK Library API:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf slides to powerpoint online - SDK Library API:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
PREFACE
This First Edition of Guide to Electric Power in Mexico was prepared to provide a comprehensive and balanced educational 
resource for a wide range of electricity customer groups, from interested residential consumers to large commercial and 
industrial organizations. It is modeled on the Guide to Electric Power in Texas, conceived of and prepared in 1997 by the 
Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) and the Center for Energy Economics (CEE) now based in the Bureau of Economic 
Geology at the Jackson School of Geosciences, the University of Texas at Austin (then at the University of Houston).
The Mexico guide stems largely from work undertaken since 1991 by Dr. Francisco García independently and jointly with  
Dr. Michelle Michot Foss of CEE to explore issues in Mexico’s energy sector. Dr. García, an emeritus professor at the  
Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), has been teaching and conducting research on  
energy and resource economics for more than 15 years. The ITESM is one of the most prominent universities in Mexico and 
an international partner with the University of Texas-Austin. Also, the ITESM is a campus-wide higher education system 
that is spread all over México. Inside the Monterrey Campus, operates the Center for Energy Studies that is based in the 
Engineering Division and the former Center for Strategic Studies that now is part of the Graduate School of Public Policy. 
Dr García has been doing research on the Mexican Economic Policy, Regional Development and Econometric Modeling. Dr. 
Garcia and Dr. Foss published joint research on the Mexican Markets of Natural Gas, LPG and Electricity. More information 
about ITESM and its programs and Dr. García’s research can be obtained from www.mty.itesm.mx/profesores/ 
The CEE is a university-based research, education, and outreach center of excellence. Our main focus is on the investment 
frameworks that support sustainable, commercially successful energy resource and infrastructure investments worldwide. 
The CEE team specializes in interdisciplinary approaches (economic, business, technology and policy/regulatory) that 
best optimize energy value chains, from energy resource exploration and production, to transportation and distribution, 
and conversion and delivery for end use. Research, training and outreach undertaken by the CEE team encompass the 
North American continental marketplace, South America, West Africa, Turkey, Eurasia and Russia. The CEE helps to 
facilitate energy sector problem solving through an international education program, New Era in Oil, Gas and Power 
Value Creation held each May in Houston. CEE researchers involved in preparation of this guide are Miranda Ferrell 
Wainberg, senior researcher and project leader; Dr. Michelle Michot Foss, chief energy economist and head of CEE; 
Dmitry Volkov, energy analyst; Ruzanna Makaryan, senior energy analyst; Dr. Gürcan Gülen, senior energy economist; 
and Dr. Mariano Gurfinkel, project manager and associate head of CEE. The CEE is supported by both private and 
public sector donors. More information about the CEE can be obtained from www.beg.utexas.edu/energyecon. 
For free downloads of Guide to Electric Power in Mexico or to make inquiries, please contact:
Center for Energy Economics
Bureau of Economic Geology
Jackson School of Geosciences
The University of Texas at Austin
Telephone 281-313-9753
Fax 281-340-3482
Email: energyecon@beg.utexas.edu
Web: www.beg.utexas.edu/energyecon 
The Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de 
Monterrey http://daf.mty.itesm.mx/investigacion
Guide to Electric Power in Mexico, Copyright 2006, Center for Energy Economics, Bureau of Economic Geology, the University of Texas at Austin. 
This report may not be resold, reprinted, or redistributed for compensation of any kind without prior written permission from the Center for Energy
Economics, Bureau of Economic Geology, the University of Texas at Austin or Instituto Tecnológico e de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey.
SDK Library API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
split PowerPoint file, change the order of PPTX sildes and extract one or more slides from PowerPoint How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
slide processing library provides users with access to operate PowerPoint slides/pages in the simplest procedures, for instance, using online clear C# methods
www.rasteredge.com
1
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part 1
Facts on Mexico Electric Power ............................................................................2
Part 2
The Basics of Electric Power ..............................................................................10
Part 3
History of Electric Power in Mexico .....................................................................13
Part 4
Fuels for Mexico Electric Generation ...................................................................16
Part 5
Environmental Impacts from Electric Generation ..................................................21
Part 6
Regulations and Policies ...................................................................................23
Part 7
Major Issues ...................................................................................................28
Part 8
Future Trends  ................................................................................................33
Glossary
  ......................................................................................................38
References
  ................................................................................................39
SDK Library API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
add image to slide, extract slides and merge library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide large amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
cent, respectively).[17] Only Asia shows 
a higher growth rate (7.0 percent).[17]
SEN Electricity Sales
SEN sales of electricity in Mexico grew at 
an average rate of 4.1 percent during the 
period 1994-2004. Between 2003 and 2004 
SEN electricity sales grew by 1.9 percent, 
largely due to increased electricity sales 
to industries. This stands in contrast to 
virtually no electricity sales growth between 
2002 and 2003, the result of an economic 
slowdown in the country.[42] When generation 
for self-consumption is added to sales by 
CFE and LFC, total electricity sales increased 
3.9 percent between 2003 and 2004.
CFE generates, transmits and distributes 
electricity across all of Mexico. LFC is 
mainly responsible for transmission and 
distribution of electricity in Mexico City 
(Distrito Federal, DF or Federal District). 
LFC buys approximately 95 percent of 
its electricity supply from CFE.[8] IPPs 
sell almost all of their output to CFE 
which then re-sells the electricity to its 
customers.
2
 (IPPs, self-generation and 
cogeneration will be discussed in more 
detail in later sections of this chapter).
Most of Mexico’s electricity sold by SEN 
is consumed by industrial and residential 
customers (59 percent and 25 percent, 
respectively, in 2004). Growth in these two 
important sectors has propelled the overall 
growth in national consumption over the 
period 1994-2004. Sales of electricity to 
industries flattened or decreased between 
2000 and 2003 due to a slowing economy 
and declining energy intensity in the 
industrial sector. However, in 2004 SEN sales 
of electricity to industrial customers (both 
large and medium) grew 1.8 percent.[42]
Electricity consumption and economic growth 
(as measured by gross domestic product 
or GDP) are closely intertwined. Electricity 
use per person or per capita tends to be 
higher in more advanced economies and 
lower in countries with less developed 
economies. Despite the growth in electric 
consumption in Mexico over the period 
1993-2003, per capita consumption (KWh/
resident) remains low at 1,810 KWh/resident 
compared to about 8,000 KWh/resident 
on average for industrialized countries.
Mexico’s Secretaría de Energía 
(SENER) reports internal Mexican 
electricity consumption as follows:
•  SEN (Sistema Eléctrico Nacional) 
electricity sales which consist 
of sales made by the two large 
state owned electric companies, 
Comisión Federal de Electricidad 
(CFE) and Luz y Fuerza del 
Centro (LFC). SEN sales include 
electricity sales made by 
independent power producers 
(IPPs) to CFE which CFE then 
resells to final customers. SEN 
sales exclude electricity generated 
by end-users, largely industrial 
companies, for their own use.
•  Total internal Mexican 
electricity consumption 
includes SEN electricity 
sales as well as electricity 
generated by self-suppliers. 
Total Internal  
Electricity Consumption
During the period 1994-2004, total sales 
of electricity in Mexico grew at an average 
rate of 4.5 percent per year.
1
 This growth 
has been driven by increases in residential 
and industrial electricity consumption, 
including sharp increases in electricity 
generated by end-users for their own use. 
(An example of the latter is an industrial 
facility that generates electricity for its own 
consumption, termed “self-generation” 
or “generation for self-consumption.”)
The 1994-2004 increase is below the 
5.7 percent annual growth rate experienced 
for the comparable period 1993 and 2003. 
Nevertheless, the increase between 1994 and 
2004 is significantly higher than electricity 
consumption growth rates experienced 
in North America and Western Europe for 
the same period (2.0 percent and 2.3 per-
1  As this book went to press in September 2006, the most recent data available are for 2004.
2  Current electricity law dating from 1993 allows IPPs to operate in Mexico but also limits the amount of “surplus” electricity they can 
generate and sell to buyers other than CFE. The existing limitation on surplus is 5 percent of generation capacity.
Table 1.  SEN Electricity Sales by Consumer Category (GWh)
Year
1994
%
2000
%
2003
%
2004
%
Residential
27,781
25
36,127
23
39,861
25
40,733
25
Commercial
9,844
9
11,674
8
12,808
8
12,908
8
Services
5,306
5
5,891
4
6,149
4
6,288
4
Agricultural
6,551
6
7,901
5
7,338
4
6,968
4
Industrial
60,051
55
93,755
60
94,228
59
96,613
59
TOTAL
109,533
100
155,349
100
160,384
100
163,509
100
Source: SENER
Figure 1.  Electricity Consumption and GDP per Capita in Select Countries, 2001
FACTS ON MEXICO ELECTRIC POWER
Brazil
India
Non-OECD
China
World
Russia
S.Korea
Canada
USA
Australia
Japan
Turkey
Mexico
Portugal
UK
OECD
Greece
Spain
Italy
Germany
France
0
2,000
4,000
6,000
8,000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18,000
0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000
35,000
40,000
GDP per capita  ($US)
KWh/ per capita
SDK Library API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
Besides, users also can get the precise PowerPoint slides count as soon as the PowerPoint document has been loaded by using the page number getting method.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
want to combine these extracted slides into a please read this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
3
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Although richer countries consume more 
electricity per capita than poorer ones, the 
energy intensity of their economies is lower. 
Richer countries use less energy to generate 
an additional dollar of GDP. In Mexico, energy 
intensity remains relatively high in spite of 
marked improvements by certain industries, 
like steel, to modernize facilities and achieve 
greater energy efficiencies. Thus, Mexico has 
yet to demonstrate widespread, sustained, 
declining energy intensity observed in other 
industrial countries. If Mexico begins to 
manifest the declining energy intensity typical 
of other industrial countries in all electricity 
consuming sectors, the overall growth rate of 
total electric consumption could decrease.[23]
Who Uses Electricity 
in Mexico?
More than 28 million customers (representing 
over 100 million inhabitants) buy electricity 
from CFE and LFC. The two organizations 
provide electric service to approximately  
95 percent of Mexico’s population. About  
88 percent of these customers are residential. 
There are three million commercial customers 
and about 166,000 industrial customers.  
CFE and LFC receive most of their revenue 
from industrial customers who spent over  
$7 billion on electricity in 2004. In this  
same year, residential customers spent  
$3 billion and commercial users $1.9 billion.
3
In most countries, large volume industrial 
customers pay lower tariffs (the final price 
for delivered electricity)
4
 than low volume 
commercial, residential and agricultural users. 
This lower tariff for large volume customers 
reflects lower delivery costs and more stable 
demand. (Low voltage, dense distribution 
systems required to serve residential and 
small commercial “load” or demand are 
relatively expensive to install and maintain, 
and in some locations, residential and 
commercial load can be highly seasonal.)
In Mexico, however, residential customers 
pay only slightly more than large industrial 
customers and agricultural customers pay 
the lowest price of all. In 2004, SEN’s 
average rates for different customer classes 
were 9.2¢/kWh for residential customers; 
7.2-9.7¢/kWh for large and medium 
size industrial customers respectively; 
4.1¢/kWh for agricultural customers; 
and 14-19¢/kWh for public service and 
commercial customers respectively.
Mexico’s tariff structure is due to electricity 
prices to residential and agricultural 
customers being set below the actual costs  
to serve these customers. All Mexican  
electricity customers receive discounted 
pricing. Official figures estimate a total  
net subsidy of US $6 billion per year.  
In 2000, residential consumers received  
64.1 percent of the total subsidy; industrial 
customers 17.9 percent; the agriculture 
sector 11 percent; and the commercial sector 
5.3 percent.[5] As a consequence of receiving 
the largest proportion of the total net subsidy, 
residential consumers in Mexico receive a 
tariff that is among the lowest in the world.
Regional Patterns of 
Electricity Consumption 
Electricity consumption across the 
Mexican regions reflects varying patterns. 
These regional variations are related to 
differences in climate and urbanization 
as well as the different compositions of 
and concentrations of industrial activity. 
Over the period 1994-2004 the states 
with the largest electricity consumption 
were Sonora, Nuevo León, Jalisco, Distrito 
Federal, México and Veracruz.[42]
Prior to the North American Free Trade 
Agreement (NAFTA), maquiladoras (factories 
that were able to import intermediate goods 
duty-free and tariff-free for final assembly 
and export) were concentrated in the 
northern border states of Baja California, 
Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León 
The average actual exchange rate between U.S. dollars and Mexican pesos for the year cited is used in this guide to convert Mexican pesos to US dollars and vice versa.
The tariff for electric power includes all costs associated with generating, transmitting, and distributing electricity, including operating and maintenance costs and depreciation 
of the electricity systems and including a rate of return that allows for reinvestment in the electricity systems.  Costs for electric power are generally apportioned across 
classes or categories of customers that reflect amount of usage and the cost to serve particular customer classes.  See section on Evolution of Electricity Prices in Mexico.
 Includes generation by CFE, LFC, IPPS, self-suppliers, cogeneration and exports.
 Includes generation capacity of CFE, LFC, IPPS, self-suppliers, cogeneration and exports.
Table 2. Facts on Mexico Electricity – 2004
Number of Central Stations
187
Number of Generation Units
598
Total Annual Generation
5
235,600 GWh
Total Generating Capacity
6
54 GW
Number of Residential Customers
25 million 
Number of Commercial Customers
 3 million
Number of Industrial Customers
166,000
Number of Agricultural Customers
105,000
Number of Public Sector Customers
152,000
Average Residential Rate
9.2¢/kWh
Average Commercial Rate
19.0¢/kWh
Average Industrial Rate
7.2-9.7¢/kWh
Average Agricultural Rate
4.1¢/kWh
Average Services Rate
14.3¢/kWh
Number of State Owned Companies
2 (CFE and LFC)
Percent Generation by State-Owned Cos.
69 percent
Percent Generation by Private Entities
31 percent
Source: CFE and SENER, 2004-2006
SDK Library API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
of the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
It contains PowerPoint documentation features and all PPT slides. Control to render and convert target PowerPoint or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
and Tamaulipas. As a result, electricity sales 
in the Northwest and Northeast regions 
grew faster than those in the rest of the 
country between 1994 and 2000. Following 
the implementation of NAFTA, the benefits 
of maquiladora production were extended 
to other Mexican industries. In addition, 
the growth rate in the Northeast slowed 
markedly after 2000 due to a slowdown in 
economic growth.[23] The Northeast region’s 
electricity consumption rebounded slightly 
in 2004 but has not reached the levels 
observed in 2000 or 2001. Since 2000, 
the Northeast has been surpassed by the 
Central West region in terms of increased 
industrial consumption of electricity.
In the Central West region electricity 
consumption growth in recent years has 
been greater than 7 percent in the states 
of Nayarit, Michoacán and San Luis Potosi. 
This growth has been driven by companies 
like SERSIINSA, Industrial Minera México, 
Cementos Apasco, Celanese, Las Encinas 
and the development of industrial parks 
like Silao, Apaseo and Buenavista.[42]
Electricity consumption in the Northwest 
region had the highest growth rate 
in Mexico over the period 1994-2004 
(5.2 percent) followed by the Southeast 
region (4.8 percent). High temperatures 
and large industrial consumption drove 
demand for electricity in the Northwest. In 
the Southeast, the negative growth rate of 
Veracruz (which accounts for 37.5 percent 
of the region’s electricity consumption) in 
2004 was offset by increased growth in the 
region’s other states, especially Tabasco 
and Quintana Roo both of which had 
growth rates in excess of 7 percent.[42]
Evolution of  
Electricity Prices  
in Mexico
The price of electricity in Mexico is a function 
of volume demanded, voltage, user type, 
and service (interruptible versus firm or 
guaranteed deliveries). There are currently 
over 30 tariff categories. The tariff structure 
is gradually being adapted to reflect the 
variety of services desired and consumer 
preferences. The relationship between costs 
of production and electricity prices and 
tariffs continues to be debated in Mexico.
Electric tariffs in Mexico are set by the 
Secretaría de Hacienda (Ministry of 
Finance) and are thus linked to 
the government’s economic and 
development strategy for the 
country as a whole. Unlike practices 
in most industrially advanced 
countries, Mexico’s independent 
electric sector regulator, the 
Comisión Reguladora de Energía 
(CRE) is not responsible for setting 
electric tariffs. As a result, electric 
tariffs frequently have not been 
compatible with the needs of a 
financially self-sustaining power sector. Tariffs 
have tended to lag production costs but the 
exact relationship between tariffs and costs is 
difficult to measure due to a lack of credible 
statistics on the true cost of electricity 
production in Mexico.[5] In 2004 the average 
price of electricity in Mexico was 9.9¢/kwh 
compared to an average production cost of 
15¢/kwh, a price/cost ratio of 66 per- 
cent.
8
 Although real prices of electricity 
have been increasing since 1999,[23] most 
observers believe that the more politically 
sensitive residential and agricultural sector 
tariffs do not cover costs of production. On 
the assumption that industry could pay a 
stiffer rate, there continues to be a cross-
subsidy from industrial and commercial 
users to residential and agricultural users. 
Industries complain that their electricity rates 
hamper their ability to compete in global 
markets. And with artificially low tariffs, 
residential and agricultural customers have 
little price incentive to moderate demand.
Table 3. SEN Electricity Sales by Region (GWh)
Region
7
1994
% Total, 1994
2000
% Total, 2000
2004
% Total, 2004
Northwest
13,470
12.3
19,949
12.8
22,311
13.6
Northeast
25,626
23.4
39,236
25.3
39,421
24.1
Central West
24,417
22.3
35,192
22.6
37,451
22.9
Central
31,366
28.6
40,733
26.2
41,006
25.1
Southeast
14,600
13.4
20,160
12.9
23,227
14.3
Small Systems
54
--
80
--
93
--
Total
109,533
100
155,349
100
163,509
100
Source: SENER 2006.
Table 4. SEN Regional Electricity Sales Growth Rates (percent over previous year)
Region
1994/93
2000/99
2002/01
2003/02
2004/03
2004/94
Northwest
8.7%
7.8%
-.6%
4.5%
4.9%
5.2%
Northeast
9.9
7.8
2.2
-4.0
0.5
4.4
Central West
9.9
7.3
1.9
1.9
3.3
4.4
Central
5.5
6.5
0.7
-0.8
0.1
2.7
Southeast
7.7
6.3
6.3
2.4
2.9
4.8
Total
8.2
7.1
1.9
0.1
1.9
4.1
Source: SENER 2006.
7  Northwest includes Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sinaloa and Sonora.  Northeast includes Chihuahua, Durango, Coahuila, Nuevo León, Tamaulipas.  
Central includes Distrito Federal, Hidalgo, México, Morelos, Puebla, Tlaxcala.  Central West includes Aguascalientes, Colima, Guanajuato, Jalisco, Michoacán, 
Nayarit, Querétero, San Luis Potosi, Zacatacas.  Southeast includes Campeche, Chiapas, Guerrero, Oaxaca, Quintana Roo, Tabasco, Veracruz, Yucatán.
8  www.sener.gob.mx 
Table 5. Average Electricity Prices by  
Consumer Category in US $/KWh
Category/Year
1995
2000
2004
Residential
0.0407
0.0591
0.092
Commercial
0.0971
0.1332
0.187
Services
0.0670
0.1106
0.143
Agriculture
0.0217
0.0303
0.041
Medium Size Industry
0.0391
0.0647
0.097
Large Industry
0.0248
0.0458
0.072
Total
0.0412
0.0636
0.099
Source: www.sener.gob.mx 
SDK Library API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
Using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF converting demo code below, you can easily convert all slides of source PowerPoint document into a multi-page PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without methods to reorder current PPT slides in both powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
5
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Making and  
Moving Electricity
The main function of an electrical power 
system is to transmit all electricity demanded 
reliably, and in the exact amount, where 
it is needed. In addition, it should provide 
for unforeseen contingencies arising 
from larger than expected demand or 
system outages. The industry structure 
has three main segments – generation, 
transmission and distribution.
Generation involves the process of producing 
electric energy by utilizing other, primary 
forms of energy such as fossil fuels (coal, 
natural gas or oil), uranium (nuclear), 
or renewable energy sources (solar, 
wind) into electricity. Transmission is the 
movement or transfer of electric energy 
over an interconnected group of high 
voltage lines between points of supply and 
points at which it is transformed to lower 
voltage for delivery to final consumers 
such as factories or across low voltage 
local distribution systems to smaller end 
users such as homes or businesses.
In Mexico, electric generation is provided by 
the state-owned companies CFE and LFC, 
independent power producers and industries 
for their own consumption. Transmission 
and distribution service are provided 
exclusively by state-owned CFE and LFC.
Generation
Electric power plants use coal, lignite, 
natural gas, fuel oil, and uranium to 
make electricity. Renewable fuels such 
as moving water, solar, wind, geothermal 
sources and biomass are also used.
The type of fuel, its cost, and generating 
plant efficiency can determine the way a 
generator is used. For example, a natural 
gas generator with steam turbines has a high 
marginal cost but can be brought on line 
quickly, making it useful for peak periods of 
demand. Coal, lignite, and nuclear units have 
lower marginal costs but cannot be brought 
on line quickly. They are used primarily to 
provide the base load of electricity (e.g. 
the constant requirement of the power 
system which is demanded continuously).
Costs for fuel, construction and operations 
and maintenance vary greatly among types 
of power plants. For example, renewable 
generation plants, such as solar or wind, 
have virtually no fuel costs but are expensive 
to manufacture and install and can be 
expensive to maintain. Nuclear and coal-
fueled plants have low fuel costs but are 
more expensive to build and maintain. Coal 
units also incur additional costs for meeting 
air quality standards. Natural gas plants 
have higher fuel costs than coal or nuclear, 
but have lower initial construction costs.
Generation Providers
Mexicans view energy, including electricity, 
as a sovereign activity and as such it is 
the exclusive responsibility of the federal 
government. By constitutional law, electricity 
for public service consumption must be 
provided by state owned CFE and LFC. CFE 
and LFC are large public enterprises with  
total assets at year end 2004 of about  
$63 billion and $9 billion respectively.[8,10] 
LFC serves Mexico City and the surrounding 
areas and CFE serves the rest of the 
country. LFC buys approximately 95 percent 
of its marketed electricity from CFE.
Reforms to the Law of Public Service of 
Electricity (Ley del Servicio Público de 
Energía Eléctrica) passed in 1992 and 
implemented in 1993 permits cogeneration
9
and generation for self-consumption by 
private entities (principally industries) as well 
as generation by IPPs with the requirement 
that essentially all IPP output is sold to 
CFE. In 2004, CFE and LFC accounted for 
73 percent of effective installed generation 
capacity in Mexico and private generators 
accounted for 27 percent of capacity.
Figure 2. Basic Electric Power System
9  Cogeneration refers to a generating facility 
that produces electricity and another 
form of useful thermal energy (such as 
heat or steam) that is used for industrial, 
commercial, heating or cooling purposes.
����������
��������
������������
����������
����������
������������������
���������
���������������
������������������
����������������
������������
�����������
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Installed Generation Capacity
At the end of 2004, Mexico had installed 
generation capacity of 53,561 MW, an 
increase of 5 percent over 2003. Most 
of this capacity increase is due to the 
completion of IPP projects.
10
 About 
73 percent of this capacity is controlled by 
CFE and LFC; 14 percent is controlled by 
IPPs; 3 percent by cogenerators; and the 
remaining 8 percent by self-suppliers.[42] 
The installed generation capacity of SEN 
at the end of 2004 was 46,552 MW or 
87 percent of total installed capacity. The 
SEN capacity consists of CFE and LFC 
capacity and the IPP capacity under contract 
to CFE. SEN installed generation capacity 
between 1994 and 2004 has grown at 
an average annual rate of four percent 
compared to average annual sales growth 
of 4.1 percent over the same period. The 
regional distribution of SEN generation 
capacity can be seen in Table 6.
The Northeast and Southeast regions account 
for 61 percent of SEN’s installed generation 
capacity. The Southeast region has the 
most hydroelectric generation of any region 
and also has the sole nuclear generation 
facility (Laguna Verde near Veracruz). 
The Northeast region has registered the 
most growth in its generation capacity 
due to the economic factors discussed 
previously and attractiveness of the 
region for IPP investments. The Northeast 
also has the greatest amount of natural 
gas combined cycle generation capacity 
(4,955 MW) followed by the Southeast region 
(2,886 MW). In the Northeast 60 percent 
of the combined cycle capacity is IPP-
owned; in the Southeast 77 percent of the 
combined cycle capacity is IPP-owned.
Of the 46,552 MW of SEN installed  
generation capacity, approximately  
23 percent is hydroelectric; 3 percent 
is nuclear; 2 percent is geothermal and 
wind; and 72 percent requires the fossil 
fuels of oil, natural gas and coal.
Total Actual Generation
In 2004 total generation (SEN and 
generation for self-use) was 235,600 GWh, 
an increase of 4.7 percent over 2003. 
Non-CFE and LFC generators provided 
32 percent of total generation.
Actual Generation SEN
In 2004 SEN electric generation was 
208,634 GWh, an increase of 2.4 percent 
over 2003 and 52 percent over 1994. The 
amount of SEN generation provided by IPPs 
increased almost 50 percent from 2003 to 
46,334 GWh in 2004. Generation provided 
by gas-fired combined cycle generating 
plants increased 31.3 percent from 2003 
to 62,376 GWh or 30 percent of the SEN 
total generation. All of the IPP generation 
is from natural gas-fired combined cycle 
generating plants. Gross SEN generation by 
type of fossil fuel can be seen in Table 8.
Between 1994 and 2004, fuel oil has lost 
almost 50 percent of its market share as 
a result of environmental restrictions and 
the adoption of natural gas-fired combined 
cycle technology (combined cycle gas 
turbine or CCGT).
11
 In contrast, natural 
gas has more than doubled its market 
share over the same time period. State-
owned oil and gas company Petróleos 
Mexicanos (PEMEX) supplies the oil 
and natural gas for this capacity.
The majority of Mexico’s coal reserves, 
which are low quality due to their high 
ash content, are located in Coahuila. 
The major coal producers are Mission 
Energy, a U.S. company, and Minerales 
Monclova, a subsidiary of Mexican steel 
company Grupo Acerero del Norte. Small 
volumes of coal are imported from the 
United States, Canada and Colombia.
Actual Generation Private: Figure 3 shows  
the rapid growth in electricity produced 
by private entities (IPPs, self-generation, 
cogeneration etc.) since 1999, primarily 
driven by the large increase in IPP 
generation after 2001. When generation 
from self-suppliers, cogenerators and 
exporters is added to SEN generation 
of 203,555 GWh, total generation in 
Mexico in 2003 was 224,881 GWh.
Table 6. SEN Generation Capacity By Region (MW)
Region/Year
1994
% Total
2004
% Total
Northwest
4,258
13.5
6,923
14.9
Northeast
5,783
18.3
11,854
25.5
Central West
5,753
18.1
6,728
14.4
Central
4,176
13.2
4,608
9.9
Southeast
11,619
36.9
16,439
35.3
Total
31,649
100
46,552
100
Source: SENER 2006.
Table 7. Total Mexico Generation 2004 (GWh)
Generation Provider
Generation (GWh)
% Total Generation
CFE and LFC
162,300
68
IPPs
46,334
20
SEN (Sub-Total)
208,634
88
Self-supply/Cogeneration
22,544
10
Export
4,422
2
TOTAL
235,600
100
Source: SENER 2006.
Table 8. Fossil Fuel SEN Generation  
By Fuel Type (percent)
Year/Fuel
1994 Total
2004 Total
Fuel Oil
68
35
Natural Gas
16
46
Coal
14
17
Diesel
2
2
All Fossil Fuels
100
100
Source: SENER 2006.
10  IPP generation capacity increased 7.5 percent in 2004.[42]
11  Combined cycle is an electric generating technology in which electricity is produced from waste heat that would otherwise be lost as it exits from one or more  
natural gas combustion turbines.  The exiting heat is routed to a conventional boiler or to a heat recovery steam generator for utilization by a steam turbine in the  
production of electricity.  This process increases the efficiency of the electric generating plant.  Combined cycle plants can achieve efficiencies ranging from 50 to  
80 percent as opposed to efficiencies of 35 to 40 percent for conventional thermal plants.  Construction time is shorter and operating costs are lower.  Natural gas-
fired combined cycle plants produce no sulfur dioxide and only half as much carbon dioxide as conventional coal-fired thermal plants for the same energy output.
7
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Storing Electricity
Unlike water and natural gas, electricity 
cannot be easily stored. This presents 
a fundamental challenge to the electric 
power system. There is no container or 
large “battery” that can store electricity for 
indefinite periods. Energy is stored in the fuel 
itself before it is converted to electricity. Once 
converted, it has to go out on the power lines. 
Worldwide, research and development on 
possible electricity storage technologies have 
been underway for some time. Compressed 
air, pumped hydroelectric, advanced batteries 
and superconducting magnetic energy 
storage are the four main technologies being 
studied for possible electricity storage.
Transmission and 
Distribution Systems
In general, power plants are located at points 
which allow access to the fuel source. The 
most desirable fuel sources are generally 
far away from population centers, and 
electricity must be moved from the point 
at which it is generated to consumers. 
The transmission system accomplishes 
much of this task with an interconnected 
system of lines, distribution centers, and 
control systems. Electricity is transported 
at high voltages (69 KV or greater) over a 
multi-path powerline network that provides 
alternative ways for electricity to flow.
Figure 3. Generation of Electricity by Type, GWH
Source: SENER 2006.
Most homes and businesses in most countries 
use low voltage electric power while industries 
can often use higher voltages. Some large 
commercial and industrial customers 
may receive electricity at high voltages 
directly from the transmission system.
Substations on the transmission system 
receive power at higher voltages and lower 
them to feed local distribution systems. 
The local distribution system consists of 
the poles and wires commonly seen in 
neighborhoods and can also include below 
ground lines. At key locations, voltage 
is again lowered or “stepped down” by 
transformers to meet customer needs.
Customers on the local distribution 
system are categorized as industrial, 
commercial/public sector, and residential/
agricultural. Industrial use is fairly 
constant, both during the day and across 
seasons. Commercial/public sector and 
agricultural use is less constant and can 
vary across seasons. Residential and 
commercial use may change rapidly during 
the day in response to customer needs, 
appliance use and weather events.
Mexico’s national electric grid, SEN, is 
owned and operated by CFE and LFC and 
serves 95 percent of the population. The 
transmission and distribution systems of 
Baja California are not connected with the 
national interconnected system and neither 
are some small systems in the Northeast.
In Mexico, transmission lines are those 
lines of high tension (150-400 kV) that 
transport electricity over large distances. 
These transmission lines supply the 
networks of subtransmission (69-138kV) 
which cover much shorter distances. 
These subtransmission lines supply 
distribution lines (2.4-34.5 kV) which 
cover small geographic zones. Finally, 
low tension lines (220-240 volts) are 
used to supply low volume consumers.
Over the same period 1994 to 2004, LFC’s 
transmission and distribution lines grew 
from 25,862 km to 70,221 km in 2004. 
Much of the large increase occurred in 2003 
as a result of including low tension lines 
(38,515 km) in LFC’s data for the first time.
Overall, a major effort has been made 
to increase long distance transmission 
capacity as well as distribution capacity 
in Mexico. Over the last ten years, the 
most substantial expansions of the 
transmission system have taken place in 
the north and the center of Mexico.[42]
As mentioned above, the transmission 
and distribution network is complemented 
by transmission substations, distribution 
Table 9. CFE Transmission, Subtransmission and Distribution Lines (Kilometers)
Year
Transmission
Subtransmission
Distribution
Low Tension
12
Total
1994
29,267
35,867
271,398
196,290
558,684
2004
44,203
44,919
357,304
242,707
746,911
Percent 
Increase
51
25
32
24
34
Source: SENER 2006.
Table 10. 2004 Substation Capacities in Mexico (millions of volts ampere)
13
Transmission-CFE
128,841 MVA
Distribution-CFE
69,667 MVA
Total-LFC:
27,107 MVA
Total SEN
225,615 MVA (3.6 percent increase from 2003)
Source: SENER 2006.
12   Includes subterranean lines.
13   Ampere is a unit of measurement, 
amps, of electrical current or flow.
������������������������
����������������������
������������������
������������
�����������
��������
�����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
������
������
�����
������
�����
������
������
������
������
������
������
�����
������
������
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
������
������
������
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
substations and distribution transformers.  
In 2004, substation capacities 
can be seen in Table 10.
Transmission and 
Distribution System Losses
Two types of losses are typically experienced 
by electricity systems: technical or line 
losses and non-technical losses. These 
losses are calculated as a percentage of net 
generation. Technical or line losses occur 
because electricity dissipates in the form of 
heat to the atmosphere along transmission 
and distribution lines. Excessive line losses 
are due to inefficient and/or non-optimal 
operation of the system and as such are  
the responsibility of the system operator, 
CFE. Non-technical losses, on the other hand, 
usually occur as illegal taps along a local 
distribution network. Non-technical losses 
impose costs to electricity systems that are 
not recovered in payments. Theft degrades 
system reliability and presents serious 
hazards both to those making the illegal 
taps as well as to people and property in the 
vicinity of illegal taps. In Mexico, technical 
and non-technical losses are aggregated; 
losses are higher in some parts of the  
country than others. These losses are not 
Table 11. System Losses of CFE
Year
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002*
Losses (percent of net generation)
11.1
10.6
10.67
10.97
10.6
10.76
10.6
Source: Garcia, Foss, and Elizalde, 2001. *January-August 2002.
Figure 4. Existing Electrical Interconnections in Mexico, 2004
Source: SENER 2006.
insignificant as can be seen in   
Table 11.
According to CFE’s annual report for  
2001-2002, the reduction in system losses for 
2002 was due to a decrease in non-technical 
losses resulting from the implementation 
of a program to reduce electricity theft. To 
further identify and reduce system losses, 
it would be useful to distinguish between 
technical and non-technical losses.
Imports/Exports
Mexico has 1,336 MW of electrical 
interconnections with the United States, 
�����������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
����
�����
���������������
�������������
������������������������� �����������
����������������
�����������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������
������
��������������������������������������������������
����
�����
������
����������������������������
�������������������������������������
��������������������������������
��������
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested