19
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Table 17. Sources of Natural Gas Supplies (MMcf/day)
Year
1994
Percent
2000
Percent
2004
Percent
AAGR
PEMEX
3,131
96
4,091
94
4,626
80
4.0
Imports
125
4
281
6
1,124
20
24.6
TOTAL
3,256
100
4,372
100
5,750
100
5.9
Source: SENER 2006.
border interconnections.[43] The pipeline 
interconnections between Mexico and the 
United States can be seen in Figure 10.
In 2004 gas imports increased 13 
percent over import volumes in 2003. 
The 2004 imports were received 
in the following states [43]:
•  Tamaulipas – 53.9 
•  Baja California – 20.2 
•  Chihuahua – 17.8 
•  Sonora & Coahuila – 8.1 
Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Imports
LNG is natural gas that has been cooled to 
the point that it condenses to a liquid, which 
occurs at a temperature of approximately 
-256 degrees F (-161 degrees C) and  
at atmospheric pressure. Liquefaction  
reduces the volume by approximately  
600 times thus making it more economical 
to transport between continents in specially 
designed ocean vessels, whereas traditional 
pipeline transportation systems would 
be less economically attractive and could 
be technically or politically infeasible. 
Thus, LNG technology makes natural 
gas available throughout the world.[6]
During 2003, the CRE granted four LNG 
regasification permits; however, only 
two are currently being developed. One 
project is the construction of a 500 MMcf/d 
regasification terminal on the east coast at 
Altamira by Shell Oil Co. It is expected to 
begin operations in the fourth quarter of 2006 
increasing output to 500 MMcf/d annually 
in 2007. CFE has signed a gas purchase 
contract with the Shell/Total joint venture 
for the full plant output to supply planned 
combined cycle power plants Altamira V, 
Tuxpan V, and Tamazunchale. These gas-
fired generation plants will serve the states 
of Tamaulipas, Veracruz and San Luis Potosí. 
Possible gas supply sources include Nigeria, 
Trinidad and Tobago, Algeria and Qatar.
The second project in development 
is the Sempra Energy regasification 
terminal in Ensenada Baja California. 
The Ensenada plant’s output will be 211 
MMcf/d beginning 2008 and will increase 
to its maximum of 500 MMcf/d by 2010. 
SENER expects that Mexico may need 
additional regasification terminals in the 
future both to boost natural gas supplies 
and to provide supply diversification.
Table 18. Coal Production and Consumption 
in Mexico (millions of short tons)
Year
1990
1995
2001
Production-Bituminous
8.59
10.26
12.81
Consumption
8.59
12.30
14.81
Imports
--
2.04
2.00
Source: USEIA, 2004.
Table 19. Geothermal Installed Generation Capacity (MW)
Year
1994
2000
2004
Geothermal Capacity
753
855
960
Total SEN Generation Capacity
31,649
36,697
46,552
Geothermal Percent Total
2.4 
2.3 
2.1 
Source: SENER, 2006
23  Btu or British thermal unit is a standard unit for measuring the quantity of heat energy equal to the 
quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit.
Nuclear  
(Uranium, Plutonium)
Nuclear energy is a non-renewable, non-
fossil fuel form of energy derived from 
atomic fission. The heat from splitting atoms 
in fissionable material, such as uranium or 
plutonium, is used to generate steam to drive 
turbines connected to an electric generator. 
Nuclear plants have been by far the most 
expensive to construct, although uranium is 
the least expensive fuel to use (apart from 
questions about disposal costs). In recent 
years, nuclear facilities have proved to be 
reliable generators. Nuclear generation 
produces no greenhouse gas emissions.
Mexico has one nuclear power plant  
(1,365 MW) located in Veracruz state which 
was built 1990-1995 by Ebasco Services Inc.
Coal
Coal is a black or brownish black solid 
combustible fossil fuel typically obtained 
from surface or underground mines. Coal 
is classified according to carbon content, 
volatile matter and heating value. Lignite 
coal generally contains 9 to 17 million Btus
23
per ton. Sub-bituminous coals range from 
16 to 24 million Btu per ton; bituminous 
coals range from 19 to 30 million Btu per 
ton; and anthracite, the hardest type of 
coal, from 22 to 28 million Btu per ton.
Coal fired generation facilities represent 
about 6 percent of Mexico’s total installed 
generation capacity in 2003. Most of the 
country’s coal reserves and all of its coal 
fired generation are in the northeastern 
state of Coahuila. The coal is low quality 
due to its high ash content.[16] Mission 
Energy, a US company, is the largest coal 
producer followed by Mexican company 
Minerales Monclova, a subsidiary of steel 
company Grupo Acecero del Norte. Due to an 
explosion at the Pasta de Conchos coal mine 
in February, 2006, the Mexican Congress 
passed a measure permitting non-PEMEX 
entities to develop and produce coalbed 
methane gas for self-use or sale to PEMEX.[30]
Domestic coal supplies are supplemented 
by imports from the United States, Canada 
and Colombia. Hard coal and brown coal 
are consumed in Mexico: hard coal is used 
by coke ovens in industrial operations and 
brown coal is used for electric generation.
Geothermal
Electricity can be created when steam 
produced deep in the earth is used to 
Change pdf to powerpoint - software application cloud:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial for Creating PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
www.rasteredge.com
Change pdf to powerpoint - software application cloud:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for Export PDF file from Microsoft Office PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
20 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
run turbines in a generator. Geothermal 
steam can be a renewable fuel if the 
associated geology and subsurface 
heat conditions are favorable.
Mexico’s geothermal electricity potential is 
estimated at 8,000 MW, second in the world 
only to Indonesia.[16] The majority of this 
potential is located in a band of geothermal 
fields across the middle of Mexico in the 
volcano region. Potential geothermal energy 
sites are in close proximity to volcanos.
Currently most of Mexico’s geothermal fired 
generation is in Baja California with very small 
amounts in the center regions. Currently 
CFE has five geothermal projects undergoing 
feasibility and prefeasibility studies.
Wind and Solar Energy
Electricity can be created when the kinetic 
energy of wind is converted into mechanical 
energy by wind turbines (blades rotating 
from a hub), that drive generators. 
Wind energy technology (advanced wind 
turbines) is available today at competitive 
prices. However, wind resources are fairly 
site specific and tend to be distant from 
major demand areas. As a result, the 
feasibility of wind energy is dependent 
on access to economic transmission 
which often is unavailable. In addition, 
wind energy is intermittent and thus is 
not always available to meet demand.
There is currently 3 MW of wind generation 
capacity in Mexico: 1 MW in the northwest 
and 2 MW in the southeast. Potential 
technically and economically feasible wind 
generation capacity in the country has 
been estimated at around 5,000 MW. CFE 
has four wind projects in feasibility studies 
and two wind projects ready to license.[42] 
To date, wind farms have been limited 
to smaller projects. Although several 
international companies have expressed 
interest in developing wind projects in 
Mexico, it is anticipated to remain a very 
small part of the country’s total generation 
capacity, in keeping with worldwide trends.
Radiant energy from the sun can be converted 
to electricity by using thermal collecting 
equipment to concentrate heat, which is 
then used to convert water to steam to drive 
an electric generator (thermosolar) or can 
be converted to electricity directly through 
silica cells (photovoltaic). Solar energy 
depends on available sunlight and is reliant 
on storage or supplementary power sources. 
Costs for solar energy applications 
have declined substantially and in some 
applications, solar electricity is economically 
competitive. Like wind resources, the best 
sites especially for large scale projects often 
are not near major populated areas and 
thus also are constrained by transmission 
access. Like wind, solar is intermittent, 
and backup power must be available for 
periods when radiant energy is too low or 
not available. In addition, solar panels and 
large solar arrays face environmental and 
community opposition similar to placement 
of other large electric power projects.
From 1993 to 2002 photovoltiac solar 
generation capacity has increased from 
7 to 14 MW in Mexico. Mexico has a 10 MW 
experimental thermosolar plant operated 
by the Engineering Institute of UNAM and 
this technology has potential for expanded 
use in the northeast. Finally, Mexico’s 
agriculture department has invested 
$6.2 million in solar-powered pumping 
systems for livestock and irrigation.
Biomass
Electricity can be created when various 
materials (like wood products, agricultural 
and urban waste) are combusted. Heat from 
combustion is used to convert water to steam 
for power generation. Biomass resources from 
urban waste are most available in heavily 
populated areas, while agricultural-based 
fuels are strongly associated with rainfall 
distribution as well as agricultural production.
The Institute of Electric Research (IIE) 
estimates that Mexico produces 90,000 tons 
of municipal waste annually which could 
support about 150 MW of generation 
capacity. At the beginning of 2004, CRE 
had granted three permits for biomass 
generation in Nuevo León. Currently there 
is 18 MW of capacity in operation. There 
are also 49 permits for hybrid generation 
using fuel oil and gas from sugar cane 
supporting 445 MW of potential generation.
software application cloud:Online Convert PowerPoint to PDF file. Best free online export
Online Powerpoint to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Then just wait until the conversion from Powerpoint to PDF is complete and download the file.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET - SDK for PowerPoint Document
Able to view and edit PowerPoint rapidly. Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to HTML5. Convert PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PowerPoint to Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
21
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS 
FROM ELECTRIC GENERATION
Providing electric power, in general, requires 
industrialization for provision of materials, 
equipment, and fuels; land and rights-
of-way (corridors) for power plants, high 
voltage transmission grids, substations, 
and distribution networks; water resources 
for some power generation; and public 
acceptance of facilities and associated activity. 
Even the most seemingly benign types of 
electric power generation bear environmental 
consequences (factories and raw materials 
are required to manufacture solar panels) 
or may lack public support for development 
(recent opposition around the world to large 
wind power projects is clear evidence that 
public acceptance is a key consideration 
for electric power development). The 
environmental considerations must be 
weighed against the enormous benefits 
derived from electric power – for clean, 
indoor lighting and energy use; for the 
huge range of industrial, commercial, and 
household applications; for public safety 
associated with street and security lighting; 
and the endless host of benefits drawn 
from electricity that improve quality of life 
and standards of living across the globe.
Like most countries, Mexican electricity 
production is based on fossil fuels, primarily 
fuel oil and natural gas. Fossil fuels account 
for 67 percent of SEN generation and 
100 percent of IPP generation in 2004. These 
fuels are expected to remain dominant in 
the foreseeable future. The main concerns 
resulting from the burning of fossil fuels 
for electric generation relate to air quality: 
greenhouse gases (and possible link to 
human induced climate change), urban ozone 
(smog), acid rain and particulate emissions.
Greenhouse Gas 
Emissions
Global warming, or the “greenhouse effect”’ 
is an environmental issue that involves 
the potential for global climate change 
due to increased levels of atmospheric 
“greenhouse gases.” Certain components 
in our atmosphere serve to regulate the 
amount of heat that is kept close to the 
Earth’s surface. Scientists theorize that an 
increase in greenhouse gases from human 
activities could induce climate change, 
which could result in many environmental 
impacts, both positive and negative.
The principle greenhouse gases (GHG) 
include water vapor (the most abundant), 
carbon dioxide (the most prominent 
of human produced gases), methane 
(the most potent), nitrogen oxides, and 
some engineered chemicals such as 
cholorofluorocarbons (which have been 
banned worldwide). While most of these 
gases occur in the atmosphere naturally, 
debate centers on the extent to which levels 
have been elevated due to a number of 
human activities ranging from agricultural 
practices and deforestation to the combustion 
of fossil fuels for energy production.
Among the GHG, carbon 
dioxide (CO2) commands 
the greatest and most 
widespread attention. 
Although carbon dioxide does 
not trap heat as effectively 
as other greenhouse gases 
(making it a less potent 
greenhouse gas), and 
although the concentration 
of CO2 in the atmosphere 
is very low relative to other 
time periods in the earth’s 
history, measures of CO2 
associated with growing 
human populations and 
increased industrialization in 
recent decades suggest that concentrations 
have been rising rapidly. A number of 
policy and regulatory issues flow from 
the debate about CO2. These include 
the potential for eliminating fossil fuel 
use altogether (an option that is widely 
regarded to be impractical because of trade 
offs associated with potential substitutes 
for electric power production, like nuclear 
power, and the lack of compelling and cost 
effective alternatives for fossil energy based 
vehicle transportation fuels); capturing 
CO2 from power plant and other industrial 
flue gases and storing CO2 long term in 
underground brine aquifers or through 
practical applications such as enhanced oil 
recovery (with CO2 recaptured during oil 
conversion at refineries and petrochemical 
facilities); reducing CO2 emissions through 
alternative technologies; and so on.
In addition to technology development, a 
number of policy and regulatory approaches 
are either under consideration or in 
experimental use to provide market and 
economic incentives for CO2 reductions. The 
most common approach is creation of CO2 
credits, produced when measurable quantities 
of CO2 emissions are reduced or eliminated, 
that can be traded and thus be used to 
transfer value of CO2 emissions mitigation 
to those undertaking the cost of making the 
reductions. A variety of CO2 emissions credit 
markets are operating around the world, 
including the European carbon credit market 
(the European Union Emissions Trading 
Scheme), the Chicago Climate Exchange in 
the US (a voluntary private market), and a 
variety of “over the counter” transactions 
in the US and Australia in which credits are 
derived and traded without formal trading 
schemes or market structures (exchanges).
Smog
Smog and poor air quality is a pressing 
environmental problem, particularly for 
large metropolitan areas. Smog, the primary 
constituent of which is ground level ozone, 
is formed by a chemical reaction of carbon 
monoxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic 
compounds, and heat from sunlight. As 
well as creating that familiar smoggy haze 
commonly found surrounding large cities, 
particularly in the summer time, smog 
and ground level ozone can contribute to 
respiratory problems ranging from temporary 
discomfort to long-lasting, permanent lung 
damage. Pollutants contributing to smog 
come from a variety of sources, including 
vehicle emissions, smokestack emissions 
like power plant flue gases, paints, and 
solvents. Because the reaction to create 
smog requires heat, smog problems 
are the worst in the summertime.
Acid Rain
Acid rain damages crops, forests, wildlife 
populations, and causes respiratory and 
other illnesses in humans. Acid rain is formed 
when sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides 
Photo: American Petroleum Institute
software application cloud:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert Image to PDF; Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint in C# .NET Programming Project. PowerPoint Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
22 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
react with water vapor and other chemicals 
in the presence of sunlight to form various 
acidic compounds in the air. The principle 
source of acid rain causing pollutants, sulfur 
dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx), 
are coal fired power plants. Particulate 
emissions also cause the degradation of air 
quality. These particulates can include soot, 
ash, metals, and other airborne particles.
Experimentation with tradable emissions 
credits was first undertaken with SO2 in 
the US in response to concerns about acid 
rain deposition. SO2 credits generated by 
power plants and other emitters are traded 
on the New York Mercantile Exchange 
(NYMEX). The success of that program in 
supporting SO2 reductions is often cited 
as a main factor underlying development 
of tradable credit schemes for CO2.
Fossil Fuels and 
Pollutants
Natural gas is the cleanest of all the fossil 
fuels. Composed primarily of methane, 
the main combustion products of natural 
gas are carbon dioxide and water vapor, 
the same compounds we exhale when we 
breathe. Coal and oil are composed of much 
more complex molecules, with a higher 
carbon ratio and higher nitrogen and sulfur 
contents. This means that when combusted, 
coal and oil release higher levels of harmful 
emissions, including a higher ratio of 
carbon emissions, NOx, and SO2. Coal and 
fuel oil also release ash particles into the 
environment, substances that do not burn but 
instead are carried into the atmosphere and 
contribute to pollution. The combustion of 
natural gas, on the other hand, releases very 
small amounts of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen 
oxides, virtually no ash or particulate matter, 
and lower levels of carbon dioxide, carbon 
monoxide, and other reactive hydrocarbons.
With respect to greenhouse gases, the 
combustion of natural gas emits almost 
30 percent less carbon dioxide than oil, 
and just under 45 percent less carbon 
dioxide than coal. In addition, natural gas 
does not contribute significantly to smog 
formation, as it emits low levels of nitrogen 
oxides, and virtually no particulate matter.
In congested urban areas where NOx and 
smog are specific problems, some natural 
gas power plants may be subjected to air 
quality rules that restrict the amount of 
emissions they can produce and thus the 
amount of time these plants can operate. 
During peak periods of demand, these rules 
can impact the amount of electric power 
available and limit the effective use of 
natural gas peaking units. In these cases, 
efforts are usually underway to balance 
NOx emissions from natural gas electricity 
generators with emissions reductions from 
other sources in order to reduce production 
of ground level ozone and smog.
Since natural gas emits virtually no sulfur 
dioxide, and up to 80 percent less nitrogen 
oxides than the combustion of coal, it 
produces fewer acid rain causing emissions. 
Natural gas emits virtually no particulates 
into the atmosphere. In fact, emissions of 
particulates from natural gas combustion are 
90 percent lower than from the combustion of 
oil, and 99 percent lower than burning coal.
Environmental 
Mitigation Associated 
with Electric Power 
in Mexico
Mexico is the largest carbon dioxide 
emitter from fossil fuel burning in Latin 
America and may be relatively vulnerable 
to climate change.
24
 As such, Mexico 
was the first country in the Western 
Hemisphere to sign the Kyoto accord.[26]
In addition, Mexico has implemented 
a fuel substitution policy that calls for 
reduced use of fuel oil and increased use 
of natural gas in electric generation. The 
Instituto Energia in Mexico City estimates 
that substitution of natural gas for other 
fossil fuels in electric generation decreased 
carbon dioxide emissions by 5.5 million tons 
between 1991 and 2002. It also appears 
that since 1998 carbon dioxide emissions 
growth has decoupled from GDP growth in 
Mexico; that is, carbon dioxide emissions 
have remained flat in spite of increased 
energy use and increased GDP. This is a 
result of the gradual improvements in energy 
efficiency and modernization referred to in 
FACTS ON MEXICO ELECTRIC POWER.
Of course, the use of renewable fuels such 
as water for hydroelectricity, solar, wind, 
geothermal and biomass fuels in place of 
fossil fuels for electric generation produces 
little or no direct emissions. However, 
generation from renewable fuels is generally 
more costly; still requires raw materials, 
land and water; and also has issues of 
availability, transmission access and reliability 
as discussed above. In 1996, CONAE
25
 and 
ANES
26
 established a consultative forum to 
identify actions necessary to promote the use 
of solar power. This forum was expanded into 
the COFER
27
, composed of representatives 
from the industrial, commercial, academic, 
government and development bank sectors 
to promote the use of renewable fuels.
COFER identifies specific projects and 
develops programs and policies to support 
them. The current marginal generation 
cost, about 3.2 cents per KwH, in Mexico is 
based on gas-fired combined cycle units.[26] 
Generation costs using most renewable fuel 
sources are higher. Programs to promote 
renewable energy provide incentives to 
offset the higher marginal generation costs 
including green funds and carbon credits. 
According to CRE, at the beginning of 2004, 
it had granted 75 permits for generation with 
renewable fuels. Of these projects, 59 are 
in operation and 16 are in construction.[42]
Table 20. Fossil Fuel Emission Levels  
(pounds per billion Btu of energy input)
Pollutant
Natural Gas
Oil
Coal
Carbon Dioxide
117,000
164,000
208,000
Carbon Monoxide
40
33
208
Nitrogen Oxides
92
448
457
Sulfur Dioxide
1
1,122
2,591
Particulates
7
84
2,744
Mercury
0.000
0.007
0.016
Source: USEIA, Natural Gas Issues and Trends, 1998 (www.eia.doe.gov)
24  A three to five degree temperature increase without commensurate rainfall could cause drought in 
50 percent of all arable land and significant damage to the inhabited Gulf of Mexico coasts.[26]
25  Comisión Nacional para el Ahorro de Energia (National Commission for Energy Savings/Efficiency).
26  Asociación Nacional de Energia Solar (National Association for Solar Energy).
27  Consejo Consultivo para el Fomento de las Energias Renovables (Forum to Promote Renewable Fuels).
software application cloud:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
Such as load and view PowerPoint without Microsoft Office software installed, convert PowerPoint to PDF file, Tiff image and HTML file, as well as add
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
create image on desired PowerPoint slide, merge/split PowerPoint file, change the order of How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to SVG
www.rasteredge.com
23
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
REGULATIONS AND POLICIES
The legal framework for the Mexican electric 
sector is set out in the Mexican Constitution 
Articles 27 and 28 and the Public Electricity 
Utility Law (Ley del Servicio Público de 
Energía Eléctrica). This law makes providing 
energy for public service, e.g. selling 
electricity to consumers, the exclusive 
domain of the SEN companies CFE and LFC.
Prior to 1992, CFE and LFC controlled 
all electric generation, transmission, 
distribution and marketing activities with 
the exception of generation for self-use.
28
In 1992 the government initiated changes to 
permit entry of private participants in electric 
power generation. Further attempts to modify 
the legal and regulatory structure of the 
industry were made in 1999 and during the 
Fox administration but were not successful.
Given the importance of fuel oil and natural 
gas supplies for electric generation, it is 
also necessary to address the legal and 
regulatory structure of the hydrocarbon 
sector in Mexico. As with the electric sector, 
the Mexican Constitution reserves oil and gas 
exploration and production, transportation, 
distribution and marketing to the state 
whose rights are exercised by PEMEX. In 
1995 reforms were made to permit private 
participants in non-exploration and production 
related gas transmission, distribution and 
storage. In 2003, PEMEX implemented a 
contracting structure (Multiple Services 
Contracts) to attract private investment in 
designated non-associated natural gas areas 
in order to increase natural gas production.
The reform initiatives, successful and 
unsuccessful, as well as the current 
legal and regulatory structures of the 
energy industries are discussed below.
Energy Sector  
and Electricity 
Governance in Mexico
Secretaría de Energía  
(SENER, Ministry of Energy)
SENER is responsible for Mexico’s energy 
policies (electricity and hydrocarbons) 
which should ensure competitive, sufficient, 
high quality, economically feasible and 
environmentally sustainable energy 
supplies as required by the nation.[33]
The Energy Minister is appointed by the 
President of Mexico. The Energy Minister is 
also the Chairman of the Boards of CFE, LFC 
and PEMEX. SENER also coordinates with 
and supports the CRE in its activities. The 
multiple roles of the Energy Minister which 
involve interaction with the regulatory body 
(CRE) and those it regulates (PEMEX, LFC 
and CFE) could lead to conflicts of interest. 
The Energy Minister is responsible for the 
financial and operating well-being of the 
state-owned companies while simultaneously 
promoting a fair and competitive business 
environment which policies may be to the 
detriment of the state-owned companies.
Comisión Reguladora 
de Energía (CRE, Energy 
Regulatory Commission) 
The CRE was created in 1994 as a 
consultative body reporting to SENER, 
and its role as an advisor was limited 
to the electricity industry. The CRE Act 
(1995) transformed its role to that of 
an empowered, independent regulator 
with technical and operational autonomy 
with a legislative mandate to regulate 
the activities of both public and private 
operators in the electricity and natural 
gas industries. The CRE Act defines the 
following activities as subject to regulation:
Supply and sale of electricity to 
public service customers;
Private sector generation, import 
and export of electricity;
Acquisition of electricity 
for public service;
Electricity transmission and distribution;
First hand sales of liquid petroleum 
gases or LPGs (mainly propane and 
butane) and natural gas (methane);
Non-E&P (exploration and production) 
related natural gas transmission, 
distribution and storage;
LPG transportation and distribution.
The main functions of the CRE are to 
grant permits, authorize transportation, 
transmission and distribution prices and 
rates, approve terms and conditions for 
the provision of services, issue directives, 
resolve disputes, request information and 
impose sanctions, among others. Although 
the CRE approves the methodologies for 
calculating payments for electricity and 
natural gas transmission and distribution, 
it does not have the authority to actually 
establish tariffs and end-use prices of 
electricity and natural gas. It “participates” 
in tariff setting with the Ministry of Finance.
The CRE also grants permits for the 
installation of regasification terminals in 
Mexico. These permits along with other 
guidelines regulate the operating, technical 
and safety standards of the facility. LNG 
storage and regasification facilities may 
be 100 percent privately owned and 
operated. Plant owners have a five year 
grace period from start-up before open 
access to the plant is required. The price 
of gas at the tail gate of the plant is set by 
market forces. Regasification tariff rates 
are regulated and approved by the CRE.
There does not appear to be a clear set of 
rules or procedures for appointment of CRE 
members. It appears that commissioners 
are selected by the Energy Minister (and 
presumably the President of Mexico) and 
approved by the President without public 
scrutiny or the approval of Congress.[19]
Secretaría de Hacienda 
(Ministry of Finance)
The Finance Ministry plays a critical role in 
both the electric and hydrocarbons sectors. 
It administers end-use electricity and 
hydrocarbons prices and is thus responsible 
for subsidy policies. By its ability to approve 
or disapprove financing for PEMEX-proposed 
projects, it also influences the supplies of 
hydrocarbons for electric generation.
The Finance Minister is a 
Presidential appointee. 
Secretaría del Medio Ambiente 
y Recursos Naturales (Semarnat, 
Ministry of the Environment 
and Natural Resources)
All electric industry activities must 
obey the applicable legal provisions on 
environmental protection, chief among them 
the Ley General del Equilibrio Ecológico 
y la Protección al Ambiente-LGEEPA 
(General Law on Ecological Balance and 
Environmental Protection) and the Mexican 
official standards (NOM) on environmental 
protection. A summary of Mexico’s NOMs 
is contained in SENER’s annual Prospectiva 
del Sector Eléctrico, www.sener.gob.mx. 
Mexican Congress
The Mexican Congress approves the annual 
operating and investment budgets of 
CFE, LFC and PEMEX. It also establishes 
the tax regimes for these companies. As 
a result, the Congress clearly influences 
28  Since 1975 the private sector has been allowed to generate power for its own use (autoabastecimiento).
software application cloud:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for Converting PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) Document. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
24 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
the availability of capital for electric and 
hydrocarbons infrastructure and supplies.
Mexican Presidency
Substantial progress in political liberalization 
has been accomplished in Mexico including 
increased transparency in elections and voting 
in general, and for presidential elections in 
particular; a more open, free, and transparent 
press; increased public access to the 
political process; more competitive elections 
and greater transparency with respect to 
campaign finance. Mexico’s president, with a 
six year term and life time ban on re-election, 
remains the nation’s most important office 
for national policy making. The office of 
the president is also engaged in day-to-day 
energy sector operations through the process 
of establishing energy prices, as described 
earlier, as well as through key appointments 
to lead Mexico’s energy companies and 
energy sector governance institutions.
Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX)
PEMEX is governed by an eleven member 
Board of Directors. The President of 
Mexico appoints six directors from various 
government ministries including the Chairman 
of the Board (the Energy Minister). The 
Petroleum Workers’ Union selects the 
remaining five directors from amongst PEMEX 
employees. Board members are not appointed 
for a specific term. Board members, except 
for those selected by the Union, serve subject 
to the discretion of the President of Mexico.
The President also appoints the Director 
Generals of PEMEX and its subsidiaries. 
As a result, the PEMEX Director General 
has little authority over the actions of 
the operating company appointees.[13]
Each PEMEX subsidiary is governed by 
an eight member board consisting of the 
Director General of PEMEX, the Director 
Generals of the three other subsidiaries and 
four members appointed by the President 
of Mexico. These 
board members 
are not appointed 
for a specific term 
and serve subject 
to the discretion 
of the President 
of Mexico.
The CRE has 
no regulatory 
authority over 
PEMEX’s oil and 
gas exploration 
and production 
activities. In this 
arena, critical to fuel supplies for electric 
generation, PEMEX is self-regulated.
Comisión Federal de 
Electricidad (CFE)
The CFE is governed by a government 
appointed Board of Directors as follows: 
the Energy Minister is the Chairman of 
the Board and other members include the 
Director General of PEMEX, the Secretaría 
de Hacienda y Crédito Público (Finance and 
Public Credit), the Secretaría de Desarrollo 
Social (Social Development), the Secretaría 
de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales 
(Environment and Natural Resources) the 
Secretaría de Economía and three workers 
from the electrical workers’ union. This 
board meets four times per year in regular 
session and also in extraordinary session 
when necessary. Decisions are taken by 
majority vote; in the case of a tie, the 
President of Mexico makes the decision. The 
mission and goals of the CFE are as follows.
Mission
To ensure, within a technologically 
updated framework, supply of 
electricity with acceptable quality, 
quantity and price, with appropriate 
diversification of power sources;
To optimize the use of physical, 
commercial and human 
resource infrastructures;
To provide outstanding 
customer service, and
To protect the environment, promote 
social development and respect 
the values of populations where 
electrical power is provided.
Goals
To remain as the leading domestic 
electric power corporation;
To operate according to international 
benchmarks in terms of productivity, 
competitiveness and technology;
To be known to our customers 
as a corporation of excellence, 
concerned about the environment 
and customer service-oriented, and
To promote high qualifications 
and professional development of 
CFE workers and managers.
Electric Power 
Reform Initiatives
1992 Electric Generation Reform
In an attempt to stimulate investment in 
Mexico’s electric power industry, the Law of 
Public Service of Electricity was reformed 
during the Presidency of Carlos Salinas. 
This law is associated with Article 28 of 
the Mexican Constitution which addresses 
the sovereign control and public service 
responsibilities of the CFE. This reform 
allowed the private sector to participate 
in cogeneration and self-use production, 
in BLT (build, lease and transfer) and as 
independent power producers (IPPs). The 
main characteristics of each one of these 
categories can be described as follows:
In the case of cogeneration and self-
use production, any surplus production 
has to be sold to the CFE at a price 
fixed by an energy regulator.
For BLT projects, building and financing 
are the responsibility of the private 
investor. The CFE supervises the project 
and sets the technical specifications. 
When construction is complete, the 
plant is operated by the CFE. Once in 
operation, the plant is leased to the 
CFE for a period of 20-25 years at the 
end of which ownership passes to the 
CFE. The project costs are registered as 
Table 21. Generation Permits Through 2004
Type of Capacity
Permits 
Granted
Permits 
Operating
Capacity 
Permitted (MW)
Capacity 
Operating (MW)
Self-use pre-1992
59
58
594
574
Self-supply, or which:
184
162
4,682
3,678
• 
Cogeneration
34
30
2,117
1,427
• 
IPPs
21
15
12,557
8,212
• 
Export
5
4
1,630
1,330
• 
Import
27
27
184
184
• 
Total 1992-2004
271
238
21,170
14,831
TOTAL
330
296
21,764
15,405
Source: SENER, 2006
25
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
direct private investment (regardless of 
whether it is domestic or foreign), and 
after two years it is converted to public 
debt (again, regardless of whether the 
generator is domestic or foreign).
In the case of IPPs, the project 
developer designs, finances, builds 
and operates the plant and delivers 
the electricity generated to the CFE 
for a period of 20-25 years. Through 
a bidding process the CFE guarantees 
the price and the market (total or 
partial) to the project developers. 
In 1995, in conjunction with the natural 
gas reforms, a separate regulatory 
commission, CRE, was established to 
oversee natural gas and power activities. In 
addition to the duties outlined previously, 
the CRE also bids and licenses new IPP 
projects under the 1992 electricity law.
The results of the 1992 reform between can 
be seen in Table 21. Of the 21,170 MW of 
permitted capacity, 14,831 MW or 70 per-
cent was operational by the end of 2004.
The 1992 reform was a stopgap measure 
that resulted in almost no change in the 
architecture of the sector. It is also complex 
in practice, due to the cumbersome 
bureaucracy it entails.[3,5] In addition, the 
level of electricity production engendered 
under the reform appears insufficient in 
light of projected electricity demand.
1995 Natural Gas 
Transportation, Storage and 
Distribution Reforms
In Mexico, the hydrocarbons (oil and 
natural gas) sector and the electricity sector 
are intertwined due to the importance 
of hydrocarbons as fuels for electric 
generation. Prior to 1995, oil and natural 
gas transportation, storage and distribution 
were controlled exclusively by PEMEX. 
In 1995, reforms were implemented 
to allow public and private companies, 
domestic and foreign, to own and operate 
natural gas transportation, storage and 
distribution systems subject to regulation 
by the CRE.
29
 These natural gas reforms 
were related to the 1992 electric sector 
reforms: public and private natural gas-fired 
generators required access to an open and 
competitive market for natural gas, including 
transportation, distribution and storage. As 
natural gas production continued to be in 
the sole domain of PEMEX, these reforms 
partially “opened” the natural gas sector.
Both PEMEX and private companies are 
required to obtain permits. Transportation 
and storage permits are issued for 30 years 
and are renewable. There permits require 
the investor to assume the market risk for 
there is no exclusivity with respect to specific 
capacities or defined routes. Permits are 
assigned to technically sound proposals and 
the market decides which permitted project 
is finally carried out. For transportation 
promoted by the government, permits are 
issued through public bidding. For example, 
the CFE bid independent power projects 
together with the pipeline that connects the 
generation plant to the natural gas system.
Between 1996 and May 2005, the CRE issued 
19 permits covering 11,316 kilometers of 
gas pipelines and requiring an investment 
of US $1.8 billion: about 20 percent of 
this investment is for private sector open 
access
30
 pipeline projects and the other 
80 percent is for PEMEX’s expenditures 
on its own trunkline. Some 112 permits 
were also granted for “self use” pipelines 
for spur lines to connect large industrial 
users and electric generators to gas 
fields or to the main trunklines requiring 
an investment of US $230 million.[43]
Despite the introduction of competition 
into the gas transportation sector, PEMEX 
continues to control about 85 percent 
of installed capacity. It also controls all 
domestic natural gas production and the 
marketing of that production. In 2000, the 
CRE recognized that the vertical integration 
of PEMEX in natural gas production, 
transportation and marketing was hindering 
competition in gas marketing. The CRE issued 
a directive requiring PEMEX to “unbundle” 
or separate its production, transportation 
and marketing activities and to eliminate 
cross subsidies between marketing and 
first hand gas sales. Similarly, private 
transporters, distributors and storage 
operators can buy and sell natural gas but the 
services must be unbundled, with separate 
accounting systems for each service and 
without cross subsidies among services.
Also in 1995 private and public companies 
were permitted to own and operate gas 
distribution facilities in Mexico subject to 
government approval and regulation. PEMEX 
had to divest its distribution assets and 
provide open access to its transportation 
system for distributors. In 1997, the CRE 
granted 21 permits to nine private companies 
to operate gas distribution systems including 
Gas Natural, Tractebel (now Suez), Gaz de 
France, Sempra Energy, Kinder Morgan, 
TXU Energy, Grupo Diavaz and Grupo 
Imperial. Through May 2005, the distribution 
investment has totaled US $674 million.
One factor impeding growth in gas-fired 
generation is the continued dominance 
of PEMEX in gas production and 
transportation. This issue is discussed 
more fully in the Major Issues chapter.
Proposed 1999 Electric 
Sector Reforms
Concern began to grow that electric demand 
would continue to outstrip supply despite 
the 1992 electricity law reforms. Electric 
price subsidies continued to stimulate 
demand growth. As well, a number of factors 
discouraged potential IPP investors: the lack 
of flexibility for wholesale transactions outside 
of CFE; restrictions on how much surplus 
generation capacity could be developed for 
sale outside of CFE (no more than 5 percent); 
lack of clarity with regard to contracts for 
the purchase of natural gas from PEMEX 
for both new and existing facilities.[19]
As a result of these concerns, a second, 
broader phase of electric reform was 
contemplated by the government of 
President Ernesto Zedillo in 1999.
In late 1999, President Zedillo’s 
energy minister, Luis Tellez, proposed 
a full restructuring of the electric 
power sector as follows.
A wholesale market would be created 
with an independent system operator 
that would mimic the functions of similar 
organizations being created in the U.S.
Generation would become fully 
competitive with generation 
companies or “Gencos” that 
could be privately owned.
The sovereign electric companies 
would not be privatized, an important 
difference between Mexico’s strategy 
and other nations. However, opinion 
hewed strongly to the notion that the 
Tellez proposals would pave the way 
for an eventual sale of CFE and LFC 
and it was clear that, privately, Tellez 
held out that possibility. Rather, CFE 
29  PEMEX continues to control oil and petroleum products transportation, storage and distribution.
30  Open access is a regulatory mandate which allows third parties to use a transporter’s transportation 
facilities to move gas from one point to another on a nondiscriminatory basis for a cost-based fee.
26 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
��
��
��
��
��������
�����
��������������������
���������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������
������
�������
���������
������
����
�������
�����
�������
�������
�������
���������
��������
��������
��������
��
��������
�����������������
���������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������
�����������������������
��
��
��
��
��
��
����
����
����
����
Source: Latinobarómetro Poll, as cited by The 
Economist, October 27, 2005
Figure 12. Latin American Public Opinion on Privatization
would maintain control and operation 
of transmission and local distribution 
(as would LFC). Mechanisms would 
be provided for private investment 
in new transmission facilities. A goal 
was to make Mexico’s grid more 
compatible with that of the US in order 
to facilitate cross-border exchanges.[19]
Tellez’s initiative was an unusual gambit 
to roll out a major policy change late 
in a presidential term. By summer 
2000, Tellez’s proposed reforms had 
failed in the Mexican Congress.
Proposed Fox Administration 
Electric Reforms
The government of President Vincente 
Fox attempted to amend the restriction 
on sales of surplus generation to non-CFE 
entities by increasing it from 5 percent 
to 10 percent but the attempt failed. A 
group of Congressmen filed a constitutional 
challenge before the Mexican Supreme 
Court, accusing Fox of exceeding his 
presidential authority. The Supreme Court, 
in an unprecedented decision, ruled that 
Fox’s amendments were unconstitutional. 
Moreover, the Supreme Court, in its 
discussions and deliberations, considered 
that power generation by private parties 
could be against the Constitution, without 
making a final ruling on this issue since it 
was not the subject matter of the case.[34] 
In 2003, Congressmen filed a complaint 
with Chamber of Deputies’ auditing entity, 
the Auditoría Superior de la Federación 
(ASF), asking it to review the legality of 
the generation permits granted by the 
CRE to private parties. The ASF found 
that the generation permits granted by 
the CRE were illegal and contrary to the 
Constitution. SENER filed a constitutional 
challenge before the Supreme Court alleging 
that the ASF does not have the authority 
to decide on the legality of the generation 
permits granted to private parties by the 
CRE. The Supreme Court admitted SENER’s 
constitutional challenge and a final resolution 
is pending. Legal experts expect the 
Supreme Court to rule in favor of SENER.[34] 
However, these legal challenges have cast 
a shadow over additional investments. 
In 2001 President Fox introduced a recast 
version of the 1999 Tellez proposal to the 
Mexican Congress which also failed. It was 
opposed by an alliance made up of Senators 
and Deputies from the PRI, the Democratic 
Revolution Party (PRD), 
the National Workers Union 
(UNT), and the Mexican Trade 
Union, made up primarily 
of electric companies. Key 
components of the Fox 
proposal are listed below.
Generation, transmission 
and distribution activities 
would be separated. 
Constitution articles 
27 and 28 would be 
amended to permit 
private investment 
in generation and 
distribution. Transmission 
and nuclear generation 
would remain reserved to 
the state and regulated.
CFE and LFC would not be 
privatized; they would be 
strengthened financially.
The CRE would have 
new and increased 
responsibilities including 
the power to fix 
electricity prices, provide 
technical and economic 
regulation and deter 
anti-competitive behavior 
from market participants, 
including CFE and LFC.
Redefinition of electricity 
price subsidies in a 
transparent way.[5]
Rather than implement the 
proposed reform, the alliance 
advocated granting technical, 
administrative and financial 
autonomy to the CFE and 
LFC so that they can expand 
capacity and leaving the 
system vertically integrated 
and organized much as it is 
today. Private generation  
(IPPs selling to CFE, self-supply 
and cogeneration) would be 
permitted as secondary and 
complementary activities 
to the public provision of 
electricity which would remain 
the responsibility of CFE and 
LFC. With respect to electricity 
prices, the PRI advocated 
that tariffs be set by the 
CRE with the input of the 
secretariats of Hacienda and 
Figure 11. Latin American Public Opinion on Value of Markets
Source: Latinobarómetro Poll, as cited by 
The Economist, October 27, 2005
27
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
Economy. The PRD advocated that tariffs be 
proposed by CFE and approved by CRE.[4]
Outlook for Further 
Electric Sector Reform
It is the view of some analysts that no 
Mexican debate in recent memory has 
been so heated as was the debate over the 
proposed Zedillo and Fox electric sector 
reforms and that the subject of electricity 
reform has left the technical arena and has 
almost totally evolved into a political issue.[3,5] 
The fragmentation of politics in Mexico has 
also impeded reform: continual debate and 
the lack of control by any single party in the 
Congress has undercut continuity in reform 
strategy and has deterred investors. Finally, 
available data shows that Mexican public 
opinion opposes private investment in the 
energy sector (electricity and hydrocarbons) 
as well as privatization of the state-owned 
companies.
31
 The public opinion results on 
private investment stand in marked contrast 
to preferences in Mexico for markets. Mexico 
has consistently been one of the strongest 
countries in Latin America with regard to 
value of markets for economic development. 
Public concerns regarding privatization 
are, however, widely shared across the 
Latin American region, a consequence of 
poorly devised and executed reforms in 
many instances as well as the perception 
that widespread benefits from privatization 
programs have not been achieved.
Creating a political coalition will be necessary 
for further reforms because of the large 
number of disparate and conflicting interest 
groups and opinions regarding how Mexico’s 
electric power sector should be developed 
and operate. Finally, any further meaningful 
reform of the electric sector is contingent 
upon the influence of Mexico’s president 
and effective use of the presidency to build 
consensus and support. As this publication 
was finalized, Felipe Calderón of the PAN 
party is the apparent president-elect 
following an extremely close election. Should 
Calderón assume the office of president 
as expected, it is likely that electricity and 
energy in general will be a prominent issue 
for engagement. The Calderón campaign 
organization articulated a number of 
potential electricity policies, as summarized 
below. Whether these remain the preferred 
approaches or priorities remain to be seen.
Felipe Calderón Electricity Policies  
(from May 2006 campaign document) 
Create a market system that 
allows large consumers to buy 
electricity at competitive prices;
Implement best practices for 
management, governance 
and transparency in the state-
owned energy companies;
Strengthen the CRE to promote fair 
competition and regulate prices; and
CFE will not be privatized. Opening 
the sector to private investment is 
the way to get competitive prices 
without damaging public finances. 
31 In a 2002 poll conducted by Coordinacion de Estudios de Opinion, 35 percent of the population 
opposed private investment in the electric sector and only 17 percent supported a strategy of 
attracting new private funds in the industry. Less than half (49 percent) of Mexicans feel that the 
country has electricity problems. 60 percent believe the electric sector reforms would harm worker 
rights and a majority believes that private investors will force higher tariffs. However, the poll shows 
that voters care much more about employment and public security than energy reforms.[5]
28 
GUIDE TO ELECTRIC POWER IN MEXICO
MAJOR ISSUES
A number of key issues impact Mexico’s 
electricity sector, now and into the future.
Political Fragmentation
Mexico is in the midst of both a political 
and an economic transition. The election 
of President Vincente Fox in 2000 marked 
an important shift towards democracy, 
increased political pluralism and resulted 
in more checks and balances to the power 
vested in the President. Seven decades of 
dominance by the Partido Revolucionario 
Institucional (PRI) resulted in an elite-driven 
policy-making process that was relatively 
straightforward. Today policy-making is much 
more complex, with the rise of a multi-party 
system, the decline of Presidentialism, and 
the rising importance of local governments for 
social and economic development. Mexico’s 
Congress and legal system are Napoleanic in 
origin and administrative in practice, yielding 
few opportunities for and no experience 
with effective political coalition building.[19]
These increasingly complex political processes 
hampered the Fox administration’s ambitious 
reform agenda, including further reforms in 
the energy (hydrocarbons and electricity) 
sector. According to the World Bank, 
further energy sector reform is needed to 
improve Mexico’s economic competitiveness. 
Specifically, the Bank recommends further 
unbundling of energy activities, strengthening 
regulatory frameworks, increasing private 
investment, and enhancing corporate 
governance in the energy sectors.[52] 
However, because no party holds a majority 
in either house of Congress, the executive has 
had very limited success securing legislative 
approval on its reform proposals. There are 
at least ten electricity sector reform proposals 
that have been or are being discussed in 
Congress. However, inaction of further energy 
sector reforms appear to have stalled until 
a new government takes power in 2006.
Based on preliminary results from the 2006 
national elections, no one party in the 
Congress will have the ability to pass laws 
or reform the Constitution. Thus, Mexico’s 
incoming president will face a legislative 
situation similar to the one faced by President 
Fox. With increased pluralism, Mexico slowly 
is developing legislative practices that can 
foster coalition building. Considerable skill 
in coalition building will be required to 
implement new energy policies much less deal 
with other high priority policies for Mexico.
Table 22. Preliminary 2006 Mexican Congressional Election Results, 
Chamber of Deputies 
• 
251 votes required to enact new or change existing legislation
• 
334 votes required to reform Constitution
Party
Seats
Percent Total Seats
PAN
206
41.2 
PRD
124
24.8 
PRI
103
20.6 
Three Other Parties
67
13.4 
Total
500
100 
Source:CIDAC 2006 [7]
Table 23. Preliminary 2006 Mexican Congressional Election Results, 
Senate 
• 
65 votes required to enact/reform legislation
• 
86 votes required to reform Constitution
Party
Seats
Percent Total Seats
PAN
52
34.4
PRI
33
21.8
PRD
29
19.2
Four Other Parties
37
24.6
Total
151
100
Source: CIDAC 2006 [7] 
Regulatory 
Independence
The CRE is not completely independent of 
political control by SENER, although CRE 
commissioners have attempted to assert 
their independence on crucial decisions 
and controversial decisions on bids and 
licenses.[19] More problematic is the conflict 
of interest inherent in the position of the 
Secretary of Energy as chairman of the 
boards of PEMEX and CFE while also providing 
support for CRE’s reforms when they threaten 
the competitive interests of the sovereign 
companies. Continuing issues range from 
implementation of an open access tariff 
on the PEMEX natural gas transportation 
system, to control of the wholesale power 
market, to the impact of high natural gas 
prices and the related question about 
whether Mexico can or should attempt to 
build a competitive natural gas market.[19]
In addition, other government entities, 
particularly the Secretariats of Hacienda 
and Economy, have significant input 
on electricity price regulation which, in 
most industrialized nations, is reserved 
to the independent regulator.
Infrastructure 
Investment
Investment in infrastructure, including energy 
infrastructure, has not kept pace with demand 
in Mexico. Infrastructure investment in Mexico 
collapsed from between 2-2.5 percent of 
GDP in most of the 1980’s and the first half 
of the 1990’s to between 0.8-1.3 percent 
of GDP in the second half of the 1990’s. 
The Mexican Congress has not been able to 
implement the critical tax reforms necessary 
to regaining higher investment levels. Some 
40 percent of CFE’s installed generating 
capacity is over 35 years old and is due for 
replacement, not to mention incremental 
capacity to meet increased demand. SENER 
estimates that investments of approximately 
$58 billion will be required over the period 
2005-2014 and the electric sector’s ability to 
fund that investment remains questionable.
Of the expected investment of $58 billion, 
about 48 percent is expected to come 
from the private sector. This private sector 
investment is uncertain given the policy and 
regulatory concerns discussed previously. 
The $30 billion in investment to come from 
CFE and LFC is also problematic due to 
the financial condition of these companies 
which is discussed in more detail below. 
Concerns about future reliability of electricity 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested