9
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
50 MW with Belize and 200 MW under 
construction with Guatemala. The 
interconnections between Mexico and the 
US are relatively weak, with only 12 high 
voltage operating interconnections.[36] The 
interconnections between Baja California 
and the US and between Mexico and Belize 
operate as “permanent” connections which 
are used for normal system operations. 
The Baja California interconnection has 
been a consistent exporter of electricity 
to the US during the period 1994-2004. 
With the exception of the Eagle Pass-
Piedras Negras interconnection, the 
Texas-Mexico interconnections are for 
emergency support only due to technical 
constraints and the potential for system 
instability. The Eagle Pass-Piedras Negras 
interconnection uses new technology which 
allows it to be operated in a “permanent” 
manner for normal operations.[42]
Source: SENER 2006.
Figure 5. Critical Zones Defined by NOMs
Since 1996, Mexico has been a net importer 
of electricity from the United States. This 
trend was reversed in 2003 when Mexico 
became a net exporter of electricity. This 
reversal is due to increased generation 
capacity in Baja California North and other 
northern states. In 2004 Mexico exported 
1,006 GWh and imported 47 GWh.[42]
Energy Savings and Efficiency
Energy savings and efficiency plans are 
implemented mainly by government agencies 
such as the Comisión Nacional para el Ahorro 
de Energia (CONAE), the Fidecomiso para 
el Ahorro de Energia Eléctrica (FIDE), the 
Programa de Ahorro de Energía del Sector 
Eléctrico (CFE-PAESE) and the Programa de 
Ahorro Sistemático Integral (ASI) with the 
goal of postponing new electric generation 
capacity creation. CONAE has published  
16 Normas Oficiales Mexicanas (NOMs) 
requiring implementation of various 
energy efficiency/conservation measures. 
SENER estimates that these measures 
saved 9 percent of total electricity sales 
by CFE in 2005, deferring new CFE 
generation capacity of about 4,900 MW.
Environmental Regulations
Three NOMs regulate emission of air and 
water pollutants by electric generators and 
the environmental impacts of electricity 
transmission systems. These regulations 
vary by geographical zone and type and 
amount of generation capacity. Nine areas 
have been defined as “critical zones” in 
terms of air and water pollution levels.
��������������������
��������������������
�����������������������
���������������
������������������������
�����������������������
���������������������������
���������������������������
�������������������������������������
����������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������
��������
Convert pdf slides to powerpoint online - software application dll:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf slides to powerpoint online - software application dll:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
10 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Electricity travels fast, cannot be 
stored easily or cheaply, and cannot 
be switched from one route to another. 
These three principles are basic to the 
operation of an electric power system.
Electricity is almost instantaneous. When a 
light is turned on, electricity must be readily 
available. Since it is not stored anywhere on 
the power grid, electricity must somehow 
be dispatched immediately. A generator is 
not simply started up to provide this power. 
Electric power must be managed so that 
electricity is always available for all of the 
lights, appliances, computers and other uses 
that are required at any particular moment. 
Electricity traveling from one point to another 
follows the path of least resistance
14
 rather 
than the shortest distance. With thousands of 
kilometers of interconnected wires throughout 
Mexico, electricity may travel miles out of 
any direct path to get where it is needed.
As a result of these three principles, designing 
and operating an electrical system is complex 
and requires constant management.
14  Resistance is measured in ohms of how much force it takes to move electric current through a conductor.  
Resistance in conductors causes power to be consumed as electricity flows through.
THE BASICS OF ELECTRIC POWER
Defining and 
Measuring Electricity
Electricity is simply the flow or exchange 
of electrons between atoms. This exchange 
of electrons forms a moving stream or 
current of electricity. The atoms of some 
metals, such as copper and aluminum, have 
electrons that move easily. That makes 
these metals good electrical conductors.
Electricity is created when a coil of metal 
wire is turned near a magnet as shown 
in the diagram above. Thus, an electric 
generator is simply a coil of wire spinning 
around a magnet. This phenomenon 
enables us to build generators that 
produce electricity in power plants. 
The push, or pressure, forcing electricity 
from a generator is expressed as volts. 
The flow of electricity is called current. 
Current is measured in amperes (amps). 
Watts are a measure of the amount 
of work done by electricity. Watts are 
calculated by multiplying amps times 
volts. Electrical appliances, light bulbs 
and motors have certain wattage 
requirements that depend on the tasks 
they are expected to perform. One kilowatt 
(1,000 watts) equals 1.34 horsepower. One 
megawatt is equal to 1,000,000 watts.
Kilowatts are used in measuring 
electrical use. Electricity is sold in units 
of kilowatt-hours (kWh). A 100-watt 
light bulb left on for ten hours uses one 
kilowatt-hour of electricity (100 watts x 
10 hours=1,000 watt hours=1 kWh).
Electricity is generated and usually 
transmitted as alternating current (AC). 
The direction of current flow is reversed 
60 times per second, called 60 hertz 
(Hz). Operators want the same frequency 
throughout the interconnected power 
grid and strive to maintain it 60 Hz.
Higher voltages in many instances can be 
transmitted more easily by direct current 
(DC). High voltage direct current (HVDC) lines 
are used to move electricity long distances. 
Generating Electricity
There are many fuels and technologies 
that can generate electricity. Usually a fuel 
like coal, natural gas, or fuel oil is ignited 
in the furnace section of a boiler. Water 
piped through the boiler in large tubes is 
superheated to produce heat and steam. 
The steam turns turbine blades which 
are connected by a shaft to a generator. 
Nuclear power plants use nuclear reactions 
to produce heat while wind turbines 
use the wind to turn the generator. 
A generator is a huge electromagnet 
surrounded by coils of wire which produces 
electricity when the shaft is rotated. 
Electricity generation ranges from 13,000 
to 24,000 volts. Transformers increase the 
voltage to hundreds of thousand of volts 
for transmission. High voltages provide an 
economical way of moving large amounts of 
electricity over the transmission system.
Figure 6. Electric Current
Figure 7. Types and Uses of Generating Units
���������
����������������
��������������������������
���������������������������
�����������������������������
����������������������������
�����������������������������
�����������������������
��������
���������������
����
����
����
������
�����������������
����������
����
���������������������
������������������������
��������������
���������������������������������
�����������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������
������������������������������������
���������������������������
��������������������������������������������
���������������������������
���������������������������������������
����������������������������������������
��������������
����������������������
�����������������������
��������
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
split PowerPoint file, change the order of PPTX sildes and extract one or more slides from PowerPoint How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
slide processing library provides users with access to operate PowerPoint slides/pages in the simplest procedures, for instance, using online clear C# methods
www.rasteredge.com
11
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Types of Generators
Steam turbines use either fossil fuel or 
nuclear fuel to generate heat to produce 
steam that passes through a turbine to 
drive the generator. These generators are 
used primarily for base loads but some gas-
fired plants are also used for peak loads. 
Sizes range from 1 to 1,250 megawatts.
In combustion turbines hot gases are 
produced by combustion of natural gas or fuel 
oil in a high pressure combustion chamber. 
These gases pass directly through a turbine 
which spins the generator. These generators 
are used primarily for peak loads but 
combined cycle combustion turbines are used 
for base loads. Simple combustion turbines 
are generally less than 100 megawatts 
and allow quick startup suitable for 
peaking, emergency and reserve power.
In hydroelectric generating units 
flowing water is used to spin a turbine 
connected to a generator. Sizes range 
from 1 to 700 megawatts. These units can 
start quickly and respond to rapid changes 
in power output. They are used for base 
loads, peak loads and spinning reserve.
15
Internal combustion engines are  
usually diesel engines connected to  
the shaft of a generator and are usually 
5 megawatts or less. There is no startup 
time and these units are typically 
operated in periods of high demand. 
Other types of generators include 
geothermal, solar, wind and biomass 
which utilize many different technologies 
and range widely in size and capabilities. 
These are discussed in more detail in the 
Fuels for Electric Generation chapter.
Transmission  
and Distribution
Once electricity is given enough push 
(voltage) to travel long distances, it can 
be moved onto the wires or cables of the 
transmission system. Electricity is stepped 
up from lower voltages to higher voltages 
for transmission. The transmission system 
moves large quantities of electricity from 
the power plant through an interconnected 
network of transmission lines to many 
distribution centers called substations. 
These substations are generally located 
long distances from the power plant. 
Figure 8. Steam Turbine Electric Power Plant
15 Spinning reserve is that reserve generating capacity running at zero load and synchronized to the electric system. 
High voltage transmission lines are 
interconnected to form an extensive and 
multi-path network. Redundancy means that 
electricity can travel over various different 
lines to get where it needs to go. If one line 
fails, another will take over the load. Most 
transmission systems use overhead lines 
that carry alternating current (AC). There 
are also overhead direct current (DC) lines, 
underground lines and underwater lines. 
All AC transmission lines carry three-phase 
current—three separate streams of electricity 
traveling along three separate conductors. 
Lines are designated by the voltage that 
they can carry. Power lines operated at 
60 kilovolt (kV) or above are considered 
transmission and subtransmission lines.
Even though higher voltages help push 
along the current, electricity dissipates in 
the form of heat to the atmosphere along 
transmission and distribution lines. This 
loss of electricity is called line loss.
Switching stations and substations  
are used to (1) change the voltage,  
(2) transfer from one line to another, and 
(3) redirect power when a fault occurs on 
a transmission line or other equipment. 
Circuit breakers are used to disconnect 
power to prevent damage from overloads.
Control centers coordinate the operation 
of all power system components. To 
do its job, the control center receives 
continuous information on power plant 
output, transmission lines, interconnections 
and other system conditions.
Transmission 
Constraints
There are some important constraints 
that affect the transmission system. 
These include thermal limits, voltage 
limits, and system operation factors.
Thermal/Current limits refer to the 
maximum amount of electrical current that 
a transmission line or electricity facility can 
conduct over a specified time period before it 
sustains permanent damage by overheating 
or violating public safety requirements. 
Electrical lines resist the flow of electricity 
and this produces heat. If the current flow is 
too high for too long, the line can heat up and 
lose strength. Over time the line can expand 
and sag between supporting towers. This 
can lead to power disruptions. Transmission 
lines are rated according to thermal limits 
as are transformers and other equipment. 
Voltage limits refer to the maximum 
voltage that can be handled without causing 
damage to the electric system or customer 
facilities. Voltage tends to drop from the 
sending to the receiving end of a transmission 
��������
����������������������������������
���������������
���������������
���������������������
�����������
��������������������
�����������
�����������������
����������������
����������������
��������������������
�������������������
�����������������������
��������������������
���������
�������������
������������
����������������
��������������
��������������
��������������
��������������
�����������������
�����������������
�����������������
����������������
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Process & Manipulate PPT (.pptx) Slide(s)
add image to slide, extract slides and merge library SDK, this VB.NET PowerPoint processing control powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
clip art or screenshot to PowerPoint document slide large amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
12 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
line. System voltages and voltage changes 
must be maintained within the range of 
acceptable minimum and maximum limits. 
To achieve this, equipment (capacitors and 
inductive reactors) is installed to help 
control voltage drop. If voltage is too low, 
customer equipment and motors can be 
damaged. A widespread collapse of system 
voltage can result in a blackout of portions 
or all of the interconnected network.
System operation constraints refer 
to those operating constraints that must 
be observed to assure power system 
security and reliability. These constraints 
apply to power flows, preventive 
operations and system stability.
Power flows: Electricity flows over the path 
of least resistance. Consequently, power 
flows into other systems’ networks when 
transmission systems are interconnected. 
This creates what are known as loop flows. 
Power also flows over parallel lines rather 
than the lines directly connecting two points—
called parallel flows. Both of these flows can 
limit the ability to make other transmissions 
or cause too much electricity to flow along 
transmission lines, thus affecting reliability.
Preventive operations refer to standards 
and procedures designed to prevent service 
failures. These operating requirements 
include (1) having a sufficient amount of 
generating capacity available to provide 
reserves for unanticipated demand and 
(2) limiting the power transfers on the 
transmission system. Operations should be 
able to handle any single contingency and 
to provide for multiple contingencies when 
practical. Contingencies are identified in the 
design and analysis of the power system.
Stability limits: An interconnected 
system must be capable of surviving 
disturbances through time periods varying 
from milliseconds to several minutes. With 
an electrical disturbance, generators can 
begin to spin at slightly differing speeds 
causing differences in frequency, current and 
system voltages. These oscillations must 
diminish as the electric system attains a 
new stable operating point. If a new point 
is not quickly established, generators can 
lose synchronism and all or a portion of the 
interconnected system may become unstable, 
causing damage to equipment and, left 
unchecked, widespread service interruption.
The two types of stability problems 
are maintaining the synchronization of 
generators and preventing voltage collapse. 
Generators operate in unison at a constant 
frequency of 60 Hz. When this is disturbed 
by a fault in the transmission system, a 
generator may accelerate or slow down. 
Unless returned to normal conditions, the 
system can become unstable and fail. 
Voltage instability occurs when the 
transmission system is not adequate to 
handle reactive power flows.
16
 “Reactive 
power” is needed to sustain the electric 
and magnetic fields in equipment such as 
motors and transformers, and for voltage 
control on the transmission network.
Distribution
The distribution system is made up of 
poles and wire seen in neighborhoods 
and underground circuits. Distribution 
substations monitor and adjust circuits within 
the system. The distribution substations 
lower the transmission line voltages.
Substations are fenced yards with switches, 
transformers and other electrical equipment. 
Once the voltage has been lowered at the 
substation, the electricity flows to homes and 
businesses through the distribution system.
Conductors called feeders reach out 
from the substation to carry electricity 
to customers. At key locations along 
the distribution system, voltage is 
lowered by distribution transformers to 
the voltage needed by customers.
Customers at the 
End of the Line
The ultimate customers who consume 
electricity are generally divided into three 
categories: industrial, commercial, and 
residential. The cost to serve customers 
depends upon a number of factors including 
the type of service (for example, high or low 
voltage) and the customer’s location with 
respect to generating and delivery facilities.
Industrial customers generally use 
electricity in amounts that are relatively 
constant throughout the day. They often 
consume many times more electricity than 
residential consumers and most industrial 
demand is considered base load (e.g. the 
load remains within certain limits over time 
with relatively little variation). As such it 
is the least expensive load to serve. Major 
industrial customers may receive electricity 
directly from the transmission system rather 
than from the distribution network. Some 
industrial plants have their own generators. 
Their excess electricity can be sold to CFE.
Commercial loads are similar to industrial 
loads in that they remain with certain levels 
over intermediate periods of time. Examples 
of commercial customers are office buildings, 
warehouses, and shopping centers.
Residential electric use is the most difficult 
to provide because households use much of 
their electricity in the morning and evening 
and less at other times of the day. This is 
less efficient to provide and is therefore a 
more expensive use of generating facilities. 
Over time, as homeowners buy new 
appliances and change life-styles, their 
electricity loads also change. Examples of 
residential loads are individual households.
16 Reactive power is the product of voltage and the out-of-phase component of alternating current. Usually 
measured in megavolt-amperes reactive, reactive power is produced by capacitors, overexcited generators 
and capacitive devices and is absorbed by reactors, underexcited generators and other inductive devices. 
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Use PowerPoint SDK to Create, Load and Save PPT
Besides, users also can get the precise PowerPoint slides count as soon as the PowerPoint document has been loaded by using the page number getting method.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
want to combine these extracted slides into a please read this VB.NET PowerPoint slide processing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
13
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
The history of Mexico’s electric industry can 
be divided into five phases as follows:
•  1879-1910: Mexican-
owned companies dominated 
the landscape with foreign 
capital as an adjunct;
•  1910-1934: Domination of 
the electric industry by foreign 
capital, primarily from the 
US, Canada and Germany;
•  1934-1960: The creation 
and growth of CFE;
•  1960-1992: Nationalization 
of the electric industry and 
expansion of the CFE system, and
•  1992-Present: Initiation 
of reforms to permit private 
sector participation in 
the electric industry.
1879-1910: Mexican 
Companies Dominant
In the last quarter of the nineteenth century 
Mexicans were beginning to use electric-
powered engines in industry, especially 
mining, and to a lesser extent for public 
lighting. The first electric generation plant 
(coal-fired) was installed in 1879 in León, 
Guanajuato for the use of the textile 
factory “La Americana.” In 1889, the first 
hydroelectric plant began operation in 
Batopilas, Chihuahua for the mining industry. 
At the same time, the Mexican government 
sold lucrative concessions for electrification 
of cities; the first of these, in 1881, was sold 
to Mexicana de Gas y Luz Eléctrica for electric 
service in Mexico City.[5] Surplus power not 
needed by industry was sold in surrounding 
areas for commercial and residential use. 
By 1899, Mexico had generation capacity of 
31 MW which was 39 percent hydroelectric 
and 61 percent thermoelectric.[11]
In the beginning, electric generation, 
transmission and distribution were controlled 
entirely by vertically integrated private 
companies. From 1890 to 1905, almost all 
electric companies were Mexican-owned.[3] 
At first, these companies were very small 
and highly dispersed and were drawn to the 
wealthiest and most industrialized areas, 
leaving rural areas unserved.[11] Between 
1887 and 1910, more than one hundred 
Mexican light and power companies were 
established, almost all in central Mexico.[3]
1910-1934: Foreign 
Companies Dominant
Despite the Mexican revolution, the years 
from 1910 on saw a gradual and sustained 
influx of foreign capital, primarily from 
Canada, the US and Germany, which 
would almost completely displace Mexican 
capital by the 1930s. By 1935, Canadian 
capital represented more than 50 percent 
of total investment in the sector (about 
$175 million), followed by the US with 
$90 million while German investment 
focused on electrical equipment.[3]
By 1910, Mexico’s generation capacity was 
50 MW and 80 percent of that capacity 
was owned by Mexican Light and Power 
Company (MLP), headquartered in Toronto, 
Canada. This growth in generation capacity 
was primarily due to MLP’s construction of 
Mexico’s first major hydroelectric project 
– the Necaxa plant in the state of Puebla.[11]
From 1902 until 1933, Mexican generation, 
transmission and distribution were 
dominated by three large foreign companies 
with a “strong tendency to monopoly”: 
MLP, Impulsora de Empresas Eléctricas 
(Impulsora), and the Compañía Eléctrica 
de Chapala (CEC) headquartered in 
Guadalajara.
17
 MLP had practically an 
absolute monopoly on electric generation 
in the central zone of the country around 
Mexico City; Impulsora controlled three 
interconnected electric systems in the 
north, and CEC controlled the western 
electric system. These three companies 
acquired the assets of the small, dispersed 
private companies and extended their 
transmission and distribution networks into 
the most economically attractive markets 
in the cities in which they operated. 
The Constitution of 1917, promulgated at 
the end of the Mexican Revolution, opened 
the possibility of state intervention in and 
regulation of the economy, including the 
electric sector. However, state regulation 
of the electric sector grew very slowly. 
The period 1920-1938 was characterized 
by the consolidation of the monopolies 
(e.g., the most important firms became 
holding companies by absorbing the 
many small retail companies) and 
increases in tariffs to consumers.
The first effort at regulating the electric 
industry was the creation in 1922 of the 
Comisión Nacional para el Fomento y 
Control de la Industria de Generación. 
This first regulatory attempt was in 
response to consumer pressure protesting 
the arbitrary monopoly tariffs of the 
companies. In 1926 this commission was 
restructured as the Comisión Nacional de 
Fuerza Motriz which tried to prevent the 
worst monopolistic abuses while continuing 
to attract private investment.[11] 
Also in 1926, the enactment of the Código 
Nacional Eléctrico declared electricity to be 
a public service and conferred to Congress 
the rights to legislate in related matters. 
Initially, this code had little impact due to the 
weakness of the federal government whereas 
regulation of local electrical monopolies 
was controlled by local governments and 
large industrial electricity consumers.[11] 
Local governance of the monopolies was 
unpredictable. In some areas such as 
Mexico City, arbitrary tariff rules set the 
stage for perpetual under-investment in 
the electric sector.[5] In other areas, local 
arbitrariness and corruption resulted in 
practices that favored the monopolies.[11]
1934-1960: The Creation 
and Growth of CFE
By the early 1930’s, MLP, CEC and Impulsora 
supplied power to only 38 percent of the 
population; the rural areas, where 67 percent 
of the population resided, were largely 
neglected. “Supply did not fulfill demand, 
power outages were constant and rates 
were too high; these conditions hindered 
the country’s economic development,” 
according to CFE (www.cfe.gob.mx).
As a result, the Mexican government 
assumed the function of supplying electricity 
itself through the creation of the CFE in 
1934-1937. The nascent CFE had two main 
objectives: (1)  to operate as a regulatory 
agency and liaison between the foreign 
private companies and the government, 
and (2) to supply electric service to 
those areas considered unprofitable by 
the foreign private companies.[11] CFE’s 
pioneer generation projects were in the 
states of Guerreo, Michoacán, Oaxaca and 
Sonora; the power generated was sold 
to the private companies for resale.
At the same time, President Lázaro Cárdenas 
consolidated power around his party, the 
Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI). 
One of the key supports for the PRI came 
HISTORY OF ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
17 Impulsora was a subsidiary of the US group, Bond and Share Co.[3]
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
of the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 code in VB.NET to finish PowerPoint document splitting If you want to see more PDF processing functions
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Complete PowerPoint Document Conversion in VB.
It contains PowerPoint documentation features and all PPT slides. Control to render and convert target PowerPoint or document formats, such as PDF, BMP, TIFF
www.rasteredge.com
14 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
from the labor unions, and the best organized 
ones were those in the largest industries 
– mining and electricity.[5] The oldest and 
strongest labor union in Mexico, the Sindicato 
Mexicano de Electricistas (SME) founded 
in 1914, was a critical piece in Cárdenas’ 
“corporatist” political structure, e.g. strong 
central government in collaboration with other 
important sectors such as organized labor. 
In 1936, the SME struck Impulsora and its 
seven subsidiaries. Labor unrest coupled 
with low mandated tariffs in key areas led 
the foreign private companies to reduce new 
investment in Mexico. From 1937 to 1943 
private investment grew less than 1 percent 
due to the uncertainty surrounding the role 
of CFE and the vitality of the trade unions.
In 1938, the Congress enacted the Electricity 
Public Service Act which required strong 
federal regulation of the electric sector.
In response to underinvestment in the electric 
sector, a “rolling process of nationalization” 
was begun: CFE was instructed to buy (at 
depressed prices) existing electric assets and 
to construct new generation, transmission 
and distribution assets funded by public 
resources. In 1944, CFE acquired CEC, the 
third largest of the foreign private companies 
and built its first large-scale generating 
plant Ixtapantongo. During the 1940’s and 
1950’s, CFE acquired and consolidated 
hundreds of regional electricity monopolies 
into a single firm with common technical 
standards. From 1939 to 1950, 82 percent 
of the total investment in the electric power 
system came from public resources and was 
dedicated to expanding the CFE system; only 
18 percent of the total investment came from 
private firms during this same period.[5]
1960-1992: 
Nationalization and 
Development of 
the CFE System
In 1960, Mexico’s rated capacity was 2,308 
MW: 54 percent owned by CFE, 25 percent  
by MLP, 12 percent by Impulsora and 9 per- 
cent by remaining private companies. 
The consolidation of the electric sector 
continued in that year when the Mexican 
government acquired a majority stake in 
MLP and 95 percent of the common shares 
of Impulsora. At the same time, a new state-
owned enterprise, Compañia de Luz y Fuerza 
del Centro (LFC), was created out of the 
remnants of MLP which would provide electric 
service to the central states of Mexico, 
Morelos, Puebla, Hidalgo and Distrito Federal.
Having completed the nationalization of 
the electric sector in fact, the government 
made the arrangement official in 1960 
by amending the Mexican constitution 
(Article 27, paragraph 6) to state: “It is 
the exclusive responsibility of the Nation to 
generate, transmit, transform, distribute 
and supply electricity that is intended for 
public service use. Therefore, concessions 
will not be given to private individuals and 
the Nation shall utilize its natural resources 
and assets required for such purposes”.
During the 1960’s, more than 50 percent 
of total public investment was dedicated to 
infrastructure projects. Major generating 
plants were built from these proceeds, 
including Infiernillo and Temascal. Installed 
generation capacity reached 17,360 MW 
by 1980 and 26,797 MW by 1991. 
In addition to greatly expanding the 
country’s generation capacity, the CFE 
standardized technical and economic criteria 
for the power system. It standardized 
operating voltages and interconnected the 
separated transmission systems. During the 
1970’s all the transmission systems were 
interconnected except the electric systems 
of Baja California and the Yucatan peninsula. 
In 1990, the Yucatan was incorporated into 
the Sistema Eléctrico Nacional (SEN). 
In 1976 the 60 hertz electrical frequency 
was unified throughout the country. 
This was done despite technical, social 
and labor union obstacles that opposed 
the conversion of existing electric 
equipment operating at 50 hertz. 
During this period, the CFE adhered to two 
basic principles: (1) satisfy the growing 
demand for electricity, and (2) keep electricity 
prices low to promote competitiveness.[3] The 
remarkable success of the CFE in connecting 
millions of people to the electric grid, 
achieving nearly universal coverage, is one 
of the reasons why many people in Mexico 
support state control of electric utilities. 
In addition, the idea of social justice was 
expanded to include a wide array of electricity 
price subsidies for residential and agricultural 
consumers which ultimately led to a system 
characterized by mounting financial losses.[5] 
In 1975 this process of nationalization and 
consolidation of state control of the electric 
industry was formalized legally with the 
Ley del Servicio Público de Energía Eléctrica 
(LSPEE) which declared CFE and LFC as public 
suppliers of electricity. “State-controlled 
monopoly, it was thought, was essential 
for ensuring the real-time management 
of electric power. Only a state enterprise 
could be trusted with a technology that had 
large economies of scale and thus natural 
tendencies to monopoly. Furthermore, private 
generators sought only profitable markets, 
leaving a large part of the population 
without electricity, and it was assumed 
that only a state-owned enterprise could 
deliver electric service more equitably.”
18
This system performed well throughout the 
1970’s. Demand grew rapidly, but so did 
installed capacity. In fact, over-building  
of generation capacity was commonplace  
with reserve margins greater than  
30 percent throughout the period.[3] 
During the 1970’s and 1980’s, fuel oil became 
the primary generation fuel. Water resources 
in the north are scarce and the load factors 
on hydroelectric plants were fairly low. As 
Mexico became one of the world’s top ten 
oil producers, oil-fired generation facilities, 
constructed mainly with local equipment in 
contrast to coal and gas plants, made sense 
for an oil-rich nation. Importantly, however, 
PEMEX sold fuel oil to the power sector at 
30 percent of its opportunity cost during the 
1970’s and 1980’s. This under-pricing of fuel 
oil amounted to a massive implicit subsidy 
to the power sector that averaged about 
$1.5 billion dollars per year for the period 
1974-1989 at 2001 constant dollars.[5] 
Artificially low fuel oil prices for electric 
generation permitted electric tariffs that 
did not fully cover costs. Overall, the 
Mexican power sector’s tariff policy seems 
to have been broadly reflecting costs 
until 1973. After that time, tariffs were 
lowered with the help of oil revenues.[5] 
Beginning in the early 1980’s, Mexico entered 
into an economic period characterized by 
financial crises, increasing public debt and 
hyperinflation. The price for fuel oil for electric 
18  Nationalism has always been invoked by both the government and the unions as a motivation for the 
consolidation of the electricity sector.  Mexican society as a whole has a positive impression of CFE 
and its accomplishments although specific operational and management criticisms exist.[5,3]
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
Using this VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF converting demo code below, you can easily convert all slides of source PowerPoint document into a multi-page PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
insert or delete any certain PowerPoint slide without methods to reorder current PPT slides in both powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
15
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
generation was increased as well as the 
electric tariffs for commercial and industrial 
users. However, the tariffs for the more 
politically sensitive residential and agricultural 
consumers were kept flat. On the assumption 
that industry could pay a higher price for 
electricity, the cross-subsidy from industrial 
and consumer users to the other customer 
classes grew over the following years.[5]
Importantly each financial crisis since 1982 
has brought strict limits on public debt. 
In fact, the financial crisis of 1994-1995 
resulted in a negotiated settlement with 
Mexico’s creditors that included a prohibition 
against state-owned enterprises incurring 
additional debt. These financial crises and 
their consequences limited the ability of CFE 
to raise the capital needed to build new plants 
to keep pace with rising demand. In contrast 
with the 1970’s, from 1982 to the present, 
the growth in electricity supply and demand 
was more unpredictable and reserve margins 
varied widely because of lack of investment in 
capacity as demand was growing. In addition, 
the NAFTA treaty fueled economic growth 
in Mexico and led to power demand that 
rose at a much higher rate than expected.
1992-Present: Reforms 
to Permit Private 
Participation in  
the Electric Sector
As a result of these factors, reforms to the 
LSPEE were undertaken in 1992 to permit 
limited private participation in the electric 
generation sector in order to alleviate the 
looming crisis in power supply caused 
by CFE’s inability to fund the required 
investment. Under current conditions, private 
entities can only participate in the sector as 
a generator; the resulting power can only 
be used for its own consumption, for export, 
or for sale to a single buyer, the CFE.[3] This 
reform of 1992 and attempted further reforms 
in 1999 and post-2000 are discussed in more 
detail in the chapter Regulations and Policies. 
In addition, measures were taken to raise 
tariffs and reduce CFE operating costs with 
the aim of restoring some sustainability to 
the sector.[5] However, it has proved to be 
politically very difficult to raise residential 
and agricultural tariffs. Similarly, it is 
politically difficult to reduce CFE’s costs 
because it requires confronting the powerful 
labor unions embedded in both CFE and 
LFC. These labor unions have led a broad 
coalition to block private investment in the 
sector and tariff reforms. If both consumers 
and labor unions oppose meaningful 
reforms, it becomes politically very risky to 
support further electric sector reforms. 
16 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Table 12 below shows that the SEN’s installed 
generation capacity of 46,552 MW  
is fueled primarily by water (23 percent)  
and the fossil fuels
19
 oil and natural gas  
(67 percent). Other fuels such as geothermal, 
wind, uranium for nuclear and coal play 
a relatively small role at present.
The use of natural gas as a fuel 
FUELS FOR MEXICO ELECTRIC GENERATION
Table 12. 2004 SEN Installed Capacity by Fuel (MW and percent)
Type
Hydro
Thermo*
Geothermal
Wind
Nuclear
Coal
Total
MW
10,530
31,099
960
2
1,365
2,600
46,552
Percent of 
Installed 
Capacity
23
67
2
N/S
3
5
100
Source: SENER, 2006. *Oil and Natural Gas
Table 13. SEN Gross Generation by Fuel (GWh)
Year/Type
1994
% of Total
2004
% of Total
Hydro
20,047
14.6
25,076
12.0
Oil
77,023
56.0
66,334
31.8
Natural Gas
9,822
7.1
75,649
36.3
Wind & Geothermal
5,602
4.0
6,583
3.1
Coal
13,036
9.5
17,883
8.6
Dual (0il/Gas)
7,770
5.6
7,915
3.8
Nuclear
4,239
3.2
9,194
4.4
Total
137,539
100
208,634
100
Source: SENER 2006
The longest river in Mexico is the Rio Grande 
(called Rio Bravo in Mexico)  
which forms part of Mexico’s northern  
border with the United States. The longest 
river within Mexico is the Lerma-Santiago 
in south-central Mexico which flows 
northward and westward to the Pacific. 
Figure 9. Rivers of Mexico
Historically Mexico has derived much of its 
power from hydroelectric facilities some of 
which date back to the 1920’s in remote 
areas. Although expensive to construct, 
hydroelectric facilities typically generate the 
least cost electricity on an operating basis. 
If water resources are abundant, countries 
19 Fossil fuels are derived from decaying vegetation over many thousands or millions of years. Coal, lignite, oil (petroleum) and natural gas are all fossil fuels. Fossil fuels 
are non-renewable, meaning that we extract and use them faster than they can be replaced. A concern is that fossil fuels, when combusted, may emit gases into the 
atmosphere that contribute to climate change. Considerable effort is underway to devise clean technologies that will allow fossil fuel use with few or no emissions.
20 Renewable fuels are those that are not depleted as they are consumed.
for electric generation has grown 
dramatically increasing from 7.1 percent 
of the total to 36 percent of the 
total. Oil-fueled electric generation 
has dropped significantly in both 
absolute and percentage terms. 
Hydroelectric
Electricity can be created as turbine 
generators are driven by moving water. 
While hydroelectricity is considered 
a renewable fuel
20
 management of 
flowing rivers and cycles of rain and 
drought can impact hydroelectric 
capacity greatly as well as contribute 
to other environmental effects.
There are no major river systems in 
Mexico. The Sierra Madre mountains 
separate the country into Pacific and 
Atlantic watersheds resulting in short-
length rivers that flow west to the Pacific 
Ocean or east to the Gulf of Mexico.[48] 
�������������
��������������
��������
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
������
�������������������
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
������
���������
��
�������������
�����������
����������
���������
�����������
�����������
�����������
��������������
��������������
�������������
������������
�����������
�����������
���������
������������
���������
������������
������������
���������
�����������
����������
�������������
����������������
������������������
����������
����������
����������
�����������
�������������
����������
��������������
�����������������
������������
������������
��������������
��������������
���������
�����������������
���������������
��������������
���������
�������������
17
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
will typically develop extensive hydroelectric 
capacity. Hydroelectric power is produced 
as water moves from a higher to lower level 
and pushes a turbine. Most of Mexico’s 
hydroelectric facilities are located in the 
south south-east part of the country. Recent 
droughts in the northeast and northwest 
(where much of the growth in electricity 
consumption is occurring) have led to 
curtailments affecting about 20 percent of the 
area’s generation.[48] As a result, hydroelectric 
generation declined in both absolute numbers 
and percent of total generation from 2000 to 
2003. It increased 27 percent from 2003 to 
2004 due to new hydroelectric capacity added 
in the Southeast region (Chiapas state).
CFE owns and operates all of Mexico’s 
hydroelectric generation except for one 
small 6 MW facility. CFE estimates that the 
country’s total hydroelectric potential is 
about 42,000 MW compared with 10,530 MW 
currently. However, because of the arid 
conditions over much of the northern 
part of the country, there are relatively 
few sites for new hydroelectric facilities. 
Environmental concerns and the need to 
relocate rural communities also hinder the 
development of new hydroelectric facilities.
Fuel Oil
Fuel oils are the heavier oils in a barrel 
of crude oil, comprised of complex 
hydrocarbon molecules that remain after 
the lighter oils have been distilled off 
during the refining process. Fuel oils are 
classified according to specific gravity and 
the amount of sulfur and other substances 
they contain. Virtually all petroleum used 
in steam electric plants is heavy fuel oil. 
In 2004 fuel oil fired the second- largest 
percentage (32 percent) of Mexico’s SEN 
generation. It comes primarily from heavy 
high sulfur crude oil (Maya-22) and PEMEX 
is the sole supplier. Historically, years of 
neglected capital investment in refining 
meant that PEMEX had large volumes 
of this high sulfur fuel oil for which CFE 
was a steady customer. On the positive 
side, Mexico had abundant reserves of 
Maya-22; on the negative side, fuel oil-
fired electric generation contributed to 
extensive air quality degradation in the 
major metropolitan areas. As a result of 
stricter environmental regulations and 
the increase in the construction of gas-
fired power plants, fuel oil’s percentage 
of total SEN generation has declined 24 
percent over the decade 1994 to 2004.
Mexico contains an estimated 17,600 miles of 
crude oil pipelines, 6,300 miles of petroleum 
products pipelines, and 875 miles of 
petrochemical pipelines. Significant expansion 
of this system to transport oil to electric 
generators is not contemplated at present.
Natural Gas
Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons 
(principally methane, a molecule of one 
carbon and four hydrogen atoms) and small 
quantities of various non-hydrocarbons 
in a gaseous phase or in solution with 
crude oil in underground reservoirs.
Natural gas consumption for electric 
generation in Mexico grew dramatically 
over the decade 1994 to 2004. This growth 
is due to the increased construction of 
combined cycle gas-fired generation 
plants, most of which was undertaken by 
IPPs, cogenerators and self-suppliers.
Because natural gas has been 
such an important fuel for electric 
power capacity additions in Mexico, 
additional detail is provided on natural 
gas supply and disposition.
Who Uses Natural Gas in Mexico?
Consumption of natural gas in Mexico is 
heavily concentrated in the oil, industrial 
and electric sectors representing 97 percent 
and 98 percent of gas consumption in 
1994 and 2004, respectively. This has been 
the pattern of consumption historically 
in Mexico with dropping percentage 
shares in the industrial and oil sectors 
being offset by growing consumption in 
the electric sector. The residential and 
commercial sectors are relatively small 
in part due to underdevelopment of the 
distribution network until recent years.[43]
The oil sector uses natural gas for gas 
lift in oil fields, for nitrogen injection in 
the Cantarell oil field offshore, for fuel in 
refineries and to generate electric power. 
In the industrial sector in 2004, PEMEX 
Petroquímica (PPQ) accounted for 24 percent 
of total industrial consumption, down from  
47 percent in 1994. PPQ uses natural 
gas both as a fuel and as a raw 
material in the production of secondary 
petrochemicals. The decrease in gas 
consumption by PPQ reflects its reduced 
petrochemical output. PPQ’s output has 
been displaced by cheaper imported 
petrochemicals since the mid-1990’s.
The remaining industrial consumption  
is concentrated in the industries  
highlighted in Table 15. Basic metals and  
chemicals accounted for 43.9 percent  
of total industrial gas consumption with 
food and glass at 20 percent of the total.
Electric sector consumption of natural 
gas represented 17 percent of total 
gas consumption in 1994, increasing to 
36 percent in 2004. The most striking  
change is the growth in natural gas 
consumption by private generators. In  
1994, gas demand by CFE and LFC  
accounted for 85 percent of total gas 
consumption for electric generation; this 
dropped to 40 percent in 2004. On the  
other hand, gas consumed by private 
generators was 15 percent of total gas 
consumption for electric generation in  
1994 and now represents 60 percent of  
the total consumed in the sector. This is due 
Table 14. Natural Gas Demand by Sector (million cubic feet per day, or MMcf/day)
Year
1994
2000
2004
AAGR, %
PEMEX
1,194
1,843
2,312
7.4
Industrial, of which:
1,404
1,392
1,246
-1.2
PPQ
658
373
295
-7.7
Others
746
1,019
951
2.5
Electric, of which:
547
1,011
2,056
14.2
CFE & LFC
466
870
843
6.4
IPPs
--
27
896
--
Self-generation
81
115
229
10.9
Export
--
--
89
--
Residential
58
60
86
3.9
Services
18
20
20
1.0
Transport
0
1
2
--
Export
19
24
--
--
TOTAL
3,240
4,350
5,722
5.8
Source: SENER, 2005. AAGR is annual average growth rate.
18 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
to the fact that all the IPP projects are gas-
fired combined cycle generation plants.
Who Supplies  
Natural Gas in Mexico?
There are two primary sources of natural 
gas supply in Mexico: PEMEX and imports. In 
recent years, PEMEX’s gas production has not 
kept up with the growth in demand and as a 
result imports increased to 20 percent of total 
natural gas supply in 2004 (see Table 17).
PEMEX
In 1938, Mexico’s President Lázaro Cárdenas 
del Rio nationalized the foreign-owned 
oil companies then operating in Mexico 
and consolidated their assets under the 
control of state-owned PEMEX. It is a 
decentralized public entity, 100 percent 
owned by the Mexican government, and 
is responsible for the central planning 
and strategic management of Mexico’s 
hydrocarbon industry. The hydrocarbon 
reserves themselves are owned by the 
Mexican nation and not by PEMEX. In 1992, 
the operational management was split into 
four subsidiaries: PEMEX-Refinación (PEMEX 
Refining), PEMEX-Gas y Petroquímica Basica 
(PEMEX Gas and Basic Petrochemicals or 
PGBP), PEMEX-Petroquímica (PPQ) and 
PEMEX-Exploración y Producción (PEMEX 
Exploration and Production or PEP). Each 
subsidiary operates as a separate entity 
of the Mexican government and has the 
legal authority to own assets and operate 
its businesses under its own name.
22
With respect to production of natural gas, 
PEP is responsible for the exploration, 
development, production and first hand 
sales of oil and natural gas. These activities 
are reserved exclusively to PEMEX by 
the Mexican Constitution. Natural gas 
processing, transportation and distribution 
are done by PGBP. In 1995, the Mexican 
Congress amended the law to allow 
domestic and foreign private companies to 
participate, with the Mexican government’s 
approval, in the storage, distribution 
and transportation of natural gas. 
Imports
To date, all natural gas imports have come 
from the United States and are delivered 
via natural gas pipeline. Natural gas 
infrastructure capacity between Mexico 
and the US amounts to 3.4 billion cubic 
feet per day (or Bcf/day) across 15 cross-
Table 15. Natural Gas Consumption by Industry Type 2004
21
Industry Type
MMcf/Day
Total
Basic Metals
297
31.2
Chemicals
121
12.7
Food, Drink, Tobacco
96
10.1
Glass
94
9.9
Non-Metal Mineral Products
64
6.7
Pulp and Paper
49
5.1
Cement
17
1.8
Other
214
22.5
TOTAL
951
100
Source: SENER 2005
Table 16. Electric Sector Natural Gas Consumption (MMcf/day)
Year
1994
Percent
2004
Percent
CFE
437
80
814
39
LFC
28
5
29
1
Sub-Total
465
85
843
40
IPPs
0
--
896
44
Self-generation
81
15
229
11
Export
0
--
89
5
Sub-Total Private Generation
81
15
1,214
60
TOTAL
547
100
2,056
100
Source: SENER 2006.
Figure 10. Mexico-United States Gas Pipeline Interconnections
Source: SENER 2006
21  Does not include gas consumption by PPQ.
22 LatinPetroleum.com, PEMEX: Taming the Untamable, June 8, 2004.  Also see Michelle Michot Foss and William A. Johnson, “Natural Gas in Mexico, ” Proceedings 
of the IAEE 13th Annual North American Conference, November 1991, and Foss, Johnson, and García, “The Economics of Natural Gas in Mexico -- Revisited,” 
The Energy Journal special edition, North American Energy After Free Trade, September 1993.  Contact iaee@iaee.org or energyecon@beg.utexas.edu. 
�������
��������
��������
�������������
����
����������������
��������������������
��������������
�����������
���������������������
����������
�������������
�����
���������
���������
����������
Punto de internación en México
Cepecided máxima (mmpcd)
Total
3,419
1. Tijuana, B.C.
300
2. Mexicali, B.C.
29
3. Los Algodones, B.C.
500
4. Naco, Son.
130
5. Neco-Agua Priete, Son.
215
6. Agua Prieta, Son.
85
7. Cd. Juárez, Chih.
80
8. San Agustin Valdivia, Chih.
312
9. Piedras Negras, Coah.
38
10. Ciudad Mier, Tamps.
425
11. Argûellos (Gulf Terra), Tamps.
35
12. Argûellos (Kinder Morgan), Tamps
340
13. Reynosa (Tetco), Tamps.
250
14. Reynosa (Tennessee), Tamps.
350
15. Reynosa  (Río Bravo), Tamps.
330
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested